Adam Matzger

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Adam Matzger

Charles G. Overberger Collegiate Professor of Chemistry, College of LS&A
Professor of Macromolecular Science & Engineering, College of Engineering

Office Location(s): 2823 Chemistry
Phone: 734.615.6627
matzger@umich.edu

  • About

    Our research program utilizes organic synthesis to make polymers and organized assemblies. Targets are chosen for their potential to have novel properties and methodology development is a critical component of all efforts. Three major research thrusts are: Conjugated polymers. Cascade radical cyclizations for the production of planarized polythiophenes, polypyrroles, and other heteroatom containing conjugated polymers have been developed. These materials possess novel properties when compared to systems lacking planar structural constraints. The effect of this perturbation on the conductivity and electro-optical properties of these polymers are being explored. Ultimate application in organic light emitting diodes (OLED's) and other devices are underway.

    Physisorbed monolayers. Highly organized monolayers can be obtained by the spontaneous self-assembly, under atmospheric conditions, of molecules containing long segments of methylene groups. The imaging of these adsorbates with submolecular resolution is possible with scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) which allows for an exquisitely detailed understanding of their arrangement and constitution. Use of this knowledge in the design of structurally more complex layers will allow control of surface properties (oxidation, corrosion, hydrophobicity, etc.) and correlation of these bulk properties with organization at the molecular level.

    Controlling crystal polymorphism. The ability of molecules to crystallize in more than one arrangement in the solid state has serious implications for a variety of applications including nonlinear optics, solid state reactivity, and pharmaceutical distribution. We are developing techniques to control the process of crystallization in a general fashion with the goal of making materials with improved functionality. Combinational materials chemistry plays a vital role in these efforts.

    Representative Publications

    Cychosz, K. A.; Wong-Foy, A. G.; Matzger, A. J., "Liquid Phase Adsorption by Microporous Coordination Polymers: Removal of Organosulfur Compounds" J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2008, 130, 6928-6939.

    Caskey, S. R.; Wong-Foy, A. G.; Matzger, A. J., "Dramatic Tuning of Carbon Dioxide Uptake via Metal Substitution in a Coordination Polymer with Cylindrical Pores" J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2008, 130, 6938-6939.

    Koh, K.; Wong-Foy, A. G.; Matzger A. J., "A Porous Coordination Copolymer with over 5000 m2/g BET Surface Area" J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2009, 131, 4184-4185.

    Lpez-Mejas, V.; Kampf, J. W.; Matzger, A. J. "Polymer-Induced Heteronucleation of Tolfenamic Acid: Structural Investigation of a Pentamorph" J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2009, 131, 4554-4555.

    Ahn, S.; Morrison, C. N.; Matzger, A. J., "Highly Symmetric 2D Rhombic Nanoporous Networks from Low Symmetry Amphiphiles" J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2009, 131, 7946-7947.

    Henssler, J. T.; Matzger, A. J. "Facile and Scalable Synthetic Approach to the Fused-Ring Heterocycles Thieno[3,2-b]thiophene and Thieno[3,2-b]furan," 2009, 11, 3144-3147.

    Henssler, J. T.; Matzger, A. J. "Facile and Scalable Synthetic Approach to the Fused-Ring Heterocycles Thieno[3,2-b]thiophene and Thieno[3,2-b]furan," Org. Lett. 2009, 11, 3144-3147.

  • Education
    • Ph.D., University of California-Berkeley
  • Awards
    • Imes and Moore Faculty Award, 2012
    • Beckman Foundation Young Investigator Award, 2003
    • 3M Nontenured Faculty Award
    • Ralph E. Powe Junior Faculty Enhancement Award  
  • Research Areas of Interest
    • Energy Science
      Materials Chemistry
      Organic Chemistry
      Organometallic Chemistry
      Sensor Science
      Surface Chemistry
      Sustainable Chemistry
      Polymers/Organic Materials
  • Fellowships
    • American Association for the Advancement of Science Fellow, 2011
    • Alfred P. Sloan Fellowship, 2005