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CAN YOU PASS THE U.S. CITIZENSHIP TEST?

People commonly equate “citizenship” with membership in a nation state and with a person’s rights and responsibilities therein.  Since at least the last half of the 18th century, people have desired to be part of a nation state, or an "imagined community" based on common ties of descent, religion, and/or language. The drive for belonging has helped determine the course of world history, both dividing and uniting people and largely shaping their identities. 
 
Today, however, globalization, capital mobility, and information and communications technology are transforming traditional categories and conceptions of citizenship. For example, a growing number of people have ties to more than one nation and hold multiple passports, and Internet sites like Myspace.com are redefining the meaning of community and the boundaries of citizenship. In a world where some hold citizenship, or even political office, in more than one country, while others cannot claim citizenship in any country at all, the question “What does citizenship mean?” becomes more and more difficult to answer.   
 
Still, nation states continue to determine the qualifications of legal citizenship and to prescribe citizens’ rights and responsibilities.In most cases, legal citizenship derives from place of birth or ethnicity, but often it can be derived from a process of naturalization. In some countries, including the United States, this process includes taking and passing a citizenship test. In the U.S., the test for naturalization asks applicants to demonstrate their knowledge of U.S. history and government, and their ability to speak, read, write and understand English. 
 
Below you will find a link to the U.S. citizenship self-test, as well as links to other national citizenship tests. You will also find links to information on citizenship and citizenship issues around the world. As you participate in courses and events for this LSA Citizenship theme year, think about how citizenship is defined in this and other countries, and how these definitions conform to your expanding conception of citizenship.  
 
U.S. Citizenship Test
 
Links to other citizenship tests:
United Kingdom Citizenship Test
Canadian Citizenship Test
 
Background information on citizenship around and of the world:
Australia
Brazil
Denmark
Estonia
Germany
India
Ireland
Malaysia
Mongolia
Namibia
Nigeria
Russia
Ukraine
 
United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights
United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees
United Nations Development Program, Gender and Citizenship Initiative