Theme Semester Lecture Series | Saturday Morning Physics | The Invisible Universe: Einstein's Legacy | Events by Date

September 21, 2005
 
What Astronomy Has Done For Einstein
Professor Joceyln Bell-Burnell, University of Oxford
4:15 PM Lecture, 1324 East Hall Auditorium
Reception prior to lecture, East Hall Atrium
   
October 5, 2005  
A Century of Particle Physics
Professor Martinus J.G. Veltman
Nobel Laureate (1999), U-M
4:10 PM Lecture, 340 West Hall
Reception after lecture, 337 West Hall
   
October 19, 2005  
Does the Everyday World Obey Quantum Mechanics?
Professor Anthony Leggett
Nobel Laureate (2003), University of Illinois
4:15 PM Lecture, Rackham Amphitheatre
Reception prior to lecture, Assembly Hall, 3:30
   
November 2, 2005  
Brownian Motion and Beyond: Collective and Emergent
Phenomena in Condensed Matter Physics

Professor Leonard Sander, University of Michigan
4:10 PM Lecture, 340 West Hall
Reception after lecture, 337 West Hall
   
November 9, 2005  
The Expanding Universe and Big Bang Cosmology
Professor Katherine Freese, University of Michigan
4:10 PM Lecture, 340 West Hall
Reception after lecture, 337 West Hall
   
November 16, 2005  
Future Particle Physics—Can We Understand the Smallest
& Largest Phenomena Even Better?

Professor Gordon Kane, U-M
4:10 PM Lecture, 340 West Hall
Reception after lecture, 337 West Hall
   
December 7, 2005  
The Second Quantum Revolution
Professor Christopher Monroe, U-M
4:10 PM Lecture, 340 West Hall
Reception after lecture, 337 West Hall
   

Saturday Morning Physics Schedule

10:30-11:30 a.m. in 170 & 182 Dennison Bldg., main campus (Oct. 8th exception). SMP educates the public about the latest developments in physics research. The lectures, given by post-doctoral researchers and U-M Faculty, present up-to-the minute scientific research to the public in an engaging, yet technically accurate way. Each lecture is carefully prepared and accompanied by a variety of physical demonstrations and multimedia visualization aides. Between 15 and 18 lectures are given each year, split between spring and fall sessions. Lectures are followed by a formal question and answer session and inevitably leads to extended informal questioning of the speaker and close-up examination of the physical demonstrations. For more information, please see the Saturday Morning Physics webpage.

October 1, 2005

1905: Einstein and Bern, A Year to Remember
One hundred years ago in a small apartment building in Bern, Switzerland, a patent clerk wrote five short articles that changed our understanding of the world. It is this amazing story that is being told in a novel audio-visual science show.
Professor Thomas Zurbuchen, AOSS, College of Engineering

October 8, 2005

Origins
Normally a scientist will not involve in speculations about the world around us and in particular not about the origin thereof. He will stick to reproducible facts, and try to produce definite verifiable predictions. That does not mean that he never thinks or phantasizes about it. In this lecture we will talk about such things.
Professor Martinus J.G. Veltman, Nobel Laureate (1999), Michigan Physics Department

October 15, 2005

Special Relativity in the Cosmos
These talks will explain Special Relativity and its consequences for high-energy astronomy, including apparently superluminal jets and intense gamma-ray flashes.
Sarah Yost, Michigan Physics Department

October 22, 2005

Observing Special Relativistic Effects Directly in Astronomy
Sarah Yost, Michigan Physics Department

October 29, 2005

Gamma-Ray Bursts: Special Relativity in the Brightest Explosions
Sarah Yost, Michigan Physics Department

November 5, 2005

When Antimatter and Matter Collide, E = mc2 Prevails
When they meet, matter and antimatter annihilate in a manner that reveals not only basic science but also provides practical application. The reality of antimatter is as rich as that presented in science fiction.
Richard Vallery, University of Michigan Physics Department

November 12, 2005

A Better Future through Annihilation: Positrons in Materials Science
Richard Vallery, University of Michigan Physics Department

November 19, 2005

Matter Condensed: Science, Technology, Emergence and Society
Through semiconductor nano-technology, condensed matter science has had a profound impact on society. Equally profound, it also provides elegant paradigms of the cooperative emergent phenomena that govern behaviors at all levels of complexity from atoms to societies.
Professor James Allen, University of Michigan Physics Department

December 3 , 2005

Matter Condensed: Science, Technology, Emergence and Society
Professor James Allen, University of Michigan Physics Department


The Invisible Universe, Einstein's Legacy

The series is a collaboration between the Department of Astronomy, the Exhibit Museum of Natural History, and the Student Astronomical Society. The public talks are at 7:30 p.m. in 1800 Chemistry. Shortly following, the Museum will offer a coordinated planetarium show, and the SAS will in parallel offer public observing at the Angell Hall Observatory, weather permitting. If not, they will offer a basic planetarium show at the Angell Hall planetarium and/or a short video/film. For more information, please see the Invisible Universe lecture series webpage.

September 16 , 2005

X-Raying Black Holes
Joel Bregman, University of Michigan

September 30 , 2005

Dark Matter and Dark Energy
David Weinberg, Ohio State University

October 7, 2005

Mysteries of the Extreme Universe
Angela Olinto, University of Chicago

October 21, 2005

The Size, Shape, and Fate of the Universe
David Spergel, Princeton University, Mohler Prize Lecture

November 4, 2005

Black Holes: Theory versus Observations
Ramesh Narayan, Harvard University

 

 
 
 

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