MCDB Professors Named American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Fellows


By U-M News Services
Nov 29, 2012 Bookmark and Share

Nineteen University of Michigan researchers, three of whom are MCDB professors, are among 702 newly elected fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. The new fellows are being honored for their efforts toward advancing science applications that are deemed scientifically or socially distinguished, AAAS announced.

James Bardwell, the Rowena G. Matthews Collegiate Professor of Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts (LSA) and a professor biological chemistry at the Medical School. He is honored for incisive studies on disulfide-mediated folding of secretory proteins, particularly the DsbA/DsbB bacterial pathway for disulfide oxidation that uses oxygen as the terminal acceptor.

Jianming Li, professor of Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology and academic program director of the UM-PKU Joint Institute, LSA. He is honored for distinguished contributions to plant physiology, particularly for genetic dissection of plant steroid responses.

Eran Pichersky, the Michael M. Martin Collegiate Professor of Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology in LSA. Pichersky is honored for distinguished contributions to the field of plant biochemistry, particularly to the biosynthesis and evolutionary biology of terpenes and other plant volatiles and flavor components.

The tradition of AAAS Fellows began in 1874. Members can be considered for the rank of Fellow if nominated by steering groups of the association's 24 sections, by any three Fellows who are current AAAS members, or by the AAAS chief executive office. The organization's policymaking council votes on the final list.

Founded in 1848, AAAS is the world's largest general scientific society and publisher of the journal Science. American Association for the Advancement of Science: http://www.aaas.org.

Read the full article "Nineteen U-M scientists and engineers named AAAS Fellows" from U-M News Services.