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UMMP Invertebrate Specimens
Specimens from the Invertebrate collection presented in Papers on Paleontology vol. 8.

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Trilobites
Eldredgeops rana crassituberculata presented in Papers on Paleontology vol. 8.

Egypt Whale desert

Birket Qarun Formation
Central 'qalah' or 'citadel' in Wadi Al Hitan in late afternoon light.

Dr. Gingerich in the field

Dr. Philip Gingerich
Field work in the western desert of Fayum, Egypt.

Russia Field Work

Vertebra
Specimen from recent field work in Russia.

Russia 2012 Mastadon tooth

Finds in the Field
Mammoth bones uncovered in Sakha Republic, Russian Federation.

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Quercus columbiana
UMMP specimen from Pickett Creek.

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Quercus prelobata
UMMP specimen from Pickett Creek.

Wilson Lesotho

Dr. Jeffrey Wilson
Cleaning up and preparing to mold the footprint of an early sauropod dinosaur.

Limestone Concretion - complete fish.

Limestone Concretion - complete fish
65-70 million-year-old limestone concretion containing a complete fish; skull, ribs, and fins are visible. Specimen found in Al-Inab, Jordan.

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U-M paleontologists unveil new online respository of fossil remains.
Visit the online repository of 2D, 3D and Animations: http://umorf.ummp.lsa.umich.edu

Welcome

The University of Michigan Museum of Paleontology (UMMP) is a research museum devoted to study the history of life, interpretation of its meaning, and sharing these experiences with students.

UMMP is the intellectual home of paleontology at Michigan. It provides staff, laboratory, and field support for faculty and students to enable new and original empirical investigations of the history of life.

UMMP provides space and facilities for conserving, organizing, and studying collections of fossil specimens and accompanying information resulting from field investigations.

UMORF ~ University of Michigan Online Respository of Fossils

UMORF Website

Visit the UMORF website!

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Short lives, violent deaths: Two CT-scanned Siberian mammoth calves

CT scans of two newborn woolly mammoths recovered from the Siberian Arctic are revealing previously inaccessible details about the early development of prehistoric pachyderms. In addition, the X-ray images show that both creatures died from suffocation after inhaling mud.

Lyuba and Khroma, who died at ages 1 and 2 months, respectively, are the most complete and best-preserved baby mammoth specimens ever found. (more...)