Sharon Glotzer

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Sharon Glotzer

Professor
Stuart W. Churchill Collegiate Professor of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science

  • About

    Sharon C. Glotzer is the Stuart W. Churchill Collegiate Professor of Chemical Engineering and Professor of Materials Science and Engineering at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. She also holds faculty appointments in Physics, Applied Physics, and Macromolecular Science and Engineering. Prior to Michigan, Sharon worked in the Polymers Division, Materials Science and Engineering Laboratory at the National Institute of Standards and Technology as Director of the NIST Center for Theoretical and Computational Materials Science, and, previously, as an NRC Postdoctoral Fellow.

    Professor Glotzer oversees a group of 20+ Ph.D. and postdoctoral students and research staff conducting research in the areas of computational nanoscience and simulation of soft matter, self-assembly and materials design. She has published over 130 archival publications and presented nearly 200 invited talks and keynote lectures. Her research is sponsored by the Department of Defense, National Science Foundation, Department of Energy, Department of Education, and the J.S. McDonnell Foundation. Professor Glotzer is a Fellow of the American Physical Society, and her other awards and honors include, among others, the American Physical Society (APS) Maria Goeppert-Mayer Award; Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers; Department of Commerce Bronze Medal; U-M College of Engineering Monroe-Brown Foundation Research Excellence Award; U-M Horace H. Rackham Faculty Recognition Award; and the Charles M.A. Stine Award from the Materials Engineering and Science Division of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE). She was a Sigma Xi Lecturer, Allan P. Colburn Memorial Lecturer, Bernard T. Bertman Memorial Lecturer, and Jerome B. Cohen Memorial Lecturer. In 2009 she was awarded a prestigious National Security Science and Engineering Faculty Fellowship from the Department of Defense that provides substantial long-term funding for her research.

    Professor Glotzer is very active in science and technology policy and serves on many national advisory and study committees, including the National Academies’ Solid State Sciences Committee; Technology Warning and Surprise study committee; Biomolecular Materials and Processes study committee; Modeling, Simulation, and Games study committee; and presently serves on the TIGER Committee on Defense Intelligence. She served for four years as a Juror for the Heinz Award for Technology, the Economy and Employment, and is a member of the Mathematical and Physical Sciences Advisory Committee for the National Science Foundation. Sharon currently serves as a Director of the Materials Engineering and Science Division of AIChE. Previously, she served as chair of the AIChE Nanoscale Science and Engineering Forum, and served twice on the executive committee of AIChE’s Area 1A. She also served as chair of the APS Forum on Industrial and Applied Physics. She currently serves on the editorial or editorial advisory boards of Nanoscale, Computers in Science and Engineering, AIChE Journal, and Oxford University Press Topics in Chemical Engineering. She chaired a pan-agency sponsored International Assessment of R&D in Simulation-based Engineering & Science (SBE&S), and co-chaired a research directions roadmapping effort in SBE&S for the National Science Foundation. She chaired the 2009 Conference on Foundations of Molecular Modeling and Simulation and will co-chair the 2013 Gordon Research Conference on Supramolecular Assembly. She is the co-founding director of a new Virtual School of Computational Science and Engineering, under the auspices of the NSF-funded Blue Waters Petascale Computing Project at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA). She currently serves as the Director of Research Computing for the University of Michigan College of Engineering.

  • Education
    • University of California, Los Angeles B.S. 1987
    • Boston University Ph.D. 1993.