Jaime Rodriguez Matos

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Jaime Rodríguez Matos

Assistant Professor of Spanish

4136 MLB

Office Location(s): 4136 MLB 1275
Phone: 734.764.4397
jaimerod@umich.edu

  • Affiliation(s)
    • Romance Languages & Literatures
  • About

    My research interests are most directly affected by the problems that arise with the conflict between literature and philosophy.  This conflict is not a mere dichotomy in which one either is within the philosophical or within the literary, or in violation of one of the two terms if they become entangled.  The relation between the literary and the philosophical, as Plato knew, passes through the terrain of politics. 

    Currently I am in the process of preparing the manuscript of a book based on my dissertation.  The central aim of this project is to join current debates concerning the rehabilitation of universality as a central concept of radical thought (as witnessed in the work of Alain Badiou and Slavoj Zizek, for example).  I argue that the work of poets such as José Lezama Lima and César Vallejo challenge us to think differently about questions regarding truth and universality: through what I see as the post-Romantic nature of the image, in Lezama Lima, and the (dis)articulation of politics and aesthetics in Vallejo. 

    I have also begun work on a second project that has the idea of tragedy in the Caribbean as its center of gravity.  I am interested in the idea of the Caribbean as rewriting, but a rewriting that leaves behind the notion of an all-pervasive textuality.  I am particularly interested in the case of Caribbean rewritings of classical tragedies, as the idea of “the tragic” has been at the center of Modern notions of ethics and politics.


    Recent and Selected Publications 


    "Alejandra Pizarnik in the Psychiatric Ward: Where Everything is Possible But the Poem".  Bulletin of Hispanic Studies 88.5 (2011) pp. 
    571-588.

    “Polyphony in Spanish Sentimental Romance.”  Hispanic Review  73.2 (Spring 2005), pp. 231-254.

    “Pedro Juan Soto’s Spiks.” In Encyclopedia of Hispanic American Literature. Ed. Luz Elena Ramirez.  New York: Facts on File (forthcoming 2007).

    “Alurista’s Return: New and Collected Poems.”  In Encyclopedia of Hispanic American Literature. Ed. Luz Elena Ramirez.  New York: Facts on File (forthcoming 2007).


    Recent undergraduate courses taught:


    476: Latin American Poetry of the 20th Century
    382: Latin American Literature II

  • Research Areas of Interest
    • Caribbean literature, Latin American poetry, Latino/a culture, political theory and philosophy