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00-01 LS&A Bulletin

Courses in Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies (Division 325)


AAPTIS 100/ACABS 100/HJCS 100/Hist. 132. Peoples of the Middle East.
(4; 3 in the half-term). (HU).
An introductory course on the diversity of peoples, cultures, economies, and politics of the Middle East. Topics include religion (Judaism, Islam, Christianity), cities and nomads, women in the Middle East, economic change, social and political systems, and the world's first civilizations of Mesopotamia and Egypt.

AAPTIS 101. Elementary Modern Standard Arabic, I.
(Language Courses)
(5). (LR). Laboratory fee ($12) required.
First course of a two-term sequence in elementary Arabic. It is designed to those who want to study MSA for communication and academic purposes. An introduction to Arabic phonology and script combined with oral basic communication practice, situational dialogues and short reading passages including basic vocabulary and fundamental grammatical structures.

AAPTIS 102. Elementary Modern Standard Arabic, II.
(Language Courses)
AAPTIS 101. (5). (LR). Laboratory fee ($10) required.
Sequel to Arabic 101. Acquisition of basic vocabulary and fundamental structure is continued and increased emphasis on developing speaking, reading, and writing skills and use of an Arabic-English dictionary.

AAPTIS 141. Elementary Persian, I.
(Language Courses)
No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Persian 143. (4). (LR).
The standard colloquial of Tehran with an introduction to the modern written language of Iran.

AAPTIS 142. Elementary Persian, II.
(Language Courses)
Persian 141. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Persian 143. (4). (LR).
The standard colloquial of Tehran with an introduction to the modern written language of Iran.

AAPTIS 143. Intensive 1st Year Persian.
(Language Courses)
No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Persian 142. (8 in the half-term). (LR).
An introduction to the Persian language with emphasis placed on reading, writing, comprehension, and speaking. A balanced approach giving equal emphasis to the development of language skills and the study of Persian culture.

AAPTIS 151. Elementary Turkish, I.
(Language Courses)
No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Turkish 155. (4). (LR).
Part of the departmental sequence in modern Turkish language, this course aims at introducing and providing the opportunity to practice the basic structures of Turkish. Although it specifically focuses on enhancing spoken proficiency, reading and writing skills are emphasized through written assignments.

AAPTIS 152. Elementary Turkish, II.
(Language Courses)
Turkish 151. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Turkish 155. (4). (LR).
This course is the sequel to Turkish 151 and is the second half of Elementary Turkish. We focus on speaking and writing the language of Modern Turkey. Course topics include the phonological structure of Turkish, basic sentence patterns, and basic vocabulary. The aural-oral approach is emphasized and serves as the basic course format. There are tapes which accompany the text.

AAPTIS 153. Elementary Uzbek, I.
(Language Courses)
(4). (Excl).
Course teaches the principles of Uzbek grammar; phonological structure, sentence patterns and morphology of the language. The proficiency methodologies are used.

AAPTIS 154. Elementary Uzbek, II.
(Language Courses)
AAPTIS 153. (4). (Excl).
Course teaches the principles of Uzbek grammar; phonological structure, sentence patterns and morphology of the language. The proficiency methodologies are used.

AAPTIS 155. Intensive 1st Year Turkish.
(Language Courses)
No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Turkish 152. (8 in the half-term). (LR).
An introduction to the Turkish language with emphasis placed on reading, writing, comprehension, and speaking. A balanced approach giving equal emphasis to the development of language skills and the study of Turkish culture.

AAPTIS 171(Slavic 171)/Armenian 171. Western Armenian, I.
(Language Courses)
No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in AAPTIS 173. (4). (LR).
This course is designed for beginners with no previous knowledge of Western Armenian. Reading, writing, listening, speaking are equally emphasized.

AAPTIS 172(Slavic 172)/Armenian 172. Western Armenian, II.
(Language Courses)
AAPTIS 171. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in AAPTIS 173. (4). (LR).
This course is a continuation of Western Armenian, I. Reading, writing, listening, speaking are equally emphasized.

AAPTIS 173(Slavic 173)/Armenian 173. Intensive First-Year Western Armenian.
(Language Courses)
No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in AAPTIS 172. (8 in the half-term). (LR).
This course is designed for beginners with no previous knowledge of Western Armenian. Combines 171/172 in an intensive half-term. Reading, writing, listening, speaking are equally emphasized.

AAPTIS 181(Slavic 181)/Armenian 181. Eastern Armenian, I.
(Language Courses)
No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in AAPTIS 183. (4). (Excl).
This course is designed for beginners with no previous knowledge of Eastern Armenian (the state language of Armenia). Reading, writing, listening, and speaking are equally emphasized.

AAPTIS 182(Slavic 182)/Armenian 182. Eastern Armenian, II.
(Language Courses)
AAPTIS 181. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in AAPTIS 183. (4). (Excl).
This course is a continuation of Eastern Armenian (the state language of Armenia). Reading, writing, listening, and speaking are equally emphasized.

AAPTIS 183(Slavic 183)/Armenian 183. Intensive First-Year Eastern Armenian.
(Language Courses)
No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in AAPTIS 182. (8). (Excl).
Designed for beginners with no previous knowledge of Eastern Armenian. Combines 181/182 in an intensive half-term. Reading, writing, listening, and speaking are equally emphasized.

AAPTIS 192. First Year Seminar in Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies.
Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU).
First year seminar to be offered on special topics. Courses would not be part of the permanent curriculum, but offered by visiting faculty or permanent faculty for special purposes.

AAPTIS 200/Rel. 201/ACABS 200/HJCS 200. Introduction to World Religions: Near Eastern.
(4; 3 in the half-term). (HU).
Religions of the Book: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. An introduction to those world religions with roots in the Near East. The traditions studied include Ancient Israel (including the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament) as well as its "offspring:" Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Special attention is paid the origins and development of these traditions, what they share, and how they differ.

AAPTIS 201. Intermediate Modern Standard Arabic, I.
(Language Courses)
AAPTIS 102. (5). (LR). Laboratory fee ($16) required.
Continues the process of acquiring proficiency in the language. Listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills are developed.

AAPTIS 202. Intermediate Modern Standard Arabic, II.
(Language Courses)
AAPTIS 201. (5). (LR). Laboratory fee ($9) required.
Continuation of Arabic 201. Continues the development of reading, discussion, and writing skills based on a variety of literary Arabic texts. Special attention is given to Arabic grammar and terminology, reading, analysis, and discussion of texts with focus on important aspects of Arab-Islamic culture.

AAPTIS 203. Intermediate Arabic for Communication I.
(Language Courses)
AAPTIS 102. (4). (LR).
Arabic 203-204 is designed for students who have completed at least one year of standard Arabic and want to expand their knowledge of spoken and written standard Arabic for communication and career purposes. Arabic 203 provides useful information on all Arab countries and includes topics related to the communication needs of travelers and business people. The situational-communicative methodology is used throughout the course to help students become fluent in the use of Arabic in communicative situations. Emphasis is placed on listening, speaking, writing and culture.

AAPTIS 204. Intermediate Arabic for Communication II.
(Language Courses)
AAPTIS 203. (4). (LR).
This course is the second half of Arabic 203. It continues the process of developing fluency and ease in the use of standard Arabic for both oral and written communication as well as appreciation and awareness of contemporary Arab culture. It includes situational topics. Instruction includes a combination of video, audio, and text supported by multimedia interactive drill practice in the language lab.

AAPTIS 241. Intermediate Persian, I.
(Language Courses)
Persian 142 or 143. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Persian 243. (4). (LR).
Reading of modern Persian texts, with conversation drill.

AAPTIS 242. Intermediate Persian, II.
(Language Courses)
Persian 241. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Persian 243. (4). (LR).
Reading of modern Persian texts, with conversation drill.

AAPTIS 243. Intensive 2nd Year Persian.
(Language Courses)
Persian 142 or 143. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Persian 242. (8 in the half-term). (LR).
This course is a continuation of first-year Persian. The goals for this course is to achieve basic level of reading competence and continuing improvement of aural understanding and speaking competence.

AAPTIS 251. Intermediate Turkish, I.
(Language Courses)
Turkish 152 or 155. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Turkish 255. (4). (LR).
The course emphasizes further study of Turkish grammar and stresses development of comprehension, and oral and written expression through the use of selected materials relating to Turkish culture. Reading and translation from modern texts and translation into Turkish.

AAPTIS 252. Intermediate Turkish, II.
(Language Courses)
Turkish 251. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Turkish 255. (4). (LR).
The course provides further study of Turkish grammar, vocabulary and pronunciation. Comprehension and oral and written expression are developed through translations and compositions. Readings are emphasized. Reading and translation from modern texts and translation into Turkish.

AAPTIS 253. Intermediate Uzbek, I.
(Language Courses)
AAPTIS 154. (4). (Excl).
Course teaches the principles of Uzbek grammar; phonological structure, sentence patterns and morphology of the language. The proficiency methodologies are used.

AAPTIS 254. Intermediate Uzbek, II.
(Language Courses)
AAPTIS 253. (4). (Excl).
Course teaches the principles of Uzbek grammar; phonological structure, sentence patterns and morphology of the language. The proficiency methodologies are used.

AAPTIS 255. Intensive 2nd Year Turkish.
(Language Courses)
Turkish 152 or 155. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Turkish 252. (8 in the half-term). (LR).
This course is a continuation of first-year Turkish. The goals for this course are to achieve a basic level of reading competence and continuing improvement of aural understanding and speaking competence.

AAPTIS 262/Rel. 204. Introduction to Islam.
(4). (HU).
This course provides a comprehensive introduction to Islam as a religious tradition. After examining the fundamental sources of Islam, particularly the Qur'an and the Reports about the activities and sayings of the Prophet Muhammad, we discuss how these foundations gave rise to the beliefs and practices of Muslims and to an Islamic civilization with spectacular achievements in such areas.

AAPTIS 271(Slavic 271)/Armenian 271. Intermediate Western Armenian, I.
(Language Courses)
AAPTIS 172 or 173. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in AAPTIS 273. (4). (LR).
The course is a continuation of Armenian 171/172. Reading, conversation, and composition. A balanced approach giving equal emphasis to the development of language skills and the study of Armenian culture is employed.

AAPTIS 272(Slavic 272)/Armenian 272. Intermediate Western Armenian, II.
(Language Courses)
AAPTIS 271. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in AAPTIS 273. (4). (LR).
The course is a continuation of Armenian 171/172. Reading, conversation, and composition. A balanced approach giving equal emphasis to the development of language skills and the study of Armenian culture is employed.

AAPTIS 273(Slavic 273)/Armenian 273. Intensive Second-Year Armenian.
(Language Courses)
AAPTIS 172 or 173. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in AAPTIS 272. IIIb in Yerevan, Armenia. (8 in the half-term). (LR).
Combines existing courses 271/272 in an intensive half-term. The course is a continuation of first year Armenian. Reading conversation and composition. A balanced approach giving equal emphasis to the development of language skills and the study of Armenian culture.

AAPTIS 274(Slavic 221)/Armenian 274. Armenia: Culture and Ethnicity.
(Armenian Literature and Culture in English)
(3). (HU).
This course explores various aspects of the Christian Armenian identity, from the earliest times to the 1990s, against a historical and political background, with a greater emphasis on the more modern times. It highlights the formation of the Armenian self-image; its principal features (political, religious, cultural); and its historical evolution in a multi-religious and multinational region that has undergone territorial and cultural transformation.

AAPTIS 291. Topics in Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish and Islamic Studies.
(3). (Excl).
Undergraduate topics course in the field of Arabic, Persian, Turkish, or Islamic Studies.

AAPTIS 296/Great Books 246. Great Books of the Middle East.
(4). (HU).
Introduction to the literary traditions of the classical (or medieval) and modern Middle East. Students explore the cultural traditions of the peoples who have expressed themselves in Arabic, Persian, Turkish, and other Islamic languages since the time of the Prophet Muhammed. Reading are taken from the religious texts (including the Qur'an), from historical writings, and from poetry and artistic prose (such as the Thousand and one Nights). Other topics include the achievements of Islamic science and relations between the Middle East and the European West.

AAPTIS 331. Introduction to Arab Culture and Language.
(Arabic Literature and Culture in English)
(4). (HU).
Offers a general survey of the social, cultural, and linguistic aspects of the Modern Arab World with special emphasis on problems and answers. Includes an Arabic language component focusing on basic communication needs and social demands that casual travelers and career professionals to Arab countries need.

AAPTIS 332. Introduction to Persian Culture and Language.
(Persian Literature and Culture in English)
(3). (HU).
A general survey of the social, cultural, and linguistic aspects of the Modern Iranian world, including Iran, Afghanistan, and Tajikistan. Surveys era the three countries, including their multi-ethnicity, their shared ancient history, their self-image, and their image in the West. Includes a special section on the crucial impact of Iranian thought and religion on the Persianate culture.

AAPTIS 364/MENAS 334/Hist. 334. Selected Topics in Near and Middle Eastern Studies.
(3). (Excl).
This course consists of a series of lectures creating themes in some crucial aspect of Near and Middle East from the third millennium to the present. It consists of a weekly lecture and a discussion section.

AAPTIS 380(Iranian 440). Persian Literature in Translation.
(Persian Literature and Culture in English)
(3). (Excl).
This course highlights, by means of translations, the great books of Persian literature by Persian writing poets from Iran, the Ottoman empire, and the Mughal empire of India. The focus is on the classical period, covering heroic epic, romantic epic, and wordly and Sufi-mystic love poetry by major poets, from Ferdowsi's heroic epic and Omar Khayyam to the masterly ghazal-poems of Hafiz of Shiraz.

AAPTIS 381. Introduction to Arab Literature in Translation.
(Arabic Literature and Culture in English)
Taught in English. (3). (HU).
A survey of the major genres of Arabic literature from pre-Islamic times to the present. Introductory lectures lead to examination and discussion of selected works through the medium of English translations.

AAPTIS 383. The Arab-Israeli Conflict in Middle Eastern Literature.
(3). (HU).
Examines how authors from various parts of the Middle East (primarily but not exclusively Israelis and Palestinians) portray the Arab-Israeli conflict in their writings, from within different cultural contexts and literary traditions, and from differing ideological and political viewpoints.

AAPTIS 393/ACABS 393/Rel. 393. The Religion of Zoroaster.
(3). (HU).
A comprehensive introduction to the dualistic religion of Zoroaster, his view of creation and salvation, and ethics.

AAPTIS 395. Directed Undergraduate Readings.
Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.
Designed for individual students who have an interest in a specific topic (usually that has stemmed from a previous course). An individual instructor must agree to direct such a reading and the requirements are specified when approval is granted.

AAPTIS 401/Hist. of Art 401. The Art and Architecture of Armenia.
(Armenian Literature and Culture in English)
Upperclass standing. (2). (Excl).
This minicourse surveys the art and architecture of medieval Armenia, considering illuminated manuscripts, sculpture, and architecture from the fourth century to the late medieval era. In addition to addressing art historical issues such as iconography and style, we will consider patterns of patronage, the place of images in medieval Armenian society, and cross-cultural contacts with the neighboring empires of Byzantium and the Sasanian and Islamic Near East.

AAPTIS 403. Advanced Modern Standard Arabic I.
(Language Courses)
AAPTIS 202. (3). (Excl).
The objectives of this course are to develop fluency and accuracy in understanding, speaking and writing modern standard Arabic and to expand students' awareness of Arab-Islamic culture and traditions. The course is based on a variety of literary texts and authentic cultural audio visual materials. The course materials reflect not only the literary but also the cultural, social and political trends of contemporary Arabic society.

AAPTIS 404. Advanced Modern Standard Arabic II.
(Language Courses)
AAPTIS 403. (3). (Excl).
This course continues the process of developing fluency and ease in the use of modern standard Arabic for both oral and written communication. It is mainly designed for learners of Arabic at the advanced level of proficiency. The course includes a wide variety of authentic textual and audio visual materials ranging from correspondants to short stories, essays, plays, poems, excerpts from speeches and panel discussions as well as tape recordings of live speeches and lectures and short films.

AAPTIS 409. Business Arabic, I.
(Language Courses)
AAPTIS 204. (4). (Excl).
Offered for students and other members of the business community who wish to continue Arabic study for career and professional purposes. Arabic 409 focuses on topics pertinent to business correspondence, commercial advertisements, and business transactions through authentic texts supported by images, audio and video cassettes.

AAPTIS 410. Business Arabic, II.
(Language Courses)
AAPTIS 409. (4). (LR).
Sequel to Arabic 409. Increased emphasis in 410 on banking documents and transactions, commercial and government contracts and agreements. It provides opportunities for the study and analysis of various aspects of Islamic banking and finance through authentic texts, brochures, and audiovisual materials including lectures and films.

AAPTIS 415. Colloquial Egyptian Arabic, I.
(Language Courses)
AAPTIS 202 or 403. (3). (LR).
Provides extensive oral and communicative practice based on situational dialogues as used by native Egyptian speakers. The basic principles of pronunciation, grammar and functional vocabulary are emphasized through oral and pattern practice drills. The goal is to develop the ability to communicate with native speakers of Egyptian Arabic with some ease.

AAPTIS 416. Colloquial Egyptian Arabic, II.
(Language Courses)
AAPTIS 415. (3). (LR).
Extensive oral drill with a native speaker emphasizing phonological, morphological, and basic syntactic structures of Egyptian Arabic. Aims at helping the student achieve fluency in this dialect of Arabic.

AAPTIS 417. Colloquial Levantine Arabic, I.
(Language Courses)
AAPTIS 102. (3). (LR).
Provides extensive oral and communicative practice based on situational dialogues as used by native speakers in Jerusalem, Amman, Damascus and Beirut. Emphasis placed on basic principles of pronunciation, grammar and functional vocabulary, the practical use of dialect through interactive communicative tasks, and cultural and social conventions.

AAPTIS 418. Colloquial Levantine Arabic, II.
(Language Courses)
AAPTIS 417. (3). (LR).
Extensive oral drill with a native speaker emphasizing phonological, morphological, and basic syntactic structures of the colloquial Arabic as spoken primarily by educated Arabs from Jerusalem, Beirut, or Damascus.

AAPTIS 433(Arabic 432)/Ling. 433. Arabic Syntax and Semantics.
(Linguistics)
AAPTIS 431, and AAPTIS 102 or 103. (3). (Excl).
Study of theories of generative syntax especially the principles and parameters approach and situation semantics and their relevance to the analysis of Modern Standard Arabic and at least on Arabic dialect using as a reference point medieval Arabic grammar. There is focus on some relevant theoretical constructs as they apply to the syntactic and semantic analysis of Arabic.

AAPTIS 434. Arabic Historical Linguistics and Dialectology.
Permission of instructor. Taught in English. (3). (Excl).
Development of Arabic from proto-Semitic and proto-Arabic origins to interrelationships of contemporary literary and colloquial varieties of Arabic, including attention to such problems as diglossia, "Middle Arabic," etc.

AAPTIS 440(Turkish 440). The Literature of the Turks.
(Turkish Literature and Culture in English)
(3). (Excl).
An examination of the literature of the Western Turks in its pre-Islamic, Islamic, and modern setting through lectures and English translations.

AAPTIS 451. Introductory Ottoman Turkish, I.
(Language Courses)
Turkish 152 or 155. (3). (Excl).
Intended for those studying Turkish for the purpose of reading Ottoman texts and archives. Course is designed to gain the expertise necessary to read the printed work in Ottoman Turkish in the Arabic script. The method of instruction is through the study of texts while reviewing the Arabic and Persian elements in the language.

AAPTIS 452. Introductory Ottoman Turkish, II.
(Language Courses)
Turkish 451. (3). (Excl).
Second half of first year Ottoman intended to sharpen skills in the handling of a variety of styles, topics and scripts through the reading and analysis of specially selected texts.

AAPTIS 461/Hist. 442. The First Millennium of the Islamic Near East.
Junior standing. Taught in English. (3). (Excl).
A survey of the history and culture of the Islamic Near East from the era of Muhammad through establishment of the Ottoman and Safavid empires in the 16th century. This course is the first half of a two-course sequence surveying the history of the Islamic Near East.

AAPTIS 462/Hist. 536. The Rise of Islam.
Junior standing. Taught in English. (3). (Excl).
The Near East and eastern Mediterranean world in late antiquity; Muhammad and the formation of Islam; the early Islamic empire at its heights

AAPTIS 463/Hist. 537. The Near East in the Period of the Crusades, 945-1258.
Junior standing. Taught in English. (3). (Excl).
Fatimids, Seljuks, Crusaders, and Mongols. Internal and external forces causing dramatic changes in the religious, economic, and political patterns of the medieval Near Eastern society.

AAPTIS 465/Rel. 465. Islamic Mysticism.
Taught in English. (3). (Excl).
Beginning with the Qur’anic origins of Islamic mysticism and its early Christian and ascetic influences, this course explores the central themes and institutional forms of Sufism, a stream of Islam which stresses the esoteric (mystical) dimensions of religious faith. It reflects upon the inward quest and devotions of Muslim mystics as these have been lived and expressed in art, theology, literature, and fellowship since the 8th century CE.

AAPTIS 466. Issues in Islamic Studies.
Taught in English. (3). (Excl).
This course covers the major aspects of Islam as a religious tradition with particular reference to the Qur'an and Qur'anic studies, reports about the words and deeds of the Prophet Muhammad, theology, law, mysticism, and philosophy. Upon studying traditional views of Islam and its disciplines the students are introduced to some revisionist approaches to Islamic legacy cultivated by Western scholars.

AAPTIS 467/Hist. 541/Religion 467. Shi'ism: The History of Messianism and the Pursuit of Justice in Islamdom.
Junior standing. (3). (HU).
The course surveys the history of diverse Alid movements from the assassination of Ali (d.661) to the crystallization of Shi'ism into distinct political, legal and theological schools (Twelver, Isma'ili, Zaydi), and ends with the establishment of Twelver Shi'ism as an imperial religion in Safavi Iran (1501-1722). Emphasis on the debate over authority in Islam.

AAPTIS 468. Islamic Law.
Taught in English. (3). (Excl).
This course deals with the philosophy, history, and principal features of Islamic Law. A comparative study of the major Islamic legal schools is made, and the Islamic legal system as a whole is compared with non-Islamic legal systems. Some of the legal problems faced by present-day Muslim societies also are examined. The course is given mainly in the form of lectures, and is built around two or three works (in English).

AAPTIS 469. Islamic Intellectual History.
Taught in English. (3). (Excl).
A comparative study of Islamic Sufism, theosophy, philosophy, and dialectical theology, focusing on how these diverse fields – varying in methodology and purpose – have conceived of God and the relationship between Him and the created world, especially the world of human beings.

AAPTIS 470/Hist. 441. The Islamic West: al-Andalus and the Magrib, 600-1500.
AAPTIS 461. (3). (Excl).
Introduction to the history of Muslim Spain and North Africa, also including Muslim Sicily, from the Islamic conquests until the end of the Muslim political presence in Spain. Emphasis is on political, economic and cultural history, as we view the region's ties with the rest of the Islamic world as well as with other regions.

AAPTIS 471(AAPTIS 371/Slavic 371)/Armenian 471. Advanced Western Armenian, I.
(Language Courses)
AAPTIS 272 or 273. (3). (Excl).
Third-Year Armenian is designed for students who have successfully completed two years of college Armenian or who have attained equivalent skills elsewhere. The chief goals of the course are increased fluency in spoken Armenian and strengthened skills in reading and composition. Grammar review is kept to a minimum; class primarily devoted to close reading and discussion in Armenian of assigned topics.

AAPTIS 472(AAPTIS 372/Slavic 372)/Armenian 472. Advanced Western Armenian, II.
(Language Courses)
AAPTIS 471. (3). (Excl).
Third-Year Armenian is designed for students who have successfully completed two years of college Armenian or who have attained equivalent skills elsewhere. The chief goals of the course are increased fluency in spoken Armenian and strengthened skills in reading and composition. Grammar review is kept to a minimum; class primarily devoted to close reading and discussion in Armenian of assigned topics.

AAPTIS 473/Armenian Studies 415. An Introduction to Classical and Medieval Armenian Literature.
(Armenian Literature and Culture in English)
(3). (Excl).
This course explores the history of Armenian literature from the 5th to the 15th centuries. It highlights the ways in which the new, Christian Armenian tradition was formulated as well as the subsequent phases of its evolution. Various aspects of the new identity and fresh themes and genres that echoed Armenian concerns and aspirations are critically evaluated against a historical and comparative background.

AAPTIS 474/Armenian Studies 416. An Introduction to Modern Armenian Literature.
(Armenian Literature and Culture in English)
(3). (Excl).
This course outlines a history of Armenian Literature from the 16th to the 20th centuries, concentrating on the works of major authors who flourished within and without Armenia. Both the traditional and new literature are analyzed, but a greater emphasis is placed on the 19th-20th centuries, including Eastern and Western Armenian literatures, literature of the post-Genocide dispersion, and that of Soviet Armenia.

AAPTIS 478/Armenian Studies 478. Classical Armenian I.
(Language Courses)
No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in AAPTIS 480. (3). (Excl).
Designed for students with no previous knowledge of Classical Armenian. Emphasis is on grammar and reading of classical and medieval Armenian texts.

AAPTIS 479/Armenian Studies 479. Classical Armenian II.
(Language Courses)
AAPTIS 478. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in AAPTIS 480. (3). (Excl).
Designed for students with no previous knowledge of Classical Armenian. Emphasis is on grammar and reading of classical and medieval Armenian texts.

AAPTIS 480/Armenian Studies 483. Intensive Introductory Classical Armenian.
(Language Courses)
No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in AAPTIS 479. (6 in the half-term). (Excl).
This intensive course is designed for students with no previous knowledge of Armenian. Emphasis is on grammar and reading of classical and medieval texts.

AAPTIS 481. Classical Arabic I.
(Language Courses)
(4). (LR).
Introduction to the phonology and script of classical Arabic and its basic vocabulary and fundamental grammar. The course also aims to improve the students' reading and writing skills through extensive reading and writing practice, including general information on Islam and six short suras from the Qur'an.

AAPTIS 482. Classical Arabic II.
(Language Courses)
AAPTIS 481. (4). (LR).
A continuation of the acquisition of basic vocabulary and fundamental grammar. There is increased focus on the development of reading ability as well as cultural insights through short selections from the Qur'an and Medieval Islamic literature. This course also provides training in the use of Arabic-English dictionary.

AAPTIS 485. Classical Near Eastern Literature.
Taught in English. (3). (HU).
A general introduction, using materials in English translation, of the classics both secular and religious works in the ancient languages as well as of Arabic, Persian, and Turkish.

AAPTIS 486. Topics in Modern Middle Arabic Literature in Translation.
(Arabic Literature and Culture in English)
Taught in English. (3). (HU).
Focus is on three main topics: (1) Mappings of the Arabic Renaissance: an alternative, cultural, literary and intellectual reading of the Arab Renaissance (Nahdah) from the standout of its forerunners. A special emphasis is put on the emergence of the concept of time, heralding the birth of the Arabic novel. (2) The Rise of the Arabic Novel: the emergence of this literary genre in modern Arabic literature has always been a very controversial issue, in point of the origin and possible influences, both intrinsic and foreign. We attempt to subvert some of the prevalent notions, and reexamine some of the counter-arguments. (3) Autobiography in Modern Arabic Literature: against a background of literary theory, we conduct a close reading, in English translation, of selected texts that are either novels disguised autobiographies, or autobiographies disguised as novels. Materials are in English translation.

AAPTIS 487/Hist. 443. Modern Middle East History.
(3). (Excl).
Impact of the West on the Islamic Near East in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Emphasis is on the modernization of the Ottoman Empire and Republican Turkey and Egypt, the rise of Arab and Zionist nationalisms and the subsequent Arab-Israeli dispute, and inter-Arab and international rivalries to the present.

AAPTIS 488. History of Arabic Literature in English.
(Arabic Literature and Culture in English)
(3). (Excl).
An introduction to the literary history of Arabic, from the earliest to modern times. Works in English translation exemplify this literature which is drawn from poetry and prose. Lectures and class discussion relate these writings to the societies, historical circumstances, and cultural values to which they give expression.

AAPTIS 491. Topics in Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies.
(3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.
A course for upper-level undergraduates and graduate students taught by temporary faculty or as a testing course for permanent faculty.

AAPTIS 494. Literary Analysis and Theory.
Taught in English. (3). (Excl).
Introduction to the theory of classical Islamic poetics and modern literary theory accompanied by practical analysis.

AAPTIS 495/WS 471/Hist. 546/Rel. 496. Gender and Politics in Early Modern Islam.
Students should preferably have had one course in Islamic Studies. Taught in English. (3). (Excl).
An introduction to Muslim understandings of gender and gender relations, first, through a study of those sacred texts (Qur'an & Hadith) that came to define the ideal woman and man, as well as their roles and relationships. Then, gender participation in the political and cultural life of the Safavi, Ottoman and Mughal Courts shall be explored to view the interplay between theory and practice.

AAPTIS 496/WS 496. Gender and Representation in the Modern Middle East.
(3). (Excl).
An examination of the construction of gender as pertains to the contemporary Middle East (predominantly but not exclusively the Arab Middle East) as found in a wide array of literary and cultural representations (fiction, travel accounts, photographs, painting, film) produced both in the Middle East and outside of it.

AAPTIS 498. Senior Honors Thesis.
Permission of instructor. (1-6). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).
The Senior Honors thesis is for students who have been approved by the Near Eastern Studies concentration advisor, Honors advisor, and the LSA Honors Council. The length of the thesis may vary, but 50-60 pages is common. Two advisors should be chosen. The principal advisor is a member of the faculty in whose field of expertise the thesis topic lies, and he or she oversees the student's research and the direction taken by the thesis.

AAPTIS 501. Advanced Arabic Conversation and Composition.
(Language Courses)
AAPTIS 404. (3). (Excl).
Objectives is to develop fluency and accuracy in understanding, speaking, and writing modern standard Arabic, and to expand students' awareness of Arab-Islamic culture, and civilization.

AAPTIS 502. Advanced Arabic Readings in Special Subjects.
(Language Courses)
AAPTIS 501. (3). (Excl).
Provides training in developing and using learning strategies independently as they red authentic materials. Students select the topics in which they are interested and prepare written summary reports to be presented in class. After each presentation, the whole class engages in discussions and conversations that promote analysis, reflection, and critical thinking.

AAPTIS 531. Reading Modern Arab Authors in Arabic.
(Arabic Literature and Culture in Arabic)
AAPTIS 501. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.
Selected texts (novels, short stories, poetry, and personal interviews), written by modern Arab authors in the last two decades, are read and discussed in Arabic, with a special emphasis on the language and strategies of narration, cultural contextualizations, and the sheer pleasure of reading an original text.

AAPTIS 532. Arabic Linguistics.
Some knowledge of Arabic. Open to undergraduates with instructor's permission. (3). (Excl).
Introduction to the linguistic analysis of the phonology, morphology, and syntax of Arabic (literary and dialectal), with some attention to historical and sociolinguistic aspects. Among the topics are derivational ablaut and the mixing of literary and vernacular varieties.

AAPTIS 541. Classical Persian Texts.
(Persian Literature and Culture in Persian)
Persian 242 or 243. Taught in English. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with permission of instructor.
Selected passages from the major prose writers e.g. Bal'ami, Bayhaqi, Nizam al-Mulk, Nizami-yi Arudi and poets e.g., Rudaki, Firdousi, Nizami, Sa'di, Hafiz of the Classical period.

AAPTIS 544. Modern Persian Fiction.
(Persian Literature and Culture in Persian)
Persian 242 or 243. (3). (Excl).
Readings from selected works of modern Persian prose and poetry. Close reading and literary analysis.

AAPTIS 551. Readings in Ottoman Turkish.
(Language Courses)
Turkish 252 and 452. (2). (Excl).
Selections from Ottoman writings in Arabic characters.

AAPTIS 552. Readings in Tanzimat Turkish.
(Language Courses)
Turkish 252 and 452. (2). (Excl).
Selections from Tanzimat writings in Arabic characters.

AAPTIS 553. Modern Turkish Readings.
(Language Courses)
Turkish 252 or 255. (2). (Excl).
The emphasis is on developing comprehension. Selected passages from books and articles of a general character are studied.

AAPTIS 556. Modern Turkish Prose Literature.
(Turkish Literature and Culture in Turkish)
Turkish 252 or 255. (2). (Excl).
Selected readings from the novels, short stories, and essays of writers in the twentieth century.

AAPTIS 557. Modern Turkish Poetry.
(Turkish Literature and Culture in Turkish)
Turkish 252 or 255. (2). (Excl).
Selected readings from representative poets of the twentieth century.

AAPTIS 561. Modern Arabic Fiction.
(Arabic Literature and Culture in Arabic)
AAPTIS 403 or reading knowledge of Arabic(3). (Excl).
Selected examples of contemporary imaginative prose writing, such as short and long fiction and drama. Readings are in Arabic and class discussion in English.

AAPTIS 563. Modern Arabic Nonfiction.
(Arabic Literature and Culture in Arabic)
AAPTIS 403 or reading knowledge of Arabic. (3). (Excl).
This course introduces the work of major Arab writers of the 19th and 20th centuries. Variable in focus according to the interests of the class, readings are selected for translation, analysis, and commentary. The course explores the historical progression in the development of political and societal theories in modern times in the Arab world.

AAPTIS 565. Qur'anic Studies.
(Arabic Literature and Culture in Arabic)
AAPTIS 202. (3). (Excl).
Selected surahs of the Qur'an in Arabic.

AAPTIS 567. Readings in Classical Islamic Texts.
(Arabic Literature and Culture in Arabic)
AAPTIS 202 or 403. Taught in English. (3). (Excl).
Selected theological, philosophical, historical, and geographical texts.

AAPTIS 568. Classical Arabic Poetry.
(Arabic Literature and Culture in Arabic)
AAPTIS 403. Conducted in Arabic. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 6 credits.
Mina focus is 7th-10th centuries CE. Selected mu'allaqat, and other poems by ash-Shanfara, Ka'b b. Zuhayr, 'Umar b. Abi Rabi'ah, Jarir, and al-Farazdaq.

AAPTIS 569. Modern Arabic Poetry.
(Arabic Literature and Culture in Arabic)
Fluency in Arabic at the advanced level (AAPTIS 502 or equivalent). (3). (Excl).
This course is meant to introduce students of modern Arabic literature to the sheer pleasure of reading – and discussing – a poem in the original language. We closely read and analyze selected poems written throughout the century, representing different schools and trends.

AAPTIS 581. Classical Arabic III.
(Language Courses)
AAPTIS 482. (4). (LR).
This course reviews grammar as it provides students with extensive training in reading authentic passages of Classical Arabic selected from the Qur'an, hadith, and medieval Arabic-Islamic literature. The students are expected to prepare the assigned readings with the aid of their dictionaries and read and discuss them in class.

AAPTIS 582. Classical Arabic IV.
(Language Courses)
AAPTIS 581. (4). (LR).
This content-based fourth semester of Classical Arabic aims at further development of the student's reading, writing, and listening skills. It provides extensive practice in reading and analyzing a variety of authentic Classical Arabic texts with varying length and developing competence in listening and summarizing lectures and khutab (sermons) dealing with Islamic topics

AAPTIS 583. Medieval Arabic Historical and Geographical Texts.
(Arabic Literature and Culture in Arabic)
AAPTIS 404. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 9 credits.
Reading and intensive study of selected texts, in Arabic, from the Islamic Middle Ages. Major writers from both the historical and the geographical traditions are chosen.

AAPTIS 584. Persianate History Through Political and Cultural Texts.
(Persian Literature and Culture in Persian)
Advanced reading knowledge of Persian. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 9 credits.
A textual study of Medieval and Early Modern political and cultural history through a variety of genres (chronicles, Bios of poets, hagiographies, "mirrors of princes", local histories, religious poetry, disputations and epics) shared by Persianate cultural spheres from Anatolia through the Iranian plateau into Central Asia and India. Primary Texts are all in Persian

AAPTIS 586(Persian 523). Avestan.
(Language Courses)
(3). (Excl).
This course is an introduction to the grammar of Avestan, the ancient language of the Zoroastrian religion. Like its sister language Vedic and Sanskrit it represents one of the oldest manifestations of Indo-European, dating back to the 15th century BCE, and its texts offer insights into one of the earliest world views, in particular of the prophet Zarathustra, which deeply influenced the Near Eastern and Western religions, and the Classic Greeks.

AAPTIS 587/Hist. 531. Studies in Pahlavi and Middle Persian.
(Language Courses)
(3). (Excl).
Introduction to the Middle Persian language, and its three major variants and alphabets, the Pahlavi of the Zoroastrian Books, the Middle Persian of the Manichaean writings from Chinese Turkestan, and the Middle Persian of the Sasanians inscriptions.

AAPTIS 591. Topics in Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies.
(3). (Excl).
Course for upper level undergraduates and graduate students taught by temporary faculty or as a testing course for permanent faculty.

AAPTIS 593. Mini Course – Topics in Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies.
(1). (Excl).
Course for upper level undergraduates and graduate students to be taught by temporary faculty or as an experimental course for permanent faculty.

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