93-94 LS&A Bulletin

Classical Studies

2016 Angell Hall

764-0360

Professor Ludwig Koenen, Chair

May be elected as a departmental concentration in Classical Archaeology, Classical Languages and Literatures, Greek, or Latin

Professors

H. D. Cameron, Greek drama, linguistics, Greek orators, Plautus

John F. Cherry, Aegean prehistory, Mediterranean landscape history, archaeological theory, island archaeology, computers and the Classics

John H. D’Arms, Roman social and cultural history, Latin literature, especially the historians, Latin epigraphy, Roman archaeology and topography

Bruce W. Frier, Roman law, Roman social and economic history, Hellenistic and Roman historiography and political science, ancient architecture, numismatics

Kweku A. Garbrah, Greek and Latin languages, comparative philology, early Latin tragedy, Greek epigraphy

Sharon C. Herbert, Greek archaeology, vase painting, mythology, Hellenistic Near East

John H. Humphrey, Roman archaeology, especially of the Roman provinces, Roman history

Sally Humphreys, Anthropology of ancient societies, Greek law, history of religions

Glenn M. Knudsvig, Applied linguistics, Latin language, theoretical linguistics, Latin learning and teaching

Ludwig Koenen, Papyrology, Greek and Latin literature, Hellenistic and Roman Egypt, patristics, the history of religion

Sabine MacCormack, Cultural and intellectual history of late antiquity and the Spanish empire

John G. Pedley, Greek and Roman art and archaeology, Greek sculpture, art and archaeology of Asian Minor and South Italy

David O. Ross, Jr., Latin literature, Hellenistic poetry, Latin textual criticism

Ruth Scodel, Homer, tragedy, Greek literary criticism, ancient narrative

Charles Witke, Catullus, Augustan poetry, Roman satire, medieval Latin literature, religion, Erasmus

Associate Professors

James I. Porter, Greek and Latin literature, literary criticism and aesthetics, contemporary literary theory

David S. Potter, Greek and Roman Asia Minor, Greek and Latin historiography and epigraphy

Assistant Professors

Susan E. Alcock, Hellenistic and Roman Greece, archaeology of the Eastern Roman Empire, landscape archeology, regional field survey, museums as a teaching resource

John D. Dillery, Greek and Latin literature and historiography, Greek history

Gregory Dobrov, Ancient comedy, Greek tragedy, linguistics

K. Sara Myers, Latin poetry, Hellenistic poetry, ancient and modern literary criticism

Sara L. Rappe,neo-Platonism, Hellenistic and classical philosophy, Greek drama

Lecturers

Traianos Gagos, Greek papyrology, Greek paleography, Roman and Byzantine Egypt, modern Greek language

Eugene W. Nissen, Elementary Latin, New Testament Greek

Robert D. Wallin, Latin, Great Books

Adjunct Professors

D.R. Shackleton Bailey, Latin literature and textual criticism, history and prosopography of the late Roman Republic

James B. White, Greek literature, law, and rhetoric

Nicholas P. White, Plato, Aristotle, pre-Socratic philosophy and post Aristotelian philosophy before neo-Platonism

Adjunct Assistant Professor

Deborah Pennell Ross, Latin language and literature, linguistics

Professors Emeriti Theodore V. Buttrey, Roger A. Pack, Gerda M. Seligson.

The Department of Classical Studies offers instruction in Greek and Latin languages and civilization including elementary, intermediate, and advanced-level courses which emphasize composition, literature, historiography, law, and philosophy. New Testament Greek and medieval Latin are offered as well as classical Greek and Latin. Utilizing one of the world’s outstanding collections of Greek papyri, the Department offers courses in papyrology. With the cooperation of colleagues in other departments, Classical Studies also offers courses in classical art and archaeology. Modern Greek is offered on a two year cycle. It fulfills the language requirement.

Courses Taught in English. The Department offers a number of Classical Archaeology and Classical Civilization courses which require no knowledge of Greek or Latin. Through lectures and reading in translation, these courses offer students an opportunity to acquire a general knowledge of Greek and Roman archaeology, literature, mythology, religion, sport and daily life, sexuality, law, philosophy, and institutions.

Intensive Language Courses. The Department offers intensive language courses in Latin which compress the normal two-year sequence required for elementary language proficiency. Intensive courses are special features of the Department’s offerings during Spring Half-Term (IIIa) or during Summer Half-Term (IIIb), but they are also offered in other terms. For information about intensive Latin, contact Professor Knudsvig or Professor D. O. Ross.

Special Departmental Policies. The Department requires that a student earn a grade of at least C- in all language courses which are prerequisite for subsequent elections. A student should repeat any language course in which a D+ or lower grade is earned and which serves as a prerequisite to other courses which are to be elected. A grade of D+ signifies some achievement but denotes too weak a foundation for subsequent courses.

Concentration Program Options. The Department offers concentration programs and Honors concentrations in the Greek language and literature, the Latin language and literature, Classical languages and literatures (i.e., where the student studies both Greek and Latin), and Classical Archaeology.

To be eligible for an Honors concentration in Classical Archaeology, a student must have a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.5 and must have achieved second term proficiency in both Greek and Latin.

To be eligible for an Honors concentration in Greek, Latin, or Classical languages and literatures, students should have a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.0 and a 3.5 grade point average in courses in Greek and Latin.

Academic Advising. Students interested in the Department’s concentration programs in Greek, Latin, or Classical languages and literatures should see the undergraduate advisor, Professor David Ross. Students interested in the Classical Archaeology concentration should see Professor Pedley. Students interested in obtaining Teacher Certification in Latin should see Professor Knudsvig. The Department recommends that interested students see the undergraduate advisors as early as possible in order to plan their programs and avoid unnecessary scheduling conflicts.

Study Abroad. The Department of Classical Studies is affiliated with the Intercollegiate Center for Classical Studies at Rome, Italy, where undergraduates from various American and Canadian institutions are given an opportunity to study Greek and Latin literature, ancient history, archaeology, and ancient art. Admission to this program is open to any undergraduate concentrating in these areas having appropriate background and interests. For information and application forms, contact the Departmental office.

Prizes. Phillips Classical Prizes are awarded annually for excellence in Greek and in Latin. Winners participate in the Phillips Prize Ceremony and a notation of the award is made on their academic record. Prizes are also awarded for excellence demonstrated in a Modern Greek translation competition. Announcement of the competition is made through the Department; examinations are held and the winners are announced in the late winter.


Classical Archaeology

May be elected as a departmental concentration program

Through study of literary evidence and monumental remains, the Classical Archaeology curriculum explores various phases of Greek and Roman civilization, especially developments in architecture, sculpture, painting, pottery, and coinage. The large collection of photographs and slides maintained by the Department of History of Art and the antiquities in the Kelsey Museum of Ancient and Medieval Archaeology provide abundant supplementary materials for the various courses.

Courses in Classical Archaeology numbered 221 through 592 do not require knowledge of Greek or Latin.

Concentration Program. Requires a minimum of 9 courses (at least 3 credits each) including:

1. at least 5 courses in Classical Archaeology which must include Classical Archaeology 221 and 222, and three advanced courses.

2. third term proficiency in Greek or Latin.

3. at least one course in both Greek and Roman history (usually History 200 and 201).

Honors Concentration. In addition to the concentration requirements stated above, Honors work focuses on independent study and an Honors thesis in the senior year.

Field Experience. Recommended but not required for a concentration in Classical Archaeology. There are several opportunities for students to join excavations in the Mediterranean area under the supervision of University of Michigan faculty. See Professor Pedley.


Greek Language and Literature

May be elected as a departmental concentration program

The LS&A language requirement may be satisfied with the successful completion of both Greek 301 and 302, or equivalent.

Prerequisites to Concentration. Greek 101 and 102 or special placement examination.

Concentration Program. Requires a minimum of 9 courses (of at least 3 credits each) including:

1. 7 courses in Greek at the 300-level or above (at least 4 of these must be at the 400-level or above, usually including Greek 401 and 402).

2. Two cognates: Classical Archaeology 221 or another course in ancient Greek archaeology, and History 200 or another course in ancient Greek history. Greek 499 may not be used.

Honors Concentration. In addition to the concentration requirements stated above, students must complete an Honors thesis and a reading list in their senior year.


Latin Language and Literature

May be elected as a departmental concentration program

Elementary Language Sequence. The language requirement for the A.B./B.S. degree may be satisfied by the successful completion of Latin 232 (but not 194), or any course at the 300- or 400-level, or by satisfactory performance on a placement test. The placement test is offered once at the beginning of each term, periodically during each term by arrangement, and throughout the Summer Orientation period. Students are placed into the department’s language sequences according to their demonstrated proficiency. Students may elect Greek 101 while continuing the study of Latin.

Prerequisites to Concentration. Latin 194 or 232 or special placement examination.

Concentration Program. Requires a minimum of 9 courses (of at least 3 credits each) including:

1. 7 courses in Latin at the 300-level or above; at least 4 of these courses must be at the 400-level or above and must include: (a) Latin 401 or 402; (b) Latin 409 or 410; (c) another course from (a) or (b) or another course at the 400-level or above.

2. Two cognates: Classical Archaeology 222 or another course in Roman archaeology, and History 201 or another course in Roman history. Latin 499 may not be used.

Honors Concentration. In addition to the concentration requirements stated above, students must complete an Honors thesis and a reading list in their senior year.

Teaching Certificate. Students interested in a secondary school teaching certificate with a major or minor in Latin must have Professor Knudsvig (2012 Angell) approve their program of study.

Major in Latin. Thirty credits which must include:

a. 15 credits in Latin beyond 194 or 232, of which 12 must be at the 400-level or above; neither Latin 499 nor 599 may be counted toward the major without permission of the teaching certificate advisor;

b. one course in Latin composition;

c. one course in Classical Archeology;

d. one course in Roman history;

e. one course in Linguistics.

Minor in Latin. Twenty credits which must include:

a. 12 credits in Latin beyond 194 or 232, of which 9 must be at the 400-level or above. Neither Latin 499 nor 599 may be counted toward the minor without permission of the teaching certificate advisor;

b. one course in Roman history;

c. one course in Linguistics.

Professor Knudsvig has the authority to modify departmental requirements for a teaching major or minor in special cases and in keeping with the general requirements for the teaching certificate.


Classical Languages and Literatures

May be elected as a departmental concentration program

Concentration Program. The concentration requires study of both Greek and Latin; the student chooses one language as the major language for the purpose of determining requirements. The student takes a minimum of 9 courses (of at least 3 credits each) including:

1. In the major language students must complete (a) at least 3 courses at the 400-level or above; and (b) two cognates: one course in Classical Archaeology and one in History; 300-level courses count toward the concentration in the major language only.

2. In the minor language students must complete at least one course at the 400-level or above. Greek 499 and Latin 499 may not be used.

Honors Concentration. In addition to the concentration requirements stated above, students must complete an Honors thesis and a reading list in their senior year.


Courses in Classical Archaeology (Division 342)

221/Hist. of Art 221. Introduction to Greek Archaeology. (4). (HU).

222/Hist. of Art 222. Introduction to Roman Archaeology. (4). (HU).

323. Introduction to Field Archaeology. (3). (HU).

324/Hist. of Art 324. Practicum in Field Archaeology. Class. Arch. 221 and 222; or permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). Special fee required. May be elected, but not in one term, for a total of 6 credits.

395. Junior Honors Survey. Permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with permission.

396. Undergraduate Seminar. Permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with permission.

421/History of Art 421. Art and Archaeology of the Ancient Near East. One previous art history, anthropology, or classical archaeology course recommended. (3). (HU).

422/Hist. of Art 422. Etruscan Art and Archaeology. Class. Arch. 221 or 222; or permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

424/Hist. of Art 424. Archaeology of the Roman Provinces. Class. Arch. 221 or 222; or permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

427/Hist. of Art 427. Pompeii: Its Life and Art. (3). (Excl).

431/Hist. of Art 431. Principal Greek Archaeological Sites. A course in archaeology or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

433/Hist. of Art 433. Greek Sculpture. Hist. of Art 101 or permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

434/Hist. of Art 434. Archaic Greek Art. Hist. of Art 101 or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

435/Hist. of Art 435. The Art and Archaeology of Asia Minor. Hist. of Art 101 or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

436/Hist. of Art 436. Hellenistic and Roman Architecture. Hist. of Art 101 or Class. Arch. 221 or 222; or permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

437/Hist. of Art 437. Egyptian Art and Archaeology. (3). (HU).

438/Hist. of Art 438. The Art and Archaeology of Hellenistic and Roman Egypt. Permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

439/Hist. of Art 439. Greek Vase Painting. (3). (HU).

440/Hist. of Art 440. Cities and Sanctuaries of Classical Greece. A course in archaeology or permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

442/Hist. of Art 442. Late Antique and Early Christian Art and Architecture. Hist. of Art 101, 222, or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

443/Hist. of Art 443. Greeks in the West. Class. Arch. 221, or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

481/Hist. of Art 481. Art of Ancient Iran. Hist. of Art 101 or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

499. Supervised Reading. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

515/Hist. of Art 515. The Archaeology of the Roman Economy. Class. Arch. 222 and upperclass standing, or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

531/Hist. of Art 531/Anthro. 587. Aegean Art and Archaeology. Class. Arch. 221 or 222; or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

534/Hist. of Art 534. Ancient Painting. Hist. of Art 101 and either Class. Arch. 221 or 222; or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

536/Hist. of Art 536. Hellenistic and Roman Sculpture. Hist. of Art 101 or Class. Arch. 222 or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

539/Hist. of Art 539. Greek Architecture. Hist. of Art 101, and Class. Arch. 221 or 222; or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

540/Hist. of Art 540. Art and Archaeology of Byzantine Egypt. Hist. of Art 101, 442, 542, or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

599. Supervised Study in Classical Archaeology. Permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Classical Linguistics (Division 345) 599. Directed Reading. Permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Classical Greek (Division 385)

Elementary Courses

See Special Departmental Policies statement above

101. Elementary Greek. Graduate students should elect the course as Greek 502. (4). (LR).

102. Elementary Greek. Greek 101. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 103, 310, or 503. Graduate students should elect the course as Greek 503. (4). (LR).

301. Second-Year Greek. Greek 102 or equivalent. The language requirement is satisfied with the successful completion of Greek 301 and 302. (4). (LR).

302. Second-Year Greek. Greek 102 or equivalent. The language requirement is satisfied with the successful completion of Greek 301 and 302. (4). (LR).

307/ABS 307. The Synoptic Gospels: Matthew, Mark and Luke. Greek 101 and 102 or the equivalent; and permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

308/ABS 308. The Acts of the Apostles. Greek 101 and 102 or the equivalent; and permission of instructor. (2). (Excl).

Intermediate Courses

401. Readings in Classical Greek Prose. Greek 302 or permission of instructor. (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of nine credits.

402. Greek Drama. Greek 302 or permission of instructor. (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of nine credits.

Advanced Courses

410. Elementary Greek Prose. Greek 302 or equivalent. (3). (Excl).

435. Fifth-Century Prose. (3). (Excl).

436. Herodotus. (3). (Excl).

444. Homer. Greek 302 or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

457. Greek Orators. Greek 302 or equivalent. (3). (Excl).

458. Plato, Early Dialogues. (3). (Excl).

459. Greek Bucolic Poets. (3). (Excl).

480. The Athenaion Politeia. Greek to the 400 level. (3). (Excl).

481. Plato, Republic. Greek 302 or equivalent. (3). (Excl).

482. Aristotle, Ethics. Greek 302 or equivalent. (3). (Excl).

483. Aristotle's Politics. Greek 302 or equivalent. (3). (Excl).

484/ABS 482. Acts of Paul and Thecla: Feminist Perspectives. Greek 401 or equivalent; or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

485/ABS 485. The Gospel of Mark in Greek. For undergraduates and graduate students. (3). (Excl).

486. Readings in Later Greek Prose. Greek 402. (3). (Excl).

487/ABS 487. The Gospel of Matthew in Greek. For undergraduates and graduate students. (3). (Excl).

488/ABS 488. The Gospel of John in Greek. For undergraduates and graduate students. (3). (Excl).

489/ABS 489. Letters of Paul in Greek. Permission of instructor. For undergraduates and graduate students. (3). (Excl).

497. Senior Greek Seminar. Honors student or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

499. Supervised Reading. Permission of instructor. May not be included in a concentration plan in Greek Language and Literature except with permission. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

501. Special Reading Course in Greek. First-year graduate student or permission. (3). (Excl).

506. Advanced Greek Composition. Greek 410 or equivalent. (3). (Excl).

509. The Homeric Epic. Permission of instructor required for undergraduates; advanced ability to read Greek. (3). (Excl).

511. Thucydides. Greek 302 or equivalent. (3). (Excl).

515. Euripides. Greek 302 or equivalent. (3). (Excl).

516. Aristophanes. (3). (Excl).

519. Aeschylus. (3). (Excl).

520. Sophocles. Greek 402. (3). (Excl).

521. Pindar. (3). (Excl).

523. Menander. Permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

525. Dionysos: Literature and Documents. Greek 600; and permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

548. Hesiod. (2). (Excl).

550. Lyric Poetry. (3). (Excl).

552. Aristotle and Tragedy. Permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

555. Plato, Republic. Permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

556. Greek Philosophical Literature I. Greek 302 or equivalent. (3) (Excl).

557. Philodemus. Upper-level concentrator or graduate standing. (3). (Excl).

560. Hellenistic Poetry. (3). (Excl).

591. History of Greek Literature, Homer to Sophocles. 20 credits of Greek or permission of instructor. (2-3). (Excl).

592. History of Greek Literature, Euripides to the Romances. Greek 591 or permission of instructor. (2-3). (Excl).

599. Supervised Reading in Greek. Permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Modern Greek (Division 433) 101. Elementary Modern Greek. Graduate students should elect Modern Greek 501. I. (4). (LR).

102. Elementary Modern Greek, II. Elementary Modern Greek 101 or permission of instructor. Graduate students should elect Modern Greek 502. II. (4). (LR).

201. Second Year Modern Greek I. Modern Greek 102. Graduate students should elect Modern Greek 503. I. (4). (LR).

202. Second Year Modern Greek, II. Modern Greek 201 or permission of instructor. Graduate students should elect Modern Greek 504. II. (4). (LR).

Latin Language and Literature (Division 411)

Elementary Courses

See Special Departmental Policies statement above

101. Elementary Latin. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 103, 193, or 502. (4). (LR).

102. Elementary Latin. Latin 101. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 193 or 502. (4). (LR).

103. Review Latin. Some background in Latin and assignment by placement test. Credit is granted for no more than two courses among Latin 101, 102 and 103. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 193 or 502. (4). (LR).

193. Intensive Elementary Latin I. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 101, 102, 103 or 502. (4). (Excl).

194. Intensive Elementary Latin II. Latin 193 or equivalent. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 221, 222, 231, 232, or 503. Graduate students should elect 503. (4). (Excl).

231. Introduction to Latin Prose. Latin 102 or 103. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 194, 222, or 503. (4). (LR).

232. Vergil, Aeneid. Latin 231 or 221. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 194, 222, or 503. (4). (LR).

Intermediate Courses

301. Intermediate Latin I. Latin 194, 222, 232 or equivalent. (3). (HU).

302. Intermediate Latin II. Latin 194, 222, 232 or equivalent. (3). (HU).

401. Republican Prose. Latin 301 or 302 or permission of instructor. (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of 9 credits.

402. Imperial Prose. Latin 301 or 302 or permission of instructor. (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of 9 credits.

409. Augustan Poetry. Latin 301 or 302 or permission of instructor. (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of 9 credits.

410. Poetry of the Republic or Later Empire. Latin 301 or 302 or permission of instructor. (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of 9 credits.

Advanced Courses

421/Education D421. Teaching of Latin. Junior standing in Latin and permission of instructor. I: (3); IIIb: (2). (Excl).

422/Education D422. Oral Methods in the Teaching of Latin. Latin 421 or equivalent. (3). (Excl).

426. Practicum. Junior or senior standing, and permission of instructor. I and II: (3); IIIb: (2). (Excl).

435/MARC 440. Medieval Latin I, 500-900 A.D. Two years of college Latin or equivalent. (3). (Excl).

436/MARC 441. Medieval Latin II, 900-1350 A.D. Two years of college Latin or equivalent. (3). (Excl).

437. Latin Paleography. (1). (Excl).

439. Ovid, Selections. (3). (Excl).

440. Vergil, Bucolics and Georgics. (3). (Excl).

441. Vergil, Aeneid. (3). (Excl).

445. Tacitus, Histories. (3). (Excl).

451. Early Latin Prose. (3). (Excl).

452. Caesar's Commentaries. (3). (Excl).

453. Sallust. (3). (Excl).

465. Latin Lyric Poetry. (3). (Excl).

466. Horace. Latin 301 or equivalent. (3). (Excl).

467. Horace, Satires. (3). (Excl).

468. Horace, Epistles. (3). (Excl).

470. Catullus. (3). (Excl).

475. Roman Historiography. (3). (Excl).

489. The Age of Nero. Latin 301 or equivalent. (3). (Excl).

497. Senior Latin Seminar. Honors students or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

499. Latin: Supervised Reading. Permission of instructor. May not be included in a concentration plan in Latin Language and Literature except with permission. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

500. Special Reading Course in Latin. (4). (Excl).

501. Juvenal. (3). (Excl).

504. Intensive Latin. Permission of instructor. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 502 or 503. (4). (LR).

506. Advanced Latin Composition. Latin 403. (3). (Excl).

510. The Plays of Plautus. Latin 401 or equivalent. (3). (Excl).

511. Letters of Cicero. (2). (Excl).

512. Terence. Latin 401 or equivalent. (3). (Excl).

514. Tacitus, Annals. One advanced course in Latin. (3). (Excl).

515. Tacitus and Roman Society. Permission of department. (3). (Excl).

516. Letters of Seneca. (3). (Excl).

529. Livy. (3). (Excl).

535. Petronius. Latin 401 or equivalent. (3). (Excl).

536. Apuleius Latin 401 or equivalent. (3). (Excl).

551. Elegiac Poets. Latin 401 or equivalent. (3). (Excl).

558. Cicero, Philosophical Works. (2). (Excl).

562. Cicero, Orations. Latin 401 or equivalent. (3). (Excl).

566. Horace, Complete Works. Latin 401 or equivalent. (3). (Excl).

581. Lucretius and Roman Epicureanism. Latin 401 or equivalent. (3). (Excl).

582. Roman Biographers. (3). (Excl).

591. History of Roman Literature, Beginnings to Cicero. Approximately eight credits in advanced Latin reading courses. (3). (Excl).

592. History of Roman Literature, Vergil to Ausonius. Latin 591 or twelve credits in advanced Latin reading courses. (3). (Excl).

599. Supervised Reading in Latin Literature. Permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Classical Civilization (Division 344)

Courses in this division do not require a knowledge of Greek or Latin. They are intended for students who wish to acquire knowledge of ancient literature, life, and thought, and of the debt modern civilization owes the Greeks and Romans.

101. Classical Civilization I: The Ancient Greek World (in English). No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Great Books 191 or 201. I. (4). (HU).

102. Classical Civilization II: The Ancient Roman World (in English). II. (4). (HU).

205. The Hero in Greece and Rome. (3). (Excl).

303. Early Sources for English Literature. (3). (HU).

320. Individual and Tyranny (the Early Roman Empire). (1). (HU).

321. Chariot Racing and Gladiators. (2). (Excl).

325/Women's Studies 325. Women in Classical Athens. (2). (HU).

326. Women in Greece. (3). (Excl).

342. Sexuality and Sexual Stereotype in Greek and Roman Culture. (3). (HU).

345. Slavery and Ethnicity in the Ancient World. Junior standing or permission of instructor; general familiarity with American history. (4). (HU).

360/Pol. Sci. 403. Greek Political Thought. Pol. Sci. 101 or 401. I. (3). (Excl).

372. Sports and Daily Life in Ancient Rome. II. (4; 2 in the half-term). (HU).

388/Phil. 388. History of Philosophy: Ancient. One Philosophy Introduction. I. (4). (HU).

450. Ancient Comedy. (3). (Excl).

452.Food in the Ancient World: Subsistence and Symbol. (3). (Excl).

454. The Roman Army. Upperclass standing. (3). (HU).

462. Greek Mythology. II. (4). (HU).

463. Greek Drama. I. (3). (Excl).

466/Religion 468. Greek Religion. (3). (Excl).

467. The Good Life. (3). (HU).

468. Greeks, Romans, and Egyptians. Students competent in Greek may elect the course for 3 credits. (2-3). (Excl).

469. Ancient Literary Criticism. Junior standing. (3). (Excl).

472. Roman Law. Not open to freshmen. (3). (HU).

473. Roman Decadence. (3). (HU).

474. Urban Problems and Pressures in Ancient Rome. Not open to freshmen. (3). (Excl).

476. Pagans and Christians in the Roman World. (3). (HU).

483/ABS 483/Religion 488. Christianity and Hellenistic Civilization. (4). (Excl).

552. Aristotle and Tragedy. (3). (Excl).


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