94-95 LS&A Bulletin

Environmental Studies

Professor James C.G. Walker (Geology), Director

Not a concentration program

The Environmental Studies Program is designed to complement a student's training in a particular academic discipline. Although the name "Environmental Studies" suggests that the Program is limited to the study of the environment, the Environmental Studies Program emphasizes courses concerned with Human-Environment Relations. The Program is not a concentration program although a student may emphasize environmental studies in the LS&A Individual Concentration Program (ICP).

The program offers Environmental Studies 320 as its introductory course. This course introduces students to the wide range of disciplines in the College and University which relate to environmental issues. Second-level courses provide a variety of perspectives from which to view and analyze areas of environmental concern. Since the spectrum of courses offered at this level varies from year to year, students should consult the Time Schedule for current information. Third-level courses include Environmental Studies 420 and 421. They enable students versed in environmental studies to focus on a particular issue. The student is responsible for defining a plan of study, enlisting others with similar interests (if appropriate), and locating a faculty member willing to supervise. Environmental Studies 450 is a Capstone Seminar providing the opportunity for seniors, particularly those pursuing ICPs, to work together to integrate and compare their diverse perspectives concerning human values and the environment. In addition to the multidisciplinary approach to the study of human-environment relations reflected in these courses, the Program offers a number of cross-listed courses which analyze humans and the environment from the perspective of a given discipline.


Courses in Environmental Studies (Division 366)

123/AOSS 123/Geol. 123. Life and the Global Environment. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 361. (2). (NS). (BS).

320. Introduction to Environmental Studies. (4). (Excl).

353/Physics 250. Energy, Entropy, and Environment. Two and one-half years of high school mathematics, or any college course in mathematics or natural science. (3). (NS). (BS).

359/Geology 279. Ocean Resources. High school science and math recommended. II. (3). (NS). (BS).

360/Geology 280. Mineral Resources, Economics and the Environment. II. (4). (NS). (BS). (QR/2).

361/Geology 277. Humans and the Natural World. Those with credit for 123 may only elect 361 for 1 credit. (3). (NS). (BS).

407. Culture as Environment. Environ. Studies 320 or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

412. Alternative Patterns of Resource Utilization: The Amish in Twentieth Century America. Environ. Studies. 320 or permission of instructor. (3) (Excl).

415/RC Nat. Sci. 415. Science and Politics. One college-level science course. (4) (Excl). (BS).

420. Practicum in Environmental Problems. Environ. Studies 320 and cognates pertinent to the study. Permission must be granted by Director prior to enrollment. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

421. Practicum in Environmental Problems. Environ. Studies 320 and cognates pertinent to the study. Permission must be granted by Director prior to enrollment. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

450. Human Values and the Environment. Environ. Studies 320 and junior standing, or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).


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