96-97 LS&A Bulletin

Military Officer Education Programs

  • The University in cooperation with the armed services of the United States provides an opportunity for all eligible male and female students to earn a commission in any of the three services (Army; Navy, including Marine Corps; and Air Force) upon completion of the degree requirements. This opportunity is available through enrollment in the Military Officer Education Program (MOEP) which is nationally known as the Reserve Officers Training Corps (ROTC).
  • All three Officer Education Programs (Army, Navy, and Air Force) offer the same general program options, financial benefits, and scholarship opportunities. Minor variations, however, do exist among the programs, and students should note the specifics under each program. Program changes occur throughout the year; interested students should contact the specific Officer Education Program for the current rules.
  • Four-Year and Two-Year Program Option. Two programs are available. Students may enroll in either program, subject to approval by the program chairman.
  • The four-year program includes eight terms of course work elected for a total of 12 to 20 credits depending on the particular Officer Education Program. The first four terms elected during the freshman and sophomore years comprise the basic course of study. No military obligation is incurred by non-scholarship students attending the basic course, and a student may withdraw from the program at any time prior to the junior year. The last four terms of course work elected during the junior and senior years constitute the advanced course of study. Depending upon the individual Officer Education Program, there is also a summer field experience of varying length which serves as a preparation for the advanced program. A student enrolling for the last two years of the program assumes a contractual obligation to complete the program, accept a commission, and discharge the military service obligation to the respective service.
  • The two-year program consists of the advanced course of study of the junior and senior years preceded by a six-week summer basic camp or field training session which replaces the freshman and sophomore basic courses taught on campus. Upon completion of summer field training, students enroll in the advanced courses and assume the same obligations as those assumed by students enrolled in the second half of the four-year program.
  • Financial Benefits. All students enrolled in the advanced third- and fourth-year Officer Education Program, whether or not on scholarship, receive a monthly stipend of $150 for the academic year. Uniforms and the necessary equipment are furnished to all students. In addition, pay and travel allowance are provided for attendance at summer field training courses including the six-week field course preceding the two-year program.
  • Scholarships. In addition to the financial benefits provided for all students in the advanced program, two-, three-, and four-year scholarships are awarded on a competitive basis by each of the Officer Education Programs. These scholarships provide full tuition, some laboratory fees, and funds for books in addition to the $150 monthly stipend. Students awarded a four-year scholarship beginning in the freshman year or a three-year scholarship beginning in the sophomore year receive the $150 monthly stipend while still in the basic (first or second year) program.
  • Course Election by Non-Program Students. Officer Education Program courses are also open by permission of the instructor to University students not enrolled in the program.


  • Credit toward graduation from LS&A. The College of Literature, Science, and the Arts does not grant credit toward graduation for any courses offered through the Officer Education Program except for those courses which are cross-listed in other academic units (effective September 1, 1971). These latter courses count as non-LS&A course work if the cross-listed offering falls outside LS&A academic departments or programs.
  • Air Force Officer Education Program

    Program Office: Room 154, North Hall
    764-2405

    Colonel Allen, Chair

    Not a concentration program
  • Major Lopez, Captain Laughman, and Major Wieck
  • Students who enroll as cadets in the Air Force Officer Education Program and who successfully complete the program and receive a University degree are commissioned as Second Lieutenants in the United States Air Force.
  • Career Opportunities. Men and women can serve in a wide range of technical fields such as meteorology, research and development, communications and electronics, engineering, transportation, logistics, and intelligence as well as in numerous managerial and training fields such as administrative services, accounting and finance, personnel, statistics, manpower management, education and training, investigation, and information services. Advanced education or technical training for these career areas may be obtained on active duty at Air Force expense.
  • Four-Year and Two-Year Programs. Students may choose either of the two program options described in the general introduction to the Military Officer Education Programs. Both program options include a summer field training course (four-week course for the four-year option and a six-week course for the two-year option) at an Air Force base between the sophomore and junior years.
  • Four-year program students with prior military service or prior ROTC training may receive up to two years credit for AFROTC based on the chairman's evaluation of their prior service or training.
  • Students who intend to enroll in the two-year program should contact the chairman by December of their sophomore year in order to be scheduled for attendance at field training. Two-year program candidates must have two years of school remaining at the undergraduate or graduate level.
  • Financial Benefits and Scholarships. For a detailed description of the available financial benefits and scholarships, read the appropriate sections in the general introduction to the Military Officer Education Programs.
  • Course of Study. Students enroll in one course in Aerospace Studies (AS) during each term of participation in the program for a total of 16 credits distributed as follows:
  • Basic course sequence (first and second years): Aerospace Studies 101, 102, 201, 202 (4 credits).

    Advanced course sequence (third and fourth years): Aerospace Studies 310, 311, 410, 411 (12 credits).
  • Supplemental course requirements for scholarship program cadets include the satisfactory completion of courses in English composition and mathematical reasoning. Non-scholarship cadets need only complete a course in mathematical reasoning.
  • These course sequences attempt to develop an understanding of the global mission and organization of the United States Air Force, the historical development of air power and its support of national objectives, concepts of leadership, management responsibilities and skills, national defense policy, and the role of the military officer in our society.
  • Military Obligation. After being commissioned, graduates of the program will be called to active duty with the Air Force in a field usually related to their academic degree program. The period of service is four years for non-flying officers, six years (including flight training) for navigators, and eight years (including flight training) for pilots.
  • Courses in Aerospace Science (Division 896)

    101. The U.S. Air Force Today I.
    Not for credit toward LS&A degree. (1).

    102. The U.S. Air Force Today II. Not for credit toward LS&A degree. (1).

    201. U.S. Aviation History and its Development into Air Power. Not for credit toward LS&A degree. (1).

    202. U.S. Aviation History and Its Development into Air Power II. Not for credit toward LS&A degree. (1).

    310. Air Force Leadership and Management I. Not for credit toward LS&A degree. (3).

    311. Air Force Leadership and Management II. Not for credit toward LS&A degree. (3).

    410. National Security Forces in Contemporary American Society I. AFOEP 310. Not for credit toward LS&A degree. (3).

    411. National Security Forces in Contemporary American Society II. Not for credit toward LS&A degree. (3).

    Army Officer Education Program


    Room 131, North Hall
    764-2400

    Not a concentration program
  • Lieutenant Colonel Buchan, Major Blanton, Captain White, Captain Smith.
  • Students enrolled in the Army Officer Education Program, upon graduation from the University and successful completion of the program, receive a commission as second lieutenant in the United States Army Reserve, the Army National Guard, or in the Regular Army. Many students enroll for the first two years to sample career opportunities. No military obligation is incurred for the first two years.
  • Career Opportunities. Graduates of the program may choose a career in the Regular Army, a limited period of active service, or part-time service in the Army Reserve or National Guard. Service in most of the Army's sixteen branches provides an opportunity to utilize the education provided by many of the College concentration programs, and Army officer experience is applicable to a broad spectrum of civilian occupations.
  • Four-Year and Two-Year Programs. Students may choose either of the two program options described in the general introduction to the Military Officer Education Programs. The four-year program includes a six-week summer camp at Fort Lewis, Washington, which is taken as part of the advanced course sequence between the junior and senior years.
  • Students who intend to enroll in the two-year program should contact the chairman by February of their sophomore year in order to be scheduled for attendance at a six-week summer training program conducted at Fort Knox, Kentucky. The summer basic camp prepares the student for enrollment in the program in the following fall term. Two-year candidates must have a total of two years of school remaining at the undergraduate and/or graduate level. Students with prior military service (or prior ROTC training) may enroll in the program with advanced standing, subject to the chairman's evaluation of prior service or training.
  • Financial Benefits and Scholarships. For a detailed description of the available financial benefits and scholarships, read the appropriate sections in the general introduction to the Military Officer Education Program. The two-, three-, and four-year scholarships are available at the University of Michigan. Currently over 50 percent of the students enrolled in Army ROTC have an Army scholarship.
  • Army Fellowship Program. Each year the top 5 percent (based on GRE scores) of all students chosen for Regular Army commissions are awarded Army ROTC Fellowships during their 5th and 6th year of Army service. This award permits the recipient to pursue a course of study leading to a Master's Degree at the Army's expense while receiving full pay and allowances as a commissioned officer.
  • Course of Study. Students enroll in one course in Military Science (MS) during each term of participation in the program for a total of 12 credits distributed as follows:
  • Basic course sequence (first and second years): Military Science 101, 102, 201, 202 (4 credits).

    Advanced course sequence (third and fourth years): Military Science 301, 302, 401, 402 (8 credits).
  • The complete course of instruction includes land navigation, professional ethics, military writing, principles of military leadership, small unit tactics, military justice, and Geneva Convention. In addition to these courses, cadets also attend a ninety minute military arts laboratory per week each term.
  • Simultaneous Membership Program. Students who are non-scholarship holders may choose to join a Reserve or National Guard unit of their choice while enrolled at the University. The students then train as a officer candidates, gaining valuable leadership training as a member of the Reserve Forces and collect over $1,000 per year in addition to the $100/month stipend previously mentioned.
  • Branch Assignments. In their last year prior to commissioning, cadets are classified for branch assignments to one of the following 16 branches of the Army in accordance with their preference, aptitude, academic background, and the needs of the Army: Aviation, Armor, Field Artillery, Air Defense Artillery, Adjutant General's Corps, Military Intelligence, Corps of Engineers, Finance Corps, Infantry, Medical Service Corps, Military Police Corps, Ordnance Corps, Quartermaster Corps, Signal Corps, Transportation Corps, and Chemical Corps.
  • Military Obligation. Non-scholarship students may apply for duty assignments in the Army Reserve or National Guard. Scholarship students may elect reserve forces duty but most serve four years on active duty.
  • Courses in Military Science (Division 897)

    101. Introduction to Officership and Leadership.
    Not for credit toward LS&A degree. (1).

    102(101). Land Navigation. Not for credit toward LS&A degree. (1).

    103. Leadership Laboratory. Not for credit toward LS&A degree. (1).

    201. Military Leadership. Not for credit toward LS&A degree. (1).

    202. History of the Military Art. Not for credit toward LS&A degree. (1).

    301. Introduction to Small Unit Tactics. Permission of chairman. Not for credit toward LS&A degree. (2).

    302. Small Unit Tactics and Combined Operations. Permission of chairman. Not for credit toward LS&A degree. (2).

    401. Military Law. Permission of chairman. Not for credit toward LS&A degree. (2).

    402. Military Professionalism and Professional Ethics. Permission of chairman. Not for credit toward LS&A degree. (2).

    Navy Officer Education Program


    Room 103, North Hall
    764-1498

    Captain Riordan, Chair

    Not a concentration program
  • Captain Riordan, Commander Ringle, Lieutenants Gunderson and Noordyk, Major Ammerman.
  • Students enrolled as midshipmen in the Navy Officer Education Program who successfully complete the program and receive a university degree are commissioned as officers in the Navy or Marine Corps.
  • Career Opportunities. Graduates of the program have a wide range of job and career opportunities as commissioned officers in the Navy or Marine Corps. Navy officers may choose duty in surface ships, aviation, submarines, or nursing. Marine Corps officers may choose aviation, infantry, armor, artillery, and a wide variety of other specialties. After graduation, all commissioned officers receive additional training in their chosen specialties.
  • Four-Year, Three-Year and Two-Year Programs. Students may choose from one of the three program options described in the general introduction to the Military Officer Education Programs.
  • Financial Benefits and Scholarships. A detailed description of the available financial benefits and scholarships can be found in the appropriate sections in the general introduction to the Military Officer Education Programs. Each year the Navy awards four year scholarships for study at the University of Michigan to approximately 60 students chosen on the basis of selections made by a national committee which convenes weekly November through March. Three-year scholarships are available to college students who complete their freshman year and Two-year scholarships are also available to college students who complete their sophomore year or third year in a five-year curriculum. The two-year scholarship covers the final two years of college. The scholarships are awarded to students who have displayed exceptional academic potential. Criteria for eligibility vary between the several programs offered. Details are available from the program chairman.
  • Course of Study. Normally, students enroll in eight Naval Science (NS) courses during their participation in the program. In addition, all students are required to elect a specific core of college courses including calculus and physics. Scholarship students also participate in four-to-six week summer training exercises after their freshman and sophomore years, and all midshipmen participate in a similar training exercise upon completion of their junior year.
  • Military Obligation. Depending upon the program in which they are enrolled, and the warfare specialty they choose, graduates' service obligation vary from four to eight years.
  • Courses in Naval Science (Division 898)

    101. Introduction to Naval Science.
    Not for credit toward LS&A degree. (2).

    102. Seapower and Maritime Affairs. Not for credit toward LS&A degree. (2).

    201/Naval Arch. 102. Introduction to Ship Systems. (3).

    202/EECS 250. Electronic Sensing Systems. Prior or concurrent enrollment in Phys. 240. II. (3).

    301/Astro. 261. Navigation. (3).

    302. Naval Operations. Not for credit toward LS&A degree. (3).

    310. Evolution of Warfare. Not for credit toward LS&A degree. (3).

    402. Leadership and Management II. Not for credit toward LS&A degree. (2).

    410. Amphibious Warfare. Not for credit toward LS&A degree. (3).