96-97 LS&A Bulletin

Political Science


5602 Haven Hall
764-6312
Professor John Jackson, Chair

May be elected as a departmental concentration program

Professors

Christopher H. Achen, Mathematical and Statistical Theory, Public Policy Analysis, American Politics and International Relations

Robert Axelrod, Mathematical Models of Politics, Decision-making, Game Theory, National Security Policy

John C. Campbell, Japan, Organizational Decision-making, Public Policy, and Gerontology

John R. Chamberlin, Ethics and Public Policy, American Political Thought, Formal Political Theory, Mathematical Models of Social Science

Michael D. Cohen, Modeling Methods, Organizational Decision-making

Mary E. Corcoran, American Government and Politics, Public Policy and Administration, Research methods, Poverty and Inequality

Zvi Y. Gitelman, Former Soviet Union, East European and Israeli politics

Edie N. Goldenberg, Politics and the Mass Media, Bureaucracy and Public Policy

Don Herzog, History of Political Thought, Contemporary Political Thought, Moral and Social Theory, Jurisprudence and Constitutional Law

Ronald F. Inglehart, Comparative Political Behavior, Mass Participation and Communication, Advanced Industrial Societies

John E. Jackson, American Politics, Political Economy

Harold K. Jacobson, World Politics, International Political Economy, International Security, International Organizations

M. Kent Jennings, American, Methods, Political Elites, Public Opinion, Socialization

Donald R. Kinder, Public Opinion and Political Action, Psychological Perspectives, Research Methods

John W. Kingdon, American National Government, Legislative Behavior, Public Policy

Daniel H. Levine, Comparative Politics, Religion and Politics, Urbanization, Cultural Change, Latin America, Contemporary Social Theory

Kenneth Lieberthal, Chinese Domestic and Foreign Policy, Sino-Soviet Relations, Comparative Communism

Gregory B. Markus, Mathematical and Statistical Modelling, American Mass Politics

Lawrence B. Mohr, Organization Theory, Quantitative Methods, Program Evaluation

A.F.K. Organski, International Politics, Comparative Politics, Political Economy, Political Development

Steven J Rosenstone, American Government and Politics, Quantitative Methods

Arlene W. Saxonhouse, Ancient and Modern Political Theory, Women in Political Thought

J. David Singer, World Politics, International Security, Foreign Policy, Theory and Method, Peace Research

Raymond Tanter, American Foreign Policy, Middle East in World Politics, International Security Affairs

Hanes Walton, Jr., American Government and Politics, Black Americans in the Political System.

William Zimmerman IV, Comparative Foreign Policy, Russia and former Soviet Union, Eastern Europe

Associate Professors

Martha S. Feldman, Organizational Theory and Behavior, Public Policy and Administration, Political Theory

Robert J. Franzese Jr., Comparative and International Political Economy; Comparative Politics and Developed Democracies; Quantitative Methodology and Formal Models

Richard L. Hall, American National Institutions, Legislative Behavior, Elite Socialization and Psychology, Public Policy

Paul K. Huth, International Conflict and War, National Security Policy, United States Foreign Policy, Soviet Domestic and Foreign Policy

Michael L. Ross, Comparative Politics, especially the Political Economy of Development; Southeast Asia; International Institutions and North-South Relations; International Environmental Politics

Kim L. Scheppele, Law and Society, Legal Theory, Normative systems, Sociology of Information, Mass media, Communication Policy, Decision making

Jennifer Widner, Comparative Political Development, African Politics

Assistant Professors

Mark E. Brandon, Constitutional Law and Theory, Jurisprudence, Law and Society, Environmental Law, American Politics, American Political Thought, Political Philosophy

Nancy E. Burns, American Local Politics and Institutions, Methodology, Gender and Politics, and Political Participation

Pradeep Chhibber, South Asian politics, Economic development

G. Douglas Dion, American Politics, Formal Theory, Legislative Processes, American Political Development, History of Political Thought

Theodore G. Hopf, World Politics, International Peace and Security, Russian and former Soviet Union

Yasheng Huang, Comparative Government and Politics; Comparative Political Economy, Chinese Government and Politics

John D Huber, Comparative Government and Politics; Formal Political Theory; Political Institutions; French Politics

Kenneth Kollman, American government, Formal modeling, pol parties and elections, interest groups

Ann Lin, American Politics, Gender and Politics

Robert Pahre, International Political Economy, International Relations Theory, Philosophy of Social Science, Political Economy of Western Europe

Jacqueline Stevens, Political Theory, Feminist Studies, Race and Gender Issue Politics

Elizabeth R. Wingrove, Political Theory

Adjunct Faculty

Constance Ewing Cook, American National Government, Interest Groups and Public Policy-making, Higher Education Policy

Michel C. Oksenberg, Politics and Foreign Policy of China, Sino-American relations, East Asian International Relations

Barry Rabe, State and Local

Michael W. Traugott, American government, Politics and the mass media

Douglas Van Houweling, Information Systems, Urban Systems, Computer Simulation

Leonard Woodcock, China, East Asia, World Politics

Professors Emeriti: William Ballis, Samuel J. Eldersveld, Russell H. Fifield, George Grassmuck, Kenneth Langton, Alfred G. Meyer, Roy Pierce


Political science is the systematic study of governmental and political structures, processes, and policies. This study uses institutional, quantitative, and philosophical approaches. The field is highly diverse, ranging across political theory, comparative government, international relations, American government, public policy, and research methods. Political scientists concentrate on public opinion and voting, organized political behavior, governmental institutions, studies of single countries, comparisons across countries and relations among countries. The field addresses both normative and empirical concerns.

Courses in Political Science (Division 450)


Primarily for First and Second Year Students

101. Introduction to Political Theory.
(4). (SS).

111. Introduction to American Politics. (4). (SS).

140. Introduction to Comparative Politics. I and II. (4). (SS).

160. Introduction to World Politics. I and II. (4). (SS).

185. Introduction to Modeling Political Processes. Primarily for first-year students and sophomores. (3). (SS). (QR/1).

190. Freshman Seminar in Political Science. (3). (SS).


Primarily for Juniors and Seniors

300. Contemporary Political Issues. (4). (SS).

305/Ling. 305/Comm. 305. Political and Advertising Discourse. Junior standing. (3). (Excl).

353. The Arab-Israeli Conflict. (4). (Excl). Laboratory fee ($30) required.

361. Current Issues in World Politics. (1-4). (Excl).

390. Practicum for the Michigan Journal of Political Science. (1). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for credit with permission of the chair.

391. Introductory Internship in Political Science. One 100-level course in political science, permission of supervising instructor before the internship period, and review by Department's internship advisor. Intended for non-concentrators. (2-4). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL). All internship courses may be elected for a maximum total of 8 credits.

392. Introductory Internship in Political Science. One 100-level course in political science, permission of supervising instructor before the internship period, and review by Department's internship advisor. Intended for non-concentrators. (2-4). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL). All internship courses may be elected for a maximum total of 8 credits.

395/REES 395/Slavic 395/Hist. 332/Soc. 392. Survey of Russia: The Russian Empire, the Soviet Union, and the Successor States. (4; 3 in the half-term). (SS).

396/REES 396/Slavic 396/Hist. 333/Soc. 393. Survey of East Central Europe. (4; 3 in the half-term). (SS).

400. Development of Political Thought: To Modern Period. Junior standing or two courses in political science. (3). (Excl).

401. Development of Political Thought: Modern and Recent. Junior standing or two courses in political science. (3). (Excl).

402. Selected Topics in Political Theory. Pol. Sci. 101 or 400 or 401. (3). (Excl).

405. Political Philosophy of the Enlightenment. Pol. Sci. 101 or 403. (3). (Excl).

406. American Political Thought. Pol. Sci. 101 or 401. (3). (Excl).

407. Marxism and 20th Century Radicalism. Pol. Sci. 101 or 401. (3). (Excl).

408/CAAS 456. Comparative Black Political Thought. Two courses in political science or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

409. Twentieth Century Political Thought. Pol. Sci. 101 or 401. (3). (Excl).

410. American Policy Processes. Any 100-level course in political science. (3). (Excl).

411. American Political Processes. Any 100-level course in political science. (3). (Excl).

412. The Legal Process. Two courses in political science or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

413. American Constitutional Politics. Pol. Sci. 111, 410, or 411; or permission of instructor. I. (3). (Excl).

414. The Politics of Civil Liberties and Civil Rights. Two courses in political science or permission of instructor. (4; 3 in the half-term). (Excl).

415. The American Chief Executive. Pol. Sci. 111, 410, or 411; or junior standing. (3). (Excl).

417. Legislative Process. Two courses in political science or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

418/WS 418. Women and the Political System. Two courses in political science or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

419/CAAS 418. Black Americans and the Political System. Two courses in political science or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

420/Comm. 484. Mass Media and Political Behavior. Comm. Studies 361 or 381 strongly recommended. (4). (Excl).

421. American State Government. Two courses in political science or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

422/WS 422. Feminist Political Theory. Junior standing, or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

423. Politics of the Metropolis. Two courses in political science or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

425. Liberalism and Its Critics. Pol. Sci. 101 or 401. (3). (Excl).

426. Democratic Theory. Pol. Sci. 101 or 401. (3). (Excl).

428/Asian Studies 428/Phil. 428/Soc. 426. China's Evolution Under Communism. Upperclass standing or permission of instructor. (4; 3 in the half-term). (Excl).

431. Public Administration. Two courses in political science or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

435. Public Program Evaluation. Stat. 402 or equivalent. (3). (Excl).

436. Bureaucracy and Policy Making. Two courses in political science or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

439/Econ. 325. Inequality in the United States. Econ. 101 or Poli. Sci. 111. (3). (Excl).

440. Comparative Politics. Any 100-level course in political science or upperclass standing. (3). (Excl).

441. Comparative Politics of Advanced Industrial Democracies. Any 100-level course in political science or upperclass standing. (3). (Excl).

442. Governments and Politics in Western Europe. Any 100-level course in political science or upperclass standing. (3). (Excl).

443. Selected Topics in Western European Politics. Any 100-level course in political science or upperclass standing. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

444. Government and Politics of Russia. Two courses in political science or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

445. Eastern Europe: Revolution, Reaction, and Reform. (3). (Excl).

447/Rel. 447. Comparative Studies in Religion and Politics. (3). (Excl).

448. Governments and Politics of Latin America. Pol. Sci. 140 or 440; or a course on Latin America elected through another department. (3). (Excl).

450. Political Modernization in the Developing World. Any 100-level course in political science or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

451/Judaic Studies 451. The Politics and Culture of Modern East European Jewry. A course in East European and/or Jewish history, and Comparative Politics is recommended. (3). (Excl).

452. Israeli Society and Politics. (3). (Excl).

453. Government and Politics of the Middle East. Two courses in Pol. Sci. or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

454. Governments and Politics of Southeast Asia. Two courses in political science or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

455. Government and Politics of China. (3). (Excl).

456. Government and Politics of Japan. Pol. Sci. 140, 440, or 450; or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

457. Governments and Politics of India and South Asia. Two courses in political science or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

458. Chinese Foreign Policy. Poli. Sci. 428 or 455 or permission of the instructor. (3). (Excl).

459/CAAS 449. Africa: Development and Dependence. Prior or concurrent study of the Third World; Pol. Sci. 465 is recommended but not required. (3). (Excl).

460. Problems in World Politics. Any 100-level course in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice with permission of the instructor.

463. International Organization and Integration. Pol. Sci. 160 or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

464. Public International Law. Two courses in political science or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

465. Political Development and Dependence. Two courses in political science or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

468. The Communist International System. Two courses in political science or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

469. Politics of International Economic Relations. Pol. Sci. 160 or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

470. Comparative Foreign Policy. Any 100-level course in political science. (3). (Excl).

471. The American Foreign Policy Process. Two courses in political science or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

472. International Security Affairs. Two courses in political science or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). Laboratory fee ($30) required.

473. Foreign Policies of the European Powers. Pol. Sci. 160 or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

474. International Relations of India and South Asia. Two courses in political science or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

475. Russian Foreign Policy. Two courses in political science or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

476. International Relations of the Middle East. Two courses in political science or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

477. Southeast Asia: International Politics. Two courses in political science or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

478. International Relations of the Far East. Pol. Sci. 160 or Asian Studies 122 or Hist. 111 or equivalent. (3). (Excl).

479/CAAS 479. International Relations of Africa. (3). (SS).

480. Political Mobilization and Policy Change. Poli. Sci. 111, or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

481. Junior Honors Proseminar. Open only to Honors concentrators with junior standing. (3). (Excl).

482/Econ. 483. Positive Political Economy. Econ. 401. (3).

483. American Political Parties and Electoral Problems. Poli. Sci. 111, 140, 410, or 411; or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

484. The Politics of Disaffection. Two courses in political science including Pol. Sci. 411 or 486; or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

485. Public Sector Decision Processes. One course in political science. (3). (Excl).

486. Public Opinion, Political Participation, and Pressure Groups. One course in political science or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

487. Psychological Perspectives on Politics. Two courses in political science or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

488. Political Dynamics. Junior standing. (3). (Excl).

489. Advanced Topics in Contemporary Political Science. Two 400-level courses in political science. (1-3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 6 credits.

490. Political Socialization. One course in political science. (3). (Excl).

491. Directed Studies. Two courses in political science and permission of instructor and the Director of Undergraduate Studies. I. (1-6). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). Political Science 491 and 492 may be elected for a total of eight credits. No more than four credits of directed study credit may be elected as part of a concentration program in Political Science.

492. Directed Studies. Two courses in political science and permission of instructor and the Director of Undergraduate Studies. II. (1-6). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). Political Science 491 and 492 may be elected for a total of eight credits. No more than four hours of directed study credit may be elected as part of a concentration program in Political Science.

493. Senior Honors Proseminar. Open only to senior Honors concentrators. I. (4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). No more than four hours of Honors credit may be elected as part of a concentration plan in Political Science.

494. Senior Honors Proseminar. Open only to senior Honors concentrators. II. (4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). No more than four hours of Honors credit may be elected as part of a concentration plan in Political Science.

495. Undergraduate Seminar in Political Theory. Senior standing, primarily for seniors concentrating in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

496. Undergraduate Seminar in American Government and Politics. Senior standing, primarily for seniors concentrating in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

497. Undergraduate Seminar in Comparative and Foreign Government. Senior standing, primarily for seniors concentrating in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

498. Undergraduate Seminar in International Politics. Senior standing, primarily for seniors concentrating in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

499. Quantitative Methods of Political Analysis. (3). (Excl). (BS).

514. The Use of Social Science Computer Programs. Pol. Sci. 499 or equivalent; or permission of instructor. (1). (Excl).

591. Advanced Internship in Political Science. Two courses in political science at the 400 level or above and concentration in political science; or graduate standing. Permission of supervising instructor and review by the Department's internship advisor. No more than 4 credits of internship may be included as part of a concentration plan in political science. I. (2-6). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL). All internship courses may be elected for a maximum total of 8 credits.

592. Advanced Internship in Political Science. Two courses in political science at the 400 level or above and concentration in political science; or graduate standing. Permission of supervising instructor and review by the Department's internship advisor. No more than 4 credits of internship may be included as part of a concentration plan in political science. II. (2-6). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL). All internship courses may be elected for a maximum total of 8 credits.