96-97 LS&A Bulletin

Residential College


133 Tyler, East Quadrangle
763-0176

Thomas Weisskopf, Director

Professors

Jane Burbank, Social Sciences: History of Russia and the Soviet Union, Russian and Soviet culture and politics

Carl Cohen, Political philosophy, moral philosophy, bioethics, logic

Hubert Cohen, Film studies and film criticism, narrative literature

Fred Cooper, Social Sciences: African history

Ann Larimore, Social Sciences: Women as farmers, cultural geography and ecology, Turkey and the Middle East

Thomas Weisskopf, Social Sciences: political economy

Associate Professors

Herbert Eagle, Russian literature, Slavic and East European film, literary theory

Yi-tsi Feuerwerker, Literary criticism, Chinese literature

Max Heirich, Social Sciences: Medical sociology, social theory, social change

John Lawler, Linguistics, semantics, computation, metaphor

Assistant Professors

Matthew Biro, History of Art

Sueann Caulfield, Social Science: History

Hubert Rast, Comparative Literature

Roger Rouse, Social Science: Anthropology

Visiting Assistant Professors

Cecilia Green, Social Science

Heather Thompson, Social Science

Adjunct Assistant Professor

Leslie Hennessey, Art and Culture

Lecturers

Carolyn Anderson-Burack, French language

Carolyn Balducci, Writing of young adult fiction, biography, film scripts

Catherine Badgley, Natural Science, Paleontology, Ecology

Mereille Belloni, French Language

David Burkam, Mathematics

Maria Barna, Solo and chamber music, piano

Charles Bright, Social Science: Twentieth century world history, American political history, Detroit history

Dominique Butler-Borruat, French Language

Andrew Carrigan, Creative Writing

Larry Cressman, Printmaking, drawing

Susan Crowell, Ceramics, ceramics history and criticism, design

Beth Genné, Art history, interdisciplinary humanities

Henry Greenspan, Clinical psychology, adult development

Michael Hannum, Photography, holography

Warren Hecht, Creative writing

Jane Heirich, Chamber music, vocal technique, music theory and composition

Olga Lopez-Cotin, Spanish Language

Alina Makin, Russian language

Kate Mendeloff, Drama, directing

Kenneth Mikolowski, Poetry writing, contemporary American poetry

Barbra Morris, Television text analysis, screenwriting and production, academic writing

Eliana Moya-Raggio, Spanish language

Gail Nomura, Social Science: Asian-American studies

Erica Paslick, German language

Fred Peters, Comparative literature, German studies, interdisciplinary humanities

Jose Vicente Perez, Spanish language

Maria Rodriguez, Spanish Language

Ann Savageau, Fiber arts, design

Janet Hegman Shier, German language, foreign language theatre

Barbara Sloat, Biology, gender and science

Cynthia Sowers, Narrative fiction, literature and the visual arts

Frank Thompson, Economics

Martin Walsh, Drama

Susan Wright, History of twentieth century science and technology, biotechnology, science policy

Walburga Zahn, German language

Professor Emeritus James Robertson.

Lecturer Emerita Sylvie Carduner

The Residential College is a four year, degree-granting unit within the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. The RC offers courses and concentrations of its own. Students in the RC elect a substantial number of courses within LS&A and often complete LS&A concentrations. Honors students are eligible to join the RC. The RC actively encourages applications from minority students.

The College opened in 1967 and presently enrolls over 900 students. The faculty consists of over fifty full or part-time lecturers and professors, most of the latter on joint appointment with LS&A departments or other schools and colleges of the University. The curriculum includes multidisciplinary approaches to the humanities, natural sciences, and social sciences. Courses are also offered in fine arts, music, and languages. Concentrations open exclusively to RC students include: Drama, Creative Writing, Comparative Literature, Arts and Ideas in the Humanities, Social Science, and RC Individualized Concentration. RC faculty advisors assist students with academic planning and personal concerns.

Residential College students are required to live in East Quadrangle for the first two years of the undergraduate program. East Quadrangle houses administrative and faculty offices, classrooms, a library, art and music studios, a theatre, a computer room, a language laboratory, a snack shop, and other facilities supportive of the academic and community life of the Residential College.

  • A degree from the Residential College requires:
    1. A First Year Seminar (Core 100).
    2. Foreign language study through a comprehensive proficiency examination and an upper-level seminar in the language (or the equivalent credits in a language not taught in Residential College).
    3. An LS&A area distribution plan (both RC and LS&A courses may be included).
    4. An approved course in Race and Ethnicity (R&E).
    5. One to two courses in Quantitative Reasoning.
    6. A concentration chosen from among regular LS&A or Residential College concentration programs, or an individualized concentration program elected through the Residential College.
    7. An upper level writing course.
    8. An arts practicum.
    9. Students are expected to complete at least four RC courses beyond completion of the First-Year Seminar and the RC language requirement.
    10. A minimum of 120 credits.
    11. At least 60 credits outside the area of concentration.

  • Candidates for a Residential College degree must be in good academic standing and fulfill all Residential College and LS&A requirements for graduation. Residential College students are graded by written evaluations instead of letter grades in their RC courses but have the option of electing letter grades when they attain junior standing or take upper-level RC courses. RC students receive letter grades in LS&A courses. The Residential College confers only the A.B. and B.S. degrees; it does not grant the B.G.S. degree.

  • University of Michigan students interested in Residential College programs and courses should contact the RC Counseling Office (134 Tyler, East Quadrangle, 763-0032) or visit in person. Others should contact the RC Admissions Office, 133 Tyler, East Quadrangle, 763-0176.
  • Residential College Courses

    Most RC courses are open to LS&A students and may be used to meet distribution requirements.


    Core (Division 863)

    Written and Verbal Expression

    100. First Year Seminar.
    ECB Writing Assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

    105. Logic and Language. (4). (N.Excl).

    300. Writing and Theory. Not open to freshmen. (4). (Excl).

    334. Special Topics. (4). (Excl).


    Foreign Language

    190. Intensive French I.
    No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in French 100, 101, 102, or 103. (8). (LR).

    191. Intensive German I. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in German 100, 101, 102, or 103. (8). (LR).

    193/Russian 103. Intensive First-Year Russian. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Russian 101, 102, 111, or 112. (8). (LR).

    194. Intensive Spanish I. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Spanish 100, 101, 102, or 103. (8). (LR).

    290. Intensive French II. Core 190. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in French 230, 231, or 232. (8). (LR).

    291. Intensive German II. Core 191. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in German 230, 231, or 232. (8). (LR).

    293/Russian 203. Intensive Second Year Russian. Core 193 or Russian 102. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Russian 201 or 202. (8). (LR).

    294. Intensive Spanish II. Core 194. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Spanish 230, 231, or 232. (8). (LR).

    310. Accelerated Review-French. Permission of instructor. (4). (LR).

    311. Accelerated Review-German. Permission of instructor. (4). (LR).

    314. Accelerated Review-Spanish. (4). (LR).

    320. Seminaire en français. Proficiency test. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

    321. Readings in German. Proficiency test. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

    324. Readings in Spanish. Proficiency test. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

    370/French 370. Advanced Proficiency in French. RC Core 320 or French 235. (3). (Excl).


    Independent Study, Fieldwork, and Tutorials

    205. Independent Study. Sophomore standing and permission of instructor. (Arr). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

    209. Study Off-Campus. Sophomore standing and permission of instructor. (Arr). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. (EXPERIENTIAL).

    305. Independent Study. Junior standing and permission of instructor. (Arr). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

    307. RC Practicum in College Team Teaching. Upperclass standing. (1). (Excl).

    309. Study Off-Campus. Junior standing and permission of instructor. (Arr). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. (EXPERIENTIAL).

    331. Field Ecology. (4). (Excl).

    405. Independent Study. Senior standing and permission of instructor. (Arr). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

    409. Study Off-Campus. Senior standing and permission of instructor. (Arr). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. (EXPERIENTIAL).

    410. Senior Project. Permission of concentration advisor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of 8 credits.

    490. Honors Thesis. Permission of concentration advisor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of 8 credits.


    Arts (Division 864)

    267. Introduction to Holography. (4). (Excl).

    268. Introduction to Visual Thinking: Adventures in Creativity. (4). (Excl). Materials fee ($10).

    269. Elements of Design. (4). (Excl). Materials fee ($30).

    285. Photography. (4). (Excl). Materials fee ($50).

    286. Sculpture. (4). (Excl). Materials fee ($35).

    287. Printmaking. (4). (Excl). Materials fee ($40).

    288. Introduction to Drawing. (4). (Excl).

    289. Ceramics. (4). (Excl). Materials fee ($75).

    348. Performance, Conceptial and Public Art: Tradition and Innovations. (4).

    389. Ceramics Theory and Criticism. RC Arts 289 or permission of instructor. (4). (Excl).


    Humanities (Division 865)

    Arts and Ideas

    236/Film Video 236. The Art of the Film.
    (4). (HU). Lab fee ($50).

    255. Film Experience. (4). (Excl).

    257. Visual Sources. (4). (HU).

    260/Dance 220. The Art of Dance: An Introduction to American and European Dance History, Aesthetics, and Criticism. (3). (HU).

    290. The Experience of Arts and Ideas in the Twentieth Century. (4). (HU).

    291. The Experience of Arts and Ideas in the Nineteenth Century. (4). (HU).

    309(210). Classical Sources of Modern Culture. (4). (HU).

    310. Medieval Sources of Modern Culture. Sophomore standing or permission of instructor. (4). (HU).

    311. Intellectual Currents of the Renaissance. Sophomore standing or permission of instructor. (4). (HU).

    312/Slavic Film 312. Central European Cinema. A knowledge of Russian is not required. (3). (HU). Laboratory fee ($50) required.

    313/Slavic Film 313. Russian Cinema. (3). (HU). Laboratory fee ($50) required.

    318. Critical Approaches to Literature. (4). (HU).

    319. Topics in Film. (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of nine credits.

    333. Art and Culture. (4). (Excl).

    344. Tradition and Invention: Aspects of the Arts in 18th Century Europe. Sophomore standing. (3). (HU).

    363/Phil. 363. Philosophical Bases of Communism, Fascism, and Democracy. One Philosophy Introduction. (4). (HU).

    472. Arts and Ideas Senior Seminar. (4). (Excl).

    475/Chinese 475/Phil. 475/Asian Studies 475/Hist. of Art 487. The Arts and Letters of China. (4). (HU).


    Comparative Literature

    214. Fundamentals of Narrative Fiction. (4). (HU).

    215. Poetry. (4). (HU).

    275. The Western Mind in Revolution: Six Interpretations of the Human Condition. (4). (Excl).

    317. The Writings of Latinas. A course in women's studies or Latina/o studies. (4). (HU).

    340. Four Interdisciplinary Studies in 19th and 20th Century Intellectual History: Psychoanalysis, Mysticism, Nihilism and Marxism. Junior/senior standing, or permission of instructor. (4). (HU).

    341. Latin American Literature. (4). (Excl).

    360. The Existential Quest in the Modern Novel. Junior/senior standing, or permission of instructor. (4). (Excl).

    410. Upperclass Literature Seminar. (4). (HU). May be repeated for credit.

    411. Translation Seminar. Reading proficiency in a foreign language. Upperclass standing or permission of instructor. (4). (Excl).

    417/MARC 417. Epic and Saga. (4). (Excl).

    451/Russian 451. Survey of Russian Literature. A knowledge of Russian is not required. (3). (HU).

    452/Russian 452. Survey of Russian Literature. A knowledge of Russian is not required. (3). (HU).

    476/Chinese 476/Asian Studies 476. Writer and Society in Modern China. No knowledge of Chinese is required. (4). (HU).


    Creative Writing

    220. Narration. Permission of instructor. (4). (Excl).

    221. The Writing of Poetry. Permission of instructor. (4). (Excl).

    222. Writing for Children and Young Adults. (4). (Excl).

    242. Creative Adaptation: Fact Into Fantasy. Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (Excl).

    320. Advanced Narration. Hums. 220 and permission of instructor. (4). (Excl).

    321. Advanced Poetry Writing. Hums. 221 and permission of instructor. (4). (Excl).

    322. Advanced Creative Writing for Children and Young Adults. Hums. 222 and permission of instructor. (4). (Excl).

    325. Creative Writing Tutorial. Hums. 221 or 320, and permission of instructor. (4). (Excl).

    326. Creative Writing Tutorial. Hums. 221 or 320, and permission of instructor. (4). (Excl).

    425. Creative Writing Tutorial. Permission of instructor. (4). (Excl).

    426. Creative Writing Tutorial. Permission of instructor. (4). (Excl).


    Drama

    280/English 245/Theatre 211. Introduction to Drama and Theatre. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RC Hums. 281. (4). (HU).

    281. Introduction to Comedy and Tragedy. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RC Hums. 280. (4). (Excl).

    282. Drama Interpretation I: Actor and Text. (4). (Excl).

    381. Shakespeare on the Stage. Hums. 280 or permission of instructor. (4). (HU).

    382. Molière and His Theatre. Hums. 280 or permission of instructor. (4). (HU).

    385. The Theatre of Bertolt Brecht. (4). (HU).

    389. The Modern Theatre. Hums. 280 or permission of instructor. (4). (HU). May be repeated for credit.

    390. Special Period and Place Drama. Hums. 280 or permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

    481. Play Production Seminar. (4). (Excl).

    482. Drama Interpretation II: Performance Workshop. Hums. 280 and either Hums. 282 or playwriting, or permission of instructor. (4-6). (Excl).

    484. Seminar in Drama Topics. Upperclass standing, Hums. 280, and three 300 or 400 level drama courses, or the equivalent, or permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

    485. Special Drama Topics. Sophomore standing. (1-2). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May be repeated for a total of 4 credits.


    Music

    250. Chamber Music. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

    251. Topics in Music. (4). (HU).

    252. Topics in Music. (4). (HU).

    253. Choral Ensemble. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

    254. The Human Voice as An Acoustical Instrument. (4). (Excl).

    350. Creative Musicianship. (4). (HU).

    351. Creative Musicianship Lab. Hums. 350. (1-2). (Excl).


    Interdivisional (Division 867)

    216. Understanding Mathematics. High school algebra. (3). (Excl).

    222. Quantitatively Speaking. (4). (Excl). (QR/1).

    257. Cultural Confrontation in the Arts. (4). (HU).

    262/UC 262. AIDS: The Challenge to Society. (4). (NS). (BS).

    310/WS 312. Gender and Science. An introductory course in natural science, engineering, social sciences or women's studies. (4). (N.Excl).

    350. Special Topics. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May be repeated for a total of 6 credits.

    351. Special Topics. (2). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May be repeated for a total of 8 credits.

    370. Western and Non-Western Medicine. Permission of instructor. (4). (Excl).

    450. Science and Social Responsibility. (4). (Excl).


    Math (Division 873)

    391. The Politics of Quantification. (4). (Excl).


    Natural Science (Division 875)

    104/Biol. 104. Introduction to the Natural Sciences. Freshman or sophomore standing; written application to the Biological Station. Does not meet prerequisites for any of the biology concentration programs. Credit is granted for a combined total of 10 credits elected in introductory biology. IIIa at the Biological Station. (5). (NS). (BS).

    214/Physics 214. The Physicists and the Bomb. High school mathematics. (4). (NS). (BS).

    232. History of Life. (4). (NS). (BS).

    250. Ecology, Development, and Conservation in Latin America. Reading and listening proficiency in Spanish; high school biology or environmental science. (4). (NS).

    260. Science and Societal Issues: The Immune System. Introductory science course or permission of instructor. (4). (NS). (BS).

    263/Urban Planning 263. Energy and the Environment. (4). (NS). (BS).

    270. New Biotechnology: Scientific, Social and Historical Perspectives. High school biology or permission of instructor. (4). (N.Excl). (BS).

    343. Scientific Change. Any introductory science course or permission of instructor. (4). (NS). (BS).

    415/Environ. Studies 415. Science and Politics. One college-level science course. (4). (Excl). (BS).

    419/Public Policy 519/NR&E 574/Physics 419. Energy Demand. Basic college economics and senior standing. (3). (SS).


    Social Science (Division 877)

    202. The Twentieth Century: A Global View. (4). (SS).

    220/Soc. 220. Political Economy. (4). (SS).

    230. Alternative Approaches to Economic Development. (4). (SS).

    241. Democratization in Brazil, Russia, and South Africa: Three Case Studies. (4). (SS).

    265. Problems of Socialization and Resocialization in Contemporary Society. (4). (Excl).

    290. Social Science Basic Seminar. (4). (Excl).

    295 Quantitative Approaches to Social Science Questions. High school algebra. (4). (Excl).

    306. Environmental History and Third World Development. (3). (SS).

    320. Exploring Alternatives to Capitalism. RC Soc. Sci. 220, Econ. 407, or permission of instructor. (4). (SS).

    357. A History of Crime and Punishment in the U.S. (4). (Excl).

    360. Social Science Junior Seminar. Upperclass standing. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

    388. Transitions to Capitalism. A 200-level Social Science course. (4). (SS).

    460. Social Science Senior Seminar. Senior standing. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.