96-97 LS&A Bulletin

Sociology


3012 LS&A Building
764-6324

Professor Richard Lempert, Chair
Professor Barbara Anderson, Associate Chair
Associate Professor F. Müge Göçek, Director of Undergraduate Programs
Professor Sonya O. Rose, Coordinator of Honors Program
Associate Professor Julia Adams, Graduate Director

May be elected as a departmental concentration program

Professors

Duane Alwin, Family, Socialization, Aging and Life Course, Social Psychology, Quantitative Methods, Survey Methods

Barbara A. Anderson, Interrelation of Social Change and Demographic Change, Soviet Society, Historical Demography, Demographic Techniques

Mark Chesler, Social Change, Theory and Praxis of Action Research, Racism, Sexism and Multicultural Organizations, Psychosocial Aspects of Cancer

Donald R. Deskins, Urban Spatial Systems, World Urbanization, Sports and Society, and Black Populations

Reynolds Farley, Characteristics of the Black Population of the United States, Racial and Ethnic Issues in the United States, Urban Sociology, Demographic Trends Involving the U.S. Population

David Featherman, Stratification, Social Psychology, Social Mobility, Health and Aging

David Goldberg, Population Studies, Statistics and Methods

Robert Groves, Survey Methods, Measurement of Survey Errors, Sampling, Statistics

Albert Hermalin, Demography of Aging, Intergenerational Relations, Fertility and Family Planning, Demographic Techniques

James House, Social Psychology, Social Structure and Personality, Psychosocial and Socioeconomic Factors in Health and Aging, Survey Research Methods, Political Sociology, American Society

Ronald Kessler, Mental Health, Quantitative Methodology, Medical Sociology

John Knodel, General Population Studies, Fertility, Southeast Asia, Historical Demography, Aging, Focus Group Research, Education, AIDS Related Behavior

Richard Lempert, Sociology of Law, Organizational Sociology, Evidence

Mark S. Mizruchi, Organizational Theory, Political Sociology, Economic Sociology, Social Network Analysis, Quantitative Methods

Jeffrey Paige, Political Sociology, Revolution, Latin America, Marxian Social Theory

Sonya O. Rose, Historical Sociology, Sociology of Gender, Sociology of Work, Class Formation, Sociology of the Family

Arland Thornton, Family, Marriage and Divorce, Life Course, Demography, Intergenerational Relations, Gender Roles, Social Change

Mayer N. Zald, Complex Organizations, Social Movements, Political Sociology, Social Policy, Social Welfare, Sociology as Humanities and Science

Associate Professors

Julia Adams, Comparative Historical Sociology, Political Sociology, Theory, Sex and Gender, Sociology of the Family

Tomas Almaguer, Comparative Race and Ethnicity, Chicano/Latino Studies, Gay/Lesbian Studies, Social Stratification

Renee Anspach, Medical Sociology, Sociology of Deviance, Sociology of Gender, Social Psychology/Social Interaction, Applied Sociology

F. Müge Göçek, Historical Sociology, Sociological Theory, Social Change, Gender, Sociology of the Middle East

Max Heirich, Social Policy, Medical Sociology, Sociology of Knowledge, Cultural Belief Systems and Protest Movements, Sociology of Religion

Michael Kennedy, The Social Reproduction and Transformation of Soviet-type and Post-Communist Societies, especially Poland and Ukraine, Intellectuals, Professionals and Expertise, Nationalism, Ideology and Identity, especially Nationalism and Nations

Howard Kimeldorf, Political Sociology, Industrial Sociology, Class Analysis, Historical Comparative Sociology

Andre Modigliani, Social Psychology, Deviance, Social Influence, Embarrassment and Face-to-Face Interaction, Public Opinion and the Packaging of Public Issues in the Mass Media

Silvia Pedraza, The Sociology of immigration, race, and ethnicity in America, The relationship of history to theories of race and ethnic relations, The labor market incorporation of immigrants and ethics in America, Immigrants and refugees as social types, Comparative studies of immigrants and ethics in America, historical and contemporary

Gay Seidman, Labor, Gender, Political Sociology, South Africa and Brazil, Social Movements

Margaret Somers, Law, Sociology of Citizenship, Comparative History, Social and Political Theory, Political Sociology, Economic Sociology, Women and Family

David R. Williams, Race and SES Differences in Health, Racism and Health, Religion and Mental Health, Medical Sociology, Social Psychology

Yu Xie, Stratification, Sociology of Science, Methods and Statistics, Demography, Chinese Studies

Assistant Professors

Eduardo Bonilla-Silva, Race and Ethnic Relations, Political Sociology, Sociology of Economic Change, and Urban Sociology, Special Interest in Social Movements, Urban Problems, and Class Conflicts

Miriam L. King, Historical Demography, Construction of Social Problems, Gender Politics and Fertility, Demography of the Elderly, Household and Family

Margaret Krecker, Life Course and Aging, Labor Markets, Organizations, Stratification

Karin Martin, Gender, feminist theory, family, childhood and adolescence, social psychology, psychoanalytic sociology

Terri Orbuch, Social Psychology, Personal and Social Relationships, Sociology of Family, Sociology of Human Sexuality, Accounts and Account-Making

Hyun Ok Park, Nation/nationhood/citizenship, social movements, sociology of inequality, sociology of body and desire, capitalism and democratization in Korea and other industrializing Asian countries, and the Korean Diaspora

JoEllen Shively, Sociology of Culture, Contemporary American Indians, Gender Inequality, Sociology of Education

Pamela Smock, Social Stratification, Demography, Gender and Family

Ann Takata, Sociology of Organizations, Japanese Society, Quantitative Methods, Economic Sociology, Comparative Historical Sociology

Lecturer

David Schoem, Intergroup Relations, Ethnic Identity, Jewish Community, Multiculturalism, Education

Professors Emeriti Ronald Freedman, Leslie Kish, Howard Schuman, Werner S. Landecker

Sociology is the study of social relationships and social structures. It focuses on relations among people, groups, organizations, classes, cultures, and society. Sociology explores and analyzes issues vital to our personal lives, our communities, our society, and the world. The curriculum in sociology is designed to provide students with an understanding of the social character of human life and of the impact of varying forms of social organization on human affairs. Students are introduced to the methods by which such knowledge is obtained and to the applications of sociological knowledge. Students considering sociology as a concentration are encouraged to speak with a sociology academic advisor.

1. Statistics: Sociology 210 or Statistics 402 (or their equivalent) completed with a grade of "C-" or better.

2. Research Methods: Sociology 310.

3. Areas of Sociology: At least one course in the three major areas of the discipline: (a) social psychology, (b) population, urban studies and human ecology, and (c) social organization. The sociology courses which are approved in each of these areas are:

a. Social Psychology: 101, 205, 452, 463, 464, 465, 470, 472, 481, and 486.

b. Population, Urban Studies, and Human Ecology: 231, 304, 330, 331, 336, 430, 435, 437.

c. Social Organization: includes most other sociology courses, except those which are methodological in character.
It should be noted that up to 4 credits of Sociology 389 can be used towards a concentration program in Sociology. This course is offered mandatory credit/no credit.

Students are encouraged to consult with a concentration advisor if they are interested in specializing within distinct areas of sociology. These Areas of Specialization may be of particular interest to those planning to pursue graduate study or a closely related career. To receive certification in an area of specialization a student is expected to take at least four courses and at least 12 credits (included in the total hours of concentration) within that area. (Appropriate Independent Study courses can count.) The Areas of Specialization include: Law, Criminology, and Deviance; Economy, Business, and Society; Health, Aging, and Population; Social Welfare, Organizations, and Social Services, Social Inequality: Race, Class, and Gender; International Social Change; and Methods of Research.

Social Anthropology

Professor John Knodel, Acting Program Advisor

May be elected as an interdepartmental concentration program

Courses in Sociology (Division 482)


Introductory Courses

100. Principles of Sociology.
Open to freshpersons and sophomores. Juniors are strongly encouraged to enroll in Soc. 400. Seniors must elect Soc. 400. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 195 or 400. No credit for seniors. (4; 3 in the half-term). (SS).

101. Person and Society: An Introduction to Sociology Through Social Psychology. Open to freshpersons and sophomores. Juniors are strongly encouraged and seniors must take Soc. 400, 401, 452, 463, 464, 465, 470, 481, 482, or 486. No credit for seniors. (4; 3 in the half-term). (SS).

102. Contemporary Social Issues: An Introduction to Sociology. Open to freshpersons and sophomores. Juniors are strongly encouraged and seniors must take Soc. 302, 303, 400, 401, 423, 444, 447, 450, 460, or 461. No credit for seniors. (4; 3 in the half-term). (SS). Credit is granted for a combined total of 8 credits elected through Soc. 102, 202, 203, and 401, provided that the course topics are different.

103. Introduction to Sociology Through Race and Ethnicity. No credit to seniors. (4; 3 in the half-term). (SS). (This course meets the Race and Ethnicity Requirement).

195. Principles in Sociology (Honors). Open to freshpersons and sophomores admitted to the Honors Program, or other freshpersons and sophomores with a grade point average of at least 3.2. Juniors are strongly encouraged and seniors must take Soc. 400. No credit for seniors. Credit is not granted for both Sociology 195 and Sociology 100 or 400. (4). (SS).

202. Contemporary Social Issues I. (2-4; 3 in the half-term). (Excl). Credit is granted for a combined total of 8 credits elected through Soc. 102, 202, 203, and 401, provided that the course topics are different.

203. Contemporary Social Issues II. (2-4; 3 in the half-term). (Excl). Credit is granted for a combined total of 8 credits elected through Soc. 102, 202, 203, and 401, provided that the course topics are different.

400. Sociological Principles and Problems. For juniors, seniors, and graduate students with no background in sociology. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 100 or 195. (3). (SS).

401. Contemporary Social Issues III. (2-4; 3 in the half-term). (Excl). Credit is granted for a combined total of 8 credits elected through Soc. 102, 202, 203, and 401, provided that the course topics are different.


Primarily for First- and Second-year Students

105. First Year Seminar in Sociology. Freshmen; sophomores with permission of instructor. (3). (SS).

111/UC 111/AOSS 172/NR&E 111. Introduction to Global Change II. No credit for seniors. (4). (SS).

204/Pilot 189. Intergroup Relations and Conflict. (4). (SS).

205. Poverty, Race, and Health. (3). (Excl).

220/RC Soc. Sci. 220. Political Economy. (4; 2 in the half-term). (SS).


For Undergraduates Only

210. Elementary Statistics. Sociology Honors students should elect this course prior to beginning the Honors Seminar sequence. Sociology concentrators must elect this course prior to their last term. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Poli.Sci. 280, Stat. 100, 402, 311, or 412, or Econ. 404 or 405. (4; 3 in the half-term). (Excl). (BS). (QR/1).

212. Sports and Society. (3). (Excl).

231. Investigating Social and Demographic Change in America. Restricted to first- and second-year students. (4). (SS). (QR/2).

302/Amer. Cult. 302. Introduction to American Society. (3). (Excl).

303/CAAS 303. Race and Ethnic Relations. An introductory course in Sociology or CAAS. (4; 3 in the half-term). (SS). (This course meets the Race and Ethnicity Requirement).

304/Amer. Cult. 304. American Immigration. (3). (SS).

310. Introduction to Research Methods. One introductory course in sociology; or completion of one social science course in economics, anthropology, political science, psychology or other sociology course; or permission of instructor. Sociology Honors students should elect this course concurrently with Soc. 397. (4; 3 in the half-term). (Excl). (BS). (QR/1).

330. Population Problems. (3). (SS).

331. Population Trends in the United States: Their Economic and Social Consequences. (3). (Excl). (QR/1).

336. The Study of Cities and Urbanization. (4; 3 in the half-term). (Excl).

341. Sociology of Economic Development. One introductory course in sociology. (3). (Excl).

389. Practicum in Sociology. Permission of instructor. Up to 4 credits may be included in a concentration plan in Sociology. A combined total of 8 credits of Sociology 389 and 395 may be counted toward a concentration in Sociology. (2-4). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. Laboratory fee ($23) required. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a total of 8 credits.

392/REES 395/Hist. 332/Pol. Sci. 395/Slavic 395. Survey of Russia: The Russian Empire, the Soviet Union, and the Successor States. (4; 3 in the half-term). (SS).

393/Hist. 333/Pol. Sci. 396/Slavic 396/REES 396. Survey of East Central Europe. (4; 3 in the half-term). (SS).

395. Directed Reading or Research. Permission of concentration advisor and supervising staff member. A combined total of 8 credits of Sociology 389 and 395 may be counted toward a concentration in Sociology. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit in the same or different terms.

397. Junior Honors in Sociology. Honors standing in sociology. Soc. 210 or permission of instructor. Prior or concurrent enrollment in Soc. 310 or 512. (3). (Excl).

398. Senior Honors in Sociology. Honors standing in sociology. Soc. 210 and 310, and permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

399. Senior Honors in Sociology. Honors standing in sociology. Soc. 210 and 310, and permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).


For Undergraduates and Graduates

404/Am. Cult. 404. Hispanic-Americans: Social Problems and Social Issues. Junior or senior standing. (3). (Excl).

405. Theory in Sociology. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 305. (3). (Excl).

410. The American Jewish Community. One introductory course in sociology. (3). (Excl).

412. Ethnic Identity and Intergroup Relations. Permission of instructor. Students are required to have taken courses in ethnic studies or intergroup relations. (3). (Excl).

415. Economic Sociology. One of the following: introductory economics, psychology, or political science. (3). (Excl).

420. Complex Organizations. One introductory course in sociology. (3). (Excl).

423/Am. Cult. 421. Social Stratification. (3). (Excl).

426/Pol. Sci. 428/Asian Studies 428/Phil. 428. China's Evolution Under Communism. Upperclass standing or permission of instructor. (4; 3 in the half-term). (Excl).

427. Societies and Institutions of Eastern Europe. (3). (Excl).

428. Social Institutions of Communist China. (3). (Excl).

430. Introduction to Population Studies. Soc. 430 does not meet core requirements for graduate students in sociology. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 530. (3). (Excl). (QR/2).

435. Urban Inequality and Conflict. Credit is granted for only one course from Soc. 335, 435, or 535. Does not meet sociology doctoral requirements. (3). (Excl).

440. Sociology of Work. One introductory course in sociology. (3). (Excl).

442. Occupations and Professions. One introductory course in sociology. (3). (Excl).

444. The American Family. One introductory course in sociology. (3). (SS).

445. Comparative Family Systems. One introductory course in sociology. (3). (Excl).

447/WS 447. Gender Roles and Status. (3). (SS).

450. Political Sociology. (3). (SS).

452. Law and Social Psychology. (3). (Excl).

454. Law and Social Organization. (3). (SS).

455/Rel. 455. Religion and Society. (3). (Excl).

458. Sociology of Education. One introductory course in sociology. (3). (Excl).

460. Social Change. (3). (Excl).

461. Social Movements. One introductory course in sociology. (3). (Excl).

462. Cultural Theories of Communication. Soc. 100, or Anthro. 101; Comm. Studies 351 or 371 strongly recommended. (3). (Excl).

463. Mass Communication and Public Opinion. (3). (SS).

464. Socialization and Social Control Throughout the Life Cycle. One introductory course in sociology. (3). (Excl).

465/Psych. 488. Sociological Analysis of Deviant Behavior. (3). (SS).

467. Juvenile Delinquency. (3). (Excl).

468. Criminology. (3). (SS).

472/Psych. 381. Advanced Laboratory in Social Psychology. Stat. 402 and Psych. 380. (3). (Excl).

475/MCO 475 (Public Health). Introduction to Medical Sociology. (3). (SS).

477/Social Work 609. Sociology of Aging. I, II, IIIa. (3; 2 in the half-term). (Excl).

481. Interaction Processes: The Self in Social Encounters. One previous course in social psychology elected either through psychology or sociology. (3). (Excl).

490/REES 490/WS 492. Women and Islam: A Sociological Perspective. (3). (Excl).

495. Special Course. One introductory course in sociology. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit, provided that the course topics are different.

496. Special Course. One introductory course in sociology. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit, provided that the course topics are different.

497. Special Course. One introductory course in sociology. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit, provided that the course topics are different.