Environmental Studies

Professor James C.G. Walker (Geology), Director

Not a concentration program

The quest for harmony between humans and the natural world requires understanding of nature, society, and our individual selves. The program in Environmental Studies encourages students to supplement their training in particular academic disciplines by exploring aspects of natural science, social science, and the humanities. The Program is not a concentration program, although a student may emphasize environmental studies in the LS&A Individual Concentration Program (ICP).

Environmental Studies 123, 124, and 320 offer broad overviews of the field and serve as introductions to more advanced work. Environmental Studies 420 and 421 offer opportunities for independent study. In these courses the student is responsible for defining a plan of study, enlisting others with similar interests if appropriate, and locating a faculty member willing to supervise the work. Environmental Studies 450 is a Capstone Seminar providing the opportunity for seniors, particularly those pursuing ICPs, to work together to compare diverse perspectives on human values and the environment.

Courses on environmental issues are offered by many different departments and programs in LS&A as well as in other colleges of the university. Students interested in the environment should explore each issue of the Time Schedule thoroughly, because many appropriate courses are offered at irregular intervals under unpredictable headings. Of particular interest are some of the University Courses.

During the Winter Term of 1998 LS&A, in collaboration with the School of Natural Resources and the Environment, will offer an enhanced program of courses, lectures, forums, and exhibits entitled The Environmental Semester/Rethinking the Relationship. Students are encouraged to take advantage of the unusual opportunities for educational enrichment that this Theme Semester will provide.


Courses in Environmental Studies (Division 366)

123/Geol. 123/AOSS 123. Life and the Global Environment. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 361. (2). (NS). (BS).

124/Geol. 124/AOSS 124. Environment, People, Resources. (2). (NS). (BS).

320. Introduction to Environmental Studies. (4). (Excl).

353/Physics 250. Energy, Entropy, and Environment. Two and one-half years of high school mathematics, or any college course in mathematics or natural science. (3). (NS). (BS).

356. Homeplace: Life in the Huron Valley. (3). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

359/Geol. 279. Ocean Resources. High school science and math recommended. II. (3). (NS). (BS).

360/Geol. 280. Mineral Resources, Economics, and the Environment. II. (4). (NS). (BS). (QR/2).

361/Geol. 277. Humans and the Natural World. Those with credit for 123 may only elect 361 for 1 credit. (3). (NS). (BS).

407. Culture as Environment. Environ. Studies 320. (3). (Excl).

412. Alternative Patterns of Resource Utilization: The Amish in Twentieth Century America. Environ. Studies. 320. (3). (Excl).

415/RC Nat. Sci. 415. Science and Politics. One college-level science course. (4). (Excl). (BS).

420. Practicum in Environmental Problems. Environ. Studies 320 and cognates pertinent to the study. Permission must be granted by Director prior to enrollment. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

421. Practicum in Environmental Problems. Environ. Studies 320 and cognates pertinent to the study. Permission must be granted by Director prior to enrollment. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

450. Human Values and the Environment. Environ. Studies 320 and junior standing. (3). (Excl).


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