Physics

2071 Randall Laboratory
764-4437
Web site: http://www.physics.lsa.umich.edu/

Professor Ctirad Uher, Chair

May be elected as a departmental concentration program in Physics or General Physics


Professors

Carl Akerlof, Experimental high-energy physics, Astrophysics
Ratindranath Akhoury, Theoretical physics, elementary particles
James W. Allen, Experimental condensed matter physics
Daniel Axelrod, Experimental biophysics, physics of membranes
Frederick D. Becchetti, Jr., Experimental nuclear physics, heavy ion physics
Paul Berman, Theoretical atomic physics
John C. Bilello, Applied physics
Michael Bretz, Experimental physics, low temperature, condensed matter physics
Philip H. Bucksbaum, Experimental atomic physics
J. Wehrley Chapman, Experimental high-energy physics, electron-positron colliding beam experiments
Timothy E. Chupp, Experimental atomic physics
Roy Clarke, Applied physics, Experimental physics, solid state and condensed matter physics
Martin B. Einhorn, Theoretical physics, elementary particles
David W. Gidley, Experimental atomic physics, fundamental low energy research, positrons and positronium
Dennis J. Hegyi, Experimental astrophysics
Joachim W. Janecke, Experimental nuclear physics, heavy ion physics, phenomenological nuclear models
Lawrence W. Jones, Experimental high-energy physics, elementary particles, prompt neutrino production and pp collider experiments, cosmic ray physics
Gordon L. Kane, Theoretical physics, elementary particles
Samuel Krimm, Experimental biophysics, physics of polymers
Alan D. Krisch, Experimental high-energy physics, polarization effects in proton-proton scattering
Jean P. Krisch, Theoretical physics, general relativity
Michael J. Longo, Experimental high-energy physics, prompt neutrino production and pp collider experiments
Roberto D. Merlin, Experimental solid state physics, condensed matter physics
Homer A. Neal, Experimental high-energy physics
Byron P. Roe, Experimental high-energy physics, prompt neutrino production and pp collider experiments
Marc H. Ross, Environmental physics, energy utilization and conservation
Leonard M. Sander, Theoretical physics, condensed matter and solid state physics
T. Michael Sanders, Experimental physics, low temperature, solid state
Robert S. Savit, Theoretical physics, condensed matter and statistical physics
Duncan G. Steel, Experimental physics, laser physics, atomic physics
Gregory Tarlé, Experimental astrophysics, particle physics, nuclear physics
Rudolf P. Thun, Experimental high-energy physics, electron-positron colliding beam experiments
Robert S. Tickle, Experimental nuclear physics, heavy ion physics
Yukio Tomozawa, Theoretical high-energy physics, elementary particles
Ctirad Uher, Experimental solid state physics, condensed matter physics
John F. Ward, Experimental physics, quantum electronics
David N. Williams, Theoretical physics, elementary particles
Alfred C.T. Wu, Theoretical physics, mathematical physics
Y.P.E. Yao, Theoretical physics, elementary particles
Valentine Zakharov, Theoretical physics, elementary particles
Jens C. Zorn, Experimental physics, atomic physics


Associate Professors

Fred C. Adams, Theoretical astrophysics
Dante E. Amidei, Experimental high energy physics, elementary particles
Meigan C. Aronson, Experimental condensed matter physics
Myron K. Campbell, Experimental particle physics
Steven B. Dierker, Experimental condensed matter, applied physics
August Evrard, Theoretical astrophysics
Katherine Freese, Theoretical astrophysics
Walter S. Gray, Experimental nuclear physics, heavy ion physics
Frederick C. MacKintosh, Theoretical condensed matter physics
Franco M. Nori, Theoretical condensed matter
Bradford G. Orr, Experimental condensed matter physics, applied physics
Stephen C. Rand, Experimental applied physics
J. Keith Riles, Experimental high energy physics


Assistant Professors

Wolfgang Lorenzon, Experimental high energy physics
Timothy McKay, Experimental astrophysics
Margaret Murnane, Experimental optical physics
Jianming Qian, Experimental high energy physics
Alberto Rojo, Theoretical condensed matter physics
Christoph Schmidt, Biophysics
Robin Stuart, Theoretical high energy physics


Research Scientists

H. Richard Gustafson, Experimental high energy physics, astrophysics
David F. Nitz, Experimental high energy physics, astrophysics


Associate Research Scientists

Ralph Conti, Experimental atomic physics: positronic physics
Ali M.T. Lin, Experimental high energy physics: spin physics, polarized proton beams
James M. Matthews, Experimental high energy physics, astrophysics: cosmic rays, proton decay
Mark Skalsey, Experimental physics, atomic physics, nuclear physics: weak interactions, leptons


Assistant Research Scientists

Norman A. Amos, Experimental high energy physics
Kevin Coulter, Experimental atomic physics
Boris Dubetsky, Theoretical atomic, molecular, and optical physics
Daniel S. Levin, Experimental astrophysics
Vladimir G. Luppov, Experimental high energy physics
Richard Phelps, Experimental high energy physics
Donald Roberts, Experimental nuclear physics
Andrew Tomasch, Experimental astrophysics


Research Investigators

William Frieze, Atomic, molecular, optical physics


Adjunct Faculty

Lawrence Antonuk, Nuclear physics
Alexander Chao, Accelerator physics
Tom Dershem, Lecturer
David O. Hearshen, Biophysics, nuclear physics
Robert C. Jaklevic, Theoretical condensed matter physics
Raoul Kopelman, Theoretical solid state physics
John R. Smith, Theoretical solid state physics
Charles C. Wang, Experimental solid state physics
Willes Weber, Condensed matter physics
Victor K. Wong, Theoretical condensed matter physics


Faculty Recently Retired

C. Tristram Coffin, George W. Ford, Karl T. Hecht, Donald Meyer, Martinus Veltman


Professors Emeriti

H. Richard Crane, Wayne E. Hazen, Alfred Z. Hendel, Ernst Katz, Robert Lewis, Oliver Overseth, William C. Parkinson, Richard H. Sands, Daniel Sinclair, John C. van der Velde, Marc Wiedenbeck, Gabriel Weinreich


The Department of Physics offers: (1) a Concentration Program in Physics; (2) a Concentration Program in General Physics.

A total of 60 credits of mathematics and natural science must be elected to receive the Bachelor of Science degree.


Physics (B.S.)

May be elected as a departmental concentration program.

Prerequisites to Concentration. Mathematics through Mathematics 216 (or the equivalent); Physics 140/141, 240/241 and 340/341 (recommended sequence).

Concentration Program. At least 31 credits in physics and mathematics, including at least 27 in physics courses numbered 390 and above. A concentration plan must include:

  1. Physics 390, 401, 405, 406, 453, and 465.

    Physics 401 and 405 should precede Physics 453; Physics 453 is a prerequisite to most courses numbered above 453.

  2. Physics 441 and 442 (advanced laboratory).

  3. Two courses from among Physics 402, 411, 413, 417, 418, 435, 438, 451, 452, 455, 457, 460, and 463.

  4. Mathematics 450 (or the equivalent).

Physics 390, 401, 405, 406, and 453 must be completed with a minimum grade of C- in each course and a cumulative average of C or higher.

Physics 419 and 489 are not acceptable for the degree BS in physics.

Honors Concentration. Students who have a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.0 are encouraged to elect an Honors concentration in physics. In addition to the regular departmental requirements for concentration, candidates for an Honors concentration must elect six credits of physics from courses numbered 401 and above which are not otherwise required and must also complete a senior Honors thesis based on research (Physics 498/499) done under the supervision of a faculty member.

Advising. A concentration plan in physics is developed in consultation with and must be approved by the concentration advisor. The advisor's name and consultation hours will be available at the Physics Student Services Office, 2061 Randall Lab.

Teaching Certificate. A teaching certificate with a major in physics requires 30 credits of physics; a minor requires 20. These credits must include Physics 125/127 and 126/128, or Physics 140/141 and 240/241; and Physics 340. The remainder of the program consists of courses numbered 390 or above or the equivalent.


General Physics (A.B. or B.S.)

May be elected as a departmental concentration program.

Prerequisites to Concentration. Mathematics through Mathematics 216 (or the equivalent); Physics 140/141 and 240/241 (or Physics 125/127 and 126/128), and Physics 340/341.

Concentration Program. At least 31 credits in physics and mathematics, including at least 21 in physics courses numbered 401 and above. A concentration plan must include:

  1. Physics 390, 401, 405, 406, and 453.

    Physics 401 and 405 should precede Physics 453; Physics 453 is a prerequisite to most courses numbered above 453.

  2. Six credits from the following: Physics 402, 411, 413, 419, 435, 438, 451, 452, 455, 457, 460, 463, and 489.

  3. Mathematics 450 (or the equivalent)

  4. Cognates: Six credits of courses from one cognate department, selected in consultation with and approved by the concentration advisor. Mathematics 450 may not be included in these six credits.

Physics and Society Option. This program, administered jointly by the Physics Department and the Residential College, is designed for students who wish to concentrate in physics and also who are interested in such fields as energy policy, law and science, public administration and other fields that require an understanding of the relationship between science and society. In addition to the minimum requirements, students must complete a minimum of three courses (9-12 credits) in Science and Society.

The Science and Society courses are chosen in consultation with and must be approved by the Residential College Science Program advisor. Contact the advisor at 763-0032 or stop by at 134 Tyler East Quad. These courses, addressing various dimensions of the social relations of science and technology (e.g., history and sociology of science, science policy), are upper-level courses (300 and above). They may be used to satisfy the cognate requirement for the General Physics concentration (requirement #4). One course may also partially satisfy the requirement for six credits of 400-level physics courses specified under requirement #2). Science and Society courses in physics used to satisfy requirement #2 must also be approved by the Physics Department. One of the Science and Society courses may be an Independent Study with a major experiential component (e.g., an internship in an organization that addresses issues related to science policy) and a required report analyzing the experience. It is permissible for concentrators to take the Science and Society courses in several departments.

Physics 390, 401, 405, 406, and 453 must be completed with a minimum grade of a C- in each course and a cumulative average of C or higher.


Courses in Physics (Division 444)

103. The Physical Universe: Relativity and Quanta. High School geometry, trigonometry, and algebra. (1). (NS). (BS).

104. The Physical Universe: What Einstein Never Knew. High School geometry, trigonometry, and algebra. (1). (NS). (BS).

105. Origin, and Fate of Life, Stars, Galaxies, and the Universe. (1). (NS).

106. Everyday Physics. (3). (NS). (BS).

107. 20th Century Concepts of Space, Time, and Matter. High school algebra and geometry. (3). (NS). (BS). (QR/1).

108. Controversial Scientific Discoveries and Claims. Algebra. (3). (NS). (BS).

112. Cosmology: The Science of the Universe. (3). (NS). (BS).

115. Living with Physics. Two and one-half years of high school mathematics, including trigonometry. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Phys. 125, 140, or 160. (3). (NS). (BS).

116. From Quarks to Cosmos: What Holds Everything Together? (3). (NS). (BS).

118. Inward Bound: The Search for Elementarity. (3). (NS). (BS).

119/Geol. 130/Chem. 108. The Physical World. High-school algebra. (4). (NS). (BS). (QR/2).

125. General Physics: Mechanics, Sound, and Heat. Two and one-half years of high school mathematics, including trigonometry. Phys. 125 and 127 are normally elected concurrently. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 140, 145, or 160. (4). (NS). (BS). (QR/1).

126. General Physics: Electricity and Light. Physics 125. Phys. 126 and 128 are normally elected concurrently. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 240 or 260. (4). (NS). (BS). (QR/1).

127. Mechanics, Heat, and Sound Lab. Concurrent election with Phys. 125 is strongly recommended. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Phys. 141. (1). (NS). (BS). Laboratory fee ($25) required.

128. Electricity and Light Lab. Concurrent election with Phys. 126 is strongly recommended. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Phys. 241. (1). (NS). (BS). Laboratory fee ($25) required.

140. General Physics I. Math. 115. Physics 140 and 141 are normally elected concurrently. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Phys. 125, 145, or 160. (4). (NS). (BS). (QR/1).

141. Elementary Laboratory I. Concurrent election with Phys. 140 or 145 is strongly recommended. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 127. (1). (NS). (BS). Laboratory fee ($25) required.

145. General Physics. Math. 115. Physics 145 and 141 are normally elected concurrently. No credit to those who have completed for are enrolled in Physics 125, 140, or 160. (3). (NS). (BS). (QR/1).

160. Honors Physics I. Math. 115. Students should elect Physics 141 concurrently. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Phys. 125, 140, or 145. (4). (NS). (BS). (QR/1).

201. Physics, Truth and Consequences. Sophomore standing. Simple high school algebra and geometry will be helpful. (3). (NS). (BS). (QR/2).

204/Great Books 204. Great Books in Physics. (4). (NS).

214/RC Nat. Sci. 214. The Physicists and the Bomb. High school mathematics. (4). (NS). (BS).

240. General Physics II. Physics 140, 145 or 160; and Math. 116. Physics 240 and 241 are normally elected concurrently. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 126 or 260. (4). (NS). (BS). (QR/1).

241. Elementary Laboratory II. Concurrent election with Phys. 240 is strongly recommended. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 128. (1). (NS). (BS). Laboratory fee ($25) required.

250/Environ. Studies 353. Energy, Entropy, and Environment. Two and one-half years of high school mathematics, or any college course in mathematics or natural science. (3). (NS). (BS).

260. Honors Physics II. Physics 140, 145, or 160; and Math. 116. Students should elect Physics 241 concurrently. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Phys. 240. (4). (NS). (BS). (QR/1).

288. Physics of Music. (3). (NS). (BS). (QR/1).

301. The Science Connection. Upperclass standing. For non natural science concentrators. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Phys. 422. (3). (NS). (BS).

333. Keller Tutor 140. Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). This is a graded course. (EXPERIENTIAL).

334. Keller Tutor 240. Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). This is a graded course. (EXPERIENTIAL).

340. Waves, Heat, and Light. Physics 240 or 260, and Math 215. Concurrent election of Physics 341 is strongly recommended. (3). (Excl). (BS).

341. Waves, Heat, and Light Lab. Physics 240 or 260. Concurrent election of Physics 340 is strongly recommended. (2). (Excl). (BS). Laboratory fee ($25) required.

350. Technologies of Physics. Upperclass standing. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May be elected for a total of 4 credits.

390. Introduction to Modern Physics. Physics 340 and Math 216. (3). (Excl). (BS).

401. Intermediate Mechanics. Physics 126/128 or 240/241, and Math. 216. (3). (Excl). (BS). (QR/1).

402. Light. Physics 126/128 or 240/241, and Math. 216. (3). (Excl). (BS).

405. Intermediate Electricity and Magnetism. Physics 126/128 or 240/241, and Math. 216. (3). (Excl). (BS).

406. Statistical and Thermal Physics. Physics 126/128 or 240/241, and Math. 216. (3). (Excl). (BS).

411. Introduction to Computational Physics. Physics 401 and Math. 216. Some familiarity with a computer language. (3). (Excl). (BS).

413/Complex Systems 541. Physics of Complexities. Physics 401. (3). (Excl). (BS).

415. Special Problems for Undergraduates. Permission of instructor. (1-6). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected for a total of 6 credits.

417/Chem. 417. Dynamical Processes in Biophysics. Math. 216, and Physics 340 or Chem. 463 (or 468). (3). (Excl). (BS).

418/Macromolecular Science 418. Structural Macromolecular Physics. Math. 216 and Physics 340. (3). (Excl). (BS).

419/Public Policy 519/NR&E 574/RC Nat. Sci. 419. Energy Demand. Basic college economics and senior standing. (3). (SS).

420. Living with Physics for Elementary Teachers. Concurrent registration in Physics 421. Open only to elementary education concentrators. (3). (Excl).

421. Living with Physics for Elementary Teachers-Lab. Concurrent registration in Physics 420. Open only to elementary education concentrators. (1). (Excl).

435. Gravitational Physics. Physics 390 and 401. (3). (Excl). (BS).

438. Electromagnetic Radiation. Physics 405. (3). (Excl). (BS).

441. Advanced Laboratory I. Physics 390 and any Physics 400-level course. (2). (Excl). (BS).

442. Advanced Laboratory II. Physics 390 and any Physics 400-level course. (2). (Excl). (BS).

451. Methods of Theoretical Physics. Physics 401 and Math. 450. (3). (Excl). (BS).

452. Methods of Theoretical Physics. Physics 451. (3). (Excl). (BS).

453. Quantum Mechanics. Physics 390. (3). (Excl). (BS).

455. Electronic Devices and Circuits. Physics 240 and 241. (3). (Excl). (BS).

457. Subatomic Physics. Physics 453. (3). (Excl). (BS).

460. Quantum Mechanics II. Physics 453. (3). (Excl). (BS).

463. Introduction to Solid State Physics. Phys. 453. (3). (Excl). (BS).

465. Senior Seminar. Open to junior and senior Physics concentrators. (2). (Excl). (BS). Meets the Junior-Senior writing requirement.

489. Physics of Music. Permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). (BS). (QR/1).

496. Senior Thesis I. Permission of departmental concentration advisor. (2-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

497. Senior Thesis II. Permission of departmental concentration advisor. (2-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

498. Introduction to Research for Honors Students. Permission of departmental concentration advisor. (2-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

499. Introduction to Research for Honors Students. Permission of physics concentration advisor. (2-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).


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