Romance Languages and Literatures

4108 Modern Languages Building
764-5344
Web site: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/rll/

Professor José Rabasa, Chair

May be elected as a departmental concentration program in French and Francophone Studies, Italian, or Spanish


Professors

Andrew Anderson, Twentieth Century Spanish Literature
Frank P. Casa, Director of Middlebury Spanish School, Golden Age Literature, Seventeenth Century Comedia, Social and Political Aspects of Twentieth Century Drama
Ross Chambers, Modern French and European Literature, Literary Theory
Steven N. Dworkin, Spanish and Portuguese diachronic linguistics, Romance etymology
Cedomil Goic, Spanish American literature; Chilean literature, Literary History and Criticism
Floyd F. Gray, 16th and 17th century French literature, Literary Theory and Criticism
Marie Hélène Huet, 18th and 19th C. French and European literature, French revolution, Critical theory
Luisa López-Grigera, Golden Age Philology and Rhetoric
Gregory Lucente, Italian Literature, Comparative Literature
Guy Mermier, Translation, Medieval literature Oil and Oc, Director of Medieval and Renaissance Collegium
William Paulson, 18th and 19th century French literature; relations among literature, science, technology and media
Domna C. Stanton, Seventeenth century French literature, Women writers, Critical Theory


Associate Professors

Frances Aparicio, Modern Latin American literature, Hispanic literature
Catherine Brown, Medieval Literature Literary theory
Alina Clej, French Literature and Comparative Literature
Santiago Colás, Latin American and Comparative literature
José Rabasa, Latin American literature, Colonial and Post Colonial Studies, Historiography


Assistant Professors

David Caron, Late 19th and 20th C. French Narrative, Gay Studies
Alison Cornish, Medieval and Renaissance Italian literature, Dante
Freida Ekotto, 20th century French and Francophone literature
Jarrod Hayes, 20th century French and Francophone literature, Post Colonial studies, Queer theory
Alejandro Herrero-Olaizola, 20th century and Latin American literature, Critical theory, Interdisciplinary studies
Juli Highfill, Modern Peninsular Spanish literature
Carina Yervasi, French cinema and literature


Lecturers

Kimberly Boys, Elementary Spanish Language Teaching, Coordination
Romana Capek-Habekovic, Elementary Italian Language Teaching, Coordination
Maria Dorantes, Elementary Spanish Language Teaching, Coordination
Craig Frisch, Elementary Italian Language Teaching
Olga Gallego, Elementary Spanish Language Teaching, Coordination
Raquel Gonzalez, Elementary Spanish Language Teaching, Coordination
Ann Hilberry, Elementary Spanish Language Teaching, Coordination
Lara Mangiafico, Elementary Spanish Language Teaching, Coordination
Kathy Meyer, Elementary French Language Teaching, Coordination
Michael Milne, Elementary Spanish Language Teaching, coordination
Helene Neu, French phonetics, Teaching Assistant supervision, Coordination
Dennis Pollard, Elementary Spanish Language Teaching, Coordination


Professors Emeriti

Büdel, Fraker, Hafter, Hagiwara, Leonard, Morgan, Muller, Nelson, O'Neill, Olken, Pulgram, Wolfe.


The department offers courses in French, Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, and Romance Linguistics. The primary goals of the undergraduate program are (1) mastery of the language; (2) an understanding and interpretation of Romance literature and culture; and (3) preparation for teaching or other careers requiring specialized linguistic knowledge and skill.

The study of a second language expands the outlook and interests of the educated citizen. By providing insight into the social and intellectual life of other peoples, language study fosters humanistic attitudes and cultivates a spirit of tolerance and understanding.

Students supplement their training in classes by use of the department's language laboratory facilities and by participation in extra-curricular language activities.

The Language Requirement for the A.B. or B.S. Degree. Students who have previous training or experience in a particular language are required to take a placement test before electing a course in that language. Students who demonstrate a fourth-term proficiency are certified to have fulfilled the LS&A language requirement. Other students are placed in courses according to their demonstrated degree of competence and satisfy the LS&A language requirement by successful completion of French 232, Italian 232, Portuguese 232, Spanish 232, or the equivalent. Students with previous background in or exposure to a Romance language are encouraged to continue study of that language through the freshman and sophomore years. Once the study of a language has begun in residence, then fourth-term language study must be taken in residence.

Language Laboratory. There is a language laboratory on the second floor of the Modern Language Building which gives students an opportunity to improve their command of the spoken language by listening to recordings of native speakers and by oral/ aural exercises and drills. Certain courses offered by the department require regular use of the language laboratory facilities.

French House. The department sponsors a Maison Française where students can improve their spoken French. The Maison Française provides room and board for both men and women. Various cultural and social events are scheduled throughout the year. For further information, contact the University Housing Office.


French and Francophone Studies

May be elected as a departmental concentration program

Concentration in French allows students considerable flexibility in developing a program of study leading to competence in the French language and basic familiarity with French civilization and literature.

Prerequisites to Concentration. French through French 232.

Concentration Program. A minimum of 30 credits in French and Francophone Studies courses numbered 240 and above. Of these, a minimum of 18 credits must be numbered 300 or above, or equivalent. A maximum of two courses in the concentration may be chosen from courses taught in English without language prerequisites. A minimum of 15 of the required 30 credits must be taken either in residence or through a study abroad program affiliated with the University of Michigan. French concentrators are encouraged to elect courses related to their field of study outside of the department and to consider the possibility of studying at the year abroad program in Aix.

Students pursuing graduate studies in French should be aware that most graduate programs expect substantial preparation in literature. For this reason, students interested in earning a graduate degree in French should give particular consideration, in choosing their courses, to French 270, 362-369, 378, and 400-level courses in literature and culture.

Honors Concentration. Qualified students may be admitted to a program of advanced study in the beginning or middle of the junior year (or at the beginning of the senior year following participation in a junior year in France program), leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts with Honors in French. Admission to senior level Honors work in French is by application only (forms are available in the Honors Office). The Honors Committee expects applicants to demonstrate superior ability for their level in both oral and written French, and to present evidence of serious interest in research.

The normal concentration requirements in French and Francophone Studies must be completed along with the following:

  1. Three additional credits in French and Francophone Studies at the level of 300 or above.

  2. Composition of a thesis, in French, incorporating the results of individual research, the minimum length being 30 pages;

  3. A discussion of the thesis and of an agreed upon set of related readings with the student's faculty advisor and one other faculty reader.

A grade point average of at least 3.5 in all courses, as well as in all French and Francophone courses is required for admission and for graduation with Honors in French. Intending students should contact the Honors advisor toward the end of their junior year, and fill out an application form obtainable in the Honors Office (1228 Angell Hall). Upon admission, they enroll in French 491 and 492, Senior Honors I and II, usually in both terms of their senior year, writing their thesis under the supervision of a member of the professional staff.

Advising. The concentration advisors are Professor Guy Mermier and Professor Floyd Gray. Helene Neu is the advisor for candidates for a secondary school teaching certificate. Appointments are scheduled at the Academic Advising Center, 1255 Angell.

Concentration Requirements in French and Francophone Studies for Students Preparing Teacher Certification. Candidates for a secondary school teaching certificate should study the general information about teaching certificate requirements which appears under the Teacher Certification Program in this Bulletin.

A minimum of 30 credits in French and Francophone Studies courses numbered 240 and above. Of these, a minimum of 18 credits must be numbered 300 or above, or equivalent. French 333, 335, and 339 are required. Only one course in the concentration may be chosen from courses taught in English without language prerequisites. A minimum of 15 of the required 30 credits must be taken either in residence or through a study abroad program affiliated with the University of Michigan.

Year Abroad. The University of Michigan jointly sponsors a Year Abroad in France (University of Aix-en-Provence) with the University of Wisconsin. Information about this program and other study abroad opportunities is available at the Office of International Programs (OIP) (G513 Michigan Union, 764-4311). See also International Programs in this chapter of the Bulletin.

France Summer Study Program. The University of Michigan sponsors a six-week program in St. Malo during the summer half term in France for second and third year courses. Information about this program is available at the Office of International Programs (OIP) (G513 Michigan Union, 764-4311).


Italian

May be elected as a departmental concentration program

Prerequisites to Concentration. Italian 232 or the equivalent.

Concentration Program. A minimum 24 credits in Italian literature and culture courses numbered 235 and above; of these, at least nine credits must be at the 400-level. Required are 235 and 433. 15 credits must be conducted in Italian. Six credits in a cognate field are also required.

Advising. Advising appointments are scheduled at 4108 MLB.


Portuguese

Not a concentration program

There is no concentration in Portuguese, but students can select courses from the beginning level, 101-102, through 231-232.


Spanish

May be elected as a departmental concentration program

Students may fulfill a concentration in Spanish by selecting one of two programs of study: Option A, Hispanic Literature, or Option B, Hispanic Studies. Option A is recommended for students with primary interests in literary studies. Option B is recommended for students interested in linguistics or interdisciplinary studies. Both options provide students with opportunities to develop language proficiency and to expand their knowledge of Hispanic cultures.

Prerequisites to concentration: Spanish 101 through 275(361) and 276(362). For eligible students, 290(307) - Spanish for U.S. Latinos - may be substituted for 275(361). The Residential College reading courses, RC Core 324, may be accepted as substitutes for either 275(361) or 276(362), subject to approval by the coordinator and a concentration advisor.

Option A. Hispanic Literature: 30 approved credits beyond the prerequisites, consisting of 12 credits at the 300-level and 18 credits at the 400-level. At the 300-level, at least nine credits must be completed in Spanish and/or Latin-American literature. At the 400-level, at least 12 credits must be selected in literature, including Spanish 459, Don Quijote. One linguistics course, either Spanish 411 or 414, is also required. Additional credits at both the 300 and 400-levels may be selected in Hispanic civilization, linguistics, film, and/or one approved course from another field taught in Spanish through Language Across the Curriculum or a study abroad program. Students should consult a concentration advisor and develop a balanced program of study that includes coursework in literature from various countries and historical periods.

Option B. Hispanic Studies: 30 approved credits beyond the prerequisites, consisting of 12 credits at the 300-level and 18 credits at the 400-level. Coursework at both the 300- and 400-levels may be selected in Hispanic culture, cultural studies, literature, linguistics, film, and may include two approved courses in other fields taught in Spanish through Language Across the Curriculum or a study abroad program. At least one course in Iberian or Latin-American civilization and culture is required [Spanish 340(375) or 341(376)]. Course selections must also include at least six credits in literature at the 300-level and at least six credits in literature at the 400-level. Students should consult a concentration advisor and develop a balanced program of study that includes the cultural production of various countries and historical periods.

Residence requirement: A minimum of 15 of the required 30 credits must be taken either in residence or through a study abroad program affiliated with the University of Michigan.

Honors Concentration. Qualified students holding a cumulative GPA of 3.5 and Spanish Concentration GPA of 3.5 may be admitted to the Honors program in Spanish at the beginning of the junior year. Admission to the program is by application to the Honors undergraduate advisor. Students are required to take Spanish 391 and 392 Junior Honors Courses (as two of the three required courses for Spanish concentration), and Spanish 490 and 491 Senior Honors Courses (as two of the six required 400-level courses for Spanish concentration) during their senior year. Spanish Honors courses may be taken as independent studies with Spanish Faculty or as additional requirement agreed upon with the professors of Spanish 371 through 388, so that students register in the courses as Spanish 391 or 392. Upon completion of Spanish 391 and 392 the students enroll in Senior Honors 490 and 491 during both terms of their senior year, and seek out a member of the Spanish professorial staff to guide their studies. Honors seniors complete two principal tasks under the guidance of their tutor: intensive preparation for the Honors oral examination, and the writing of a senior thesis, normally produced in Spanish 491. The thesis (a forty-page essay) is submitted and the oral examination taken near the end of the senior year. In the oral examination the thesis must be defended by the Honors concentrator. Honors students are expected to complete the requirements for concentration in Spanish.

Teaching Certificate: Candidates for a secondary school teaching certificate should study the general information about requirements which appears under the Teacher Certification Program in this Bulletin.

A teaching major in Spanish requires 30 credits beyond Spanish 276(362). From 9 to 12 credits must be selected at the 300-level, including Spanish 340(375) or 341(376) and at least three credits in literature. The remaining 18 to 21 credits must be selected at the 400-level, including Spanish 411, 412, Romance Linguistics 414, and 6 credits in literature. A teaching minor in Spanish requires 21 credits beyond Spanish 275(361), including Spanish 276(362) and 412. The remaining course selections must include 6 to 9 credits at the 300-level and 6 to 9 credits at the 400-level.

Advising. The concentration advisors are Professor L. López-Grigera, J. Highfill, F Casa, F. Aparicio, J Rabasa, and C. Brown. Professor L. Carbón Gorell is the advisor for candidates for a secondary school teaching certificate. Appointments through the department secretary in 4108 MLB.

Spain Summer Study Program. The University of Michigan sponsors a six-week program during the Summer half term in Barcelona and Madrid, Spain for second and third year courses. Information about this program is available at the Office of International Programs G513 Michigan Union, 764-4311. See also International Programs in this chapter of the Bulletin.

Junior Year Abroad The University of Michigan jointly sponsors a Junior Year Abroad in Spain (University of Seville) with Cornell University. A Junior Year Abroad in Chile (Catholic University of Chile) and Quito is sponsored jointly with the University of Wisconsin-Madison and University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. Information about these program and other study abroad opportunities is available at the Office of International Programs, G513 Michigan Union, 764-4311. See also International Programs in this chapter of the Bulletin.


Courses in French (Division 371)

Elementary Language Courses

Students who intend to continue a language begun in high school or at another college or university must take the Placement Test to determine the language course in which they should enroll. French 102 is NOT open to students who have begun instruction in high school.

101. Elementary French. Students with any prior study of French must take the Placement Test. Credit is not granted for more than two courses from French 101, 102, and 103. (4). (LR).

102. Elementary French, Continued. French 101. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 103. French 102 is NOT open to students who have begun instruction at the high school level. College or university transfer students who have received credit for one term are encouraged to enroll in French 103. (4). (LR).

103. Review of Elementary French. Assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 102. (4). (LR).

205. French Conversation for Non-concentrators. French 102, or 103, or equivalent. I, II in Ann Arbor; IIIb in St. Malo, France. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

231. Second-Year French. French 102, or 103, or equivalent; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 112 or 230. I, II, IIIa in Ann Arbor; IIIb in St. Malo, France. (4). (LR).

232. Second-Year French, Continued. French 231 or equivalent; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 112 or 230. I, II, IIIa, IIIb in Ann Arbor; IIIb in St. Malo, France. (4). (LR).

Courses Taught in English (without language prerequisite)

214/Hist. 214. Interpretations of French Society and Culture. Taught in English. A knowledge of French is not required. (3). (HU).

240. French and Francophone Topics in Translation. Taught in English. A knowledge of French is not required. (3). (HU).

244. Issues in Race and Cultural Diversity in the Francophone World. Taught in English. A knowledge of French is not required. (3). (HU).

342. French and Francophone Film Taught in English. Taught in English. A knowledge of French is not required. (3). (HU). Laboratory fee ($35) required.

444(401). Readings in French and Francophone Studies (in English Translation). Taught in English. A knowledge of French is not required. One course in French numbered 240 or above. May not be included in a concentration plan in French (or teaching minor). Only one literature in translation course may be considered for the concentration requirements. (3). (HU).

Cultural and Literary Studies

250. First-Year Seminar in French and Francophone Studies. French 232. (4). (HU).

270. French and Francophone Literature and Culture. French 232. (4). (HU). May be repeated for a total of 8 credits.

272. French and Francophone Film, Media, and Culture. French 232. (4). (HU). Laboratory fee ($35) required.

274. French and Francophone Societies and Culture. French 232. (4). (HU). May be repeated for a total of 8 credits.

276. Spoken and Written Performance in French. French 232. (4). (HU).

350(381). Special Topics in French and Francophone Studies. French 232, and 8 credits in courses numbered between French 250 and 299. (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of 9 credits.

362. Quebec and French Canadian Studies. French 232, and 8 credits in courses numbered between French 250 and 299. (3). (Excl).

363. Caribbean Studies. French 232, and 8 credits in courses numbered between French 250 and 299. (3). (Excl).

364. African Studies (Maghreb). French 232, and 8 credits in courses numbered between French 250 and 299. (3). (Excl).

365. African Studies (Sub-Saharan). French 232, and 8 credits in courses numbered between French 250 and 299. (3). (Excl).

366(386)/MARC 386. Medieval Literature, History, and Culture. French 232, and 8 credits in courses numbered between French 250 and 299. (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of 6 credits.

367(387). Literature, History, and Culture of Early Modern France. French 232, and 8 credits in courses numbered between French 250 and 299. (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of 6 credits.

368(388). Enlightenment, Revolution, and Romanticism. French 232, and 8 credits in courses numbered between French 250 and 299. (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of 6 credits.

369(389). Literature, History, and Culture of Modernity. French 232, and 8 credits in courses numbered between French 250 and 299. (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of 6 credits.

372(440). Film and Cinema Studies. French 232, and 8 credits in courses numbered between French 250 and 299. (3). (Excl). Laboratory fee ($35) required.

373. Studies in Popular Culture. French 232, and 8 credits in courses numbered between French 250 and 299. (3). (Excl).

374(430). Problems in Society and Social Theory. French 232, and 8 credits in courses numbered between French 250 and 299. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of nine credits.

375. Cinema and Society in the Francophone World. French 232, and 8 credits in courses numbered between French 250 and 299. (3). (Excl). Laboratory fee ($35) required.

377. Media Studies. French 232, and 8 credits in courses numbered between French 250 and 299. (3). (Excl). Laboratory fee ($35) required.

378. Studies in Genre. French 232, and 8 credits in courses numbered between French 250 and 299. (3). (Excl).

379. Studies in Gender and Sexuality. French 232, and 8 credits in courses numbered between French 250 and 299. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 6 credits.

384. Origins of Contemporary France: From the Gauls to de Gaulle. French 235. (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of 9 credits.

385. Contemporary France: Politics, Culture, and Society. French 235. (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of 9 credits.

399(350/450). Independent Study. French 232 or the equivalent and permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of 6 credit.

450(460). Special Studies. Three courses in French numbered 300 or above. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

461(475)/MARC 444. Reading of Old French Texts. Three courses in French numbered 300 or above. (3). (Excl).

463(453). Literature of the Seventeenth Century. Three courses in French numbered 300 or above. (3). (Excl).

464(454). Literature of the Eighteenth Century. Three courses in French numbered 300 or above. (3). (Excl).

465(455). Literature of the Nineteenth Century. Three courses in French numbered 300 or above. (3). (Excl).

466(457). Literature of the Twentieth Century. Three courses in French numbered 300 or above. (3). (Excl).

469(470). African and Caribbean Literature. Three courses in French numbered 300 or above. (3). (Excl). (This course meets the Race and Ethnicity Requirement). May be elected for a total of 6 credits.

491. Senior Honors Course. Open only to seniors by permission of the departmental Honors Committee. (3). (Excl).

492. Senior Honors Course. Open only to seniors by permission of the departmental Honors Committee. (3). (Excl).

Other Language Courses

111. First Special Reading Course. French 111 and 112 are designed for juniors, seniors, and graduate students interested in gaining a reading knowledge of the language. Completion of French 111-112 does not satisfy the LSA language requirement. May not be elected for credit by undergraduates who have received credit for college French. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 101, 102, or 103. (4). (Excl).

112. Second Special Reading Course. French 111. French 111 and 112 are designed for juniors, seniors, and graduate students interested in gaining a reading knowledge of the language. Completion of French 111-112 does not satisfy the LSA language requirement. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 230, 231, or 232. (4). (Excl).

235(361). Advanced Practice in French. French 232. May not be included in a concentration plan in French. I, II in Ann Arbor; IIIb in St. Malo, France. (3). (Excl).

333(363). French Phonetics. French 232, and 8 credits in courses numbered between French 250 and 299. (3). (Excl).

335(371). Composition and Stylistics. French 232, and 8 credits in courses numbered between French 250 and 299. (3). (Excl).

370/RC Core 370. Advanced Proficiency in French. French 235 or RC Core 320. (3). (Excl).

380. Intermediate Business French. French 235 and one additional course numbered 250 and above. A maximum of six credits of French 380, 414, and Business Administration 415 may be counted toward a degree. (3). (Excl).

436. French for Professions. Three courses in French numbered 300 or above. (3). (Excl).

437. Special Topics in the Linguistics of French. Three courses in French numbered 300 or above. (3). (Excl).

438(428)/Rom. Ling. 456/Educ. D456. Topics in Learning and Teaching French. French 232, and 8 credits in courses numbered between French 250 and 299. (3). (Excl).

439. Writing Workshop. Three courses in French numbered 300 or above. (3). (Excl).


Courses in Italian (Division 399)

Elementary Language Courses

101. Elementary Italian. I, II, IIIa in Ann Arbor; III in Florence, Italy. (4). (LR).

102. Elementary Italian. Italian 101. I, II, IIIb in Ann Arbor. (4). (LR).

103. Accelerated Italian. Assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 102. (4). (LR).

111. Special Reading Course. (4). (Excl).

205. Italian Conversation for Non-concentrators. Italian 102. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

206. Conversation for Non-concentrators. Italian 102. Italian 206 may be elected prior to Italian 205. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

231. Second-Year Italian. Italian 102; or permission of course supervisor. No credit granted to those who have completed 112 or 230. I and II in Ann Arbor; III in Florence, Italy. (4). (LR).

232. Second-Year Italian, Continued. Italian 231 or permission of course supervisor. No credit granted to those who have completed 112. (4). (LR).

233. Accelerated Second Year Italian. Italian 102 or 103. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Italian 112 or 232. (4). (Excl). This course does not satisfy the language requirement.

Courses Taught in English Translation (without language prerequisites)

150. First Year Seminar in Italian Studies. (3). (HU).

310. Italian Cities. (3). (HU). May be repeated for credit with permission of instructor.

315(380). Italian Cinema and Society Since 1945. A knowledge of Italian is not required. II. (3). (HU). Laboratory fee ($10) required.

325(420). Italian Novels and Films. One literature course (in any field); knowledge of Italian is not required. (2-3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 9 credits.

433/MARC 439. Dante's Divine Comedy. A knowledge of Italian is not required. (3). (HU).

Other Language and Literature Courses

235(362). Intermediate Italian. Italian 232. (3). (Excl).

300. Advanced Composition and Conversation. Italian 232 and 235. (3). (Excl).

340(360). Contemporary Italian Culture. Italian 232. (3). (HU).

350(468). The Historical Novel. Italian 232. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of nine credits.

359. Italian Culture and History to the Eighteenth Century. (3). (HU).

361. Intermediate Italian. Italian 232. (3). (Excl).

374. Topics in Italian Literature. Italian 232. (3). (HU). May be repeated for credit.

387. Italian Renaissance Literature. Italian 232. (3). (HU).

399(485). Directed Reading. May be elected only with permission of concentration advisor in Italian. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

400(472). Pirandello. Italian 232. (3). (Excl).

419. Italo Calvino: A Writer for All Seasons. One literature course (in any field); knowledge of Italian is not required. (2). (HU).

475. Dante, Petrarca, Boccaccio. Italian 232. (3). (HU).

481. Boccaccio, Bandello, and the Novella. Italian 232. (3). (Excl).

483. Ariosto and Tasso. Italian 232. (3). (Excl).

486. Petrarch's Canzoniere.Italian 232. (3). (Excl).


Courses in Portuguese (Division 452)

101. Elementary Portuguese. (4). (LR).

102. Elementary Portuguese. Portuguese 101. (4). (LR).

231. Second-Year Portuguese. Portuguese 102. (4). (LR).

232. Second-Year Portuguese. Portuguese 231. (4). (LR).

350. Independent Study. Portuguese 232. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected for a total of six credits.

450. Independent Study. Permission of department. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected for a total of six credits.


Courses in Romance Linguistics (Division 460)

300. Introduction to the Romance Languages. French, Spanish, or Italian: five terms at college level. (3). (Excl).

410/Spanish 410. Spanish Phonetics and Phonology. Spanish 275 and 276. (3). (Excl).

413/Spanish 413/Educ. D455. Teaching Spanish/Applications of Linguistics. Spanish 275 and 276. (3). (Excl).

414/Spanish 414. Background of Modern Spanish. Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl).

450. Independent Study. Permission of department. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

456/French 438/Educ. D456. Topics in Learning and Teaching French. French 232, and 8 credits in courses numbered between French 250 and 299. (3). (Excl).

503/Class. Ling. 503. History of the Latin Language I: 600-1 B.C. Latin 231. (2). (Excl).


Courses in Spanish (Division 484)

Elementary Language Courses

Students who intend to continue a language begun in high school are given a placement test to determine the course level at which they will start their college language instruction. Students must check with the course coordinators and Program Director for any exceptions to the Placement Test level.

101. Elementary Spanish. (4). (LR).

102. Elementary Spanish, Continued. Spanish 101. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 103. Spanish 102 is NOT open to students who have begun instruction at the high school level. Open only to students who have completed 101 at the University of Michigan. College or university transfer students who have received credit for one term are encouraged to enroll in Spanish 103. (4). (LR).

103. Review of Elementary Spanish. Assignment by placement test or permission of department. Transfer students elect Spanish 103 if they have completed the equivalent of Spanish 101 elsewhere. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 102. (4). (LR).

231. Second-Year Spanish. Spanish 102 or 103; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 112 or 230. I, II, IIIa in Ann Arbor; IIIb in Salamanca, Spain. (4). (LR).

232. Second-Year Spanish, Continued. Spanish 231; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 230 or 112. I, II, IIIa, IIIb in Ann Arbor; IIIb in Salamanca, Spain. (4). (LR).

233. Intensive Second-Year Spanish. Spanish 231 completed with a grade of B or better; assignment by placement test or permission of Program Director. No credit granted to those who have completed 230, 232, or 112. (3). (Excl).

Special Elementary Reading Courses

Spanish 111 and 112 are designed for juniors, seniors, and graduate students interested in gaining a reading knowledge of the language.

111. First Special Reading Course. May not be elected for credit by undergraduates who have already received credit for high school or college Spanish. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 101, 102, or 103. (4). (Excl).

112. Second Special Reading Course. Spanish 111. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 230, 231, or 232. (4). (Excl).

Other Language Courses

270(358). Spanish Conversation for Non-Concentrators. Spanish 232 or 233. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Spanish 275(361) or 276(362). A maximum of six credits of Spanish 270, 275, and 276 may be counted toward graduation. (3). (Excl).

275(361). Grammar and Composition. Spanish 232 or 233. A maximum of six credits of Spanish 270, 275, and 276 may be counted toward graduation. I, II, IIIa in Ann Arbor; IIIb in Salamanca, Spain. (3). (Excl).

276(362). Reading and Composition. Spanish 232 or 233. A maximum of six credits of Spanish 270, 275, and 276 may be counted toward graduation. I, II in Ann Arbor; IIIb in Salamanca, Spain. (3). (Excl).

290(307)/Amer. Cult. 224. Spanish for U.S. Latinos. Basic knowledge of Spanish language. (4). (Excl). This course does not satisfy the language requirement.

305. Spanish for Business and the Professions. Spanish 275 and 276. (3). (Excl).

410/Rom. Ling. 410. Spanish Phonetics and Phonology. Spanish 275 and 276. (3). (Excl).

411. Advanced Syntax. Spanish 275 and 276. (3). (Excl).

412. Spanish Grammar for Teachers. Spanish 275 and 276. (3). (Excl).

413/Rom. Ling. 413/Educ. D455. Teaching Spanish/Applications of Linguistics. Spanish 275 and 276. (3). (Excl).

414/Rom. Ling. 414. Background of Modern Spanish. Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl).

415(363). Problems in Language Translation. Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl). May be elected for a total of six credits.

Literature

320. Introduction to the Study of Literature. Spanish 275 and 276. (3). (HU).

328. Studies in Latin(o) American Popular Culture. Spanish 275 and 276. (3). (Excl).

331/Great Books 331. Great Books of Spain and Latin America. Open to students at all levels. A knowledge of Spanish is not required. May not be included in a concentration plan in Spanish (or teaching certificate major or minor). (3). (HU).

332. Short Narrative in Latin America/Spain. Spanish 275 and 276. (3). (HU).

335(388). Contemporary Spanish and Spanish-American Literature. Spanish 275 and 276. (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of 6 credits.

340(375). Introduction to Iberian Cultures. Spanish 275 and 276. (3). (Excl).

341(376). Introduction to Latin American Cultures. Spanish 275 and 276. (3). (Excl).

350. Independent Studies. Permission of concentration advisor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected for credit more than once with permission.

355. New World Spanish. Spanish 275 and 276. (3). (Excl).

368. Literature and the Other Arts. Spanish 275 and 276, and one additional 300-level course. (3). (HU).

371. Survey of Spanish Literature, I. Spanish 275 and 276, and one additional 300-level course. (3). (HU).

372. Survey of Spanish Literature, II. Spanish 275 and 276, and one additional 300-level course. (3). (HU).

373. Topics in Hispanic Literatures and Cultures. Spanish 275 and 276, and one additional 300-level course. I, II in Ann Arbor; IIIb in Salamanca, Spain. (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of 6 credits.

381. Survey of Latin American Literature, I. Spanish 275 and 276, and one additional 300-level course. (3). (HU).

382. Survey of Latin American Literature, II. Spanish 275 and 276, and one additional 300-level course. (3; 2 in the half-term). (HU).

387. Social Forces and Literary Expression in Golden Age Spain. Spanish 275 and 276, and one additional 300-level course. (3; 2 in the half-term). (HU).

391. Junior Honors Course. Permission of departmental Honors Committee. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

392. Junior Honors Course. Permission of departmental Honors Committee. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

400. Spanish and Latin American Literature in Translation. A knowledge of Spanish is not required. Open to students at all levels. May not be included in a concentration plan in Spanish (or teaching certificate major or minor). (3). (Excl).

425. Latin-American Theater. Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level course. (3). (Excl).

430. Advanced Studies in Spanish Culture and Society. Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl).

432. Gender, Writing, and Culture. Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level course. (3). (Excl).

435. Independent Study. Permission of department. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected for a total of 3 credits.

437. Introduction to Literature Studies and Criticism. Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl). May be elected for a total of 6 credits.

440. Literatures and Cultures of the Borderlands. Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level course. (3). (Excl).

445. Romance Studies: Introduction to French-Spanish Literary Relations. A reading knowledge of French and Spanish. (3). (Excl).

450. Middle Ages. Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl).

451. Spanish Literature of the Fifteenth Century. Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl).

456. Golden Age. Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl).

457. Trends of Golden Age Thought. Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl).

458. The Spanish Picaresque Novel. Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl).

459. Don Quijote. Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (HU).

460. The Spanish Comedia. Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl).

463. Spanish Literature of the Eighteenth Century. Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl).

464. Spanish Romanticism. Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl).

465. The Modern Spanish Novel I. Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl).

466. The Modern Spanish Novel II. Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl).

467. Literary and Artistic Movements in Modern Spain. Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 9 credits.

468. Spanish Theater of the Twentieth Century. Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl).

470. Latin-American Literature, Sixteenth to Nineteenth Centuries. Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl).

473. Colonial/Postcolonial Studies in Latin-American Cultures. Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl).

475. Latin American Narrative of the Twentieth Century. Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl). May be elected for a total of 9 credits.

476. Latin American Poetry of the Twentieth Century. Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl). May be elected for a total of 9 credits.

485. Case Studies in Peninsular Spanish and Latin American Literature. Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. I, II in Ann Arbor; IIIb in Barcelona, Spain. (3). (Excl). May be elected for a total of 6 credits.

488. Topics in Hispanic Literatures and Cultures. Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl). May be elected for a total of 6 credits.

490. Spanish Honors: Introduction to Literary Studies and Criticism. One 400-level Spanish literature course, and permission of Honors advisor. (3). (Excl).

491. Senior Honors Course. Open only to seniors by permission of the departmental Honors Committee. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).


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