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Courses in Russian (Division 466)


Russian 101. First-Year Russian.
(Language)
No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 103 or 111. (5; 4 in the half-term). (LR).
Introduction to the essentials of the Russian language featuring a four-skills approach to provide a firm control of the sound system and the structure of Russian. Major emphasis is on the development of oral expression and acquisition of cultural knowledge. Use of the language laboratory is required.
Russian 102. First-Year Russian, Continued.
(Language)
Russian 101. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 103, 111, or 112. (5; 4 in the half-term). (LR).
Continuation of Russian 101.
Russian 103/RC Core 193. Intensive First-Year Russian.
(Language)
No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 101, 102, 111, or 112. (8). (LR).
Equivalent of Russian 101 and 102 taught in one term. Designed for highly motivated students who wish to acquire rapid mastery of Russian. Emphasis is placed upon vocabulary building, speaking, and comprehension.
Russian 105. Spoken Russian I.
(Language)
Russian 101; student must be concurrently enrolled in Russian 102. (1). (Excl).
Supplementary conversation course meeting one hour weekly, specifically for students simultaneously enrolled in Russian 102.
Russian 106. Spoken Russian II.
(Language)
Russian 102; student must be concurrently enrolled in Russian 201. (1). (Excl).
Supplementary conversation course meeting one hour weekly, specifically for students simultaneously enrolled in Russian 201.
Russian 107. Spoken Russian III.
(Language)
Russian 201; student must be concurrently enrolled in Russian 202. (1). (Excl).
Supplementary conversation course meeting one hour weekly, specifically for students simultaneously enrolled in Russian 202.
Russian 201. Second-Year Russian.
(Language)
Russian 102 or 103. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 203. (5; 4 in the half-term). (LR).
Second-level course reviewing the fundamentals of Russian grammar through both written exercises and oral drill. More complex structures are introduced, and supplementary readings intended to broaden the vocabulary are assigned. Use of the language laboratory is required.
Russian 202. Second-Year Russian, Continued.
(Language)
Russian 201. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 203. (5; 4 in the half-term). (LR).
Continuation of Russian 201.
Russian 203/RC Core 293. Intensive Second Year Russian.
(Language)
Russian 102 or 103. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Russian 201 or 202. (8). (LR).
Equivalent of Russian 201 and 202 taught in one term. Special emphasis is placed on speaking, comprehension and vocabulary building. Recommended for students who intend to concentrate in Russian or REES.
Russian 222. Russia Today.
(Literature)
(4). (HU).
An examination of how contemporary Russia defines itself through many forms of cultural production.
Russian 231. Russian Culture and Society: An Introduction.
(Literature)
(3). (HU).
Interdisciplinary course spanning many periods and areas of Russian culture, from medieval times to the present day, covering art, music, literature, architecture, popular culture, and cinema.
Russian 301. Third-Year Russian.
(Language)
Russian 202, and satisfactory scores on a proficiency test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 303. (4). (Excl).
The course provides concentrated training in the speaking, aural comprehension, and writing of Russian.
Russian 302. Third-Year Russian.
(Language)
Russian 301. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 303. (4). (Excl).
The course provides concentrated training in the speaking, aural comprehension, and writing of Russian.
Russian 303. Third-Year Intensive Russian.
(Language)
Russian 203. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 301 or 302. (8). (Excl).
Russian 303 is the intensive variant of Russian 301 and 302, and provides a concentrated review of grammar, introductory readings in Russian culture and literature, and regular practice in conversation.
Russian 351. Introduction to Russian Literature.
(Literature)
Russian 202. (3). (Excl).
The course provides third-year students with insight into the main trends of nineteenth and twentieth century Russian prose and develops a facility in reading Russian literary texts rapidly and with thorough comprehension. Lectures and readings in Russian.
Russian 352. Introduction to Russian Literature.
(Literature)
Russian 351. (3). (Excl).
A practical introduction to Russian poetry from Derzhavin to the 20th century including principles of versification. Lectures and readings in Russian.
Russian 355. Supervised Reading of Russian Literature.
(Literature)
Permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected for credit twice.
The course is designed for students who have completed one or more courses in Russian literature and wish to continue but are unable to enroll in a regular course owing to scheduling difficulties. Literary texts in various genres are read and discussed, and papers are required.
Russian 401. Fourth-Year Russian.
(Language)
Russian 302. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 403. (4). (Excl).
Systematic review of Russian grammar combined with continued work on speaking, reading, and writing through inquiry into Russian attitudes toward such issues as the changing political and social system, the environment, gender roles in society, justice and the law, prestige and success, among others. Assignments include film and TV viewing for comprehension development, compositions, and oral reports.
Russian 402. Fourth-Year Russian.
(Language)
Russian 401. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 403. (4). (Excl).
Continued work on vocabulary combined with the mastery of oral fluency and freedom of self-expression in speech and writing. Readings taken from Russian short stories and the press.
Russian 403. Fourth-Year Intensive Russian.
(Language)
Russian 302. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 401 or 402. (8). (Excl).
Russian 403 is the intensive variant of Russian 401-402, and is designed to provide concentrated drill leading to an active mastery of various facets of Russian grammar, especially the verbal system. Assignments include Russian short stories, compositions, and oral reports.
Russian 410/EducationD 437. Teaching of Russian.
(Language)
Permission of instructor. (2). (Excl).
An exploration of the multiple aspects of language teaching, including theoretical background. Topics of discussion include intercultural understanding, drilling, testing, computer-assisted instruction, and multi-media technology. Emphasis on development of practical skills for classroom instruction.
Russian 413. Business Russian.
(Language)
Russian 302. (3; 4 in the half-term). (Excl).
The course is designed for advanced Russian students who are oriented toward economics and business. In particular this would target seniors seeking experience in international business, and graduate students in the Center for Russian and East European Studies.
Russian 414. Political Russian.
(Language)
Russian 302. (3; 4 in the half-term). (Excl).
The course is designed for advanced Russian students who are oriented toward economics and politics. In particular the course targets juniors and seniors seeking experience in political science or political studies, and graduate students in the Center for Russian and East European Studies.
Russian 415. Analysis of Contemporary Spoken Russian.
(Language)
Russian 402 or 403. (3; 4 in the half-term). (Excl).
An analysis of selected features of modern spoken Russian as illustrated in Soviet plays and prose works. Reports and discussions by students, exclusively in Russian, and supplementary reading from contemporary source materials in the Russian language.
Russian 416. Analysis of Contemporary Spoken Russian.
(Language)
Russian 415. (3). (Excl).
An analysis of selected features of modern spoken Russian as illustrated in Soviet plays and prose works. Reports and discussions by students, exclusively in Russian, and supplementary reading from contemporary source materials in the Russian language.
Russian 417. Contemporary Russian Culture.
(Language)
Russian 302. The course is conducted in Russian. (3). (Excl).
Lectures and discussions conducted in Russian and designed to acquaint students with various aspects of contemporary life in Russia. Special attention is devoted to the development of oral-aural skills in the use of the Russian language.
Russian 419. Russian Stylistics.
(Language)
Russian 402 or 403. (3). (Excl).
An analysis of syntactic and morphological structure and word usage of contemporary Russian (colloquial style, official style, etc.) Questions of synonymity, word order, and lexical differentiation. Problems of translation and comparative analysis of English and Russian constructions. Reading of prose, essays, and poetry. Recommended to all students who intend to teach Russian (seniors and graduate students).
Russian 420. Russian Stylistics.
(Language)
Russian 402 or 403. (3). (Excl).
An analysis of literary styles in their historical perspective. The focus of this course may vary depending on the preparation of the students, e.g., a particular literary school or author(s) may be chosen. Through a close analysis of texts the specific stylistic features are discovered and evaluated. Thorough knowledge of Russian required.
Russian 449. Twentieth-Century Russian Literature.
(Literature)
A knowledge of Russian is not required. (3). (HU).
This historical survey of Russian literature from 1890 to 1921 covers the final achievements of realism in the later works of Tolstoy and Chekhov, the art of symbolism, the post-symbolist currents in poetry and prose, and the major literary events of the first post-revolutionary years both in the USSR and in exile. The required reading includes English translations of representative poems by Soloviev, Briusov, Balmont, Merezhkovsky, Hippius, Sologub, Blok, Belyi, Viacheslav Ivanov, Annensky, Kuzmin, Khodasevich, Gumilev, Akhmatova, Mandelstam, Khlebnikov, Maiakovsky, Pasternak, Tsvetaeva, Esenin, and Kliuev.
Russian 450. Twentieth-Century Russian Literature.
(Literature)
A knowledge of Russian is not required. (3). (HU).
A sequel to Russian 449 but quite independent of it. Surveys Russian literature from 1920 to present include Babel, Zamyatin, Bulgakov, Pasternak, Solzenitsyn, Erofeev, and Sokolov.
Russian 451/RC Hums. 451. Survey of Russian Literature.
(Literature)
A knowledge of Russian is not required. (3). (HU).
Russian literature 1820-1870, with emphasis on Pushkin, Lermontov, Gogol, Turgenev, Dostoevsky, and Tolstoy. Lectures, assigned reading, and discussions.
Russian 452/RC Hums. 452. Survey of Russian Literature.
(Literature)
A knowledge of Russian is not required. (3). (HU).
Russian literature from circa 1870 to 1905, with emphasis upon Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Leskov, Chekhov. Lectures, assigned reading, and discussions.
Russian 453. Emigre Literature: Nabokov.
(Literature)
A knowledge of Russian is not required. (3). (Excl).
A study of Russian and English novels, short stories, poetry, and plays of Vladimir Nabokov.
Russian 454. Russian Poetry to 1840.
(Literature)
Thorough knowledge of Russian. (3). (Excl).
Close reading of the major Russian poets from Polocky to Lermontov. Discussion of literary trends and polemics pertaining to style, themes and general orientation of a given period.
Russian 455. Russian Poetry from 1840 to 1900.
(Literature)
Thorough knowledge of Russian. (3). (Excl).
Close reading of Russian poets from Tiutchev to Bunin. Discussion of literary trends and polemics.
Russian 456. Russian Drama Through Chekhov.
(Literature)
A knowledge of Russian is not required. (3). (Excl).
A brief survey of pre-19th century Russian drama, followed by a close analysis of major plays of the 19th century playwrights.
Russian 457. Russian Drama from Ostrovsky to the Present.
(Literature)
Thorough knowledge of Russian. (3). (Excl).
Major dramatic works of the 19th and 20th centuries are studied against the general cultural and literary background as well as the Russian theatrical tradition. Lectures, discussions, and readings are in Russian.
Russian 460. Russian Social Fiction.
(Literature)
(3). (Excl).
A study of Russian literature of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries with emphasis on the art of social or national purpose.
Russian 461. Pushkin.
(Literature)
Russian 352. A knowledge of Russian is required. (3). (Excl).
This course discusses the poetry, prose, and drama of Alexander Pushkin.
Russian 462. Dostoevsky.
(Literature)
A knowledge of Russian is not required. (3). (HU).
Readings and discussions of Dostoevsky's major works from earliest (Poor Folk) to latest (Brothers Karamazov). Lectures and discussions in English.
Russian 463. Chekhov.
(Literature)
A knowledge of Russian is not required. (3). (Excl).
A close analysis of Chekhov's prose and drama with emphasis upon its development and stylistic features.
Russian 464. Tolstoy.
(Literature)
A knowledge of Russian is not required. (3). (Excl).
An analysis of Tolstoy's art and its development as revealed in his major works.
Russian 471. Modern Russian Poetry.
(Literature)
A knowledge of Russian is required. (3). (Excl).
Russian poetry in the age of Symbolism. Detailed analysis of representative texts.
Russian 472. Modern Russian Poetry.
(Literature)
A knowledge of Russian is required. (3). (Excl).
Russian Post-Symbolist poetry. Fundamentals of Acmeist and Futurist poetics. Explication of selected texts.
Russian 476(Slavic 567). Russian Literary and Cultural Theory and the West.
(Literature)
(3). (Excl).
This course examines the contributions of twentieth-century Russian critical theory to the Western understanding of literature and culture. Works by the Russian Formalists, Soviet semioticians, Bakhtin and his circle, as well as contemporary post-modernists are discussed in the light of comparable Western approaches.
Russian 480. Popular Sub-Genres in Modern Russian Literature.
(Literature)
(3). (Excl).
A historical and comparative survey of the "entertaining" sub-genres characterized by stable plots and themes: science fiction, crime, historical romance, adventure, etc. Extensions of these in children's literature and nonfiction. Analysis of selected "classics" and "commercials" with regard to their specific plot structure, subject matter, narrative and descriptive techniques, ideological trends, and social impact.
Russian 482. Ten Masterpieces of Russian Literature.
(Literature)
A knowledge of Russian is not required. (2). (Excl).
Readings, lectures, and discussions of ten representative works (novels, plays, short novels, or short stories) from the body of Russian literature. A different genre offered every other year.
Russian 491. Senior Honors Course.
(Literature)
Approval of departmental Honors Committee. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). Credit is granted for a combined total of six credits of Russian 491 and 492.
Supervised independent study leading to a comprehensive knowledge of particular aspects of Slavic literature or linguistics.
Russian 492. Senior Honors Course.
(Literature)
Approval of departmental Honors Committee. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). Credit is granted for a combined total of six credits of Russian 491 and 492.
Supervised independent study leading to a comprehensive knowledge of particular aspects of Slavic literature or linguistics.
Russian 563. Russian Literary Movements and Genres.
(Literature)
Open to upper-level undergraduates. A knowledge of Russian is not required.(3). (Excl).
Immanent study of the history of Russian literature concentrating on problems of style and genre evolution, literary movements and trends, and periodization. The main material for the course consists of readings in the relevant scholarship. Extensive acquintance with Russian literature and a reading fluency in Russian required.


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