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Courses in Sociology (Division 482)


Soc. 100. Principles of Sociology.
Open to first- and second-year students. Juniors are strongly encouraged to enroll in Soc. 400. Seniors must elect Soc. 400. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 195 or 400. No credit for seniors. (4; 3 in the half-term). (SS).
An introduction to the sociological study of human groups.
Soc. 101. Person and Society: An Introduction to Sociology Through Social Psychology.
Open to first- and second-year students. Juniors are strongly encouraged and seniors must take Soc. 400 or 401. No credit for seniors. (4; 3 in the half-term). (SS).
An introductory study of the interrelationships of the functioning of social systems and the behavior and attitudes of individuals. Lecture and discussion.
Soc. 102. Contemporary Social Issues: An Introduction to Sociology.
Open to first- and second-year students. Juniors are strongly encouraged and seniors must take Soc. 400 or 401. No credit for seniors. (4; 3 in the half-term). (SS). Credit is granted for a combined total of eight credits elected through Soc. 102, 202, 203, and 401, provided that the course topics are different.
This course provides an introduction to sociology through an in-depth analysis of one or more contemporary social issues. The issues vary from term to term. Students should consult the Time Schedule for the topic.
Soc. 105. First Year Seminar in Sociology.
Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS).
Serves as a vehicle for Gateway seminars in Sociology.
Soc. 111/UC 111/AOSS 172/NR&E 111. Introduction to Global Change II.
No credit for seniors. (4). (SS).
An introduction to the evolution of life and the human species on earth, with focus on problems of global change produced by recent human advances in technology and institutions.
Soc. 122/Psych. 122. Intergroup Dialogues.
Intended primarily for first- and second-year students. May not be used as a prerequisite for a concentration in psychology. (2). (Excl). May not be included in a concentration in psychology or sociology. May be repeated for a total of four credits.
Students participate in structured meetings of at least two different social identity groups, discuss readings, and explore each group's experiences in social and institutional contexts. Students examine psychological, historical, and sociological materials which address each group's experiences, and learn about issues facing the groups in contemporary society.
Soc. 195. Principles in Sociology (Honors).
Open to first- and second-year students admitted to the Honors Program, or other first- and second-year students with a grade point average of at least 3.2. Juniors are strongly encouraged and seniors must take Soc. 400. Credit is not granted for both Sociology 195 and Sociology 100 or 400. No credit for seniors. (4). (SS).
An intensive introduction to sociology theory and research.
Soc. 205. Poverty, Race, and Health.
(3). (Excl).
This course critically examines the health status of disadvantaged/minority groups in the U.S. Attention is focused on the patterned ways in which the health of this groups is embedded in the social, cultural, political, and economic contexts and arrangements of U.S. society.
Soc. 210. Elementary Statistics.
Sociology Honors students should elect this course prior to beginning the Honors Seminar sequence. Sociology concentrators should elect this course prior to their last term. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Stat. 100, 265, 311, 402, 405, or 412, or Econ. 404 or 405. (4; 3 in the half-term). (MSA). (BS). (QR/1).
A survey of the use of statistics in research. Students are introduced to descriptive measures and problems of inference in relation to a wide range of materials. An introduction to statistical packages on microcomputers is provided.
Soc. 212. Sports and Society.
(3). (Excl).
This course embraces the broad-based sociological theory that is covered in typical sociology courses taught at this level. Sports is the phenomenon being examined in this course to exemplify these sociological principles. This substantive focus is based on the fact that sports is an integral part of society and when it is examined, it is obvious that it is a microcosm. Since sports is so closely tied to the American ethos and societal values, it is an excellent and logical example to emphasize because it is of such wide popular appeal both today and historically.
Soc. 220/RC Soc. Sci. 220. Political Economy.
(4; 2 in the half-term). (SS).
This course uses the approach of a critical social science, exemplified by political economy, to analyze major institutional sectors of modern society such as the state, education, and bureaucracy. The analysis is applied to questions of inequality, to relations between advanced industrial societies and the Third World, and to patterns of response to these developments including successful and unsuccessful revolutions of the modern era.
Soc. 222/RC Soc. Sci. 222. Strategies in Social Interaction: An Introduction to Game Theory.
(4). (Excl).
This course explores human society from the interdisciplinary social science perspective of contemporary game theory, the theory of strategies in social interaction. The course combines a systematic exposition of elementary game theory with an examination of several applications in particular disciplines as well as experimental in-class workshops.
Soc. 231. Investigating Social and Demographic Change in America.
Restricted to first- and second-year students. (4). (SS). (QR/2).
This social demography course introduces students to basic dimensions of race, class, household, and industrial stratification in American society. Through readings, lectures and computer analyses of census data, students examine the ways in which major social and economic changes have affected the nation's demographic structure in recent decades.
Soc. 302/Amer. Cult. 302. Introduction to American Society.
(3). (Excl).
A survey of the major social institutions of contemporary American society. Special consideration is given to American social stratification, economic institutions, political institutions, religious organizations, educational organizations, and kinship institutions. Analyzes American common values of the maintenance of societal normative integration in the face of change.
Soc. 303/CAAS 303. Race and Ethnic Relations.
An introductory course in sociology or CAAS. (4; 3 in the half-term). (SS). (R&E).
This course examines the history and problems that racial minorities have faced in the U.S. by surveying the experiences of groups such as African Americans, Mexican Americans, Puerto Ricans, Native Americans, and Asians. The social history of the groups is discussed as well as the social problems confronting it.
Soc. 304/Amer. Cult. 304. American Immigration.
(3). (SS).
As America is a nation of immigrants, this course surveys the immigrant past of ethnic groups such as the Irish, Germans, Jews, Italians, Chinese, Japanese, Blacks, Puerto Ricans, Cubans, and Mexicans. Surveying these varied ethnic histories, we analyze them from contrasting theoretical perspectives on race and ethnic relations, theories of assimilation, internal colonialism, etc. We seek to understand what is unique to and shared among these experiences.
Soc. 310. Introduction to Research Methods.
One introductory course in sociology; or completion of one social science course in economics, anthropology, political science, psychology or other sociology course. Sociology Honors students should elect this course concurrently with Soc. 397. (4; 3 in the half-term). (Excl). (BS). (QR/1).
A laboratory course in research techniques which emphasizes elements of research design, measurement, sampling, data analysis, and statistical inference. Individual research projects are conducted by students, with data made available to the class.
Soc. 320/Psych. 310. Training in Processes of Intergroup Dialogues.
Permission of instructor. Open to juniors and seniors. (3). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL).
This course is designed to give students a foundation in the skills and knowledge needed to facilitate multicultural group interactions, including structured intergroup dialogues. Topics include: basic group facilitation skills and their applications to multicultural settings; social identity group development; prejudice and stereotyping and their effects on groups; etc.
Soc. 321/Psych. 311. Practicum in Facilitating Intergroup Dialogues.
Sociology 320 and permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). A combined total of 8 credits of Sociology 321, 389, and 395 may be counted toward a concentration in Sociology. (EXPERIENTIAL).
This practicum follows Sociology 321, and requires applied work in facilitating intergroup dialogues. Students also participate in weekly supervision seminars to discuss their work in the dialogue groups, and to discuss theory and practice of group observation, in-outgroup conflict intervention skills, intergroup communication and community building, etc.
Soc. 323/CAAS 321. African American Social Thought.
(3). (SS).
This course seeks to understand, interpret, and critique different schools of social thought on the social condition and social character of African Americans.
Soc. 330. Population Problems.
(3). (SS).
A survey of the implications of population size, structure, and change on selected environmental problems such as land, pollution, resources, oceanic development, aging, and urbanization. A review of current views about population policies and ways of implementing them with particular attention to family planning programs. Illustrations are drawn from the United States and a variety of developed and underdeveloped countries.
Soc. 331. Population Trends in the United States: Their Economic and Social Consequences.
(3). (Excl). (QR/1).
This course examines both historical and contemporary demographic trends in the United States from an ecological perspective. The implications of changes in population growth and distribution for the economy and the social structure are considered.
Soc. 341. Sociology of Economic Development.
One introductory course in sociology. (3). (Excl).
Considers the social conditions that affect increases in human productivity; with special emphasis on historical and organizational conditions, and on Southeast Asia.
Soc. 383/Psych. 383. Introduction to Survey Research I.
Psych. 380. (3). (Excl). (BS).
Through conducting a small complete survey and a critical review of published studies, students participate in basic phases of survey research from design through sampling, the questionnaire, interviewing, analysis, and reporting.
Soc. 389. Practicum in Sociology.
Permission of instructor. (2-4). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. Up to four credits of 389 may be included in a concentration plan in sociology. A combined total of eight credits of Sociology 321, 389, and 395 may be counted toward a concentration in sociology. Laboratory fee ($22) required. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a total of eight credits.
Sociology 389 is known as "Project Community" and "Trained Volunteer Corps." Students combine 4 to 8 hours of weekly service in community settings, with weekly seminars. Seminars are interactive, focus on related sociological issues, and provide a time for mutual support, planning and problem-solving. Over 35 sections offer settings that include working in school classrooms with "at-risk" children and youth in a variety of tutoring, chemical dependency, and mentoring situations; in adult and juvenile criminal justice system; with adult literacy; and with the homeless, elderly, mentally ill, developmentally disabled, and in hospitals.
Soc. 392/REES 395/Hist. 332/Poli. Sci. 395/Slavic 395. Survey of Russia: The Russian Empire, the Soviet Union, and the Successor States.
(4; 3 in the half-term). (SS). Laboratory fee ($10) required.
An interdisciplinary survey of the history, politics, government, economy, social institutions, literature, and arts of the Soviet Union and its successor states and their relations with the rest of the world. Lectures and discussion.
Soc. 393/REES 396/Hist. 333/Poli. Sci. 396/Slavic 396. Survey of East Central Europe.
No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in REES 397. (4; 3 in the half-term). (SS). Laboratory fee ($10) required.
An interdisciplinary survey of the people, history, politics, government, economy, social institutions, literature, and arts of the communist and post-communist states of Eastern Europe and their relations with the rest of the world. Lectures and discussions.
Soc. 395. Directed Reading or Research.
Permission of concentration advisor and supervising staff member. (1-4). (Excl). A combined total of eight credits of Sociology 321, 389, and 395 may be counted toward a concentration in Sociology. (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit in the same or different terms.
For students interested in work not available within the framework of regular Departmental offerings (either work beyond the scope of present course offerings for students who have completed available courses with at least a grade of B or work in areas not available through existing course work for students with a 3.0 grade point average). Graduate students should elect Sociology 995.
Soc. 397. Junior Honors in Sociology.
Soc. 210; prior or concurrent enrollment in Soc. 310 or 512; and Honors standing in sociology. (3). (Excl).
A seminar dedicated to help students prepare an original research proposal which is then carried out under the supervision of a faculty member.
Soc. 398. Senior Honors in Sociology.
Honors standing in sociology. Soc. 210 and 310, and permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).
Senior seminar for Sociology Honors students.
Soc. 399. Senior Honors in Sociology.
Honors standing in sociology. Soc. 210 and 310, and permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).
Senior seminar for Sociology Honors students.
Soc. 400. Sociological Principles and Problems.
For juniors, seniors, and graduate students with no background in sociology. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 100 or 195. (3). (SS).
An introduction to the mode and procedure of sociological explanation in its major fields of theory and application.
Soc. 401. Contemporary Social Issues III.
(4; 3 in the half-term). (Excl). Credit is granted for a combined total of eight credits elected through Soc. 102, 202, 203, and 401, provided that the course topics are different.
The course focuses on an in-depth analysis of one or more contemporary social issues. The issues discussed vary from term to term. Students should consult the Time Schedule for a listing of topics offered in any given term.
Soc. 404/Am. Cult. 404. Hispanic-Americans: Social Problems and Social Issues.
Junior or senior standing. (3). (Excl).
Hispanic-Americans share a cultural heritage yet they comprise variegated experiences in the U.S. Both their reasons for migration and their processes of incorporation vary widely. To understand these, we use various theoretical perspectives and we seek to understand the social problems and social issues Hispanic-Americans serve to exemplify, such as political vs. economic migration, the ethnic enclave, ethnic identity, social movements, cultural vs. structural assimilation.
Soc. 405. Theory in Sociology.
No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 305. (3). (Excl).
Sociological theory is treated in its research implications, with special attention to concepts, hypotheses, research goals, the systematization of findings, and the relation between theory and practice.
Soc. 410. The American Jewish Community.
One introductory course in sociology. (3). (Excl).
The course examines current issues and ongoing controversies within the American-Jewish community as it reviews broadly the sociological literature on American Jewry. Students become familiar with contemporary trends at the individual, group and institutional levels, and forces operating to create change. Students study topics such as ethnic identity, intergroup relations, group survival, and community structure and organization as the class explores the conflicts and struggles of American Jews to maintain themselves in a pluralistic society.
Soc. 412. Ethnic Identity and Intergroup Relations.
Permission of instructor. Students are required to have taken courses in ethnic studies or intergroup relations. (3). (Excl).
Explores ethnic identity and intergroup relations, focusing on specific groups as well as case studies of particular conflicts and alliances as a basis for broader theoretical understanding.
Soc. 415. Economic Sociology.
One of the following: introductory economics, psychology, or political science. (3). (Excl).
This course offers an integrated view of the interactions between formal organizations and socio-political systems. It examines large, diversified, modern corporate organizations, explicitly recognizing the constraints imposed by modern state-advanced capitalist societies. It integrates literature from sociology, political science, and economics to provide a better understanding of the organizational, industrial, and political parameters that guide the behavior of particular industries and organizations. The course explicitly includes historical studies and cross-national comparisons of both capitalist and socialist economies.
Soc. 420. Complex Organizations.
One introductory course in sociology. (3). (Excl).
An extensive survey of the empirical and theoretical analyses of a variety of complex formal organizations is undertaken. Studies of industrial and other economic organizations, military organizations, voluntary associations, prisons, hospitals, government bureaus, and educational institutions (especially colleges and universities) in contemporary societies is given special consideration.
Soc. 426/Poli. Sci. 428/Asian Studies 428/Phil. 428. China's Evolution Under Communism.
Upperclass standing. (4; 3 in the half-term). (Excl).
An analysis of developments since 1949 with particular emphasis on the evolution of political control, economic development, and social change and their relationship to ideology.
Soc. 427. Societies and Institutions of Eastern Europe.
(3). (Excl).
An introduction to the social institutions of the Soviet Union, with emphasis on the impact of communism and current social trends.
Soc. 428. Social Institutions of Communist China.
(3). (Excl).
An introduction to the social institutions of Communist China, their origins, and the nature of social change in China since 1949.
Soc. 429. Social Institutions of Modern Japan.
One introductory course in sociology, anthropology, political science, or economics. (3). (SS).
An examination of the structural features and functions of major social institutions in modern Japan, and social issues facing contemporary Japanese society. Topics covered include demography, family, neighborhood community, educational system, the workplace, social welfare, minorities, crime, and social conflict.
Soc. 430. Introduction to Population Studies.
Soc. 430 does not meet core requirements for graduate students in sociology. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 530. (3). (Excl). (QR/2).
A basic introduction to the study of demographic behavior and measurement of demographic behavior. A survey of the current state of knowledge concerning trends and differentials in fertility, mortality, nuptiality, and migration. Illustrations are drawn from the United States and a variety of developed and underdeveloped countries.
Soc. 434/CAAS 434. Social Organization of Black Communities.
(3). (Excl).
Course analyses and interprets black communities in the U.S. Specifically the origins and development, competing theories, unique characteristics and institutions, and contemporary problems of Black communities are to be examined.
Soc. 435. Urban Inequality and Conflict.
Credit is granted for only one course from Soc. 435 and 535. (3). (Excl).
Examines the social and spatial factors affecting the location, social organization, structure and functioning of American cities. Both the internal arrangements and external connections of cities are analyzed. Emphasis is placed on contemporary social problems and spatial processes, such as suburbanization and residential segregation, housing deprivation and neighborhood revitalization, transit system and labor markets, city riots, poverty and the urban underclass.
Soc. 440. Sociology of Work.
One introductory course in sociology. (3). (Excl).
Comparative investigation of the meaning of work, with particular emphasis on institutional constraints. Major focus is on job satisfaction, management ideology, employee participation in decision making, labor force trends, and alternatives to bureaucracy.
Soc. 444. The American Family.
One introductory course in sociology. (3). (SS).
A course in the history of American family life, family patterns of various ethnic groups, theories of family variation and change, recent changes in American family life, and prospects for the future.
Soc. 447/WS 447. Sociology of Gender.
(3). (SS).
This course asks: Why is there gender inequality? and What are women's experiences of the inequality? This course examines politics, the state, work, family, body, and sexuality, all areas of social life that have been theorized as the locus of women's oppression.
Soc. 450. Political Sociology.
(3). (SS).
A consideration of Marxian, Weberian, neo-Machiavellian, and functionalist concepts as employed in the analysis of political processes in Western Europe, the United States, and the developing nations. Studies are examined of elites, ideology, and the social bases of political, military, community, and national power.
Soc. 452. Law and Social Psychology.
(3). (Excl).
The purpose of this course is to explore topics of interest to both lawyers and social psychologists. The course investigates at least five areas of intersection and conflict between law and social science: (1) the memory and perception literature in social psychology and experimental psychology applied to testimony and eyewitness identification; (2) the attribution of responsibility literature and the clinical psychology literature on insanity applied to the issue of diminished responsibility before the law; (3) the small group and group dynamics literature applied to jury decision making; (4) public opinion research applied to the capital punishment debate; and (5) the literature on total institutions applied to the operation of the prison systems.
Soc. 454. Law and Social Organization.
(3). (SS).
An analysis of law as an instrument of social control and social change. Attention is given to different modes of dispute settlement and to the creation and interpretations of rules governing individual and organizational interactions.
Soc. 455/Rel. 455. Religion and Society.
(3). (Excl).
Ultimate Reality (the focus of religion) becomes understood quite differently as people pursue religious quests within different social contexts. This course uses sociological methods of inquiry to explore the emergence of new religious movements, the ways that organizations respond to extraordinary experiences like mysticism and the ecstatic, the kinds of impact social forces have on organized religion, and the ways that religion, in turn, affects other areas of social life.
Soc. 458. Sociology of Education.
One introductory course in sociology. (3). (Excl).
A consideration of educational institutions as social organizations and of their relationship to society and of the diverse groups within educational institutions. Comparative examples are drawn from various societies as a basis for cross-cultural generalizations about the social role of educational systems.
Soc. 460. Social Change.
(3). (Excl).
A discussion of selected historic and contemporary theories which account for social and personal change, ongoing changes in American society, concepts and methods currently used to study these changes, and the utility and implications of these techniques.
Soc. 461. Social Movements.
One introductory course in sociology. (3). (Excl).
An analysis of the social context, goals, internal organization, strategies, and tactics of social movements and examination of utopias, revolutions, political extremism, civil rights groups, and student radicalism.
Soc. 462/Comm. Studies 472. Cultural Theories of Communication.
Soc. 100, or Anthro. 101; Comm. Studies 351 or 371 strongly recommended. (3). (Excl).
We look at the ways in which "culture" has been an object of inquiry in the fields of sociology, anthropology, and communication. Specific consideration is given to the interplay of the mass media and American subcultures, including youth, women, and ethnic minorities.
Soc. 463/Comm. Studies 485. Mass Communication and Public Opinion.
Comm. Studies 361 or 381 strongly recommended. (3). (SS).
This course explores enduring research questions concerning mass communication and public opinion. Emphasis is given to recent research dealing with the impact of the media on public opinion.
Soc. 464. Socialization and Social Control Throughout the Life Cycle.
One introductory course in sociology. (3). (Excl).
A sociological analysis of the multifarious ways a society socializes and controls its members, focusing on the life cycle from birth to death and the organizations through which the members pass. This examination includes a general consideration of how the "social" is composed, communicated, sustained, and changed.
Soc. 465/Psych. 488. Sociological Analysis of Deviant Behavior.
Introductory sociology or introductory psychology as a social science. (3). (SS).
A general analysis of the sociological factors producing deviance, the effects of social control efforts on the course of deviant development, and the functional significance of deviance in social systems.
Soc. 467. Juvenile Delinquency.
(3). (Excl).
Extent, causes, and methods of treatment of juvenile delinquency in the United States.
Soc. 468. Criminology.
(3). (SS).
The analysis of criminal behavior in relation to the institutional framework of society. Emphasis is placed on the more routinized and persistent forms for criminality and the joint roles played by victims, the criminal, the police, and all other relevant parties.
Soc. 470. Social Influence.
One previous course in social psychology elected either through psychology or sociology. (3). (Excl).
An examination of how people's behavior and attitudes are modified or controlled by the actions of others with whom they interact. In addition to describing and analyzing some major theories of social influence and attitude change, attention is also directed to related theories of deviance and social control.
Soc. 472/Psych. 381. Advanced Laboratory in Social Psychology.
Stat. 402 and Psych. 380. (3). (Excl).
Laboratory or field experiments emphasize the conditions of change in attitudes and behavior as a function of personal and group determinants.
Soc. 475/MCO 475 (Public Health). Introduction to Medical Sociology.
(3). (SS).
The relationship between disease characteristics, people, and providers of service is studied from an ecological, interpersonal, and institutional perspective. The impact of disease on society and the reciprocal impact of society on disease and processes of professionalization of health personnel analyzed as interpersonal systems and as an institutionalized medical care system.
Soc. 490/REES 490/WS 492. Women and Islam: A Sociological Perspective.
(3). (Excl).
This course explores the theoretical and methodological issues involved in studying women. The course starts with an introduction to the existing paradigms on women's position in sociology, women's studies, and Near Eastern Studies. After a lecture on the position of women in Islamic history, it proceeds to study women in contemporary contexts such as in Iran and Saudi Arabia, Turkey, Egypt and the Fertile Crescent, North Africa, Central Asia and the Balkans, and contemporary U.S. society.
Soc. 495. Special Course.
One introductory course in sociology. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit, provided that the course topics are different.
Addresses specific research problems currently under study by faculty members. The topics are announced each term in the Time Schedule.
Soc. 496. Special Course.
One introductory course in sociology. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit, provided that the course topics are different.
Addresses specific research problems currently under study by faculty members. The topics are announced each term in the Time Schedule.
Soc. 497. Special Course.
One introductory course in sociology. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit, provided that the course topics are different.
Addresses specific research problems currently under study by faculty members. The topics are announced each term in the Time Schedule offered for a particular term.
Soc. 521/CAAS 521. African American Intellectual Thought.
Senior standing. (3). (Excl).
This seminar explores the research and policy debates constructed by African American scholars on the "Negro Problem." The objective is to ascertain how these social analyses and intellectual arguments framed definitions of and solutions for the social condition of the African American community throughout the twentieth century.


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