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LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Fall 2007, Dept = AAPTIS
 
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Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
AAPTIS 100 — Peoples of the Middle East
Section 001, LEC
Issues in Race & Ethnicity

Instructor: Babayan,Kathryn; homepage
Instructor: Brisch,Nicole M

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

This course will survey Middle Eastern political, social, and cultural history from Sumer (3000 BC) to Khomeini's Iran (1979-89). The lectures, the readings, the visuals (web, movies, slides) are all geared towards providing the student with a sense of the nature of authority, political and cultural styles, the fabric of society, attitudes and behaviors, heroes and villains, that are and were part of the heritage of those peoples who lived in the lands between the Nile and Oxus rivers, generally referred to as the Middle East. Throughout the academic term you will have four quizzes, a midterm, and an accumulative final exam. A one-page synopsis of your readings will be due weekly for your discussion section.

AAPTIS 101 — Elementary Modern Standard Arabic, I
Section 001, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 5

This is the first of a two-term sequence in elementary Arabic. It is designed for students who want to study Arabic for academic and communication purposes. It starts with an introduction to the phonology and script of Modern Standard Arabic combined with oral basic communication practice. This is followed by combined training in listening, speaking, reading, and writing supported by audio cassettes and DVDs. The course follows the proficiency-communicative approach with special emphasis on functional language use. There is focus on simple interactive communicative tasks involving teacher-student, student-student, and group interactions. Reading and cultural skills are developed through simple short texts and situational dialogues. Course requirements include daily attendance of classes, preparation of the basic texts, vocabulary, grammar, oral and written drills, listening and reading passages and writing answers to certain drills and questions based on the listening and reading passages as well as filling out forms and supplying biographical information. Evaluation is based on active participation in all aspects of class, as well as all homework assignments, quizzes, midterm and exams.

Textbooks:

  • Arabic Sounds and Letters. A Beginning Program Course, by R. Rammuny (Textbook and Manual).
  • Al-Kitab, Part One, by K. Brustad et al. (Lessons 1-7).
  • Hans Wehr's Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic.

AAPTIS 101 — Elementary Modern Standard Arabic, I
Section 002, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 5

This is the first of a two-term sequence in elementary Arabic. It is designed for students who want to study Arabic for academic and communication purposes. It starts with an introduction to the phonology and script of Modern Standard Arabic combined with oral basic communication practice. This is followed by combined training in listening, speaking, reading, and writing supported by audio cassettes and DVDs. The course follows the proficiency-communicative approach with special emphasis on functional language use. There is focus on simple interactive communicative tasks involving teacher-student, student-student, and group interactions. Reading and cultural skills are developed through simple short texts and situational dialogues. Course requirements include daily attendance of classes, preparation of the basic texts, vocabulary, grammar, oral and written drills, listening and reading passages and writing answers to certain drills and questions based on the listening and reading passages as well as filling out forms and supplying biographical information. Evaluation is based on active participation in all aspects of class, as well as all homework assignments, quizzes, midterm and exams.

Textbooks:

  • Arabic Sounds and Letters. A Beginning Program Course, by R. Rammuny (Textbook and Manual).
  • Al-Kitab, Part One, by K. Brustad et al. (Lessons 1-7).
  • Hans Wehr's Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic.

AAPTIS 101 — Elementary Modern Standard Arabic, I
Section 003, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 5

This is the first of a two-term sequence in elementary Arabic. It is designed for students who want to study Arabic for academic and communication purposes. It starts with an introduction to the phonology and script of Modern Standard Arabic combined with oral basic communication practice. This is followed by combined training in listening, speaking, reading, and writing supported by audio cassettes and DVDs. The course follows the proficiency-communicative approach with special emphasis on functional language use. There is focus on simple interactive communicative tasks involving teacher-student, student-student, and group interactions. Reading and cultural skills are developed through simple short texts and situational dialogues. Course requirements include daily attendance of classes, preparation of the basic texts, vocabulary, grammar, oral and written drills, listening and reading passages and writing answers to certain drills and questions based on the listening and reading passages as well as filling out forms and supplying biographical information. Evaluation is based on active participation in all aspects of class, as well as all homework assignments, quizzes, midterm and exams.

Textbooks:

  • Arabic Sounds and Letters. A Beginning Program Course, by R. Rammuny (Textbook and Manual).
  • Al-Kitab, Part One, by K. Brustad et al. (Lessons 1-7).
  • Hans Wehr's Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic.

AAPTIS 101 — Elementary Modern Standard Arabic, I
Section 004, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 5

This is the first of a two-term sequence in elementary Arabic. It is designed for students who want to study Arabic for academic and communication purposes. It starts with an introduction to the phonology and script of Modern Standard Arabic combined with oral basic communication practice. This is followed by combined training in listening, speaking, reading, and writing supported by audio cassettes and DVDs. The course follows the proficiency-communicative approach with special emphasis on functional language use. There is focus on simple interactive communicative tasks involving teacher-student, student-student, and group interactions. Reading and cultural skills are developed through simple short texts and situational dialogues. Course requirements include daily attendance of classes, preparation of the basic texts, vocabulary, grammar, oral and written drills, listening and reading passages and writing answers to certain drills and questions based on the listening and reading passages as well as filling out forms and supplying biographical information. Evaluation is based on active participation in all aspects of class, as well as all homework assignments, quizzes, midterm and exams.

Textbooks:

  • Arabic Sounds and Letters. A Beginning Program Course, by R. Rammuny (Textbook and Manual).
  • Al-Kitab, Part One, by K. Brustad et al. (Lessons 1-7).
  • Hans Wehr's Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic.

AAPTIS 101 — Elementary Modern Standard Arabic, I
Section 005, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 5

This is the first of a two-term sequence in elementary Arabic. It is designed for students who want to study Arabic for academic and communication purposes. It starts with an introduction to the phonology and script of Modern Standard Arabic combined with oral basic communication practice. This is followed by combined training in listening, speaking, reading, and writing supported by audio cassettes and DVDs. The course follows the proficiency-communicative approach with special emphasis on functional language use. There is focus on simple interactive communicative tasks involving teacher-student, student-student, and group interactions. Reading and cultural skills are developed through simple short texts and situational dialogues. Course requirements include daily attendance of classes, preparation of the basic texts, vocabulary, grammar, oral and written drills, listening and reading passages and writing answers to certain drills and questions based on the listening and reading passages as well as filling out forms and supplying biographical information. Evaluation is based on active participation in all aspects of class, as well as all homework assignments, quizzes, midterm and exams.

Textbooks:

  • Arabic Sounds and Letters. A Beginning Program Course, by R. Rammuny (Textbook and Manual).
  • Al-Kitab, Part One, by K. Brustad et al. (Lessons 1-7).
  • Hans Wehr's Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic.

AAPTIS 141 — Elementary Persian, I
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Aghaei,Behrad

FA 2007
Credits: 4

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in AAPTIS 143.

This is an elementary level course emphasizing oral fluency, reading comprehension and written expression. The objectives of this course are to work with the students in a lively and an interactive environment to:

  • Communicate and converse in Persian (Farsi) on a variety of daily and common topics.
  • Develop elementary level reading skills.
  • Write elementary, narrative style, paragraphs, and simple correspondence and/or memoirs, coherently and with reasonable accuracy.
  • Acquire and develop cultural awareness through readings, class discussions, presentations and films, picture books, etc!


AAPTIS 151 — Elementary Turkish, I
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Er,Mehmet Sureyya

FA 2007
Credits: 4

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in AAPTIS 155.

Part of the departmental sequence in modern Turkish language, this course aims at introducing and providing the opportunity to practice the basic structures of Turkish. Although it specifically focuses on enhancing spoken proficiency, reading and writing skills are taught and practiced through special readings and written assignments. Students are evaluated in accordance with the provisional Proficiency Guidelines prepared by the AATT (American Association of Teachers of Turkic Languages), class participation, homework, achievements in weekly quizzes, and a final examination.

AAPTIS 153 — Elementary Uzbek, I
Section 001, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4

This course will introduce students to modern Uzbek, a Turkic language that is prevalent in contemporary Central Asia. Instruction in both speaking and writing will be proficiency-based; the course will include conversation, grammar and syntax, and composition and translation. No prerequisites. Class meeting times have not yet been determined — the instructor will work with enrolled students to find a mutually agreeable class schedule. For further information, contact Prof. Douglas Northrop at northrop@umich.edu.

AAPTIS 171 — Western Armenian, I
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Bardakjian,Kevork B; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in ARMENIAN 173/AAPTIS 173.

This course is designed for beginners with no previous knowledge of Western Armenian. Reading, writing, listening, speaking are equally emphasized.

AAPTIS 200 — Introduction to World Religions: Near Eastern
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Williams,Ralph G; homepage
Instructor: Knysh,Alexander D

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

This course serves two main functions: the first of these is to provide an introductory sense of what is involved in the academic study of religion; the second, which will occupy almost the whole term, is to introduce the major religious traditions of the Near East, with emphasis on the development and major structures of Israelite Religion, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. The course will keep two foci in view: one will have to do with the historical development of these religious traditions, their sacred texts and major personalities; the second will involve a comparative view of these traditions by analyzing their sense of the sacred in space, time, and text, their views on holy people. This is an introductory course: it is not necessary for students to have any previous experience in the study of religion. The course consists of three weekly lectures and a discussion group. Writing for the course typically involves an essay, a midterm, and a final exam.

AAPTIS 201 — Intermediate Modern Standard Arabic, I
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Samy,Waheed A

FA 2007
Credits: 5

AAPTIS 201 is the third semester of Arabic open for students who have completed AAPTIS 101-102 or one year of Modern Standard Arabic at the elementary level. It continues the process of acquiring proficiency in the language. Listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills are developed through texts and practice, focusing on the newly introduced vocabulary and grammatical structures. Required outside homework includes daily preparation of lessons, written assignments, use of audio and computer resources accompanying the textbook, and occasional extra reading assignments with the aid of the dictionary. Use of Arabic is emphasized throughout the course. Evaluation is based on attendance and participation, occasional quizzes, mid-term and a final exam including an oral component. (Staff)

Textbooks:

  • Al- Kitab, Part One by Brustad et al. (lessons 16-20).
  • Arabic for Communication: Interactive Multimedia Program (Lessons 1-5)
  • The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic, (Arabic- English Dictionary), Edited by J.M Cowan.

Advisory Prerequisite: AAPTIS 102.

AAPTIS 201 — Intermediate Modern Standard Arabic, I
Section 002, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 5

AAPTIS 201 is the third semester of Arabic open for students who have completed AAPTIS 101-102 or one year of Modern Standard Arabic at the elementary level. It continues the process of acquiring proficiency in the language. Listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills are developed through texts and practice, focusing on the newly introduced vocabulary and grammatical structures. Required outside homework includes daily preparation of lessons, written assignments, use of audio and computer resources accompanying the textbook, and occasional extra reading assignments with the aid of the dictionary. Use of Arabic is emphasized throughout the course. Evaluation is based on attendance and participation, occasional quizzes, mid-term and a final exam including an oral component. (Staff)

Textbooks:

  • Al- Kitab, Part One by Brustad et al. (lessons 16-20).
  • Arabic for Communication: Interactive Multimedia Program (Lessons 1-5)
  • The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic, (Arabic- English Dictionary), Edited by J.M Cowan.

Advisory Prerequisite: AAPTIS 102.

AAPTIS 201 — Intermediate Modern Standard Arabic, I
Section 003, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 5

AAPTIS 201 is the third semester of Arabic open for students who have completed AAPTIS 101-102 or one year of Modern Standard Arabic at the elementary level. It continues the process of acquiring proficiency in the language. Listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills are developed through texts and practice, focusing on the newly introduced vocabulary and grammatical structures. Required outside homework includes daily preparation of lessons, written assignments, use of audio and computer resources accompanying the textbook, and occasional extra reading assignments with the aid of the dictionary. Use of Arabic is emphasized throughout the course. Evaluation is based on attendance and participation, occasional quizzes, mid-term and a final exam including an oral component. (Staff)

Textbooks:

  • Al- Kitab, Part One by Brustad et al. (lessons 16-20).
  • Arabic for Communication: Interactive Multimedia Program (Lessons 1-5)
  • The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic, (Arabic- English Dictionary), Edited by J.M Cowan.

Advisory Prerequisite: AAPTIS 102.

AAPTIS 201 — Intermediate Modern Standard Arabic, I
Section 004, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 5

AAPTIS 201 is the third semester of Arabic open for students who have completed AAPTIS 101-102 or one year of Modern Standard Arabic at the elementary level. It continues the process of acquiring proficiency in the language. Listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills are developed through texts and practice, focusing on the newly introduced vocabulary and grammatical structures. Required outside homework includes daily preparation of lessons, written assignments, use of audio and computer resources accompanying the textbook, and occasional extra reading assignments with the aid of the dictionary. Use of Arabic is emphasized throughout the course. Evaluation is based on attendance and participation, occasional quizzes, mid-term and a final exam including an oral component. (Staff)

Textbooks:

  • Al- Kitab, Part One by Brustad et al. (lessons 16-20).
  • Arabic for Communication: Interactive Multimedia Program (Lessons 1-5)
  • The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic, (Arabic- English Dictionary), Edited by J.M Cowan.

Advisory Prerequisite: AAPTIS 102.

AAPTIS 241 — Intermediate Persian, I
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Aghaei,Behrad

FA 2007
Credits: 4

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in AAPTIS 243.

This is an intermediate to advanced level course in Persian. Emphasis will be on oral fluency, reading comprehension, and written expression. The objectives of this course are to work with the students in a lively and interactive environment to:

  • Communicate and converse in Persian (Farsi) on a variety of daily topics and selected issues, i.e. contemporary Persian Literary figures.
  • Develop reading skills further through reading auxiliary texts of intermediate to somewhat advanced levels.
  • Write narrative style, short essays, correspondence and/or memoirs, coherently and with reasonable accuracy.
  • Develop cultural awareness through readings, class discussions, presentations, films, picture books, etc!

Advisory Prerequisite: AAPTIS 142 or 143.

AAPTIS 251 — Intermediate Turkish, I
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Er,Mehmet Sureyya

FA 2007
Credits: 4

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in AAPTIS 255.

Part of the department sequence in modern Turkish, this course will be an immediate continuation of AAPTIS 152 as taught in the preceding winter term. The aim is to further improve proficiency skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing, according to the guidelines of the AATT (American Association of Teachers of Turkic Languages). Textbook materials will be supplemented by short original texts from literature and newspapers in accordance with the students' progress. Additional material for training in communicative situations will be used. Evaluation will be based on classroom participation, homework, quizzes, and a final examination.

Advisory Prerequisite: AAPTIS 152 or 155.

AAPTIS 261 — The Civilization of Medieval Islam
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Bonner,Michael David; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

This course describes the splendid culture and civilization of the Islamic world, from the beginning until the rise of the Ottoman Empire (ca. 600-1300). It introduces students to Islamic achievements in the arts and humanities, including poetry, artistic prose, historical writing, music, architecture, painting, ceramics and calligraphy; and also in the exact sciences, including mathematics, astronomy, geography and medicine. It emphasizes the fact that that these were collective achievements, made by people from many different ethnic and religious backgrounds.

The course does not provide a chronological presentation of the political and religious history of the Islamic world. Instead, it is organized around the following six locales:

  1. The desert. Mapping Arabia: how to survive and find your way. The poets and their themes of ruins, lost love, generosity and heroism. Disciplining the self: "the desert a city." Men and the veil.
  2. The court. Palaces and their floor-plans. Praising the monarch. The etiquette, theory and practice of falling in love. Music and its modes. The importance of having good handwriting. Tragic destinies of the bureaucrats (scribes).
  3. The salon. Sessions held for learning, listening, performing and drinking: their timing and layout. Participants in these sessions: female and male, slave and free. Hetero- and homosexuality. The "Renaissance of Islam." The sense of self, in biography and autobiography. Access to knowledge in an information age.
  4. The marketplace. Mapping the great cities. Ideals and realities of consumption and exchange, poverty and wealth. Books, textiles, carpets, ceramics and other commodities.
  5. The road. Mapping the routes that extend across the world. The environment, natural and human. The quest for knowledge. Ill-gotten gains: identity theft, beating the odds, abusing the kindness of strangers.
  6. The frontier. Different ways of visualizing the frontier. Islamic history viewed as a series of frontier societies. Soldiers and armies. Strangers and deviants. Inclusion and exclusion, both within and across the boundaries of the Islamic world.

No prerequisites. Readings will consist mainly of original sources in English translation. Students will be required to write a series of short papers on these readings. There will be a midterm examination and a final. Four credits, including one discussion hour.

Advisory Prerequisite: IN ENGLISH

AAPTIS 274 — Armenia: Culture and Ethnicity
Section 001, LEC
Issues in Race & Ethnicity

Instructor: Bardakjian,Kevork B; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: RE, HU
Other: WorldLit

This course explores various aspects of the Christian Armenian identity, from the earliest times to the 1990s, against a historical and political background, with a greater emphasis on the more modern times. It highlights the formation of the Armenian self-image; its principal features (political, religious, cultural); and its historical evolution in a multi-religious and multinational region that has undergone territorial and cultural transformation.

AAPTIS 289 — From Genghis Khan to the Taliban: Modern Central Asia
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Northrop,Douglas Taylor; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS, RE

More than 500 years ago, the Silk Road famously connected traders from all over the world, linking the major cities of China and Southeast Asia with those of Europe and Africa. Vast wealth traveled this route, wending across the mountains and steppes of Central Asia, creating rich and sophisticated towns along the way. Bukhara and Samarkand became two of the world's greatest cities, enviable centers of learning and culture. How did Central Asia go from being the most cosmopolitan place on earth to an area now seen as one of the most isolated, remote places in the world? How did a region where a dizzying array of cultures had long intermingled and coexisted peacefully become a place associated (at least in Western eyes) with intolerance and terrorism? This course tries to answer such questions by providing an overview of modern Central Asian history. Using both lecture and discussion, it focuses on the colonial and post-colonial periods of the last 300 years: especially in Russian and Soviet Central Asia, but also the neighboring areas dominated by Britain and China (Afghanistan, Pakistan, Xinjiang). It offers a strong emphasis on the links and connections across these political borders, which were at first largely artificial and porous but which became crucially important and shaped local communities in deeply divergent ways. It also emphasizes social and cultural history, as a complement and counterweight to the usual political frameworks and classic grand narratives of khans, revolutions, and wars. Three themes structure the course: the fragmented, changing character of regional identities; the complexities of popular attitudes towards, and relations with, various forms of state power; and the differences between — and the complicated economic, environmental, political, artistic, and cultural legacies of — the major imperial systems (Russian, British, Chinese). Students will be evaluated on their class contributions as well as written work (short essays and class exercises) and two exams.

AAPTIS 291 — Topics in Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish and Islamic Studies
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Naber,Nadine C

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Undergraduate topics course in the field of Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish and Islamic Studies.

AAPTIS 332 — Introduction to Persian Culture and Language
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Windfuhr,Gernot L; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

This course is designed for undergraduate students, and aims at providing basic knowledge about a vital cultural area which has had a decisive impact on the world throughout history, but about which more misinformation, if any, than facts are commonly known. It introduces the geographic, social, historical, literary, and linguistic aspects of Persian culture, and their sources in the pre-Islamic Iranian world empires, and the Zoroastrian religion. The emphasis will be on the country of Iran. The format of the course is lecture and class discussion. The grade is based on participation, a midterm and a final exam.

AAPTIS 335 — African-American Religion Between Christianity and Islam
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Jackson,Sherman A; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

A study of African-American Religion, as a phenomenon that develops out of the experience of enslaved Africans in the Americas, and its dialectical relationship with the supertradition of Christianity, on the one hand, and Islam, on the other, studied diachronically from the 18th through the 20th centuries.

AAPTIS 339 — Turkey: Language, Culture, Society Between East and West
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Hagen,Gottfried J

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: WorldLit

An introduction to the culture, language, and society of modern Turkey with a special emphasis on the Turkish position between Europe and the Middle East, and the Turkish project of modernity.

  • Where is this country, Turkey?
  • What kind of people are living there?
  • How do they live, work, think, express themselves?
  • What do they believe?
  • Where do they locate themselves on the map of the world?
  • Are they European or Middle Eastern? Traditional or modern?
  • What does it mean to be modern, anyways?
  • What other issues are there to complicate Turkish identity?

These are the question this course seeks to address in a series of lecture&discussion units on different aspects of modern Turkish social and cultural life, using literary criticism, sociological, and anthropological approaches. Movies, literature, and music will be used to illustrate relevant issues of gender, religion, urban and rural life, history and national myth. This cultural production will give students food for discussion of the overarching theme of modernity and identity in a culture between the Middle East and Europe.

Textbook: Reşat Kasaba and Sibel Bozdoğan, eds., Rethinking Identity and Modernity in Turkey. University of Washington Press, 1997, available at Shaman Drum, State St. Additional material will be made available through a course website. No knowledge of Turkish required!

Evaluation will be based on participation in classroom discussions (20%), a midterm in-class exam (30%), and a final paper (50%). It is expected that students have read the assigned readings before every class, and are able to make informed contributions to the discussion. The midterm will consist of a number of short essay questions. The final paper should be on a topic approved by the instructor, and should involve some independent research in the library or on the web (but with caution!).


AAPTIS 381 — Introduction to Arab Literature in Translation
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Legassick,Trevor; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

Materials in English translation will illustrate the progression of Arabic Literary culture from the earliest recorded sources to the present. Lectures and discussion, along with audio-visual materials, will introduce the essentials of the history of the Arabs and the cultural context expressed in their writings. Examination of pre-Islamic poetry will lead to discussion of the religious and historical texts of Islam. The literary legacy of the Caliphal period will be presented. The Arabian Nights will be seen to illustrate the popular culture of the times. Bell-lettrist works and those of the Arab explorers, scientists, and philosophers will be sampled. The contacts between the Arab world and the West in the modern era will be seen to have resulted in new departures in Arabic Literature, with the rise of the play, the short story, and the novel. Particular attention will be given to the works of Naguib Mahfouz, the Egyptian winner of the Nobel Prize for Literature. Students will write a series of short papers commenting upon aspects of the works assigned. Credit will also be given for attendance and for class discussion. A professor of Arabic literature, the instructor is a much-published translator and commentator on Arabic literature.

AAPTIS 395 — Directed Undergraduate Readings
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 3
Other: INDEPENDENT

Designed for individual students who have an interest in a specific topic (usually that has stemmed from a previous course). An individual instructor must agree to direct such a reading, and the requirements are specified when approval is granted.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

AAPTIS 403 — Advanced Modern Standard Arabic I
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Samy,Waheed A

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course seeks to provide learners with training in speaking, reading, and writing based on selected readings taken from various genres of modern prose fiction and non-fiction as well as Arabic newspapers and magazines. In an attempt to bolster the listening component, and to provide a background of current affairs, this class will also include an Internet news audio component. Use of Arabic is emphasized throughout the whole course based on communicative approaches to learning. Course grade is based on class attendance and participation, written assignments, weekly quizzes and tests, and a final exam.

Textbooks:

  1. Al- Kitab, fi Tacallum al-Carabiyya A Textbook for Arabic, Part Two Second Edition (AK) by Brustad et al., lessons 4-7.
  2. Business Arabic (Intermediate Level) Language, Culture, & Communication (AC) by Raji Rammuny, and multimedia component. Lessons 11-15 will be covered. Before class, please do the lessons at the Language Resource Center, located in the Modern Languages Building. The program is located in the main area on the second floor.
  3. The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic, (Arabic- English Dictionary), Edited by J.M Cowan. (Books and the dictionaries are available at bookstores)
  4. CTools (https://ctools.umich.edu/ portal): Please check the site regularly for announcements, assignments and/or additional materials.

Advisory Prerequisite: AAPTIS 202 or equivalent.

AAPTIS 425 — Near Eastern Studies Capstone Seminar
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Babayan,Kathryn; homepage
Instructor: Ginsburg,Elliot K; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

The proposed capstone seminar will be thematically driven, focusing each year on a theme and topical clusters, organized around key issues in the Middle East, such as rituals, problems in Middle Eastern history and literature, gender issues, wars and violence, etc. The pilot seminar will focus on "rituals" and combine study of the methodological approaches to the study of ritual — drawn from anthropology, sociology, psychology, history of religions, etc. — with application of case studies drawn from our representative fields. Specifically, the rituals seminar aims to:

  • afford exposure to representative cultures in discrete sites and settings, i.e., to provide micro- studies of specific traditions and cultural moments;
  • provide a framework for fruitful juxtaposition or comparison of these cultures;
  • afford students greater methodological sophistication by focusing on ritual as a critical category for interpreting and theorizing about culture and cultures; and
  • develop students' critical writing skills.

Throughout the seminar, we will see the ways in which ritual serves as a launching pad to discuss core issues of identity/belonging, the boundaries of community and nation, issues of authority, sacred and profane, stasis and crisis, orality and literacy, memory and forgetting, the encounter with the other (imagined or real, human or divine), as well as key issues of gender, embodiment, and textuality. In short, we will use ritual to explore fundamental dimensions (and specific cultural inflections) of being human.

Intended audience: Senior concentrators in Near Eastern Studies

Course Requirements: Regular attendance and participation; three short essays (4-5 pages each); one final research paper (12-15 pages); one oral presentation.

Class Format: Three hours per week seminar format

Enforced Prerequisites: Senior standing

Advisory Prerequisite: JR P.I.

AAPTIS 475 — Rumi and the Great Persian Mystical Poets
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Windfuhr,Gernot L; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: WorldLit

This course is an introduction to the Classical Persian mystical poets through translations. We will focus on the 13th century Persian poet Jalaloddin Rumi, the leading figure in Persian mystical poetry, who fundamentally influenced Persian writing poets from the regions of the Ottoman Empire to the Indian subcontinent and Central Asia. We will also explore the works of other major classical Persian poets, including Attar, Sa'di and Hafez. Through close readings and explication of selected texts we will learn to appreciate their poetic art and imagery poets, and learn about major tenets of Sufism. The format of the course is lecture and class discussion. The grade is based on participation, a mid term and a final exam.

AAPTIS 486 — Topics in Modern Arabic Literature in Translation
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Shammas,Anton; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: WorldLit

The different histories of the Arab Nahdah (Renaissance) have been mainly a reflection of the different mappings of the problematically complex relationship between the Arab World and the West, in the wake of the French invasion of Egypt in 1798. This course will offer a cultural, literary and intellectual reading of the Nahdah from the standpoint of its forerunners, from Al-Jabarti to Jabra. It will explore some of the traditionally ignored events of the nineteenth century: the publication of the Bulaq edition of alf laylah wa-laylah in 1935; Shidyaq's 1855 al-saq 'ala al-saq; the 1865 Protestant translation of the Bible into Arabic; Bustani's Encyclopedia; the 1882 "Darwin Affair," etc. Besides focusing on the intellectual biographies of some of the "founders" and their contributions, a special emphasis will be put on the role of the Arabic language in the emergence of Arab nationalism. Students will be evaluated through class performance; one in-class presentation, based on the weekly readings; and a final term paper.

AAPTIS 491 — Topics in Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Arlinghaus,Sandra L
Instructor: Larimore,Ann E

FA 2007
Credits: 3

A course for upper-level undergraduates and graduate students taught by temporary faculty or as a testing course for permanent faculty.

AAPTIS 493 — Comparative Perspectives of the Middle East and North Africa
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Hagen,Gottfried J

FA 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Minicourse

The aim of this course is to expose students to various UM faculty and outside experts on a particular theme. It is taught from a comparative perspective to introduce students to a range of historical periods, geographical areas, and methods for future study and research.

AAPTIS 498 — Senior Honors Thesis
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 6
Other: Honors, Indpnt Study

The Senior Honors thesis is for students who have been approved by the Near Eastern Studies concentration advisor, Honors advisor, and the LS&A Honors Council. The length of the thesis may vary, but 50-60 pages is common. Two advisors should be chosen. The principal advisor is a member of the faculty in whose field of expertise the thesis topic lies, and he or she oversees the student's research and the direction taken by the thesis.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

AAPTIS 501 — Advanced Arabic Conversation and Composition
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Rammuny,Raji M

FA 2007
Credits: 3

The objectives of this course are to develop fluency and accuracy in understanding, speaking, and writing modern standard Arabic, and to expand students' awareness of Arab-Islamic culture and civilization. The course is based on a variety of literary texts and authentic cultural audio-visual materials including slides, video cassettes, and films. The course materials reflect not only the literary but also the cultural, social, and political trends of contemporary Arab society. Occasionally, students are required to read outside topics and give brief presentations. Evaluation is based on daily preparations, weekly written compositions, monthly tests, and a final paper in Arabic.

Textbook is Advanced Standard Arabic, parts one and two, by Raji Rammuny.

Advisory Prerequisite: AAPTIS 404 or equivalent. Taught in Arabic.

AAPTIS 544 — Modern Persian Fiction
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Windfuhr,Gernot L; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Readings from selected works of modern Persian prose and poetry. Close reading and literary analysis.

Advisory Prerequisite: AAPTIS 242 or 243.

AAPTIS 563 — Modern Arabic Nonfiction
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Legassick,Trevor; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course introduces the work of major Arab writers of the 19th and 20th centuries. Variable in focus according to the interests of the class, readings are selected for translation, analysis, and commentary. The course explores the historical progression in the development of political and societal theories in modern times in the Arab world.

Advisory Prerequisite: AAPTIS 403 or reading knowledge of Arabic.

AAPTIS 581 — Classical Arabic III
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Knysh,Alexander D

FA 2007
Credits: 4

This course reviews grammar as it provides students with extensive training in reading authentic passages of Classical Arabic selected from the Qur'an, hadith, and medieval Arabic-Islamic literature. The students are expected to prepare the assigned readings with the aid of their dictionaries and read and discuss them in class.

Advisory Prerequisite: AAPTIS 482.

AAPTIS 583 — Medieval Arabic Historical, Biographical, and Geographical Texts
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Bonner,Michael David; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Each time this course is given, it is devoted to either historical, biographical or geographical texts, in Arabic, from the rise of Islam through the Mamluk period (roughly 600-1500). We read some modern studies in English, but most of our efforts go toward engaging the Arabic texts and acquiring navigational skills.

In addition to the general assignments, students make presentations based on their own readings and research. At the end of term they write up their results in a research paper.

This time we turn to the environment of the court during the Buyid period in Iraq and western Iran (the 4th/10th and 5th/11th centuries). We concentrate on two monumental works, the Kitab al-aghani or Book of Songs of Abu' l-Faraj al-Isfahani, and the Kitab Al-Imta' wa'-mu'anasa or Book of Enjoyment and Conviviality of Abu Hayyan al-Tawhidi.

AAPTIS 583 can provide an introduction to classical Arabic for advanced students of Modern Standard Arabic.

Advisory Prerequisite: AAPTIS 404.

AAPTIS 798 — Directed Graduate Readings
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 3

Designed for individual students who have an interest in a specific topic (usually that has stemmed from a previous course). An individual instructor must agree to direct such a reading, and the requirements are specified when approval is granted.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Permission of instructor.

AAPTIS 837 — Applied Linguistics and the Teaching of Arabic
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Rammuny,Raji M

FA 2007
Credits: 4

The main purpose of this course is to provide graduate students, who are genuinely interested in teaching, with basic training in applied linguistics and theory and practice in foreign language teaching and learning with particular emphasis on teaching Arabic to non-Arabs. Topics include: teacher's preparation; Arabic diglossia and its implication for Arabic instruction; learning theories and principles of second language acquisition; teaching the specific skills of listening, speaking, reading, writing, and culture; testing and grading; use of audiovisual and technological aids; material development; evaluation and modification of instructional materials. Students are required to read assignments, observe classes and attend special lectures and workshops on campus and to submit brief reports once a week based on their readings, observations, or participation. Toward the end of the course, the focus will shift toward systematic and supervised teaching practice, testing and grading and training in material development. There is a group meeting once a week for discussion and analysis of issues related to the reading assignments or practice teaching problems based on classroom teaching and tutoring. In addition, each trainer is required to provide tutoring assistance, for the maximum of two hours per week, to a beginning Arabic language student who needs extra help. Course grade is based on a weekly diary, lesson plans, materials developed by trainees and participation (50%); a term project involving analysis and critical evaluation of a topic related to language learning and teaching, including development or modification of language materials (50%).

Textbooks:
  1. Raji M. Rammuny, Annotated Bibliography on Foreign Language Learning and Teaching,
  2. CRLT, A Guidebook for University of Michigan Teaching Assistants,
  3. Course packet at Kolossos, 310 E. Washington.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and advanced knowledge of Arabic. Graduate standing.

AAPTIS 990 — Dissertation/Precandidate
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 8

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Advisory Prerequisite: Election for dissertation work by doctoral candidate not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing.

AAPTIS 993 — Graduate Student Instructor Training Program
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Rammuny,Raji M

FA 2007
Credits: 1

A seminar for all beginning Graduate Student Instructors (GSIs), consisting of a one-day orientation before the term starts and seven consecutive two-hour workshops/meetings discussion during the Fall Term. Topics include classroom management, strategies for effective classroom discussion, rules for group discussion, grading of students' written work, handling controversial issues, teaching encounters, etc. Evaluation is based on students' attendance, participation and weekly presentations of brief reports. Beginning GSIs are required to register for this course.

Advisory Prerequisite: Must have a Teaching Assistantship. Graduate standing. permission of instructor.

AAPTIS 995 — Dissertation/Candidate
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 8

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Enforced Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate

 
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