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LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Fall 2007, Dept = ACABS
 
Page 1 of 1, Results 1 — 25 of 25
Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
ACABS 100 — Peoples of the Middle East
Section 001, LEC
Issues in Race & Ethnicity

Instructor: Babayan,Kathryn; homepage
Instructor: Brisch,Nicole M

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

This course will survey Middle Eastern political, social, and cultural history from Sumer (3000 BC) to Khomeini's Iran (1979-89). The lectures, the readings, the visuals (web, movies, slides) are all geared towards providing the student with a sense of the nature of authority, political and cultural styles, the fabric of society, attitudes and behaviors, heroes and villains, that are and were part of the heritage of those peoples who lived in the lands between the Nile and Oxus rivers, generally referred to as the Middle East. Throughout the academic term you will have four quizzes, a midterm, and an accumulative final exam. A one-page synopsis of your readings will be due weekly for your discussion section.

ACABS 101 — Elementary Classical Hebrew I
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Schmidt,Brian B; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

The purpose of this and the complementary course, ACABS 102 Elementary Classical Hebrew II (Winter Term), is to equip the beginning student with the basic tools necessary for reading the Hebrew Bible. The course will introduce the student to the grammar of biblical Hebrew; its phonology (the study of speech sounds), morphology (the study of word formation), and syntax (the study of phrase and sentence formation). In addition to mastering the grammar, the student will need to acquire a sizable working vocabulary of the language, as competency in grammar and lexicon best facilitates the goal of reading the biblical text. The grading will be based on corrected daily assignments (i.e., the textbook exercises), 13-14 announced quizzes (with one class day advance notice), a final comprehensive exam, as well as attendance and participation. The daily assignments will comprise 25% of the grade, the ten best quizzes, 25%, the final exam, 25%, and attendance and participation, 25%.

ACABS 200 — Introduction to World Religions: Near Eastern
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Williams,Ralph G; homepage
Instructor: Knysh,Alexander D

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

This course serves two main functions: the first of these is to provide an introductory sense of what is involved in the academic study of religion; the second, which will occupy almost the whole term, is to introduce the major religious traditions of the Near East, with emphasis on the development and major structures of Israelite Religion, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. The course will keep two foci in view: one will have to do with the historical development of these religious traditions, their sacred texts and major personalities; the second will involve a comparative view of these traditions by analyzing their sense of the sacred in space, time, and text, their views on holy people. This is an introductory course: it is not necessary for students to have any previous experience in the study of religion. The course consists of three weekly lectures and a discussion group. Writing for the course typically involves an essay, a midterm, and a final exam.

ACABS 201 — Intermediate Classical Hebrew, I
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Schmidt,Brian B; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This and the complementary course, ACABS 202/ACABS 602 Intermediate Classical Hebrew II (Winter Term), are designed to introduce the second year or intermediate level student to the fundamental syntactic features of the language of the Hebrew Bible. The features covered include the syntax of individual words and phrases as well that of clauses and sentences. By advancing the student's analytical skills beyond basic morphological observations to syntactic analysis, the course aims to facilitate greater competency in translation and interpretation of select portions of the biblical text. Course requirements include attendance and participation (10%), daily readings in a text book grammar (10%), written syntax analysis and translation of select biblical texts (10%), vocabulary and paradigm review quizzes (10%), and two half-term exams (30% each).

Advisory Prerequisite: ACABS 102.

ACABS 221 — Jesus and the Gospels
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Boccaccini,Gabriele; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

The course focuses on the founder of Christianity, Jesus son of Joseph (Joshua bar-Yosef), as an historical character. By examining all extant historical sources (Jewish, Christian, and Pagan), the course offers a critical reconstruction of the major stages of the life and deeds of the prophet from Nazareth, from his birth under Herod the Great to his death and crucifixion under Pontius Pilate, within the diverse world of Second Temple Judaism. The course also explores the way in which the figure of Jesus has been reinterpreted over the centuries within the Christian, Jewish, and Muslim traditions, as well as his numerous portraits in the arts, involving the students in a multimedia experience of theater, fine arts, and music (Gospel music, and operas like Amahl and the Night Vision by Menotti as well as musicals like Jesus Christ Superstar and Godspell). Particular emphasis is placed on a detailed analysis of the many movies on Jesus, from Zecca-Noguet (1905) to DeMille (1927), Ray (1961), Pasolini (1966), Scorsese (1988), and Gibson (2004). The format of the course consists of two lectures per week by the instructor and a weekly discussion session conducted by a GSI. The course grade will be based upon daily assignments and attendance; midterm(s) and final exam.

ACABS 307 — The Synoptic Gospels: Matthew, Mark and Luke
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Gagos,Traianos

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course is part of the second year of the ancient Greek language sequence. Students can elect it as an alternative or in addition to GREEK 301 or in addition to GREEK 302. This semester the focus of the course will be on the Gospel of Luke with sight readings from the other synoptic Gospels. The purpose of the course is to read accurately koine texts. Emphasis will be placed upon the key-features of koine Greek, especially as those differ from Attic Greek morphology and syntax; upon linguistic and grammatical skills; and upon translation and comprehension. One midterm and one final exam as well as regular participation and quizzes in class will determine the course grade.

Advisory Prerequisite: GREEK 101 and 102; and permission of instructor.

ACABS 382 — Introduction to Egyptian Archaeology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Richards,Janet E; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

This course focuses on the material culture and disposition of archaeological sites in ancient Egypt and Nubia from c. 3200 bce-285 ac. The logic and nature of both sacred and secular landscapes are explored, and specific sites, some well known (such as the extensive temple precinct at Karnak and the Meroitic pyramids).

ACABS 395 — Ancient Civilizations and Biblical Studies: Directed Readings
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 3
Other: INDEPENDENT

Designed for individual students who have an interest in a specific topic (usually that has stemmed from a previous course). An individual instructor must agree to direct such a reading and the requirements are specified when approval is granted.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

ACABS 411 — Introduction to Akkadian
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Brisch,Nicole M

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course introduces the grammar and examines the principles underlying the writing system of the Babylonians and Assyrians. It includes readings in original texts, including The Law Code of Hammurabi.

ACABS 413 — Ancient Mesopotamia: History and Culture
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Yoffee,Norman; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Other: WorldLit

(Graduate students: Please note description for the graduate section of this course ACABS 513 below.)

Sumerian, Babylonian, and Assyrian civilization from the first cuneiform documents (ca. 3100 BC) to the fall of the Neo-Babylonian empire (539 BC); special attention to

  1. the rise and nature of early Mesopotamian city-states;
  2. Mesopotamian economics;
  3. Mesopotamian law;
  4. ethnic relations in Mesopotamia;
  5. Mesopotamia and its neighbors — Egypt, Iran, Israel;
  6. the collapse of Mesopotamian civilization.
Original documents are examined to show methods of interpreting the history and culture of Ancient Mesopotamia.

ACABS 513 meets with ACABS 413 but is intended for graduate students. It will survey Sumerian, Babylonian, and Assyrian civilization from the first written documents (ca. 3100 BC) to the fall of the Neo-Babylonian empire (539 BC). Students will meet with the instructor bi-weekly to discuss readings and topics.

Advisory Prerequisite: Junior standing.

ACABS 425 — Near Eastern Studies Capstone Seminar
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Babayan,Kathryn; homepage
Instructor: Ginsburg,Elliot K; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

The proposed capstone seminar will be thematically driven, focusing each year on a theme and topical clusters, organized around key issues in the Middle East, such as rituals, problems in Middle Eastern history and literature, gender issues, wars and violence, etc. The pilot seminar will focus on "rituals" and combine study of the methodological approaches to the study of ritual — drawn from anthropology, sociology, psychology, history of religions, etc. — with application of case studies drawn from our representative fields. Specifically, the rituals seminar aims to:

  • afford exposure to representative cultures in discrete sites and settings, i.e., to provide micro- studies of specific traditions and cultural moments;
  • provide a framework for fruitful juxtaposition or comparison of these cultures;
  • afford students greater methodological sophistication by focusing on ritual as a critical category for interpreting and theorizing about culture and cultures; and
  • develop students' critical writing skills.

Throughout the seminar, we will see the ways in which ritual serves as a launching pad to discuss core issues of identity/belonging, the boundaries of community and nation, issues of authority, sacred and profane, stasis and crisis, orality and literacy, memory and forgetting, the encounter with the other (imagined or real, human or divine), as well as key issues of gender, embodiment, and textuality. In short, we will use ritual to explore fundamental dimensions (and specific cultural inflections) of being human.

Intended audience: Senior concentrators in Near Eastern Studies

Course Requirements: Regular attendance and participation; three short essays (4-5 pages each); one final research paper (12-15 pages); one oral presentation.

Class Format: Three hours per week seminar format

Enforced Prerequisites: Sr. standing

Advisory Prerequisite: JR P.I.

ACABS 427 — Advanced Koine
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Verhoogt,Arthur Mfw

FA 2007
Credits: 3

In this class we are going to read substantial selections from a variety of Koine Greek prose authors (a.o. Philo, Josephus, Diodorus Siculus, Strabo). The key aims are to enhance students' reading ability in Koine Greek both with respect to grammar (morphology, syntax) and to translating and understanding.

Advisory Prerequisite: NES,Two years of Greek, one term of New Testament Greek (300 level or equivalent), or permission of instructor.

ACABS 483 — Aramaic I
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Reymond,Eric Daniel

FA 2007
Credits: 3

The course offers an introduction to the study of Aramaic, the language of the Arameans, the administrative language of the western Persian Empire. It was the lingua-franca for much of the Ancient Near East in the middle of the 1st millennium BCE and remained the common language of the populace through the first few centuries of the common era. The course will begin with a study of Biblical Aramaic, including portions of Daniel and Ezra. The course will also cover portions of other corpora, including some of the Dead Sea Scrolls, the Targumin (the ancient Aramaic translations of the Hebrew Bible), inscriptions, papyri, and rabbinic writings from the first centuries of the common era.

We will use, as our textbook, the 6th edition of Franz Rosenthal's A Grammar of Biblical Aramaic (Porta Linguarum Orientalium 5; Wiesbaden: Harrosowitz, 1995). Other material will be covered by handouts distributed once classes begin.

Student evaluation will be based on attendance, class participation, performance on quizzes, a midterm, and a final exam. Students need not have any acquaintance with any Semitic language to take the course; all are welcome. Feel free to ask questions. Email me at ericreymond@hotmail.com.

Advisory Prerequisite: ACABS 102.

ACABS 498 — Senior Honors Thesis
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 6
Other: Honors, Indpnt Study

The Senior Honors thesis is for students who have been approved by the Near Eastern Studies concentration advisor, Honors advisor, and the LS&A Honors Council. The length of the thesis may vary, but 50-60 pages is common. Two advisors should be chosen. The principal advisor is a member of the faculty in whose field of expertise the thesis topic lies, and he or she oversees the student's research and the direction taken by the thesis.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

ACABS 513 — Ancient Mesopotamia
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Yoffee,Norman; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

(Graduate students: Please note description for the graduate section of this course ACABS 513 below.)

Sumerian, Babylonian, and Assyrian civilization from the first cuneiform documents (ca. 3100 BC) to the fall of the Neo-Babylonian empire (539 BC); special attention to

  1. the rise and nature of early Mesopotamian city-states;
  2. Mesopotamian economics;
  3. Mesopotamian law;
  4. ethnic relations in Mesopotamia;
  5. Mesopotamia and its neighbors — Egypt, Iran, Israel;
  6. the collapse of Mesopotamian civilization.
Original documents are examined to show methods of interpreting the history and culture of Ancient Mesopotamia.

ACABS 513 meets with ACABS 413 but is intended for graduate students. It will survey Sumerian, Babylonian, and Assyrian civilization from the first written documents (ca. 3100 BC) to the fall of the Neo-Babylonian empire (539 BC). Students will meet with the instructor bi-weekly to discuss readings and topics.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

ACABS 591 — Topics in Ancient Civilizations and Biblical Studies
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Reymond,Eric Daniel

FA 2007
Credits: 3

In part, what makes Aramaic interesting is that its study reveals not only the Arameans themselves, but also the peoples, cultures, and religions of those who adopted their language. The Elephantine papyri reveal the nature of Jewish life in a Persian military colony, at the southern extreme of Egypt, as well as the life of Arameans at the neighboring outpost of Syene, and the Persian officials who administered this region. In later periods Jewish writers used Aramaic to translate and/or adapt material from the Hebrew Bible. These translations and adaptations constitute part of the corpora of the Dead Sea Scrolls. The Targums are Aramaic translations of the Bible, including many additions and supplements to the biblical books, that were written after 200 C.E.

Beginning with the administrative texts and letters and literature of so-called Imperial Aramaic, this course traces the ascendancy of this important Near Eastern language in Jewish groups who wrote the Dead Sea Scrolls and the Aramaic translations of Scripture, called Targums. We will be reading texts from each of these corpora in order to familiarize students with these important dialects of Aramaic and to cement their knowledge of the relevant grammar and vocabulary.

Texts will be distributed during class in the form of handouts. Supplemental readings will be placed on reserve.

Student evaluation will be based on attendance, class participation, and performance on a final exam. The prerequisite for the course is ACABS 483 Aramaic I, or an equivalent course. Questions are welcome. Email me at ereymond@umich.edu.

ACABS 601 — Advanced Readings in Classical Hebrew
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Schmidt,Brian B; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This and the complementary course, ACABS 202/ACABS 602 Intermediate Classical Hebrew II (Winter Term), are designed to introduce the second year or intermediate level student to the fundamental syntactic features of the language of the Hebrew Bible. The features covered include the syntax of individual words and phrases as well that of clauses and sentences. By advancing the student's analytical skills beyond basic morphological observations to syntactic analysis, the course aims to facilitate greater competency in translation and interpretation of select portions of the biblical text. Course requirements include attendance and participation (10%), daily readings in a text book grammar (10%), written syntax analysis and translation of select biblical texts (10%), vocabulary and paradigm review quizzes (10%), and two half-term exams (30% each).

Advisory Prerequisite: ACABS 102; Graduate standing.

ACABS 611 — Akkadian Documents
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Yoffee,Norman; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Readings of old Babylonian legal, administrative, and economic documents. Evaluation: Grading will be based on in-class recitation and a term paper.

Advisory Prerequisite: ACABS 412 or equivalent.

ACABS 615 — Sumerian Readings
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Brisch,Nicole M

FA 2007
Credits: 3

We will be reading a variety of Sumerian literary and non-literary compositions in the original language.

Grading will be based on weekly class performance. No texts are required. Method of instruction: lecture, discussion, class readings. No books are required.

Advisory Prerequisite: ACABS 512. Graduate standing.

ACABS 686 — Seminar in Egyptian Archaeology
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Richards,Janet E; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course focuses specifically on the material culture and disposition of archaeological sites in ancient Egypt and Nubia from ca. 3200 bc–285 ac. The logic and nature of both sacred and secular landscapes will be explored, and specific sites, some well-known (such as the extensive temple precinct at Karnak and the Meroitic pyramids), some less well-known (such as the town of Karanis and the city of Kerma), will be investigated as examples of different kinds of interpretive problems in archaeology. The course also will introduce a consideration of theoretical approaches to Nile Valley archaeological data and the ways in which they articulate with other sources of information.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permission of instructor.

ACABS 798 — Directed Graduate Readings
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 3

Designed for individual students who have an interest in a specific topic (usually that has stemmed from a previous course). An individual instructor must agree to direct such a reading, and the requirements are specified when approval is granted.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

ACABS 811 — Northwest Semitic Inscriptions
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Reymond,Eric Daniel

FA 2007
Credits: 3

The concentration of texts recovered from the island of Yeb or Elephantine, located in the southern Nile, opens a window on this ancient society, specifically the particular way that these Jewish people communicated with each other, formed contracts, and worshipped. The texts also reveal how a non-indigenous population in the Persian empire lived among an indigenous one.

This course will exam in detail the texts of the Elephantine Papyri, including the material not covered in ACABS 591: literary texts, contracts, legal material, and letters. This course will not only further familiarize students with this particular dialect of Aramaic, but will also allow insight into the society and history of this important period and place.

Texts will be distributed during class in the form of handouts. Supplemental readings will be placed on reserve.

Student evaluation will be based on attendance, class participation, performance on a final exam. Some prior knowledge of Aramaic is a prerequisite. Questions are welcome. Email me at ereymond@umich.edu.

Advisory Prerequisite: NES,ACABS 202, or equivalent with permission of instructor.

ACABS 990 — Dissertation Research Precandidate
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 8

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Advisory Prerequisite: Election for dissertation work by doctoral candidate not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing.

ACABS 993 — Graduate Student Instructor Training Program
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Rammuny,Raji M

FA 2007
Credits: 1

A seminar for all beginning Graduate Student Instructors (GSIs), consisting of a one-day orientation before the term starts and seven consecutive two-hour workshops/meetings discussion during the Fall Term. Topics include classroom management, strategies for effective classroom discussion, rules for group discussion, grading of students' written work, handling controversial issues, teaching encounters, etc. Evaluation is based on students' attendance, participation and weekly presentations of brief reports. Beginning GSIs are required to register for this course.

Advisory Prerequisite: Must have a Teaching Assistantship. Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

ACABS 995 — Dissertation/Candidate
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 8

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Enforced Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate

 
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