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LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Fall 2007, Dept = ANTHRARC
 
Page 1 of 1, Results 1 — 19 of 19
Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
ANTHRARC 282 — Introduction to Prehistoric Archaeology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Young,Lisa C; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS

Is archaeology about hunting for lost treasure in exotic places? In Introduction to Prehistoric Archaeology, we examine what archaeology is by investigating the techniques, methods, and theories that archaeologists use to interpret the human past. We then explore what archaeologists have learned about the past through a ‘greatest hits' tour of world prehistory, starting with the earliest humans through historic times. The course is specifically designed to be accessible to students regardless of their previous backgrounds in anthropology, but it will provide the foundation necessary for students who want to take more advanced courses in archaeology. The course format is lecture and weekly discussion sections. Students will be evaluated on take-home projects designed to help you think critically about archaeological evidence and two hourly exams. Textbooks: "Archaeology: Down to Earth" by David Hurst Thomas, and "Images of the Past" by T. Douglas Price and Gary M Feinman).

ANTHRARC 381 — Introduction to Egyptian Archaeology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Richards,Janet E; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

This course focuses on the material culture and disposition of archaeological sites in ancient Egypt and Nubia from c. 3200 bce-285 ac. The logic and nature of both sacred and secular landscapes are explored, and specific sites, some well known (such as the extensive temple precinct at Karnak and the Meroitic pyramids).

ANTHRARC 383 — Prehistory of Africa
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Holl,Augustin F C

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS

This course explores the development of cultures in Subsaharan Africa from the first emergence of human-like bipeds more than 5 million years ago to the rise of states and urban centers during the Iron Age. The requirement of the course include a midterm examination (take-home) and either an in-class final exam or a research paper.

Advisory Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

ANTHRARC 385 — The Archaeology of Early Humans
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Speth,John D; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: ULWR, SS

This course introduces students to the many exciting new discoveries in the archaeology of our earliest human ancestors, tracing what we know of human cultural and biological evolution from the first appearance of upright, small-brained, tool-making humans, 2.0 to 2.5 million years ago, to the appearance of fully modern humans in the last 30,000 to 40,000 years. The course is divided into two segments. The first briefly surveys the techniques and methods used by archaeologists to find ancient archaeological sites, and how they go about studying the fossil human remains, animal bones, and stone tools from these sites to learn about ancient lifeways. This section also looks at how studies of living primates in the wild, especially chimpanzees, as well as modern hunter-gatherers, such as the Bushmen and Australian Aborigines, can help us to interpret the distant past. The second segment of the course turns to the actual archaeological record, looking at some of the most important finds from Africa, Asia, and Europe. In this segment, the course follows the accelerating developmental trajectory of our ancestors from the simplest tool-makers, who lacked any sign of art or religion, to humans much like ourselves, who began to bury their dead with clear displays of ritual and who adorned the walls of their caves and their own bodies with art. The course is oriented as much toward students with a general curiosity and interest in the human past as toward students who will become eventual concentrators in anthropology.

Requirements include three in-class hourly exams and a series of brief essays on specific topics covered in lecture and readings. Sections will involve both discussion and hands-on projects with archaeological artifacts and human fossils.

Required readings: a text and course pack with articles supplementing the lectures.

Advisory Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

ANTHRARC 394 — Undergraduate Seminar in Archaeology
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Young,Lisa C; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Have you ever wondered about the ethical questions facing archaeologists in the world of today? How do archaeologists work with indigenous communities; what are the political implications of archaeologists findings; what can be done to protect the archaeological record against looting and the sale of antiquities? The Undergraduate Seminar in Archaeology discusses the history of American archaeology to understand these ethical questions and to discuss major changes in theoretical perspectives. Students will also learn about the process of doing research in archaeology and professional skills. This class is geared toward seniors interested in archaeology, who have some background in the field. Grades are based on participation in seminar discussions and two written assignments (an annotated bibliography and a research design). Discussions will be based on readings from "Skull Wars" by David Hurst Thomas and course pack materials.

Advisory Prerequisite: ANTHRARC 282, concentration in Anthropology, and permission of instructor.

ANTHRARC 398 — Honors in Anthropological Archaeology
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Young,Lisa C; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Honors

The Undergraduate Honors Seminar in Archaeology is the first half of a two part seminar course designed for students who wish to write an Honors thesis in archaeology. You must discuss the Honors program in archaeology with Lisa Young (lcyoung@umich.edu) before enrolling in this course. During the fall academic term, we will focus discussions on the history of American archaeology to understand the ethical issues facing archaeologists today. We will also examine the research process and look at how to develop and write a research design, as a means of starting work on your Honors thesis. Professional skills are also discussed. Students will prepare an annotated bibliography of background information related to their thesis topic and write a short research design. Grades are based on participation in seminar discussions, written assignments, and an oral presentation of your research topic at the end of the academic term.

ANTHRARC 442 — Ancient Mesopotamia: History and Culture
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Yoffee,Norman; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Other: WorldLit

(Graduate students: Please note description for the graduate section of this course ACABS 513 below.)

Sumerian, Babylonian, and Assyrian civilization from the first cuneiform documents (ca. 3100 BC) to the fall of the Neo-Babylonian empire (539 BC); special attention to

  1. the rise and nature of early Mesopotamian city-states;
  2. Mesopotamian economics;
  3. Mesopotamian law;
  4. ethnic relations in Mesopotamia;
  5. Mesopotamia and its neighbors — Egypt, Iran, Israel;
  6. the collapse of Mesopotamian civilization.
Original documents are examined to show methods of interpreting the history and culture of Ancient Mesopotamia.

ACABS 513 meets with ACABS 413 but is intended for graduate students. It will survey Sumerian, Babylonian, and Assyrian civilization from the first written documents (ca. 3100 BC) to the fall of the Neo-Babylonian empire (539 BC). Students will meet with the instructor bi-weekly to discuss readings and topics.

Advisory Prerequisite: Junior standing.

ANTHRARC 480 — Practica in Archaeological Research Techniques
Section 001, LEC
Zooarchaeology

Instructor: Redding,Richard William

FA 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Minicourse

This course seeks to provide students with skills in the analysis of archaeological materials, including animal bones (zooarchaeology), plant remains (archaeobotany), stone tools, ceramics, and soils and sediments. Specific methodologies include remote sensing (subsurface radar, sonar, satellite imagery analysis), Geographic Information Systems, and materials analysis through chemical or geologic methodologies. Sections provide students with basic skills and fundamental knowledge to allow them to develop a wide range of essential analytical skills in archaeology.

Advisory Prerequisite: Juniors and above or permission of instructor

ANTHRARC 482 — Topics in Anthropological Archaeology
Section 001, LEC
Hunter-Gatherers

Instructor: Whallon Jr,Robert E; homepage
Instructor: Speth,John D; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Humans have been hunter-gatherers (or foragers) for most of their existence, and many parts of the world were still peopled by hunters and gatherers at the time of European contact. Though most foraging societies are now gone, there is a large and fascinating body of ethnohistory and ethnography documenting the foraging way of life, providing the foundation for much of our thinking about how humans lived and changed over the vast time-span of the Pleistocene.

This course will focus on simple, band-level, hunter-gatherers, reviewing such issues as forager diet and subsistence, mobility, kinship and social organization, demography, health and reproduction, interaction and exchange, and religion. In presenting these topics, lectures and discussion will consider both the "living" or ethnographic context, and the use of such information to develop models and testable hypotheses for exploring forager behavior in the past.

The course will be organized as a mixture of lectures and discussions. Grading will be based on participation in discussions and on a final research paper to be prepared by each student. Most of the readings will be provided to participants in the form of pdf files, although some may be set up as a modest course pack. No textbook purchase is required.

Advisory Prerequisite: Junior standing and permission of instructor.

ANTHRARC 490 — Prehistory of North America
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Speth,John D; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Students are introduced to the diversity of prehistoric Native American cultures in North America, with emphasis on the Eastern Woodlands, Plains, Great Basin, and Southwest. Twelve thousand years of accommodations to diverse natural and social environments are covered, starting with the initial peopling of the Americas and ending with early contacts between Europeans and Native Americans. Topics of special interest include the extinction of mammoths, mastodons, and other megafauna at the end of the Pleistocene or "Ice Age"; changing hunter-gatherer adaptations leading to the independent domestication of several seed-bearing plants and the origins of agriculture; the development of organizationally complex societies, often called chiefdoms, in the Southeast and southern Midwest; and the devastating impact of European exploration and colonization on the cultures of Native North America. Requirements include three in-class "hourly" exams (there will be no final examination). Required readings include two texts and course pack with articles supplementing the lectures.

Advisory Prerequisite: Sophomore & above/permission of instructor

ANTHRARC 499 — Undergraduate Reading and Research in Anthropology
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 3
Other: INDEPENDENT

Independent reading and research under the direction of a faculty member. Ordinarily available only to students with background in anthropology.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

ANTHRARC 581 — Archaeology I
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Whallon Jr,Robert E; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course develops an approach to studying the emergence of human culture as part of the process of human evolution. After a brief historical background, the first half of the course is devoted to building a model of the organization and operation of small-scale (band-level) cultural systems. Aspects of society and ecology in non-human, higher primates are compared with those of ethnographically-known hunter-gatherer bands in an effort to define hypothetically the essential characteristics of pre- and proto-cultural societies, for which there are no extant examples or analogs. The second half of the course consists of a review of Paleolithic-Mesolithic archaeological data in the light of these models, discussing the ways in which proto-cultural and early cultural systems may be studied from the archaeological record. The result is an emerging outline of the evolution of human culture from its earliest appearance until the appearance of complex hunter-gatherer groups and the beginnings of sedentary agricultural communities.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing only

ANTHRARC 593 — Archaeological Systematics
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: O'Shea,John M

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course is designed principally for graduate students in anthropology. It examines the epistemological basis for archaeology, major theoretical frameworks for reconstructing past human organization and studying its change, and methodological approaches appropriate for such investigations. The course is designed as a seminar, with strong emphasis on active student participation. There are no exams, but weekly written essays are required.

Advisory Prerequisite: ANTHRO,Senior concentrators and graduates with permission of instructor.

ANTHRARC 683 — Topics in Archaeology
Section 001, SEM
Hunter-Gatherers

Instructor: Whallon Jr,Robert E; homepage
Instructor: Speth,John D; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Humans have been hunter-gatherers (or foragers) for most of their existence, and many parts of the world were still peopled by hunters and gatherers at the time of European contact. Though most foraging societies are now gone, there is a large and fascinating body of ethnohistory and ethnography documenting the foraging way of life, providing the foundation for much of our thinking about how humans lived and changed over the vast time-span of the Pleistocene.

This course will focus on simple, band-level, hunter-gatherers, reviewing such issues as forager diet and subsistence, mobility, kinship and social organization, demography, health and reproduction, interaction and exchange, and religion. In presenting these topics, lectures and discussion will consider both the "living" or ethnographic context, and the use of such information to develop models and testable hypotheses for exploring forager behavior in the past.

The course will be organized as a mixture of lectures and discussions. Grading will be based on participation in discussions and on a final research paper to be prepared by each student. Most of the readings will be provided to participants in the form of pdf files, although some may be set up as a modest course pack. No textbook purchase is required.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing only

ANTHRARC 693 — Archaeological Research Design
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: O'Shea,John M

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This seminar addresses archaeological research design from problem formulation through data collection and analysis. Topics include scientific methods, and hypothesis testing, as well as how to link theoretical questions to archaeological evidence. Also addressed are practical dimensions of research, including proposal writing, granting agencies, budgets, research permits, and ethics.

Advisory Prerequisite: ANTHRARC 593.

ANTHRARC 958 — Anthropological Research
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 3
Other: INDEPENDENT

This course requires a substantial research paper or an extensive exploration and critical evaluation of relevant sources on a particular topic.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and 18 hours of Anthropology; permission of instructor.

ANTHRARC 959 — Survey of Literature on Selected Topics
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 3
Other: INDEPENDENT

This course requires an annotated bibliography. A written statement detailing a program of readings and objectives is to be submitted to the instructor.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and 18 hours of Anthropology; permission of instructor.

ANTHRARC 990 — Dissertation/Precandidate
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 8
Other: INDEPENDENT

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Advisory Prerequisite: Advanced Doctoral student. Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

ANTHRARC 995 — Dissertation/Candidate
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 8

Graduate school authorization for admission as a doctoral candidate.

Enforced Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate

 
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