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LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Fall 2007, Dept = ANTHRBIO
 
Page 1 of 1, Results 1 — 16 of 16
Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
ANTHRBIO 161 — Introduction to Biological Anthropology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: MacLatchy,Laura M; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, NS

This is a four-unit course that examines the processes that have shaped human evolution. The first unit covers the basic principles of evolutionary biology, and includes overviews of adaptation, natural selection and genetics. The second unit focuses on the ecology and behavior of nonhuman primates, and considers how a comparative approach may help us to understand human evolution. Unit three pays particular attention to the fossil record, and how the study of human prehistory informs our understanding of modern humans. Finally, we focus on humans in modern contexts and consider the biological bases of behavioral and morphological variability. Lectures are multimedia presentations including film clips and slides, and sections include discussion and hands-on exercises (using fossil casts, etc). Students are evaluated with exams based on lecture material, and by quizzes in section. There is one required text (How Humans Evolved, by Boyd and Silk) and several reserve readings. No prerequisites.

ANTHRBIO 265 — Human Evolutionary Anatomy
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: MacLatchy,Laura M; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, NS
Other: Honors

This course introduces students to the evolutionary history of humans through the study of comparative human anatomy. The focus will be on the musculoskeletal anatomy of humans and their closest living and fossil relatives. Included in the course will be the reconstruction of the dietary, locomotor and social behavior of extinct hominids, such as Australopithecus and earlier forms of Homo. The class will make use of the skeletal and cast collections housed in the Anthropology Department.

This course covers two broad sub-areas in Biology, Comparative Anatomy and Evolutionary Theory. The fossil record will be used to illustrate the evolution of specific anatomical structures and theories about the selective advantages of these structures will be discussed. In addition, the concept of homology will be used to infer phylogenetic relationships among taxa, and to situate humans within the primate order. In the course of studying comparative human anatomy, students will be introduced to concepts of natural selection and genetic drift, species and speciation, convergent evolution, etc. They will also be introduced to simple metric and biomechanical methods of quantifying and comparing different species' anatomies. This course is open to students without any background in biology or anthropology, and will introduce students to valuable concepts in the natural sciences.

Humans are innately curious about their own evolutionary history. Three lines of evidence have provided us with much of the data we use to reconstruct our past: 1) comparative morphology (i.e., anatomical and physiological comparisons among humans and our closest relatives); 2) the fossil record; and 3) comparative genomics. The first two of these rely heavily on insights provided by each other and are particularly amenable to study by undergraduates because some key methodological approaches (e.g. three-dimensional shape comparisons and biomechanical interpretations) are highly intuitive. Furthermore, the demonstration of evolutionary continuity between our own bodies and those of other animals (both living and extinct) can be very illuminating for students, leading them to appreciate the magnitude of the selective process and the importance of the relationship between organism and environment. "Human Evolutionary Anatomy" will cover each region of the musculoskeletal system and compare the anatomy of humans to that of apes and fossil hominids. This approach will allow students to understand the current anatomical form and function of each region, as well as appreciate the evolutionary processes that led, for example, to the limbs being transformed from those of a climbing quadruped to those of an animal that can walk on two legs. T

Although the material covered is typically taken at the advanced undergraduate level, it would be very suitable for a group of bright, motivated students in the Honors program. Some of the relevant literature is terminologically dense, but the basic principles allowing students to understand the functional significance of shape differences (e.g. lever mechanics, simple metric comparisons) are straightforward. Understanding that humans are the product of biological evolution remains a key element in a liberal arts and sciences education, especially given the contention surrounding the teaching of evolution. The study of human anatomy is one the best opportunities we have to teach young people about evolution, because, just as in Darwin's day, the process of natural selection seems inescapable once the similarities between humans and apes are made clear.

Intended audience: First and second year Honors students. Students do not need any college-level prerequisites, but a background in biology or osteology will be an asset.

Course Requirements: Two practical midterm exams (total of 30%); five lab reports (total of 50%); and one final exam (20%). Five written assignments will be due over the course of the semester, four of which will be based on lab exercises. The final report will be a description of a "mystery human fossil" given to the student for analysis.

Class Format: Class meets three hours per week: mix of lecture, discussion, and hands-on learning in the department's bone lab. No GSI needed.

Advisory Prerequisite: LSA Honors. Background in biology or osteology helpful.

ANTHRBIO 364 — Nutrition and Evolution
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Frisancho,Andres R; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, NS

The purpose of this course is to study nutrition from an evolutionary perspective. Specifically this course will examine:

  1. the evolutionary roots including mammalian evolutionary history, primate origins, fossil evidence from australopithecine to Homo sapiens;
  2. food procurement through hominid evolution including the archaeological evidence about the evolutionary roots of human diet, the evolution of the digestive system and brain size of non-human and human primates;
  3. food and nutrients which examines the physiology of nutrient utilization from carbohydrates to fats and proteins, vitamins, minerals and electrolytes;
  4. Homo sapiens food procurement from hunter-gathering, agriculture and animal domestication;
  5. food and culture which examines the socio-cultural factors that may have contributed to the practice of cannibalism, the ecological basis for the preference and food taboos in contemporary populations, the biological basis for the variability in the ability to digest milk, accommodation to dietary restriction throughout the life cycle, and the consequence of human endeavor to increase its food supply and decrease energy expenditure on the increased prevalence of obesity that is reaching epidemic proportions throughout the industrialized world.

NOTE: All students are expected to know about the principles on which techniques of assessing body composition and nutritional status are based. Such knowledge will be tested on the exam. One option is to learn these techniques by having one's own body size and composition measured by another student, and to measure another student's body size and composition. Students may also choose the option of measuring the weight and fat percentage of their GSI, if their GSI agrees. Students who do not wish to have their body size and composition measured and/or who do not wish to perform such measurements on others will be excused from the assignment. Those who do not participate in these measurements will lose no points as a result. Instead, such students will be given written exercises addressed at interpreting these anthropometric measurements.

Advisory Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

ANTHRBIO 365 — Human Evolution
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Wolpoff,Milford H; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, NS

Human evolution has been a biological process with both social and physical aspects. Through lectures, discussion section, laboratory, and reading, the interrelated process of behavioral and physical change is outlined for humans and their ancestors. Emphasis is placed on evolutionary mechanisms, and context is provided through an understanding of the pre-human primates. The human story begins with origins and the appearance of unique human features such as bipedality, the loss of cutting canines, the appearance of continual sexual receptivity, births requiring midwifery, and the development of complex social interactions. An early adaptive shift sets the stage for the subsequent evolution of intelligence, technology, and the changes in physical form that are the consequence of the unique feedback system involving cultural and biological change. The "Eve" theory and other ideas about the origin of modern humanity and human races, and their development and relationships, are discussed in this context. Class participation and discussion are emphasized, and there is a required discussion/laboratory section for elaboration of lecture topics and supervised hands-on experience with primate skeletal material and replicas of human fossils. Student evaluations are based on two examinations, laboratory quizzes, and a laboratory exam.

Enforced Prerequisites: Sophomore or Junior or Senior

Advisory Prerequisite: High school biology is assumed.

ANTHRBIO 368 — Primate Social Behavior I
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Mitani,John C; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: ULWR, BS, NS

This course will review the social systems and behavior of our closest living relatives, the primates. The course will be divided into three parts. I will begin by outlining questions about primate behavior. In this section the order primates will be introduced by examining the biology and behaviour of prosimians, monkeys, and apes. Second, various aspects of social primate systems including spacing, mating, and grouping patterns will be discussed. The course will conclude by reviewing selected topics of primate behavior, such as infanticide and vocal communication. I will draw heavily on field studies of primates and emphasize their behavior in natural environmental and social settings.

ANTHRBIO 371 — Techniques in Biological Anthropology
Section 001, LAB

Instructor: Wolpoff,Milford H; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 3
Reqs: BS

Laboratory training and work in the techniques used in various aspects of research in biological anthropology.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

ANTHRBIO 398 — Honors in Biological Anthropology
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS
Other: Honors, Indpnt Study

Seniors who choose to enter the Honors program undertake a senior project under the supervision of a member of the faculty. Most often this takes the form of an original paper of greater scope than is possible in an ordinary term paper, and it gives the student experience in conducting and writing up his or her own research. Students who are interested in joining the senior honors program should consult with the departmental honors advisor for biological anthropology. Previous participation in the college Honors program is not a prerequisite for joining the senior Honors program.

ANTHRBIO 471 — Undergraduate Reading and Research in Anthropology
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 3
Other: INDEPENDENT

Laboratory training and work in the techniques used in various aspects of research in biological anthropology.

Advisory Prerequisite: PER. INSTR.

ANTHRBIO 563 — Mechanisms of Human Adaptation
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Frisancho,Andres R; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS

The course is addressed at evaluating the physiological response and adaptations that enable humans to survive environmental extremes such as those found under stressful conditions of heat, cold, solar radiation, high altitude, undernutrition, overnutrition, and Westernization of dietary habits. Because this course is addressed to students of several disciplines and to facilitate understanding of the mechanisms of human adaptation to the environmental stress, the discussion of the major topics is preceded by sections outlining initial responses observed in laboratory animals. Emphasis is given to the short adaptive mechanisms that enable an organism to acclimate itself to a given environmental stress. Subsequently, the long-term adaptive mechanisms that enable humans to acclimatize themselves to natural, stressful environmental conditions are discussed. Throughout the course, emphasis is given to the effects of environmental stresses and the adaptive responses that an organism makes during its growth and development and their implications for understanding the origins of population differences in biological traits. The method of instruction is lecture and some discussion. The course also involves practice with field laboratory techniques.

Advisory Prerequisite: Senior standing.

ANTHRBIO 665 — Topics in Human Evolution
Section 001, SEM
Paleoanthropology Journal Club

Instructor: Wolpoff,Milford H; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 2

In this seminar we will read current articles an paleoanthropology (including biological anthropology and paleolithic archaeology) and paleogenetics and discuss one each week in depth.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

ANTHRBIO 668 — Topics in Primatology
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Mitani,John C; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 2

This course will include discussion of topics related to current problems in the study of primate behavior. Topics span the breadth of questions concerning the causation, function, development and evolution of primate behavior.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

ANTHRBIO 961 — Research Practicum in Anthropology
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 2 — 8

This course provides students with the opportunity to design and to conduct fieldwork or laboratory analysis of original anthropological data. A faculty member may undertake it as a special aspect of a research project under investigation or the student under the supervision of a faculty member may initiate it.

Advisory Prerequisite: 18 hours or Graduate standing; permission of instructor

ANTHRBIO 962 — Anthropological Research
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 3

This course requires a substantial research paper or an extensive exploration and critical evaluation of relevant sources on a particular topic.

Advisory Prerequisite: 18 hours or Graduate standing; permission of instructor

ANTHRBIO 963 — Survey of Literature on Selected Topics
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 3

This course requires an annotated bibliography. A written statement detailing a program of readings and objectives is to be submitted to the instructor.

Advisory Prerequisite: 18 hours or Graduate standing; permission of instructor

ANTHRBIO 990 — Dissertation/Precandidate
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 8

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Advisory Prerequisite: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing.

ANTHRBIO 995 — Dissertation/Candidate
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 8

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Enforced Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate and permission of instructor.

 
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