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LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Fall 2007, Dept = ANTHRCUL
 
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Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
ANTHRCUL 101 — Introduction to Anthropology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Shryock,Andrew J; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS, RE

This introductory course exposes and explores the structures of inquiry characteristic of anthropology and surveys the field's four subdisciplines (biological, archaeological, cultural, and linguistic anthropology), providing a first glimpse of the field's overall context, history, present status, and importance. The principal aim of the course is to help students develop a coherent view of the essential concepts and methods that typify the discipline. It stresses unifying principles that link the subdisciplines and thereby create anthropology's comprehensive, holistic world view. It teaches students various ways of learning and thinking about the world's many designs for living in time and space. It prepares them to integrate and interpret information, to evaluate conflicting claims about human nature and diversity, and to think critically. Topics covered include: the nature of culture; human genetics, evolution and the fossil record; the concept of race; primate (monkey and ape) behavior; language and culture; systems of marriage, kinship and family organization; sex-gender roles; economics, politics, and religion in global perspective; the cultural dimension of economic development and contemporary social change, and the emergence of a world system. Required readings come from one introductory text and additional paperbacks. Lectures and discussion-recitation. Two objective exams (multiple choice and true or false questions) cover the two halves of the course. The second exam is given on the last day of class. There is no final exam and no term paper. Section leaders require quizzes and a short paper.

ANTHRCUL 101 — Introduction to Anthropology
Section 026, LEC

Instructor: Peters-Golden,Holly; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS, RE

This introductory course surveys the field's four subdisciplines (biological, archaeological, cultural, and linguistic anthropology), providing a first glimpse of the field's overall context, history, present status, and importance. The principal aim of the course is to help students develop a coherent view of the essential concepts, structures, and intellectual methods that typify the discipline. It stresses unifying principles that link the subdisciplines and thereby create anthropology's comprehensive, holistic world view. It teaches students various ways of learning and thinking about the world's many designs for living in time and space. It prepares them to integrate and interpret information, to evaluate conflicting claims about human nature and diversity, and to think critically.

Topics covered include: the nature of culture; human genetics, evolution and the fossil record; the concept of race; primate (monkey and ape) behavior; language and culture; systems of marriage, kinship and family organization; sex-gender roles; economics, politics, and religion in global perspective; the arts; and medicine. Required readings come from one introductory text, a case studies book and additional paperbacks. Lectures and discussion-recitation. Three multiple choice exams each cover one-third of the course. The third exam is given on the last day of class. There will be several quizzes and short writing assignments due in section.

ANTHRCUL 158 — First Year Seminar in Cultural Anthropology
Section 001, SEM
The Races of Sexuality and the Sexualities of Race

Instructor: Partridge,Damani James

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS
Other: FYSem

From the lynching advocated in D.W. Griffith's Birth of a Nation to the feminization of East Asian bodies in David Henry Hwang's M. Butterfly, to ethnographies of mail order brides and sex tourism, this course will examine the intimate links between race and sexuality. Through ethnography, film, literature and diverse histories, we will investigate how race gets sexualized and how sexualities get racialized through processes of globalization and in particular local and national settings.

This course will include midterm and final papers, as well as short weekly reading responses. Grades will be based on the quality of written work, on class participation, and on attendance.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

ANTHRCUL 158 — First Year Seminar in Cultural Anthropology
Section 002, SEM
Cities and Communities in Films and Their Scores

Instructor: Hart,Janet Carol

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS
Other: FYSem

This course combines several approaches, drawing materials from urban and more broadly, cultural anthropology by focusing on cities and communities; media and visual anthropology, taking into account popular cultural forms and life ways as portrayed on the big screen; and musicology and film studies, asking how — and why — film scores are matched and used to evoke particular cinematic narratives. We will watch, read about, listen to and discuss a selection of films and consider the many ways in which, in them, music and images are arranged to convey meanings, symbols, places, cultural practices and political relations. Evaluations will be based on class participation, a short, autobiography about your personal history and relationship to film, a take-home midterm essay, and ongoing group projects organized around distinct film genres, culminating in a final collective paper and presentation.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

ANTHRCUL 158 — First Year Seminar in Cultural Anthropology
Section 003, SEM
Venezuela and the U.S. in Historical Perspective

Instructor: Skurski,Julie A

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS
Other: FYSem

This course examines key moments in Venezuelan history from Simón Bolívar, independence hero, to Hugo Chávez, the current president and critic of the U.S. It examines how interactions with the U.S. have shaped Venezuelan nationalism and images of national culture. In particular, it focuses on issues of race, gender, political violence, the petroleum state, and religiosity, with an emphasis on the contemporary period. We will use film, novels, and the press, and students will present brief research projects.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

ANTHRCUL 202 — Ethnic Diversity in Japan
Section 001, LEC
Issues in Race & Ethnicity

Instructor: Robertson,Jennifer E; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: RE, SS

This course begins with an overview of popular and anthropological ideas and theories about human diversity. Japanese ideas of "race" and "ethnicity" are analyzed comparatively. We then explore the history and cultures of Japanese ethnic groups and minorities. Among the groups we will focus on are the ("aboriginal") Ainu, resident Koreans, migrant workers (of Japanese ancestry) from South America, so-called "international marriages" and children of mixed parentage, Burakumin ("outcastes"), "sexual minorities" (i.e., gays, lesbians, bisexuals), and others. Anthropological readings are augmented by novels and short stories, comics, videos, and films.

ANTHRCUL 246 — Anthropology of Religion
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Keane Jr,Edward Webb; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4

An introduction to basic problems faced by religions and by the study of religion. Drawing on case studies from around the world, the course examines different ways people have confronted questions such as how one deals with an invisible world, what happens after death, why do bad things happen to good people, what makes life worth living, how can one obtain wealth and power. The emphasis will be on comparison, showing how very different traditions have dealt with the same or similar problems. In the process of examining these issues, the course also raises questions about the difficulties involved in studying other people's most strongly held values and beliefs, and the relations between tolerance and faith.

ANTHRCUL 258 — Honors Seminar in Cultural Anthropology
Section 001, SEM
Cuba: Race and Nation

Instructor: Skurski,Julie A

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Honors

Cuba has long occupied a vital place in the Caribbean and continues to be the object of metropolitan competition and imaginings. This seminar introduces students to the history and culture of Cuba since its wars of independence in the late 19th century. It focuses on the development of Cuban nationalism with relation to concepts of race, paying particular attention to music and religious practice as arenas in which issues of historical memory, forms of identity and political organization have been contested. It traces intersections between Cuba and other countries, both in the movement of people across borders and relations with major powers. A wide variety of materials will be used, including primary documents, film, and audio. Students will write two papers and make a presentation.

Enforced Prerequisites: LSA Honors

Advisory Prerequisite: Honors students with sophomore standing or above

ANTHRCUL 314 — Cuba and its Diaspora
Section 001, LEC
Issues in Race & Ethnicity

Instructor: Behar,Ruth

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: RE, ULWR

This course examines Cuban history, literature, and culture since the Revolution both on the island and in the United States diaspora. In political and cultural essays, personal narratives, fiction, poetry, drama, visual art and film, we will seek a comprehensive and diverse view of how Cubans and Cuban-Americans understand their situation as people of the same nation divided for years by the Cold War, revolution, and exile. Topics will include: discussions of race, ethnicity and intolerance in the context of Cuba and the diaspora, the meaning of diasporas in the twentieth century, Fidel Castro and the making of the Cuban Revolution, masculinity and gay sexuality in the Revolution and Cuban diaspora, women's dreams, everyday life under communism, Afrocuban culture and religion, the Cuban arts movement, and the construction and deconstruction of exile identity. We will read and discuss the writings of Fidel Castro, Oscar Hijuelos, Edmundo Desnoes, Reinaldo Arenas, Lourdes Casal, Senel Paz, Dolores Prida, and Carmelita Tropicana, among others, and view major Cuban feature and documentary films. A weekly two hour film screening is required Mondays 4-6pm or 6-8pm in 238A WH.

ANTHRCUL 319 — Latin American Society and Culture
Section 001, LEC
Issues in Race & Ethnicity

Instructor: Frye,David L; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: RE, SS

This course examines the cultures and societies of contemporary Latin America, a vast and varied region with more than twenty countries spread over one and a half continents that have developed over more than 500 years of history. We will cultivate an awareness of the particularities of local ways of life while searching for shared themes and histories that in some ways unite the many societies of this vast region. Topics covered include: race, ethnicity, and national identity; indigenous rights and citizenship; religion and religious change; gender issues; class and economic development; and immigrant communities within Latin America. As a student, you will be expected to keep up with reading and writing assignments and to participate actively in lectures and discussion sections. By the end of this course you should have a grasp of the various countries and regions that make up Latin America; the most important social divisions within those regions; and the nature of current developments in Latin American societies. This is an introductory course on the region, with no prerequisites other than a desire to learn new things. Grades will be based on participation, essays, and exams.

ANTHRCUL 325 — Childbirth & Culture
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4

This course focuses on the distinctive sociocultural configurations of childbirth practices and beliefs in several different societies. The cross-cultural study of childbirth provides a basis for understanding the cultural logic underlying these practices and beliefs and expands our knowledge of women's perspectives on social change and the medicalisation of childbirth.

Advisory Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

ANTHRCUL 330 — Culture, Thought, and Meaning
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Paley,Julia Felice; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: ULWR, HU

This course is an intensive, upper-division introduction to Cultural Anthropology and Cultural Studies. Concentrators and non-concentrators are welcome; the course is closed to Freshmen. The course introduces students to the closely interrelated concepts of "culture," "thought" and "meaning" as they are used in anthropology. Despite its centrality to the discipline of anthropology, "culture" has proved to be a highly inconsistent concept over time. This course traces the consequences of different concepts of culture from the early nineteenth century through the present and their relation to thought and meaning. It is organized around debates in anthropology about structure, interpretation, cognition, metaphor, practice, personhood, gender, the body, and place. Students have the opportunity to explore cultural difference by reading widely about other cultures, from the Trobriand Islands to the Caribbean, and to apply what they learn to their own cultural circumstances.

ANTHRCUL 333 — Non-Western Legal Systems, I
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Owusu,Maxwell K

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS

The nature, function, and development of law. Law and society. Problems of social control: why is law obeyed in societies without courts and in societies with courts. Dispute settlement procedures and the judicial process; civil and criminal law; principles of liability for legal wrongs; women, class and community; the impact of Western law on customary, tribal, or aboriginal law. Case studies from Africa, Middle East, Asia, Europe, the Americas. A good introduction to comparative law from an anthropological perspective. Requirements: four 3-5 page papers, or three 6-8 page student papers. Lecture/discussion format.

Advisory Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

ANTHRCUL 346 — Latin America: The Colonial Period
Section 001, LEC
Issues in Race & Ethnicity

Instructor: Mumford,Jeremy Ravi

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: RE, SS

This course examines Latin America from the initial encounters between Europeans and Native Americans to the early nineteenth-century wars of independence. It focuses on interactions among Native Americans, Africans, and Europeans, and on the emergence of a durable colonial system. We will use primary sources such as the transcripts of court cases as well as secondary works, and look at culture as well as the dynamics of social change. There will be a midterm exam, a final exam, and several reaction papers. There are two lectures per week and a discussion section. Students who wish to complete an extra hour's credit may opt for a somewhat longer discussion section held in Spanish.

ANTHRCUL 357 — Undergraduate Seminar in Ethnology
Section 001, SEM
Ethnographic Methods in Cultural Anthropology

Instructor: Fricke,Thomas E

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Readings, discussions, and reports on problems in modern ethnology.

Advisory Prerequisite: A course in cultural anthropology and junior standing.

ANTHRCUL 370 — Language and Discrimination: Language as Social Statement
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS, RE

In this course we examine the interplay between language and ideological processes, particularly as they function below the level of conscious awareness. We are concerned with the suppression of linguistic variation; that is, with the development of a standard language ideology, which is understood to be a bias toward an abstracted idealized, (but ultimately unattainable) homogenous spoken language, modeled on variants favored by the white, middle American mainstream. This ideology is one of many social practices on which people depend without close analysis of underlying assumptions. In this class, we will look into those assumptions linguistic and social and about the arguments used to uphold them. We will examine the way in which these behaviors are institutionalized by the media, the entertainment industry, school systems, business community, and the judicial system, all of which promote standard language ideology and underwrite assimilatory and often discriminatory practices, the goal of which is to suppress perfectly functional language variation intimately linked to homeland, race, ethnicity, ability (e.g., as it relates to the use of signed rather than spoken languages), or gender. We will look at issues of language choice and accent as legal issues in the courts, including battles about hate speech. This course should be of interest to those concerned with non-mainstream language varieties as a cultural resource and asset, historical heritage, and potential complication in supre-cultural communication. An introductory linguistics course would be helpful but is not essential.

Advisory Prerequisite: LING 210

ANTHRCUL 374 — Language and Culture
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Lemon,Alaina M; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

This course is concerned with the relations among language, thought, and culture. The first half of the course centers on how language as a system of signs makes culture possible. It looks at some basic questions about the nature of human language and its implications for how people make sense of the world. We ask such things as these: What do we share with other animal systems of communication and what is peculiar about human language? How does language shape the way we perceive and think about the things around us — and how does the world shape language? How does language let people mean things? The second half of the course focuses on language in action and interaction. We explore the dynamics of everyday conversations, the artful uses of language in performance, and aspects of power such as the politics of gender, national identity, and social status. Although most of the readings are drawn from anthropology, we will also venture into closely related areas in linguistics, sociology, and psychology. This course does not assume any background in linguistics and has no prerequisites.

There are four written exercises: two short (2-4 page) take-home essays and two in-class exams. The essays may involve some observations of your own surroundings but otherwise make use only of readings on the syllabus. Attendance in both lectures and discussion sections is mandatory and will be reflected in the final grade. Active participation in discussion sections is expected.

Advisory Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

ANTHRCUL 375 — Talking and Telling
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Keller-Cohen,Deborah

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

This course introduces students to systematic thinking about the structure and function of conversation and narrative from the perspective of anthropology, sociology and linguistics. We will think about such topics as what makes something a conversation, how conversations are organized, what role speaker characteristics play in talk (e.g., gender, age, ethnicity, social rank, culture), the family as an interactional unit, talk in institutions, types of talk (e.g., gossip, interviews), the differences between conversation and narrative, and the role of narratives in ritual, identity construction, and public life. Methodologically the course is aimed at developing students into careful observers who study face to face interactions and narrative. To this end students are taught how to gather oral language data, transcribe it, formulate research questions, and conduct analyses. After an initial independent project, students will work in teams with their collective data to explore other questions collaboratively.

Advisory Prerequisite: One course in linguistics, anthropology, or a related field.

ANTHRCUL 398 — Honors in Cultural Anthropology
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Mueggler,Erik A; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Honors, Indpnt Study

This honors course sequence in cultural anthropology is designed for undergraduate anthropology concentrators who are specializing in cultural anthropology and have applied for senior honors in the Department of Anthropology. This course is divided into two parts. In the Fall Term, the students will meet once a week in seminar to read and discuss a selection of significant monographs and papers in ethnology, and a selection of writings on fieldwork methods and research strategies in ethnology. This seminar provides background for the students to define their own senior honors thesis project. By the end of the term, the students will have decided on a project, and begun preliminary work on it. In consultation with the honors advisor the student may request any member of the Anthropology Department to serve as a main thesis advisor or second reader. In the Winter Term, the students will convene periodically in seminar with the honors advisor to discuss their research projects and get feedback from the group, as well as staying in contact with the honors advisor and second reader. By the end of the term, each student should have completed the research and write-up for their thesis so that they can make a formal summary presentation of it for the group. Original field research or library work may be used for honors projects.

ANTHRCUL 402 — Chinese Society and Cultures
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Mueggler,Erik A; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme

The twentieth century was a time of enormous change in mainland China: two revolutions, civil war, famine, cultural upheaval, and many episodes of massive economic, social, and political restructuring.

  • What was life like in the twentieth century for farmers, urban people, men and women, and ethnic and cultural minorities?
  • What are their lives like today?
  • What were experiences of sex, food, work, religion, and family life, and how have these experiences been transformed?

In the last five years, a new anthropological literature on China has begun to probe these questions in rich detail. We explore this literature in this seminar to build an understanding of daily life for China's diverse populations through the twentieth century and today. We also examine questions of method: how best can we study and understand the historical transformations of daily life? Students will participate actively in class, lead a class discussion, and write one short review paper and one research paper.

Advisory Prerequisite: Junior standing.

ANTHRCUL 404 — Peoples and Cultures of Southeast Asia
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Keane Jr,Edward Webb; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Southeast Asia is marked by enormous diversity in everything from ecology to political systems. Long a dynamic cross-road between the Indian Ocean and China, with deep ties to the Pacific islands, the region is socially and culturally complex. Indonesia, the world's fourth largest country, is home to the largest Islamic population within a single national border; the Philippines, whose complicated special relationship with the United States dates back to the nineteenth century, is predominantly Catholic. Thailand, which has never been formally colonized, is a major Buddhist nation. In the background to these large nation-states are hundreds of distinct local traditions and languages, as well as significant diasporic communities such as urban Chinese entrepreneurs. Interacting with rice farming villages, fishing towns, and royal courts are sprawling mega-cities and multi-national industrial enclaves; not far from the quintessential capitalist society of Singapore is the distinctively Vietnamese variety of socialism. This course will approach the region by way of selected case studies. Therefore the course will be of interest to any student seeking experience in the reading of ethnographic monographs, regardless of any particular regional interests. It is open to advanced undergraduates and graduate students; the latter will have extra assignments appropriate to the 500 level.

Advisory Prerequisite: ANTHRCUL 101 or 222.

ANTHRCUL 414 — Introduction to Caribbean Societies and Cultures, I
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Owusu,Maxwell K

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course provides an introduction to the peoples and cultures of the Caribbean. Topics covered include:

  • the historical origins of the social structure and social organization of contemporary Caribbean states;
  • family and kinship;
  • religion, race, class, ethnicity, and national identity;
  • Caribbean immigration; politics and policies of socioeconomic change.

The course is open to both anthropology concentrators and non-concentrators.

Films and videos on the Caribbean will be shown when available.

Requirements: four 5-6 page or three 6-7 page typewritten papers, which ask students to review/synthesize reading and lecture materials; participation in class discussions; regular class attendance.

Advisory Prerequisite: Junior standing or above

ANTHRCUL 416 — Global Health: Anthropological Perspectives
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Padilla,Mark B

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This interdisciplinary course explores the field of global health (a.k.a. international health), particularly the serious health problems facing populations in resource-poor societies around the globe. The course provides an overview of the major initiatives and issues in global health, as well as in-depth case studies of three nations (Haiti, Mali, Egypt). Five major areas of focus include:

  1. a history and critique of the major international health agencies and their development initiatives;
  2. the political ecology of infectious disease;
  3. child survival;
  4. women's reproductive health; and
  5. men's health under "modernization."

The underlying purpose of the course is to develop students' awareness of the political, socioeconomic, ecological, and cultural complexity of most health problems in "developing" nations and the consequent need for anthropological involvement in the field of global health.

The course emphasizes three different anthropological approaches to global health:

  1. Anthropology in Global Health: This course will introduce the principles, methods, and approaches of applied medical anthropology in global health settings, whereby anthropologists attempt to develop effective public health education and intervention programs;
  2. Anthropology of Global Health Problems: This course will examine the ways in which anthropologists attempt to understand global health problems in a larger cultural, historical, ecological, and political-economic context, but without intervening to develop education/control programs. The importance of indigenous health culture, including ethnomedical understandings of and local solutions to public health problems, is emphasized; and
  3. Anthropological Critiques of Global Health: This course will examine the ways in which anthropologists have critically analyzed notions of health "development," and have pointed out the difficulties of developing effective, long-term, public health interventions for many of the most serious global health problems. The importance of evaluation — of the agencies themselves and of local intervention projects — is emphasized.

Required Texts: Four required texts are available at Shaman Drum, and are also on two-hour reserve at the SPH Library. They are:

  • Robert Hahn, Anthropology in Public Health: Bridging Differences in Culture and Society
  • Paul Farmer, AIDS and Accusation: Haiti and the Geography of Blame
  • Katherine Dettwyler, Dancing Skeletons: Life and Death in West Africa
  • Marcia Inhorn, Local Babies, Global Science: Gender, Religion, and In Vitro Fertilization in Egypt

ANTHRCUL 429 — Television, Society, and Culture
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Kottak,Conrad P; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Television executives, commentators, and reporters have become "key gatekeepers," assuming roles played historically by political and religious leaders. Television has been compared to a new religion, cultivating homogeneity, uniting adherents in a common set of images and symbols. TV has been labeled "narcoticizing" and faulted for diverting attention from serious social issues and replacing effective thought and action with passive absorption in portrayals and celebrity lives. Television has been said to reinforce existing hierarchies and to impede social reform. It also stimulates participation in a worldwide cash economy, and TV's worldwide spread has raised concerns about cultural imperialism. Ethnocentrism is common in the evaluation of television and its effects. Understanding of TV impact can be broadened through a cross-cultural approach to this medium, which, specific content and programming aside, must be recognized as one of the most powerful information disseminators, socializing agents, and public-opinion molders in the contemporary world. This seminar will consider cross-cultural diversity in television and will assess the medium's various social, cultural, and psychological dimensions and effects. Students, who will include seniors, concentrators and graduate students in Anthropology, American Culture, Communication, and related fields will investigate and reflect upon various aspects of television. Students will be responsible for attending class regularly, keeping a televiewing journal, organizing and participating in discussions of particular readings, and presenting, orally to the class and in writing, a term project. The term project will be an analysis, following models illustrated in course readings, of some aspect of television, society, and culture. Because the class meets just once a week and has a seminar-discussion format, attendance is mandatory. Students must have access to a television set and the varied programming available through cable or satellite. Students who dislike television should avoid this course.


ANTHRCUL 436 — Human Rights, Gender and Culture
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Ticktin,Miriam I

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course introduces the concept of human rights in interdisciplinary perspective. Processes of globalization have facilitated the adoption of human rights discourse transnationally by widely varying actors, particularly in the 1990s. However, just as those who study globalization argue that globalization does not entail a process of standardization or homogenization, but must be understood via its cultural specificities, this course is based on the argument that the transnational discourse of human rights must be understood in local contexts. The readings will help students explore how an increasingly hegemonic discourse is culturally contextualized and mediated; and while trying to understand how claims of resistance and struggle are being re-articulated in a legal language of rights and entitlements, we will pay particular attention to how these claims often have unintended consequences. We will use gender, race and class as focal points for the varying discourses of rights; this provides a useful perspective through which to examine who benefits from this discourse of social justice, in that women, people of color and non-property owners were left out of the initial definitions of "humanity" that universal human rights were protecting.

Advisory Prerequisite: One course in WOMENSTD or ANTHRCUL

ANTHRCUL 438 — Urban Anthropology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Partridge,Damani James

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course will examine the histories, possibilities and limits of cities as global ethnographic sites. We will look at recent, past, and future manifestations of urban spaces and the people who live within them. Furthermore, we will examine cities as sites of work, as spaces of decay, as cosmopolitan centers, and as spaces of intense socio-economic, ethnic and "racial" diversity and division.

This course is organized around ethnographic and historical literature and will also include close analyses of film and other media representations. Students will be expected to write short weekly reading responses as well as completing a mid-term and final exam. Grades will be based on written work, class participation, and attendance.

Advisory Prerequisite: ANTHRCUL 222/327

ANTHRCUL 447 — Culture, Racism, and Human Nature
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Williams,Melvin D; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: RE

This course examines the possible origins of culture to understand the unique behavior and historical development of Homo sapiens and traces the salient features of human history and contemporary modernity to discuss and explain the nature of humans. The understanding of the nature of humans and their development will enable the students to comprehend, explain and resolve racism, part of a pan-human phenomenon. Is racism fundamental to the character of human culture? The course will suggest that many of our modern social problems have a common generation — the nature of human culture. That would suggest that the solutions will require a social transformation in the character of human culture. These examinations of human culture will require us to return to the discussions of Leslie White (culture is autonomous) and Alfred Kroeber (culture is superorganic) to determine the possibilities of social transformations that contemporary society may require. The course looks at human Biophobia — the denial, defiance, and defilement of our animal kinship. This biophobia and denial gives humans an inferiority complex that is only assuaged by classism, racism, ethnocentrism, sexism, sectarianism, ageism, nationalism, disableism, speciesism, and power (CRESSANDS-POWER). The present stockpile of human weapons, the rage of international terrorism, and the oppression that CRESSANDS-POWER creates requires a new human revolution — THE ECOLOGICAL REVOLUTION. In that revolution the human body and the Earth will have such value that we can develop a new human-global community and end the human plague that CRESSANDS-POWER has brought upon our species.

ANTHRCUL 453 — African-American Culture
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Williams,Melvin D; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course examines the Afro-American as one example of how humans live. It places distinctive Black behavior within its social context and its history. It reminds of middle-class Jews in Nazi Germany who believed that success would make you full citizens. It ponders the great (although restricted) contributions that African Americans have made to white identity, the U.S. Nation and economy, fashion, youth rebellion, gay and women rights and entertainment. An understanding of African Americans enlightens the nature of systemic oppression and explains the anomalies of Native America, Jack Johnson, Paul Robeson, Joe Louis, Jackie Robinson, Tiger Woods, Michael Jordan, Venus Williams, W. Arthur Lewis, Toni Morrison, Ralph Bunche, E. Franklin Frazier and many others. This course looks at the future of African-Americans in a millennium in which the memory of their oppressions and reparations seem lost.

Advisory Prerequisite: One introductory course in the social sciences. CAAS 201 recommended.

ANTHRCUL 499 — Undergraduate Reading and Research in Anthropology
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 3
Other: INDEPENDENT

Independent reading and research under the direction of a faculty member. Ordinarily available only to students with background in anthropology.

Advisory Prerequisite: PER. INSTR.

ANTHRCUL 504 — Peoples and Cultures of Southeast Asia
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Keane Jr,Edward Webb; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Southeast Asia is marked by enormous diversity in everything from ecology to political systems. Long a dynamic cross-road between the Indian Ocean and China, with deep ties to the Pacific islands, the region is socially and culturally complex. Indonesia, the world's fourth largest country, is home to the largest Islamic population within a single national border; the Philippines, whose complicated special relationship with the United States dates back to the nineteenth century, is predominantly Catholic. Thailand, which has never been formally colonized, is a major Buddhist nation. In the background to these large nation-states are hundreds of distinct local traditions and languages, as well as significant diasporic communities such as urban Chinese entrepreneurs. Interacting with rice farming villages, fishing towns, and royal courts are sprawling mega-cities and multi-national industrial enclaves; not far from the quintessential capitalist society of Singapore is the distinctively Vietnamese variety of socialism. This course will approach the region by way of selected case studies. Therefore the course will be of interest to any student seeking experience in the reading of ethnographic monographs, regardless of any particular regional interests. It is open to advanced undergraduates and graduate students; the latter will have extra assignments appropriate to the 500 level.

ANTHRCUL 519 — Principles and Methods of Historical Linguistics
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Thomason,Sarah G

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course is an introduction to the theories and methods that enable linguists to describe and explain processes of linguistic change and historical relationships among languages. The major topics to be covered are the emergence of language families and means of establishing family relationships; sound change; grammatical change, especially analogy; language change caused by culture contacts; the Comparative Method, through which prehistoric language states can be reconstructed with an impressive degree of accuracy; internal reconstruction, a less powerful but still important method for gaining information about linguistic prehistory; and ways in which the study of current dialect variation offers insights into processes of change.

Course requirements: regular homework assignments (45%), final exam (45%), class participation (10%).

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing, or permission of instructor.

ANTHRCUL 526 — Traditions of Ethnology I
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Robertson,Jennifer E; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4

This course presents the major schools and traditions in ethnology from its nineteenth-century precursors to about 1950. It is the first part of a year-long sequence.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing only

ANTHRCUL 530 — Oral History and Narrative Experience
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Hart,Janet Carol

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course is about oral histories and other specifically narrative constructions of selfhood and collective experience. Oral histories involve spoken memories. Responding to prompts by interviewers, speakers tell their stories. Through narrative, individuals and communities conceptualize their pasts and the social processes that shape them in the form of tales with leading characters, time boundaries, and reasonably coherent plot structures. Embedded in oral histories are the narratives that people use to help make sense of various occurrences in their lives. At a broader level, powerful institutions and groups promulgate master-narratives. Counter narratives seek to expose the politics behind master narratives and tell a markedly different story. One goal will be to consider how oral histories and other tales can aid in the exploration and writing of cultures. We will cover theories and debates surrounding narrative and oral history and read articles and selections which make use of them. We will join authors such as Benjamin, Shuman, Bruner, Connerton, Boyarin, Goffman, Passerini, Scott, Nora, Brenneis, Kuhn, Bakewell, Portelli, Halbwachs, Fields, Borland, Bahloul, Ginzburg, and Bourgois in imagining how experience, consciousness, emotion, and culture may be expressed and understood in narrative form. Evaluations will be based on class participation, weekly reading commentaries, and a final term paper.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

ANTHRCUL 540 — Methods in the Ethnography of Everyday Life
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Fricke,Thomas E

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Most general discussions of method in cultural anthropology are awful. They tend toward a listing of techniques with no real sense of why you'd want to use them. This is a seminar intended to explore and practically discuss approaches to ethnographic work and representation that highlight those areas where documentary and ethnography converge. We will cover a range of materials circling around the notion of everyday life, the elements of story and narrative in ethnographic writing and their implications for what we do in the field, the ethics of fieldwork and representation, the implications of being a person studying persons, and more. This is partly a seminar in self-confidence but it won't ignore technique. Our common need to work in a concrete place, observe concrete things, and talk to real people implies a need to be familiar with the nuts and bolts of fieldwork along those shared lines (taking field notes, conducting open-ended interviews, and the like). But we'll justify our toolkit by discussion of prior themes that motivate, defend, and arise out of the whole enterprise of ethnographic fieldwork. The reading and discussion materials are constructed along the lines of a sampler that moves back and forth between the general and the specific. Concrete examples from various ethnographies or ethnography-like writing will give us the proper grip on more general weekly themes. Seeing how a range of people have tried to convey the immediacy of human experience within more general discussions will help us to feel confident in our own experiments with experience.

Texts will include Robert Coles' "Doing Documentary Work" (Oxford University Press, 1997), James Agee and Walker Evans' "Let Us Now Praise Famous Men" (Houghton Mifflin, 1941), Howard Becker's "Tricks of the Trade: How to Think About Your Research While You're Doing It" (University of Chicago Press, 1998), John Van Maanen's "Tales of the Field: On Writing Ethnography" (University of Chicago Press, 1988), and 2-3 other books currently being selected — one of which will likely be John Berger's "Keeping a Rendezvous" (Pantheon, 1991). There will be a huge number of selections from longer works passed out in class. This is a discussion seminar. Be prepared to talk. Grades will be evaluated on the basis of class participation, very brief weekly 2-3 page reaction to readings essays, and a sequenced essay assignment involving ethnographic observation, vignette construction, and reelection.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing

ANTHRCUL 553 — Blurred Genres: Autobiography, Fiction & Ethnography
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Behar,Ruth

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Where does the story of the observer end and the story of the observed begin? Autobiography, ethnography, and fiction share a concern with constructing meaningful representations of the self and of the other in narrative form. This course will focus on the history, politics, and possibilities of interconnecting autobiography, ethnography, and fiction. We will read widely in a variety of ethnographic, fictional, and autobiographic genres, including literary journalism, autobiographic ethnography, feminist ethnography, fieldwork accounts, the memoir, autobiographical criticism, family stories, and fiction that uses first-person voices. Our theoretical aim will be to gain an understanding of our current historical moment as one in which writers both inside and outside of the academy are pursuing intersecting trajectories in their use of the personal voice to explore the social world. We will consider the recent "memoir boom" and its impact on the academy as well as the academy's impact on its flourishing. We will also consider gender differences in the use of the personal voice, exploring the fine line that distinguishes "reflexive" (often coded as "male") and "confessional" (often coded as "female") writing within anthropology. And we will ask what anthropology, as a personal act of witnessing scripted in diverse genres, means at the end of the century. Our practical aim will be to gain expertise in the analysis and use of a range of textual strategies, including monologue, dialogue, first person narrative, third person narrative, flashback, different methods of quoting or paraphrasing "informants," and descriptive accounts of other places, times, and subjectivities.

Advisory Prerequisite: 400-level coursework in Anthropology, Graduate standing, and permission of instructor.

ANTHRCUL 558 — Current Issues in Ethnology
Section 001, SEM
The Aryans: Politics, Language, Religion and Race, from Sanskrit Philology to the Neo-Nazis

Instructor: Rubin,Gayle S
Instructor: Trautmann,Thomas R

FA 2007
Credits: 3

The concept of the "Aryan" has been highly mobile; it is connected both with linguistic discoveries of enduring scientific value and various forms of racial politics. This seminar explores the extraordinary career of the Aryan idea from its modern inception in Sanskrit scholarship in British India in the late eighteenth century to some of today's controversial cultural and political manifestations. With the discovery of the structural affinity of languages knows as Indo-European (or Aryan), the modern history of the Aryan idea begins as a node in a tree of languages and nations inherited from the Bible. In the nineteenth century it is involved in the classifications of religions and races. What had in ancient times been a term used by Indo-Persians to refer to themselves became in the West the idea of an ancestral unity between Europeans on the one hand and the ancient rulers of India and Persia on the other, a unity that came to exclude the Semites and other Orientals. In the seminar we will explore how linguistic, racial and religious taxonomies were transmuted into popular discourse and political programs, most disastrously in the National Socialist state, and how the Aryan concept came to be identified with racial "whiteness" as a central symbol around which contemporary neo-Nazi and white supremacist groups still mobilize.

Advisory Prerequisite: 400-level coursework in Anthropology, Graduate standing, and permission of instructor.

ANTHRCUL 572 — Introduction to Sociolinguistics
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Queen,Robin M

FA 2007
Credits: 2 — 3

This seminar presents a graduate-level introduction to sociolinguistics. Sociolinguists are researchers generally interested in trying to understand and systematically investigate language as it is related to social life. Sociolinguists do not have a common research paradigm, theory, epistemology or set of research questions; however, they do share the conviction that understanding language involves understanding both the extralinguistic and the linguistic contexts in which language is produced, intended, and interpreted. We will consider many of the topics and methods on which people who call themselves sociolinguists have focused, including language change, language contact, linguistic diversity, bi- and multilingualism, the relationships between social identity and language use, intercultural communication, and the connections of these issues to ideologies about language. Throughout the course, we will be interested in several issues concerning the research and the researchers we are studying, such as:

  • What assumptions does this researcher make about language and about the nature of society and culture?
  • How does this work give us insight into the nature and structure of language?
  • How might this work fit into a general theory of language?
  • How does this work relate to the work of other researchers interested in similar questions?
  • What are the aims and methods used for focusing on this topic?
  • How can this research be applied to other disciplines such as education, rhetoric, sociology, psychology, communications, or anthropology or to other professionals (e.g., teachers, doctors, lawyers, therapists, etc.)?

Advisory Prerequisite: LING,Graduate standing

ANTHRCUL 576 — Introduction to Linguistic Anthropology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Irvine,Judith T
Instructor: Mannheim,Bruce; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course is an intensive introduction to theoretical issues in linguistics of special relevance to anthropologists, most of whose primary interests are outside of language. Think of language as a special kind of semiotic or cultural system. Our subject matter, then, consists of ways of approaching its formal description and the general issues (for the most part, about the nature of culture) that are raised by those approaches. Several such issues will continually crop up: (1)The nature of cultural patterning, its representation, and the means we use to describe it; (2)The possibility of cross-cultural comparison and typology using culturally-meaningful (or "emic") patterns as a basis; can general "laws of structure" of cultural form be constructed from descriptions of particular cultural systems? (3) Are there true universals of culture? Are they biologically determined, determined by the nature of the cultural code, or some combination of the two? What evidence is required to make sense of the question? (4)What does it mean for individuals to share a culture? Does "sharing a culture" require collective representations? Are there any? (5)How do languages, and other aspects of cultural patterning, map onto populations of speakers? (6)Is language best viewed as an especially complex cognitive system, or as socially-situated practices? Are these views mutually exclusive? No background whatever in linguistics or linguistic anthropology is assumed, although familiarity with one of the other fields of anthropology is expected.

Advisory Prerequisite: Two courses in ANTHRCUL or LING and permission of instructor.

ANTHRCUL 629 — Method and Interpretation in Ethnology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Kottak,Conrad P; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 3

This course is concerned with anthropological field research from research design and grant proposal writing, to data collection and analysis.

IS INTENDED FOR ADVANCED GRADUATE STUDENTS IN SOCIOCULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY WHO ARE PREPARING PROPOSALS FOR DISSERTATION RESEARCH.

Advisory Prerequisite: ANTHRO,Graduate standing only

ANTHRCUL 658 — Special Topics in Ethnology
Section 001, SEM
The Anthropology of Performance

Instructor: Lemon,Alaina M; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Under the rubric of performance, this graduate seminar explores intersections of representation and social reproduction. How is "ordinary" social life bounded off from the "theatrical"? Or not? What else (identities, authorities, spaces, affects) do such boundaries create, or perform? We will attend to genres from politic polemics and speeches to staged entertainments to "everyday" presentations of self. The course concentrates on recent monographs about performance in various societies and situates them in relation to relevant social, cultural, and linguistic theories.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

ANTHRCUL 658 — Special Topics in Ethnology
Section 002, SEM
Gender and Transnationalism: Globalization, identity and place

Instructor: Fadlalla,Amal Hassan

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Many feminists and anthropologists have critiqued the historical absence of gender from early analyses of diaspora and transnationalism. They have recently demonstrated the significance of centering the experiences of both women and men in documenting the narratives and practices of dispersal. Building on these theoretical premises, this course examines the various ways in which mobility, border-crossing, (dis)location, and (dis)placement are gendered and are given cultural and political meanings in the era of trans-migration. To what extent have "globalization" and "transnationalism" advance our theoretical understanding of the complexities of social norms and constructions, especially those of race, ethnicity, class, and health and reproduction? We will particularly explore how questions of power, gender, and class intersect to shape immigrants' daily struggles with new systems and how immigrants create and "imagine" their own social spaces within their new settings and with reference to their homelands. We will analyze the increasing trends of mobility and (dis)placement with reference to the rapidly increasing liberalization of global economies and the escalation of poverty, militarism, wars, and violence.

Our readings and discussion will focus on cultural and theoretical perspectives from Anthropology and Women's Studies. And we will take as examples ethnographies and narratives of immigrants from different parts of the world, specifically Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East. The seminar is intended for graduate students.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

ANTHRCUL 777 — Linguistic Anthropology Laboratory
Section 001, LAB

Instructor: Mannheim,Bruce; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 3

Linguistic anthropology is a laboratory field. The reasons for it were several. First, we regard graduate training in linguistic anthropology to much more closely resemble an apprenticeship model, than in cultural anthropology. Second, there are new technologies being developed that are increasingly being used in data analysis, including sound and visual analysis of face-to-face interaction. These require special training and resources. And third, but perhaps most importantly, a laboratory model provides a framework for encouraging research collaboration among graduate students and between students and faculty, rather than a model of research as done by a solitary ethnographer. This aspect of the lab framework has worked very well. A single lab-group has met on a regular basis for almost 10 years, discussing papers by visitors, discussing each other's works in progress, and practicing talks for professional meetings and for job interviews. We have succeeded in creating a strongly supportive, cooperative, and nurturing environment for within which students have been able to try out first ideas and first critiques of work by many of the leading figures in the field. The special issue of Michigan Discussions in Anthropology on Linguistic form and social action is a direct outcome of the lab structure.    

Advisory Prerequisite: ANTHRO,Graduate standing in Anthropology or a related discipline.

ANTHRCUL 830 — Anthropology and History Workshop/Reading Group
Section 001, SEM

FA 2007
Credits: 1

This one-credit course is to support a workshop/reading group of students in the Anthro/History program. It will be a seminar in format with the purpose of discussing works-in-progress and especially significant pieces of scholarship in the field. Presentations will be circulated and read in advance. The two hour session is dedicated fully to discussion of the work among all those present.

ANTHRCUL 836 — Anthropology and Social Work Seminar
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Paley,Julia Felice; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This seminar is a foundation course for students in the joint Anthropology/Social Work Program. The readings bring together social theory and ethnographic accounts of contemporary social issues. Topics, chosen to illustrate the intersection of the two fields and to bring together faculty from both schools, may include medicine and health, human and civil rights, urban neighborhoods, immigration, race, ethnicity, and gender. Beyond the joint Anhtropolgy/Social Work students, the course is expected to attract joint Social Work/social science students from other disciplines, as well as graduate students in anthroplogy, political science, sociology, psychology, economics, and other fields. The course will include events such as guest speakers, works in-progress discussions, reading group, etc.

ANTHRCUL 957 — Research Practicum in Anthropology
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 2 — 8

The course provides students with the opportunity to design and to conduct fieldwork or laboratory analysis of original anthropological data. A faculty member may undertake it as a special aspect of a research project under investigation or the student under the supervision of a faculty member may initiate it.

Advisory Prerequisite: ANTHRO,Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

ANTHRCUL 958 — Anthropological Research
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 3

This course requires a substantial research paper or an extensive exploration and critical evaluation of relevant sources on a particular topic.

Advisory Prerequisite: ANTHRO,Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

ANTHRCUL 959 — Survey of Literature on Selected Topics
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 3

This course requires an annotated bibliography. A written statement detailing a program of readings and objectives is to be submitted to the instructor.

Advisory Prerequisite: ANTHRO,Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

ANTHRCUL 990 — Dissertation/Precandidate
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 8

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Advisory Prerequisite: ANTHRO,Advanced Doctoral student. Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

ANTHRCUL 993 — Graduate Student Instructor Training Program
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Peters-Golden,Holly; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 1

A seminar for all beginning graduate student instructors, consisting of a two day orientation before the term starts and periodic workshops/meetings during the Fall Term. Beginning graduate student instructors are required to register for this class.

Advisory Prerequisite: ANTHRO,Graduate standing

ANTHRCUL 995 — Dissertation/Candidate
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 8

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Enforced Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate

 
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