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LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Fall 2007, Dept = ARCH
 
Page 1 of 1, Results 1 — 7 of 7
Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
ARCH 201 — Basic Drawing
Section 001, LAB

Instructor: Harris,A Melissa; homepage
Instructor: Quiring,Nicholas Jon

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: CE

A freehand studio drawing course limited to pencil and pen, this introductory class concentrates upon seeing, describing, and analyzing form through linear graphic means. Though intended primarily for students considering a design-related career, it is open to students from any discipline wishing to improve their visual literacy. The first half of the course — unbiased toward a particular art — focuses upon understanding the role of line in creating form. Principles of orthographic and perspective projection are introduced in the second half of the semester.

ARCH 202 — Graphic Commun
Section 001, LAB

Instructor: Gilpin,Dawn M
Instructor: Putalik,Erin Sullivan

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: CE

This studio drawing course emphasizes mechanical drawing means and is intended primarily for students contemplating careers in architecture and related professional fields. The student is introduced to a wide range of basic techniques, conventions, and means used in the design fields, as well as selection of drawing instruments and surfaces. Considerable attention is given to the development of a disciplined approach to the construction of measured drawings.

ARCH 218 — Visual Studies
Section 001, LAB

Instructor: Gilpin,Dawn M
Instructor: Kaba,Melanie Jo

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: CE

This studio course provides an introduction to the elements, principles, and techniques that underlie and inform the analysis, creation, and evaluation of visual organizations and are crucial to the process and product of form- making. The course consists of: 1. An overview of selected topics pertaining to the perception of visual organizations. 2. The study of visual organizations entailing point, linear, two-, and three-dimensional elements or combinations thereof. 3. The study of color and its influence on visual organizations. A variety of studio exercises are used to apply the knowledge and skills acquired throughout the term.

ARCH 423 — Introduction to Urban and Environmental Planning
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 3

A comprehensive introductory course. Methods and processes in governmental planning and development of human activity systems requiring space, capital, and management components in the metropolitan environment. Major topics include: space and location planning, zoning and subdivision regulations, urban form and design, new town planning, housing urban renewal, transportation, metropolitan intergovernmental relations, comprehensive urban developmental planning, population and economic planning studies, planning techniques and methods. Emphasis is placed on recent developments and emerging problems.

ARCH 503 — Spec Topc Arch Hist
Section 001, SEM
Trajectories of British Modernism

Instructor: Zimmerman,Claire A

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 3

The seminar considers a series of shifting contexts for British architecture together with increasingly fluid transmissions between British architects, Continental modernists, and a shrinking colonial empire. From an early embrace of modern building during the Industrial Revolution (culminating in the Crystal Palace), Britain then shrank from a blatantly technological modernity until the conclusion of World War II, when a doctrinaire, economically constrained version of European functionalism swept the British scene as a result of postwar building needs and ideological affinities. The particular efforts of the prewar MARS group of Morton Shand (aided by the arrival of Walter Gropius, Erich Mendelsohn, Arthur Korn, Laszlo Moholy-Nagy, Berthold Lubetkin and others in the 1930s) were dramatically eclipsed after the war by the London County Council and other local building authorities that produced a reduced and bureaucratized (and often poorly constructed) modernism against which architects of the late 1950s reacted with militant iconoclasm. Returning to the sources from which British architects learned of Continental modernism (Le Corbusier's Oeuvre Complète (1935-) and Alberto Sartoris's Gli elementi dell'architettura funzionale (1935) among others), young architects trained in the immediate aftermath of the war resumed the incomplete project of modernism with pioneering ambition. Organized by a variety of institutions — the ICA, CIAM's Team X, Gordon Cullen's townscape movement, the Architectural Association, and Reyner Banham, to name a few — a new architecture emerged from the work of the Smithsons, Archigram, Cedric Price, Stirling + Gowan, Fry and Drew, and others. Skirmishes with Italy's ‘neo-Liberty' (neo-Realist) architects in the late 50s and 60s left Britain victoriously leading a neo avant-garde that avoided the pitfalls of American corporate modernism without relinquishing the project of an integrated, progressive, multi-disciplinary modern culture in which architects, artists, urban planners, and social scientists worked side by side. Banham's ‘Second Machine Age' helped create the emergent group of techno-architects who went on to mastermind the most recent wave of British cultural imperialism: Stirling, Richard Rogers, Norman Foster, Ove Arup, and Nicholas Grimshaw. The course will conclude with the contemporary British scene as represented by David Chipperfield, David Adjaye, and young collectives like FAT (Fashion Architecture Technology). Open to advanced undergraduates and graduate students.

IV.4

Advisory Prerequisite: ARCH 323/permission of instructor

ARCH 526 — Sociocultural Issues in Planning and Architecture
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Harper-Anderson,Elsie L; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Throughout U.S. history, socio-cultural factors have influenced the formation of places, and consequently, social relations and conditions within them. Yet, the fields of planning and architecture have traditionally not emphasized issues such as race, ethnicity, gender, class relations, immigration status (among other) as central topics to be addressed. The purpose of this course is to examine socio-cultural issues and their significance to planning and architecture practice and education. The course has three main goals:

  1. Students will gain an understanding of the historical role that social and cultural factors have played in shaping the current context within which planning and architecture work takes place;
  2. Students will engage in critical examination of theories and practices that shape the fields of planning and architecture and their social implications; and
  3. Students will reflect on the current and desired roles carried out by planners and architects in deliberately or inadvertently affecting social conditions.

Advisory Prerequisite: Enrollment in ARCH/UP/Landscape ARCH/permission of instructor

ARCH 609 — Topics in Disability Studies
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Mulhorn,Kristine A; homepage
Instructor: Brown,Susan Holly Curwin

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 3

This course provides an interdisciplinary approach to disability studies, including focus on the arts and humanities, natural and social sciences, and professional schools. Some topics include history and cultural representation of disability, advocacy, health, rehabilitation, built environment, independent living, public policy. The point of departure of the course is the idea that disability provides a critical framework that reorients the basic assumptions of various fields of knowledge, from political science to architecture, from engineering to art history, from genetics to law, from public policy to education, from biology to poetry, and so on. Disability Studies views people with disabilities not as objects but as producers of knowledge whose common history has generated a wide variety of art, music, literature, and science infused with the experience of disability. Students will have the opportunity to interact with visiting speakers from a broad range of fields. The course is offered for 1 or 3 credits. Accessible classroom with realtime captioning. For more information, please contact Tobin Siebers at tobin@umich.edu.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing

 
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