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LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Fall 2007, Dept = ASIAN
 
Page 1 of 1, Results 1 — 40 of 40
Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
ASIAN 204 — East Asia: Early Transformations
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: de Pee,Christian

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: Theme, WorldLit

Survey of the history of China, Korea, and Japan, from mythical times to 1600. The course emphasizes the historical interactions and transformations that have made East Asia a coherent cultural region: exchanges of objects and ideas, technology and writing, monks and merchants, artists and scholars.

ASIAN 206 — Indian Civilization
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Trautmann,Thomas R

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

This course is an introduction to one of the world's great civilizations, that of India, from its beginnings in the third millennium BC to the present day. The first half will deal with classical Indian civilization, its origins, its social structure, religions, arts and sciences. The second half will examine India's encounters with the civilizations of Islam and Europe. We will also study the modern nations— India, Pakistan, Nepal, Bhutan, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka — which have emerged in the twentieth century, and their problems and accomplishments.


ASIAN 207 — Southeast Asian Civilization
Section 001, LEC
Issues in Race & Ethnicity

Instructor: Lieberman,Victor B

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: RE, SS
Other: WorldLit

Southeast Asia is one of the world's most culturally diverse regions, home to Buddhist, Moslem, Confucian, and Christian civilizations. It boasts ancient monuments of surpassing grandeur and symbolic complexity. It was the scene of the bloodiest conflict since World War II, the so-called Second Indo-China War (c.1960-1975). Until very recently it boasted the world's fastest growing regional economy.

HISTORY 207 offers an introduction to Southeast Asian history — the earliest civilizations, through the colonial conquest, the struggle for independence, and the development of an interdependent region.

The following paperback books can be purchased at Shaman Drum, 313 South State:

  • David Steinberg et al., In Search of Southeast Asia
  • Milton Osborne, Southeast Asia: an Introductory History
  • George Orwell, Burmese Days
  • Clark Neher and Ross Marlay, Democracy and Development in Southeast Asia
  • Thierry Zephyr, Khmer: The Lost Empire of Cambodia

In addition, you will need a course pack which is also available at Shaman Drum Bookstore.

ASIAN 225 — Hinduism
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Deshpande,Madhav

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

Hinduism is a major world religion practiced by over a billion people, primarily in South Asia, but it also was the precursor of Buddhism, and along with Buddhism it had a major impact on the civilizations in East and Southeast Asia. This course will cover its origins and development, its literature, its belief and practices, its unique social structures and doctrines, its interactions with other religions, and finally its confrontation with and accommodation of 'modernity.' We will use reading materials, lectures, discussions, and audio and video resources.

ASIAN 230 — Introduction to Buddhism
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

In this course, you will form a basic acquaintance with some representative ideas and practices of the Buddhist Tradition in its development of some two thousand five hundred years. We will devote the bulk of the course to exploring the origins and development of Buddhism in India, the land of its birth. In the final few weeks we will make a survey of the transmission and vicissitudes of Buddhism elsewhere, lingering for stops in Tibet, China, Japan, and North America. Throughout this time, you will be asked to use these materials continuously to test your own criteria for defining "religion," and your ideas of how we can have fruitful encounters with the religious traditions of others (and this applies even if you are yourself a practicing Buddhist). Other key themes that you will encounter in the presentation of Buddhism include:

  1. Buddhism and the visual arts and literature;
  2. Buddhism and its troubled relationship with state authority and violence;
  3. the modulating effects of factors like gender, class, and ethnic identity on the experience of Buddhism; and
  4. Buddhism and its acculturation to new cultural spheres.
There will be considerable readings of selected Buddhist primary texts in English. Course requirements include regular attendance, biweekly short response papers and two exams (midterm and final).

ASIAN 235 — Introduction to the Study of Asian Cultures
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Merrill,Christi Ann; homepage
Instructor: Fukuoka,Maki

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

This course combines lectures, discussion, visits to University collections, and interactive social networking exercises (wikis, annotations, folksonomies, blogs) for building the basic, critical vocabulary necessary to study Asian cultures in all their diversity. Rather than an exhaustive survey, students will be asked to engage with a range of exemplary cultural products (performances, objects, literary texts, films) from East, South and Southeast Asia that have traveled within Asia and beyond in order to make conceptual links between them. We assume that any serious engagement with Asian cultures in this era of globalization requires us to articulate their complex interconnectedness. The goal will be to develop a responsive, constantly-evolving conceptual map of Asia students can reliably draw on in the future when working with any facet of these cultures.

Requirements: The majority of each student's grade will be determined on a point system, earned by active participation in discussion, regular attendance at lectures and collection visits, and ongoing, meaningful contributions to the networking site for the course. (While minimum involvement in each category is necessary, students will have latitude in pursuing the topics and exercises that interest them most.) Instead of a final examination, students will be expected to turn in a portfolio of their best work to be graded qualitatively. All readings will be in English and no prior knowledge of any Asian language or culture is necessary. Likewise, students can expect to acquire any computer skills necessary for passing this course through class resources.

ASIAN 252 — Undergraduate Seminar in Japanese Culture
Section 001, SEM
Haiku as Poetry and Philosophy

Instructor: Ramirez-Christensen,E

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem, WorldLit

The seminar will examine the world's briefest known poem, the haiku.

  • How does this 17-syllable, 3-line poem signify?
  • What assumptions about the nature of language and meaning lie behind its composition and interpretation?
  • What social milieu produced it?
  • What is its link to Zen practice and other Zen arts?

Readings will be from the poetry and critical commentaries of the master Bashô and his disciples, with later poets such as Buson and Issa, as well as haiga (haiku paintings), providing opportunities for comparative study. The Western understanding of haiku in the Imagist movement, Ezra Pound, the beat generation, and Barthe's Empire of Signs will also be examined. Secondary sources are available in English, but given the brevity of the poems, analysis of some Japanese texts and their various English renditions will often be possible.

Requirements: 4 short papers, a 36-verse haikai linked sequence by the class, and individual English haiku compositions through the academic term.

Advisory Prerequisite: No knowledge of Japanese language is required.

ASIAN 252 — Undergraduate Seminar in Japanese Culture
Section 002, SEM
Food, Identity and Community in Japan

Instructor: Ito,Ken K

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem, WorldLit

Students will explore the place of food in a community's understanding of itself and of others. Using modern Japanese fiction and film as our main texts, we will examine how the discourse of food defines regional and national identities, and how communities are represented through patterns of consumption or deprivation. We will probe the tension between the role of certain foods as markers of cultural authenticity and the reality of cuisine as a historically dynamic, hybrid enterprise. We will investigate the connections of gender and class to food and its preparation, and study how the sharing of food affects human alliances. In short, we will be asking what it means to eat sushi.

Advisory Prerequisite: No knowledge of Japanese language is required.

ASIAN 252 — Undergraduate Seminar in Japanese Culture
Section 003, SEM
Tokyo and the Crowd

Instructor: Fukuoka,Maki

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem, WorldLit

Everyday, four million people pass through Tokyo's Shinjuku station, the busiest train station in the world. This is 40 times more than the entire population of Ann Arbor. Responding to such staggering statistics, this course explores representations of the crowd in Tokyo in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. We will consider how the crowd is evoked in visual culture by looking at popular magazines, woodblock prints, and postcards. We will also consider a number of literary, cinematic, and artistic works with particular attention paid to themes of disaster, sacred pilgrimage, political activism and entertainment. Ultimately, students will gain from this seminar an introduction to the history of Tokyo itself, with its peculiar intersection of topography and ideology, as well as a greater appreciation of the extent of the city's urban planning and the breadth of its representation.

Advisory Prerequisite: No knowledge of Japanese language is required.

ASIAN 253 — Undergraduate Seminar in South and Southeast Asian Culture
Section 001, SEM
The Philippines: Culture and History

Instructor: de la Cruz,Deirdre Leong

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

This course surveys major themes in history of the Philippines, paying particular attention to their cultural dimensions. Starting with its inception as a colony of Spain, through the American colonial period, to the post-colonial present, we will draw from Philippine historiography, ethnography, literary works and popular culture to examine the cultural effects of processes such as: religious conversion and colonial encounter; revolution and nationalism; hybridity and language; regional, class, and identity formation; modernity, globalization, and migration.

The course will be conducted as a seminar. Students will be graded on their active participation in discussion, response papers, and final research project.

Advisory Prerequisite: No knowledge of any Asian language required.

ASIAN 253 — Undergraduate Seminar in South and Southeast Asian Culture
Section 002, SEM
Global Encounters

Instructor: Sloan,Anna J

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

The final years of the fifteenth century heralded a new era in the relationship between Asia and distant parts of the globe. The arrival of Vasco da Gama on the west coast of India in 1498 established direct contact between Europe and maritime Asia. It also initiated centuries of commercial, cultural, artistic and technological exchange. This course explores facets of that exchange, pursuing case studies in India, Southeast Asia, China and Japan. Readings, lectures, and student projects will address the varied nature of Asia's encounters with the Portuguese, Dutch, and British, and more recently with global modernity and post-modernity. Topics include cartography, exotica, gift exchange, diplomacy and protocol, trade, missionary activity, colonization, Orientalism, and the post-colonial condition.

Advisory Prerequisite: No knowledge of any Asian language required.

ASIAN 254 — Undergraduate Seminar in Korean Culture
Section 001, SEM
The Outcast in Korean Literature

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem, WorldLit

As the product of a crisis within a given community, the outcast materializes, by his or her very existence, the boundaries within which the community imagines itself to be whole or coherent. For this reason, the outcast is always a figure of danger but also of potentiality — this is precisely the ambiguity which has proven fruitful for thinking across disciplines, from moral philosophy and political theory to psychoanalysis. In this course, we will focus on literary manifestations of the outcast in twentieth century Korea, where attempts to secure and legitimize various communal formations were accompanied by spectacular displays of violence, and rely on this figure as our guide in re-examining the history of modern nation-building in Korea. The outcast will serve as a broad heading under which we can consider relations between such terms as exile, migrant, refugee and nomad; special attention will be paid to the place of the writer within these relations. The course will conclude with discussions of recent texts that address new forms of exclusions emerging within the globalizing economy and digitalized culture of South Korean society today.

Advisory Prerequisite: No knowledge of Korean language is required.

ASIAN 260 — Introduction to Chinese Civilization
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Brown,Miranda D

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: Theme

This course is intended to introduce students to major issues in pre-modern Chinese history. The course covers the political, cultural, social, and intellectual history from the Neolithic to the Mongol conquest (in the 13th century). Some of the major questions we will treat include: Is "China" the oldest continuous civilization? Was it culturally and ethnically homogeneous? Was Chinese traditional culture and society "patriarchal"? To what extent was the state successful in penetrating into the daily lives of individuals? Course assignments will include not only reading primary and secondary literature (entirely in English); but they will also require students to analyze visual sources (to a lesser degree). No assumed knowledge of Chinese history, culture, or language required.

ASIAN 289 — From Genghis Khan to the Taliban: Modern Central Asia
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Northrop,Douglas Taylor; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS, RE

More than 500 years ago, the Silk Road famously connected traders from all over the world, linking the major cities of China and Southeast Asia with those of Europe and Africa. Vast wealth traveled this route, wending across the mountains and steppes of Central Asia, creating rich and sophisticated towns along the way. Bukhara and Samarkand became two of the world's greatest cities, enviable centers of learning and culture. How did Central Asia go from being the most cosmopolitan place on earth to an area now seen as one of the most isolated, remote places in the world? How did a region where a dizzying array of cultures had long intermingled and coexisted peacefully become a place associated (at least in Western eyes) with intolerance and terrorism? This course tries to answer such questions by providing an overview of modern Central Asian history. Using both lecture and discussion, it focuses on the colonial and post-colonial periods of the last 300 years: especially in Russian and Soviet Central Asia, but also the neighboring areas dominated by Britain and China (Afghanistan, Pakistan, Xinjiang). It offers a strong emphasis on the links and connections across these political borders, which were at first largely artificial and porous but which became crucially important and shaped local communities in deeply divergent ways. It also emphasizes social and cultural history, as a complement and counterweight to the usual political frameworks and classic grand narratives of khans, revolutions, and wars. Three themes structure the course: the fragmented, changing character of regional identities; the complexities of popular attitudes towards, and relations with, various forms of state power; and the differences between — and the complicated economic, environmental, political, artistic, and cultural legacies of — the major imperial systems (Russian, British, Chinese). Students will be evaluated on their class contributions as well as written work (short essays and class exercises) and two exams.

ASIAN 301 — Writing Japanese Women
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Ramirez-Christensen,E

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

This is a course on writing by and about women — women's self-representation and male major authors' representations of women — in Japanese culture. It begins by a feminist reading of one of the world's oldest (9th-11th c.) traditions of women's writing: the memoirs, poetry, and fiction of the Heian court ladies who produced the country's first canonical literature and permanently marked its cultural self-image. It moves on to examine the semiotics of the feminine in Japanese culture using the popular image of women (including the portrayal of Heian women authors and their works) in medieval didactic and gothic tales; in the narrative painting scrolls; in the Nô and Kabuki stage, where male actors performed the "quintessentially feminine" to admiring audiences; in wood-block prints of "beauties" (courtesans or geisha) and stories of "amorous women" in the thriving new merchant culture. The third section focuses on modern women's writing, in particular its resistance to the intervening representations of the feminine and its own productive rereading of the Heian "mothers" in the process of recuperating women's ancient place in the critical representation of Japanese society.

Along with primary sources in literature and the visual arts, secondary sources will include theoretical readings in the psychology of sex, love, and death by Freud, Kristeva, Lacan, and Bataille; in the field of cultural production by Bourdieu; in feminist theories of reading in the Anglo-American academy. Materials and focus will vary from year to year. To be offered in the fall semester alternately with ASIAN 300.

Advisory Prerequisite: Knowledge of Japanese is not required

ASIAN 303 — Warrior Saints: Introduction to Sikh Religion, Culture, and Ethnicity
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Mandair,Arvind-Pal Singh

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

Sikhism's relatively short but eventful history provides a fascinating insight into the working of seemingly contradictory themes in the study of religion, such as politics and religion, or violence and mysticism.

Not surprisingly contemporary Sikh religion's emphasis on the essential identity of the Warrior and the Saint has also generated a great deal of misunderstanding particularly in the West. This interdisciplinary course provides an introduction to the forms and central ideas of Sikh culture and religion. Students will gain an understanding of the development Sikh traditions and the construction and institutionalization of its major beliefs, practices and festivals.

In addition the course will aim to explore the central teachings and leading ideas that have arisen from the Sikh textual and interpretive traditions. Students will be expected to analyse the complex interactions that have given rise to the contemporary interpretive scene, and will be encouraged to link their understanding of the various traditions to the present day problems of textual transmission and reception in global diasporas.

ASIAN 324 — The History of Islam in South Asia
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Mir,Farina

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

This is an introductory level course on the history of Muslim communities and institutions in South Asia. Its aim is to introduce students to the broad historical currents of the expansion of Islam in the Indian subcontinent, the nature of Muslim political authority, the interaction between religious communities, Islamic aesthetics and contributions to material culture, the varied engagements and reactions of Muslims to colonial rule, the partition of British India and the creation of Pakistan, and the contemporary concerns of South Asia's Muslims. The course will begin with an introduction to the Islamic religious tradition. The main emphasis of the course will be on the social, political, and cultural history of Islam in South Asia. This course does not assume any prior knowledge of South Asian or Islamic history.

This course has no prerequisites

Evaluation in this course will be based on participation, a midterm exam, a 4-5 page essay, and a final exam.

Required texts:

  • Sugata Bose and Ayesha Jalal, Modern South Asia (Routledge, 2004).
  • Jamal Elias, Death Before Dying (University of California Press, 1998).
  • Jamal Elias, Islam (Prentice Hall, 1999).
  • Barbara Metcalf, trans., Perfecting Women: Maulana Ashraf Ali Thanawi's Behishti Zewar (University of California Press, 1992).

ASIAN 325 — Zen: History, Culture, and Critique
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Robson,James

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: Theme, WorldLit

This course provides an introduction to the religious history, philosophy and practices of Zen Buddhism. Zen is the Japanese pronunciation of the Chinese word Chan, which is itself a transcription of the Sanskrit word dhyâna, meaning meditation. While meditation is no doubt the backbone of the Zen tradition, this course will highlight the fact that Zen has a number of different faces, including a radical antinomian side that challenged the role of meditation (and all forms of mediation). This course will examine the rich diversity of the Zen tradition as it developed in China, Korea, and Japan, with the first part providing an overview of the historical development of Zen and situating it within the Buddhist tradition that it emerged out of. The second part of the course will challenge and critically evaluate much of what is presented in the first half by exploring some less well known facets of Zen practice that on first glance appear to run counter to what the Zen tradition says about itself. We will explore the role of language in Zen from the enigmatic and abstruse use of koans to questions about why a tradition which took pride in "not being dependent on words" nonetheless produced a voluminous textual record. We will study both the crazy antics of inspired Zen monks and the structured life of Zen monastics and their rituals. Consideration will also be given to why a seemingly iconoclastic tradition like Zen also has a long tradition of venerating its masters, including some that were mummified. Why, we will ask, was Zen appealing to the Japanese warrior class and what has been its role in modern nationalistic movements in Japan? This course is designed to be as much an ongoing critical reflection on the history of the study of Zen as it is about Zen history.

ASIAN 354 — Rebellion and Revolution in China Through Two Centuries
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Cassel,Par Kristoffer

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme

This course will explore rebellions and revolutions in China, from the White Lotus rebellion in the late 18th century through social protests during the last decades of the 20th century. Although the subject matter will be arranged chronologically, different time periods will be used to highlight different themese in the Chinese "revolutionary tradition." The course will draw on selected readings from secondary sources, as well as fiction and translated primary sources. The course should enable students to identify and explain the significance and relevance of major figures, terms, events and institutions in Chinese political and social history from 1790 to 2000 by using supporting evidence from course readings. Students will acquire a nuanced and critical understanding of how the transformation in China in the 19th and 20th centuries has been characterized by both continuity and rupture.

Intended audience: Sophomore and upperclass students with little or no prior knowledge of China.

Course Requirements: No prior knowledge of China or Chinese is required. Grades based on class participation (10%), one short paper (30%), one midterm exam (20%), and one final exam (40%). Paper topics should be chosen in consultation with the instructor.

Class Format: 3 hours each week in lecture format.

Advisory Prerequisite: At least one course in HISTORY or Asian Studies

ASIAN 362 — Writer and Society in Modern China
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Luo,Liang; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: Theme, WorldLit

The rise of China has impacted contemporary world politics and economy in significant ways. How did it all happen? What can we learn from it? This course introduces a special angle of interpretation suggested by Chinese writers and intellectuals themselves. We will examine the role and self-conception of the writer in relation to the changing historical context of modern China, through the study of influential works of narrative fiction, performing arts and film, criticism, and literary theory (all in English translation). We will be focusing on the relationship between arts and politics, the intellectual and the people, and the artistic, the sexual, and the political aspects of Modern Chinese intellectual life. Our goal is to develop critical reading skills and to gain a deep knowledge of modern Chinese identity formation so as to better understand our own position in the contemporary world.

Advisory Prerequisite: No knowledge of Chinese is required.

ASIAN 365 — Science in Premodern China
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Brown,Miranda D

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: Theme

This course is intended as an introduction to the basic problems and issues in Chinese medicine, astronomy, chemistry, and mathematics before the 14th century. In addition to examining the content of what many scholars construe as Chinese science and natural philosophy, this course will examine two themes at length. The first is how one should define science. Is science, as older scholars assumed, a timeless, cross-cultural phenomenon that emerged exclusively in 17th and 18th-century Europe? Or is science socially and culturally contingent? Is there, in other words, more than one effective way to represent and predict natural phenomenon? The second theme involves the "Needham thesis," which argues that China, despite early advances in natural philosophy and proto-science, failed to develop "modern science" because of the adoption of Confucianism as state orthodoxy in the early 14th century. In addition to reading the monumental works of Joseph Needham (1900-1995) and others, students will be asked to evaluate the Needham thesis by examining the primary sources Needham et al. drew upon to make their arguments. Readings will focus equally on primary and secondary sources in English. In addition to weekly "response" paragraphs, students will give oral presentations and write two 6 to 8-page papers critically treating the secondary literature by examining the primary sources from which scholars have drawn conclusions about some aspect of Chinese science and natural philosophy. No knowledge of Chinese language or China is required, and the course is open to all.

ASIAN 381 — Junior/Senior Colloquium for Concentrators
Section 001, SEM
Theories of the Post Colonial

Instructor: Dass,Manishita

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

Over the last two decades, postcolonial theory has had a significant impact on how literary critics, anthropologists, and historians (among others) analyze colonial relationships and the political and cultural legacies of colonialism. This course introduces students to some of the key concepts, methods, and debates in the field of postcolonial studies and explores their relevance to Asian Studies.

Topics include: Orientalism and its critiques, anti-colonial nationalisms, nation and gender, subalternity and representation, colonial and postcolonial modernity, globalization and diaspora, the political and intellectual stakes and contexts of postcolonial studies.

Enforced Prerequisites: ASIAN 235 with at least a C-

Advisory Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing and concentration in Asian Studies.

ASIAN 395 — Honors Thesis
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 3
Other: Honors, Indpnt Study

Honors students in Asian Studies should use this course number for their Honors thesis, but will normally work with whatever faculty member is closest to the subject of the thesis.

Advisory Prerequisite: Honors candidate in Asian Studies and permission of instructor.

ASIAN 400 — Indian Religions and Western Thought
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Mandair,Arvind-Pal Singh

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course examines the intellectual encounter between India and the West from the 1770's to the present day, a period that coincides with the entry of India into the historical experience of colonialism and modernity. It looks at how the discovery of knowledge about India affected debates in modern European philosophy and conversely examines the reception of European ideas in modern Indian thought. Students will be encouraged to compare some central philosophical ideas from Indian devotional traditions with the ideas of Western philosophers in order to examine the possibility of a convergence between these seemingly different traditions of thought.

Advisory Prerequisite: Junior and above.

ASIAN 428 — China's Evolution Under Communism
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Gallagher,Mary E; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Other: Theme, WorldLit

An analysis of China's remarkable evolution to develop an understanding of the present system's capacity to deal with the major challenges that confront it in the political, economic, social, environmental, and security arenas.

Advisory Prerequisite: Upperclass standing

ASIAN 480 — Topics in Asian Studies
Section 001, SEM
Secular Enchantments: Technology and Modernity in the Asia-Pacific

Instructor: de la Cruz,Deirdre Leong

FA 2007
Credits: 3

For centuries some correspondence between technological innovation and rationalism has been assumed. Yet throughout the world technological innovation has also gone hand in hand with practices which may be considered not so rational: Photographs are used to communicate with the dead, street cars are believed to be possessed by evil spirits, animist rituals of sacrifice are performed to ensure the smooth functioning of an industrial machine, and on. In the 19th and early 20th centuries, some technologies that enabled the displacement of religion by secular nationalism also provided new sites for the collective practice of superstition. Are such responses to be read as misrecognitions of a given technology's function? Are they active resistances to modernity? Or are they ways of reasoning technology's own illogical transformations of space and time and presence? This course will pursue these and related questions in the Asia-Pacific region by looking at several cases where the introduction of modern technology inspired, rather than dispelled, new ideas about magic and/or resuscitated old forms of supernatural belief. Students will be expected to produce and present short response papers to the readings, actively participate in discussion, and write a final paper.

ASIAN 480 — Topics in Asian Studies
Section 002, SEM
Hinduism and Colonialism

Instructor: Raman,Srilata

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Covers issues of relevance to Asia as a whole or to more than one of the geographical areas covered in the department.

ASIAN 480 — Topics in Asian Studies
Section 003, SEM
Chinese Popular Religion

Instructor: Robson,James

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme

The religious landscape of contemporary China is filled with surprises around every corner, from the dramatic revival of all forms of religious practice in the past few years to the appearance of small shrines in restaurants and the religious veneration of Mao. While these practices are clearly related to the social and economic changes brought by modernity, they should not be dismissed as aberrant "commercialized" practices that depart from "pure" traditional religious movements like Buddhism, Daoism, and Confucianism. Popular practices have long been intertwined with those "official" religions and have been actively supported and propagated in modern Chinese religious institutions. This course will trace the historical development of Chinese religions (including their doctrinal positions) in relationship to popular movements — from early folk religion through the recent resurgence of "religion" in modern China. Some of the main themes that will be covered in this course include: the yearly festival calendar, veneration of ancestors, exorcism and spirit possession, beliefs in ghosts and fantastic demons, conceptions of religious time and space, pilgrimage, religion and healing, the effects of modernity on new religious movements, and religion and the modern Chinese state. This course provides a critical survey of these main themes in the history of Chinese popular religion. The primary aim of this course is to reconsider the nature of the Chinese religious landscape and look closely at the religious characteristics of what Chinese people do, even if those practices do not fall neatly within the accepted categories of what the "state" has determined as "orthodox" religion.

ASIAN 499 — Independent Study-Directed Readings
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: INDEPENDENT

Directed readings or research in consultation with a member of the Asian Studies faculty.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

ASIAN 501 — Social Scientific Studies of Historical and Contemporary China
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Lee,James
Instructor: Tardif,Twila Z

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme

CCS 501 is part of a two-semester Interdisciplinary Seminar in Chinese Studies intended for M.A. and Ph.D. students from all disciplines. Disciplinary departments create barriers between shared problems, methods, and sources. ISCS is designed to recover and highlight the connecting links of Chinese Studies: the multidimensional study of China encompassing all social groups and the entire range of human experience, from literature and the visual arts to politics and economics. There are no formal prerequisites, except permission of the instructors.

CCS 501 will introduce graduate students to current issues in social scientific studies of China, emphasizing different methodological approaches drawn from multiple disciplines. The course will address four common themes — family and social organization, poverty, social stratification and social mobility, and political economy — that intersect the multiple social science disciplines. Each class will discuss one or more disciplinary approaches to a common subject through class discussion of exemplary studies of China. We will discuss the existing state of the field on each subject and emphasize the different research design and data available for such studies.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

ASIAN 534 — Seminar in Chinese Drama
Section 001, SEM
Traditional Chinese Theater in the Modern World

Instructor: Rolston,David Lee

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme

Theater was the mass media of its day in China, and even though it has had to compete with a variety of new media over time, it has retained its cultural importance. Various attempts have been made to harness the power of Chinese theater to achieve social goals, culminating in the Model Revolutionary Operas of the Cultural Revolution. Beginning with an introduction to traditional Chinese theater as a system produced and consumed in ways alien to our present day conceptions of theater, in this seminar we will then see that what is now thought of as "classical Chinese theater" is really a product of the early 20th century, and represents a response, among other things, to the new need to have a "national theater" that could be shown with pride to Westerners. We will look at various attempts to modernize Chinese theater through the incorporation of new ideologies and technologies, a process that continues unabated today. The class is open to anyone who has completed three years of modern Chinese at the college level or has an equivalent competency in Chinese. Please contact the instructor for details.

Advisory Prerequisite: ASIANLAN 410. Graduate standing.

ASIAN 550 — Seminar in Cultural and Comparative Studies of Asia
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Nornes, Abé Mark
Instructor: Florida,Nancy K

FA 2007
Credits: 3

In this seminar the student, is introduced to a set of theoretical topics that are relevant to the comparative and critical study of Asia. Rather than focusing on a particular region, historical period, or disciplinary perspective, the course seeks to equip students with tools essential for a sophisticated and compelling analysis of a variety of regions, historical periods, and disciplinary perspectives. These tools will allow them to move more easily across the disciplines of Asian studies by, among other things, exploring the historical foundations of those disciplines. The readings will offer a variety of strategies for understanding Asian cultures, pairing readings in social theory with monographs that concern specific Asian materials. Students will thereby gain a purchase on critical theory and productive ways of using it in the study of cultures across national and/or disciplinary boundaries.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

ASIAN 554 — Modern Japanese Literature
Section 001, SEM
Shishosetsu and Its Refractions: Fiction of the Taisho Period

Instructor: Ito,Ken K

FA 2007
Credits: 3

During the Taisho period (1912-1926), Japanese authors are said to have developed a distinctive form of writing, the shishosetsu (personal fiction), which became the standard for high-culture art fiction in Japan. As we read examples of this type of writing, we will consider the critical discourse that constructed shishosetsu as a literary category and examine the historical and cultural exigencies involved in valorizing a supposedly native form of expression. We will also explore the subversions and resistances that were called forth by efforts to institutionalize the form and read theoretical material on authorship which may provide leverage in understanding the shishosetsu phenomenon.

Advisory Prerequisite: ASIAN,ASIANLAN 428.

ASIAN 575 — Seminar in Indonesian Studies
Section 001, SEM
Indonesian Literary Cultures

Instructor: Florida,Nancy K

FA 2007
Credits: 3

The course is designed to explore Modern Indonesian writing through critical readings of selected literary and historical texts. Themes that may be explored concern Islam in Indonesia, memory and forgetting in Indonesian texts and contexts, and forms of revolutionary writing. With an emphasis on text analysis, the students will produce critical commentaries on each of the required readings. For some sessions the students may be required to produce English translations of significant passages of the assigned texts. The commentaries are written in Indonesian. The course is run as a seminar with discussion conducted in Indonesian.

Evaluation is based on classroom performance, written assignments, and a final project. The final project consists of the critical analysis of a text or idea and should be based on the readings from the seminars (5-10 pp. typed in Indonesian). Proficiency in Indonesian language is required.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Qualified undergraduates with permission of instructor. Reading knowledge of Indonesian required.

ASIAN 580 — Seminar in South Asian Studies
Section 001, SEM
Hindu Devotionalism — Theoretical Perspectives and Regional Traditions

Instructor: Raman,Srilata

FA 2007
Credits: 3

The colonial period in South Asia saw not merely the construction of "Hinduism" and other salient conceptual categories (such as "world religions", "ritual" and "monotheism") within the parameters of Orientalist scholarship but, in addition, also the construction of those very structures and modes of viewing these categories as systems to be apprehended. Thus, "Hinduism" needed to be explained not just as a world religion but also as consisting of modes of religious activity which could be understood from a comparative perspective — one such mode was that of "bhakti" or "Hindu devotionalism". This graduate seminar seeks to examine colonial and post-colonial theoretical perspectives on "bhakti" in "Hinduism", on the one hand while supplementing this with readings from classical and vernacular "bhakti" texts (Tamil, Sanskrit, Marathi, Hindi to name a few) in the original as well as in translation. In adhering to this structure in the seminar we shall be attempting to see the interplay as well as the gap between theory and original text, problematize the issue of translation and translatability, of "North Indian" and "South Indian" religion, as well as critically examine the lenses of devotionalism through which "Hinduism" has come to be inevitably apprehended.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Qualified undergraduates with permission of instructor. Reading knowledge of a South Asian language perfered.

ASIAN 699 — Directed Readings
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 6
Other: INDEPENDENT

Designed for individual students who have an interest in a specific topic (usually that has stemmed from a previous course). An individual instructor must agree to direct such a reading, and the requirements are specified when approval is granted.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

ASIAN 798 — MA Essay SSEA Studies
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 6
Other: INDEPENDENT

The Master's Essay is a substantial research paper reflecting interdisciplinary training and the ability to use Western language literature and SSEA language sources. The thesis is usually undertaken in the last term of the degree program, under the supervision of two Center faculty. Students in the joint degree programs should refer to the appropriate sections in the handbook for additional requirements specific to their program.

Advisory Prerequisite: Center MA Students. Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

ASIAN 799 — Master's Essay in Japanese Studies
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 6

Students electing the thesis track must complete the Master's Essay. The Master's Essay is a substantial research paper reflecting interdisciplinary training and the ability to use Western language literature and Japanese language sources. The thesis is usually undertaken in the last term of the degree program, under the supervision of two Center faculty. Students in the joint degree programs should refer to the appropriate sections in the CJS handbook for additional requirements specific to their program.

Advisory Prerequisite: Master's student in Asian Studies. Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

ASIAN 990 — Dissertation Research — Precandidate
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 8

Credit Exclusions: This course replaces JAPANESE 990, CHIN 990, and BUDDHST 990.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

ASIAN 995 — Dissertation Research — Candidate
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 8

Credit Exclusions: This course replaces JAPANESE 995, CHIN 995, and BUDDHST 995.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Enforced Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate

 
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