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LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Fall 2007, Dept = BIOLOGY
 
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Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
BIOLOGY 100 — Biology for Nonscientists
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Kurdziel,Josephine P; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, NS

Credit Exclusions: Not open to those with Advanced Placement or "Departmental" credit in biology, nor to those concentrating in the biological sciences. Credit is granted for a combined total of 17 credits elected in introductory biology.

BIOLOGY 100 is a one-term course designed to introduce students to current biological concepts. The course consists of three hours of lecture per week plus a coordinated discussion session which occupies two hours per week. BIOLOGY 100 provides an introduction to some general principles of biology and concentrates on the areas of cell biology and biotechnology, genetics and genetic diseases, physiology, evolution, and environmental biology.

A major objective of this course is to point out to students the nature of the scientific process and illustrate the uses and non-uses of science in contemporary life. Wherever possible, the ethical and social implications of contemporary scientific effort will be discussed. This course is designed for students with a minimal background in the biological sciences, but we do assume some exposure to biology and chemistry at the high school level. Discussion sections enroll 20 students and are taught by graduate student instructors. In the discussion section, students have the opportunity to review material presented in lecture and participate in discussions of issues raised in the lecture segment.

Textbook: Starr, C., Biology: Today and Tomorrow. Brooks/Cole, a division of Thomson Learning, Inc., Belmont, CA. 2005. Softcover student edition. ISBN 0-534-46732-6

Advisory Prerequisite: Some exposure to biology and chemistry at the high school level is assumed.

BIOLOGY 101 — Biology and Human Affairs
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Vandermeer,John H; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, NS

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for a combined total of 17 credits elected in introductory biology.

This is a course for non-science majors that provides an introduction to those aspects of biology that have direct applicability to the lives of people in today's world. Subjects include race and the historical development of ideas about how biology was thought to be a determinant; a critique of the biological determinist assumption of genetic control of human behavior; energy and the history of its development; global warming as a consequence of that history; agriculture and food production and its historical relationship with ecology.

BIOLOGY 110 — Introduction of Global Change: Physical Processes
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: van der Pluijm,Ben A; homepage
Instructor: Allan,J David; homepage
Instructor: Kling II,George W; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: NS

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for a combined total of 17 credits elected in introductory biology.

Instructor(s):

Every day, millions of human and natural activities are altering the planet on which we live. Over the past century, through our ever-increasing population and mastery of technology, we have been changing the global environment at a pace unknown to natural history.

The University of Michigan Global Change Program offers an interdisciplinary, introductory course sequence which investigates the causes and potential impacts of these changes using a combination of traditional lecture-based and modern web-based teaching methodologies. The Fall Academic Term course deals with issues relating to the physical, chemical, and biological cycles contributing to Global Change. Students apply learned knowledge by using spreadsheet and systems modeling software to investigate the dynamics of natural systems.

The Web-based course curriculum provides unparalleled opportunities to conduct on-line Internet research. In fact, you will create your own web-based poster on a topic of your choosing. The interactive laboratory exercises provide you the opportunity to use computers to examine how natural systems function as well as develop projections of the future consequences of changes in the environment. And, perhaps most important of all, you will have ample time for discussion of the critical issues in human development and how they relate to the international business community, global economics, society as a whole and the individual. All topics are developed in a manner that students will find both accessible and enjoyable. The course grade is based on two midterm exams, a final exam, completion of laboratory modules, and a course project based on some aspect of global change. There are no prerequisites for the course and no science background is assumed. The course is appropriate for all undergraduate students, irrespective of intended concentration, and is the first of a series of courses that can be taken as part of the Global Change Minor.

You will discuss...

  • Current and Projected Global Change

  • The Role of the Individual as a Citizen of the Planet

  • Case Studies of Regional and Global Change Issues

You will create...

  • Models of Interacting Systems that Give Insight into the Collision Between Natural and Societal Processes

  • A Web-based Poster on a Related Topic of Your Choice

Topics that are covered ......

The Universe:

  • Big Bang Theory

  • Birth and Death of Stars

  • Radiation Laws

  • Origin of the Elements

  • Planetary Energy Budget

Our Planet:

  • The Age of the Earth

  • Primitive Atmospheres

  • Natural Hazards

  • Plate Tectonics

  • Chemical & Biological Evolution

  • The Building Blocks for Life

Earth's Atmospheric & Oceanic Evolution:

  • Life Processes and Earth Systems

  • The Great Ice Ages

  • Atmospheric Circulation and Weather

  • Climate and Paleoclimate

  • Greenhouse Gases and Global Warming

  • Sea Level Change

  • El Niño

The Tree of Life:

  • Emergence of Complex Life

  • Extinction and Radiation

  • The Five Kingdoms

  • Natural Selection

  • Respiration and Photosynthesis

  • Ecosystems

Projected Ecological Consequences:

  • Elevated Carbon Dioxide Levels

  • Environmental Pollutants

  • Ozone Depletion

  • Likelihood of Global Climatic Change

BIOLOGY 111 — Investigative Biology Laboratory
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Kurdziel,Josephine P; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 2
Reqs: BS, NS

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for a combined total of 17 credits elected in introductory biology.

Biology is a fascinating and diverse field of study. This one-semester laboratory course is intended for students not planning to major in the biological sciences that want an introduction to the nature of science and first-hand experience with processes of scientific inquiry. It complements BIOLOGY 100, and either BIOLOGY 100 or another 100-level biology course should be taken concurrently or have been taken previously.

An introductory biology course should expose students to the ways that biologists explore questions about the natural world, drawing on the latest research, and let students experience that sense of personal discovery for themselves. In this course, students will not be graded on their ability to memorize isolated facts, but will be coerced into thinking about how biologists address and answer questions about biological phenomena. This course will focus on the processes of scientific inquiry and require students to think critically and creatively. Students will improve their thinking and reasoning skills as they pose original questions, formulate testable hypotheses and predictions, design experiments and tests to address their research questions, collect and analyze data, interpret their results, and present their research projects to their peers.

Textbook: None. Readings will be available through CTools.

Advisory Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent enrollment in BIOLOGY 100 or another 100-level BIOLOGY course.

BIOLOGY 120 — First Year Seminar in Biology
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Oakley,Bruce

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, NS
Other: FYSem

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for a combined total of 17 credits elected in introductory biology.

A User's Guide to the Brain

Two years of high school biology required.

Brain function depends upon intricate connections among nerve cells strategically positioned to process information. This means you will learn about the physiology of individual nerve cells and the operation of synaptic communications among nerve cells. Because sensory systems are reasonably well understood, they provide an opportunity to understand how the brain works. As we sort through various functions of the brain, we will eventually consider whether it is possible for someone to read or modify your thoughts and feelings.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

BIOLOGY 120 — First Year Seminar in Biology
Section 002, SEM

Instructor: Oakley,Bruce

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, NS
Other: FYSem

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for a combined total of 17 credits elected in introductory biology.

All human cultures have seasoned their foods. Although hunger makes us eat, it is flavor that controls what we choose to eat. Some typical questions:

  • How do the chemical senses detect savory flavors and what do we know about the neurophysiology of their pleasures?
  • Do plants taste attractive or repellent to animals?
  • How do natural or artificial seasonings affect your health?
  • Can dieters successfully replace calories with seasonings?

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

BIOLOGY 130 — Animal Behavior
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Tibbetts,Elizabeth Alison

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, NS

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for a combined total of 17 credits elected in introductory biology.

Why are male cardinals brilliant red while females are dull brown? Why do some ground squirrels emit alarm calls when a predator is nearby, thus drawing attention to themselves? Why do lions commit infanticide? Do animals lie? These are just some of the questions you should be able to discuss by the end of this course.

This course in an introduction to the behavior of animals in their natural environment. Examples will be drawn from birds, mammals, insects, and humans. Specific topics include: sexual selection and mating behavior; cooperation and conflict in animal families; natural selection; Darwinian medicine; communication; culture; and behavioral development. The goals are to: a) gain a background in the natural behavior of animals, and b) understand sexual, aggressive, and social behaviors from an evolutionary perspective.

The course consists of lectures, discussions, and movies. There will be two midterms and a final exam.

Textbook: Principles of Animal Behavior, Lee A. Dugatin. (W.W. Norton)

BIOLOGY 140 — Genetics and Society
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Adams,Julian P

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, NS

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for a combined total of 17 credits elected in introductory biology.

This course is designed to provide students with a basic knowledge of genetics required to intelligently assess and understand the latest developments in genetics, as well as to appreciate some of the genetics. Topics covered: genetics; race and IQ; forensic applications of genetic fingerprinting; gene therapy; recombinant DNA technology and possible environmental concerns; the Human Genome Project.

BIOLOGY 171 — Introductory Biology: Ecology and Evolution
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Ó Foighil,Diarmaid

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, NS

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed BIOLOGY 162 or 163 or 195. Credit is granted for a combined total of 17 credits elected in introductory biology.

BIOLOGY 171 is a one-term course in ecology and evolutionary biology that, together with BIOLOGY 172 and 173, collectively form the introductory biology course unit. BIOLOGY 171 and 172 can be taken in either order. The two-semester set of BIOLOGY 171, 172, and 173 is intended for concentrators in biology, other science programs, or pre-professional studies. Other suitably prepared students wishing detailed coverage of biology are also welcome. The primary aims of BIOLOGY 171 are:

  1. to provide factual and conceptual knowledge concerning the origin and complex interactions of the earth's biodiversity;
  2. to give an integrated overview of biological organization including genes, individuals, kin groups, populations, species, communities, and ecosystems;
  3. to engage with biological hypotheses dealing with prominent current issues such as human evolutionary origins, emerging diseases, conservation biology and global change; and
  4. to develop critical-thinking and writing skills.

Topics in BIOLOGY 171 are divided among three primary areas:

  • Mendelian Genetics and Evolutionary Processes;
  • Biodiversity, Organismal Biology and the Evolution of Development;
  • and Ecology.

BIOLOGY 171 — Introductory Biology: Ecology and Evolution
Section 002, LEC

Instructor: Ó Foighil,Diarmaid

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, NS

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed BIOLOGY 162 or 163 or 195. Credit is granted for a combined total of 17 credits elected in introductory biology.

BIOLOGY 171 is a one-term course in ecology and evolutionary biology that, together with BIOLOGY 172 and 173, collectively form the introductory biology course unit. BIOLOGY 171 and 172 can be taken in either order. The two-semester set of BIOLOGY 171, 172, and 173 is intended for concentrators in biology, other science programs, or pre-professional studies. Other suitably prepared students wishing detailed coverage of biology are also welcome. The primary aims of BIOLOGY 171 are:

  1. to provide factual and conceptual knowledge concerning the origin and complex interactions of the earth's biodiversity;
  2. to give an integrated overview of biological organization including genes, individuals, kin groups, populations, species, communities, and ecosystems;
  3. to engage with biological hypotheses dealing with prominent current issues such as human evolutionary origins, emerging diseases, conservation biology and global change; and
  4. to develop critical-thinking and writing skills.

Topics in BIOLOGY 171 are divided among three primary areas:

  • Mendelian Genetics and Evolutionary Processes;
  • Biodiversity, Organismal Biology and the Evolution of Development;
  • and Ecology.

BIOLOGY 172 — Introductory Biology — Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Clark,Steven E; homepage
Instructor: Kuwada,John Y

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, NS

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed BIOLOGY 162 or 163 or 195. Credit is granted for a combined total of 17 credits elected in introductory biology.

BIOLOGY 172 is a one-term course in molecular, cellular, and developmental biology that, together with BIOLOGY 172 and 173, collectively form the introductory biology course unit. BIOLOGY 171 and 172 can be taken in either order. The two-semester set of BIOLOGY 171, 172, and 173 is intended for concentrators in biology, other science programs, or pre-professional studies. Other suitably prepared students wishing detailed coverage of biology are also welcome. Topics in BIOLOGY 172 include: the chemistry of the living cell; the structure, function, metabolism, and interaction of animal, plant and bacterial cells; molecular biology; the regulation of gene expression, cell signaling, cell-cell interactions, and the physiology of plants and animals.

BIOLOGY 172 is part of a new, two-semester introductory unit (along with BIOLOGY 171 and the lab course, BIO 173) designed to replace our current introductory biology course, BIOLOGY 162. This set of courses provides students with a broad introduction to modern biology with sufficient depth to continue a concentration in any of the biological sciences. The two semesters of lecture (which may be take in either order) focus on different parts of the general subject, but the set of courses represent an integrated whole. In particular, the laboratory (BIOLOGY 173) integrates the molecular and cellular approaches of BIOLOGY 172 with the ecological and evolutionary approaches of BIOLOGY 171. This three-course set allows a more in-depth presentation of material and approaches than was possible in the compressed format of BIOLOGY 162. As a result, students who proceed to succeeding courses in Genetics, Biochemistry, and Evolution will have a deeper understanding of the concepts and a broader experience of the material, and thus be better prepared to assimilate the more specialized material of these later courses. Students who do not continue in a biological concentration will also have a richer appreciation of biology in the modern world and will be better able to evaluate issues that will arise in the 21st century.

Intended audience: BIOLOGY 172 is part of new, two-semester introductory unit designed to replace our current introductory BIOLOGY 162. It is intended for concentrators in all of the biological concentrations, other science programs, and preprofessional studies.

Course Requirements: 85% of the assessment will be based on lecture material and this assessment will consist of 3 non-cumulative exams with both multiple-choice and short-answer questions, and a final exam. 15% of the total grade will be based on three written assignments, concerning the discussion material, graded by the GSIs.

Class Format: 3 hrs weekly in lecture format together with 1.5 hrs of discussion. GSIs will be responsible for the weekly discussion sessions and for assistance in grading written evaluation material. They will be trained and supervised by the instructor, via weekly preparation sessions.

Advisory Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent enrollment in CHEM 130

BIOLOGY 172 — Introductory Biology — Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental
Section 002, LEC

Instructor: Clark,Steven E; homepage
Instructor: Kuwada,John Y

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, NS

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed BIOLOGY 162 or 163 or 195. Credit is granted for a combined total of 17 credits elected in introductory biology.

BIOLOGY 172 is a one-term course in molecular, cellular, and developmental biology that, together with BIOLOGY 172 and 173, collectively form the introductory biology course unit. BIOLOGY 171 and 172 can be taken in either order. The two-semester set of BIOLOGY 171, 172, and 173 is intended for concentrators in biology, other science programs, or pre-professional studies. Other suitably prepared students wishing detailed coverage of biology are also welcome. Topics in BIOLOGY 172 include: the chemistry of the living cell; the structure, function, metabolism, and interaction of animal, plant and bacterial cells; molecular biology; the regulation of gene expression, cell signaling, cell-cell interactions, and the physiology of plants and animals.

BIOLOGY 172 is part of a new, two-semester introductory unit (along with BIOLOGY 171 and the lab course, BIO 173) designed to replace our current introductory biology course, BIOLOGY 162. This set of courses provides students with a broad introduction to modern biology with sufficient depth to continue a concentration in any of the biological sciences. The two semesters of lecture (which may be take in either order) focus on different parts of the general subject, but the set of courses represent an integrated whole. In particular, the laboratory (BIOLOGY 173) integrates the molecular and cellular approaches of BIOLOGY 172 with the ecological and evolutionary approaches of BIOLOGY 171. This three-course set allows a more in-depth presentation of material and approaches than was possible in the compressed format of BIOLOGY 162. As a result, students who proceed to succeeding courses in Genetics, Biochemistry, and Evolution will have a deeper understanding of the concepts and a broader experience of the material, and thus be better prepared to assimilate the more specialized material of these later courses. Students who do not continue in a biological concentration will also have a richer appreciation of biology in the modern world and will be better able to evaluate issues that will arise in the 21st century.

Intended audience: BIOLOGY 172 is part of new, two-semester introductory unit designed to replace our current introductory BIOLOGY 162. It is intended for concentrators in all of the biological concentrations, other science programs, and preprofessional studies.

Course Requirements: 85% of the assessment will be based on lecture material and this assessment will consist of 3 non-cumulative exams with both multiple-choice and short-answer questions, and a final exam. 15% of the total grade will be based on three written assignments, concerning the discussion material, graded by the GSIs.

Class Format: 3 hrs weekly in lecture format together with 1.5 hrs of discussion. GSIs will be responsible for the weekly discussion sessions and for assistance in grading written evaluation material. They will be trained and supervised by the instructor, via weekly preparation sessions.

Advisory Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent enrollment in CHEM 130

BIOLOGY 173 — Introductory Biology Laboratory
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Ammerlaan,Marcus C; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 2
Reqs: BS, NS

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed BIOLOGY 162 or 163. Credit is granted for a combined total of 17 credits elected in introductory biology.

BIOLOGY 173 is an integrative, project-based, one-term introductory laboratory course intended for concentrators in any of the biological sciences, other science programs, and pre-professional studies. The primary aims of BIOLOGY 173 are: I) to introduce fundamental methods in biological research; 2) to provide an integrated perspective of experimental biology; 3) to foster hypothesis-based analytical approaches to experimental data; 4) to enhance thinking and writing skills. Topics in BIOLOGY 173 are divided among four primary areas: Biochemistry, Molecular Genetics, Evolution and Phylogenetics, and Ecology.

In contrast to traditional labs, where students essentially follow recipes that lead them to some anticipated result, students in this course will have input into the design of research questions. Students will devise methods to test their ideas, they will collect, analyze and interpret data and learn how to present their research both orally and in writing. The aims of the weekly lecture in BIOLOGY 173 will be to provide students with the conceptual background necessary to plan, execute and interpret their laboratory projects. Lectures will engage retrospectively with data obtained in the previous laboratory session in addition to setting the stage for the subsequent session. More broadly, the laboratory projects themselves will aim to integrate the general principles of biological subfields such as ecology, evolution, cell biology, molecular biology, metabolism, and gene regulation, that the students will have covered in the parallel lecture courses (BIOLOGY 171 and 172).

Intended audience: BIOLOGY 173 is one of the 3 new introductory courses (171, 172, 173) designed to replace our current introductory course, 162. It will have the same target audience: concentrators in biology, other science programs, or pre-professional studies, with the modification noted in the statement below.

Course Requirements: 60% of the assessment will be based on four formal laboratory reports, one for each 4-week module. Two of the reports will be written assignments in scientific format (title, abstract, introduction, materials and methods, results, discussion, literature cited, labeled figures) typically 6-8 pages in length. One report will have a scientific poster format and the remaining report will be an oral presentation. This combination will give the students experience of the three primary methods of scientific communication (paper, poster, talk). GSIs will grade the reports and they will receive detailed scoring rubrics to ensure consistency. The remaining 40% of the assessment will consist of short within-laboratory and within-lecture quizzes, graded by the GSIs, that will test the students' conceptual understanding of the experimental approaches employed.

Class Format: Four contact hours a week composed of a three hours laboratory research led by GSIs plus one hour lecture led by an instructor.

Advisory Prerequisite: Prior completion of or concurrent enrollment in BIOLOGY 171 or 172

BIOLOGY 173 — Introductory Biology Laboratory
Section 002, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 2
Reqs: BS, NS

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed BIOLOGY 162 or 163. Credit is granted for a combined total of 17 credits elected in introductory biology.

BIOLOGY 173 is an integrative, project-based, one-term introductory laboratory course intended for concentrators in any of the biological sciences, other science programs, and pre-professional studies. The primary aims of BIOLOGY 173 are: I) to introduce fundamental methods in biological research; 2) to provide an integrated perspective of experimental biology; 3) to foster hypothesis-based analytical approaches to experimental data; 4) to enhance thinking and writing skills. Topics in BIOLOGY 173 are divided among four primary areas: Biochemistry, Molecular Genetics, Evolution and Phylogenetics, and Ecology.

In contrast to traditional labs, where students essentially follow recipes that lead them to some anticipated result, students in this course will have input into the design of research questions. Students will devise methods to test their ideas, they will collect, analyze and interpret data and learn how to present their research both orally and in writing. The aims of the weekly lecture in BIOLOGY 173 will be to provide students with the conceptual background necessary to plan, execute and interpret their laboratory projects. Lectures will engage retrospectively with data obtained in the previous laboratory session in addition to setting the stage for the subsequent session. More broadly, the laboratory projects themselves will aim to integrate the general principles of biological subfields such as ecology, evolution, cell biology, molecular biology, metabolism, and gene regulation, that the students will have covered in the parallel lecture courses (BIOLOGY 171 and 172).

Intended audience: BIOLOGY 173 is one of the 3 new introductory courses (171, 172, 173) designed to replace our current introductory course, 162. It will have the same target audience: concentrators in biology, other science programs, or pre-professional studies, with the modification noted in the statement below.

Course Requirements: 60% of the assessment will be based on four formal laboratory reports, one for each 4-week module. Two of the reports will be written assignments in scientific format (title, abstract, introduction, materials and methods, results, discussion, literature cited, labeled figures) typically 6-8 pages in length. One report will have a scientific poster format and the remaining report will be an oral presentation. This combination will give the students experience of the three primary methods of scientific communication (paper, poster, talk). GSIs will grade the reports and they will receive detailed scoring rubrics to ensure consistency. The remaining 40% of the assessment will consist of short within-laboratory and within-lecture quizzes, graded by the GSIs, that will test the students' conceptual understanding of the experimental approaches employed.

Class Format: Four contact hours a week composed of a three hours laboratory research led by GSIs plus one hour lecture led by an instructor.

Advisory Prerequisite: Prior completion of or concurrent enrollment in BIOLOGY 171 or 172

BIOLOGY 200 — Undergraduate Tutorial
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 2
Other: INDEPENDENT

This course is intended for sophomores learning research and laboratory techniques, working under close supervision of a faculty member. It also may be used for directed readings at an appropriate level. It includes reading on a significant topic and regular consultation with the faculty member chosen to supervise the work. The required paper could be on the scientific literature in a broad field, on biological issues on which the student may want to do continuing work, or on the detailed results of research in a biological specialty. Conferences, seminars, readings, and assigned writings are used to develop critical perspectives on modern biological problems and to provide breadth and sense of historical continuity in biological thought.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of faculty member in biology.

BIOLOGY 207 — Introductory Microbiology
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, NS

This course in microbiology consists of two one-and-a-half hour lectures and one three-hour laboratory session each week. The lectures describe the basic biology of microbial life, with emphasis on bacteria in the Domain Bacteria and Domain Archaea, and including eukaryotic microbes (protists and fungi) of the Domain Eukarya.

Lecture material in the course is divided into three approximately equal sections.

  1. The first section examines bacterial and eukaryal cell structure and functions; and bacterial nutrition, cultivation, and growth; molecular biology of bacteria, including regulation of gene expression; genetics and genomics; virology; and genetic engineering.
  2. The second section of the course covers microbial evolution, metabolic and ecological diversity, nutrient cycles, and symbiotic interactions.
  3. The third section of the course describes medically related topics, including bacterial and fungal pathogenesis, epidemiology, viral diseases, and immunology.

The laboratory sessions are designed to develop skill in fundamental aspects of microbiological work, including microscopy, aseptic and pure-culture techniques, experimental manipulation of bacteria, microbial enrichment, and isolation and characterization of bacteria.

Grades for the course are based on three lecture exams together with assessments of practical skills from the laboratory sessions.

The course is required for the Microbiology concentration, and it is appropriate for the Biology and the Cell and Molecular Biology concentrations.

Textbook (required):
Brock Biology of Microorganisms, M.T. Madigan, et al., 11th edition, Prentice-Hall, 2005.

Laboratory manual (required): Benson's Microbiological Applications: Laboratory Manual in General Microbiology (complete version), A.E. Brown, 10th edition, McGraw-Hill, 2005.

Advisory Prerequisite: BIOLOGY 162 or 163 or 171 & 172 & 173 or 195 & 173.

BIOLOGY 222 — From Message to Mind: An Introduction to Neurobiology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Nagaya,Naomi

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS

This course will introduce you to key concepts in neurobiology. The first half of the course will focus on the cellular and molecular basis of electrical and synaptic signaling, and on how changes in synaptic signaling are related to learning and memory. The second half of the course will focus on sensory neurobiology. This section of the course will deal with how physical and chemical signals are transduced into electrical signals, and how the synaptic networks of the brain extract useful information from these signals to give rise to conscious perceptions of the outside world. The textbook does an excellent job of explaining current concepts. A major focus of the lectures and discussion sections will be to help you understand the experiments that led to the development of our current views.

This course is particularly appropriate for sophomores considering majoring in one of the biological sciences, as it is a required part of the Neuroscience concentration, and a popular elective in the Biology and Cell and Molecular Biology concentrations.

Textbook: Mark F. Bear, Barry W. Connors, Michael A. Paradiso; Neuroscience: Exploring the Brain, 3rd edition, Lippincott & Wilkins. ISBN 0781760038

Enforced Prerequisites: BIOLOGY 162 or 163 or [171 and 172] or [195 and 173].

BIOLOGY 225 — Principles of Animal Physiology: Lecture
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Webb,Paul W

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS

This course is an introduction to the physiology of animals. The physiology of both invertebrate and vertebrate animals is covered as well as limited treatment of human physiology as it relates to general physiological mechanisms. The course relies on the comparative method in analyzing physiological systems of diverse taxa to identify general principles of functional mechanisms. The course also considers variations in these mechanisms as related to the requirements of the animals but does not attempt a phylogenetic survey.

The course is intended for concentrators and pre-medical students in their sophomore, junior, or senior years. The subject matter includes metabolism and temperature regulation, nervous and endocrine system controls and integration, respiration and circulation, water and ion balance, excretion, digestion, reproduction, and immune system function. There are three one-hour lectures a week and four one-hour examinations.

Textbook: Biology, 7th edition, Campbell and Reece, ISBN 0-8053-7171-0 (ISBN-13: 9780805371468)

Enforced Prerequisites: BIOLOGY 162 or 163 or [171 and 172] or [195 and 173] and CHEM 210

BIOLOGY 226 — Animal Physiology Laboratory
Section 001, LAB

Instructor: Pavgi, Sushama ; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 2
Reqs: BS

This laboratory course provides hands-on experience with physiological systems at the level of organisms and organ systems. Prior or concurrent enrollment in BIOLOGY 225 is required to take this course. The laboratory meets for one four-hour session a week. Students perform experiments in small groups, collate class data, and perform analyses. Students should be aware that this course uses live animals. Each student is expected to lead one or more summary presentations at the beginning of the laboratory session following the conclusion of a previous laboratory exercise. The presentations will be 10-15 minutes in length and cover the analyses and summary of the data as well as provide conclusions and implications. Following the presentation, all students will be expected to contribute to the discussion. A term paper, an oral presentation, and other short assignments are required during the term.

Laboratory Exercises in Animal Physiology, BIOLOGY 226, Current Term, edited by Dr. Sushama Pavgi is required for the course. It is available at Dollar Bill Copying, located at 611 Church Street (off South University Avenue).

Advisory Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent enrollment in BIOLOGY 225

BIOLOGY 226 — Animal Physiology Laboratory
Section 002, LAB

Instructor: Pavgi, Sushama ; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 2
Reqs: BS

This laboratory course provides hands-on experience with physiological systems at the level of organisms and organ systems. Prior or concurrent enrollment in BIOLOGY 225 is required to take this course. The laboratory meets for one four-hour session a week. Students perform experiments in small groups, collate class data, and perform analyses. Students should be aware that this course uses live animals.

Each student is expected to lead one or more summary presentations at the beginning of the laboratory session following the conclusion of a previous laboratory exercise. The presentations will be 10-15 minutes in length and cover the analyses and summary of the data as well as provide conclusions and implications. Following the presentation, all students will be expected to contribute to the discussion. A term paper, an oral presentation, and other short assignments are required during the term.

Laboratory Exercises in Animal Physiology, BIOLOGY 226, Current Term, edited by Dr. Sushama Pavgi, is required for the course. It is available at Dollar Bill Copying, located at 611 Church Street (off South University Avenue).

Advisory Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent enrollment in BIOLOGY 225

BIOLOGY 226 — Animal Physiology Laboratory
Section 003, LAB

Instructor: Pavgi, Sushama ; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 2
Reqs: BS

This laboratory course provides hands-on experience with physiological systems at the level of organisms and organ systems. Prior or concurrent enrollment in BIOLOGY 225 is required to take this course. The laboratory meets for one four-hour session a week. Students perform experiments in small groups, collate class data, and perform analyses. Students should be aware that this course uses live animals.

Each student is expected to lead one or more summary presentations at the beginning of the laboratory session following the conclusion of a previous laboratory exercise. The presentations will be 10-15 minutes in length and cover the analyses and summary of the data as well as provide conclusions and implications. Following the presentation, all students will be expected to contribute to the discussion. A term paper, an oral presentation, and other short assignments are required during the term.

Laboratory Exercises in Animal Physiology, BIOLOGY 226, Current Term, edited by Dr. Sushama Pavgi, is required for the course. It is available at Dollar Bill Copying, located at 611 Church Street (off South University Avenue).

Advisory Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent enrollment in BIOLOGY 225

BIOLOGY 226 — Animal Physiology Laboratory
Section 004, LAB

Instructor: Pavgi, Sushama ; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 2
Reqs: BS

Advisory Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent enrollment in BIOLOGY 225

BIOLOGY 226 — Animal Physiology Laboratory
Section 005, LAB

Instructor: Pavgi, Sushama ; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 2
Reqs: BS

This laboratory course provides hands-on experience with physiological systems at the level of organisms and organ systems. Prior or concurrent enrollment in BIOLOGY 225 is required to take this course. The laboratory meets for one four-hour session a week. Students perform experiments in small groups, collate class data, and perform analyses. Students should be aware that this course uses live animals.

Each student is expected to lead one or more summary presentations at the beginning of the laboratory session following the conclusion of a previous laboratory exercise. The presentations will be 10-15 minutes in length and cover the analyses and summary of the data as well as provide conclusions and implications. Following the presentation, all students will be expected to contribute to the discussion. A term paper, an oral presentation, and other short assignments are required during the term.

Laboratory Exercises in Animal Physiology, BIOLOGY 226, Current Term, edited by Dr. Sushama Pavgi, is required for the course. It is available at Dollar Bill Copying, located at 611 Church Street (off South University Avenue).

Advisory Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent enrollment in BIOLOGY 225

BIOLOGY 226 — Animal Physiology Laboratory
Section 006, LAB

Instructor: Pavgi, Sushama ; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 2
Reqs: BS

Advisory Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent enrollment in BIOLOGY 225

BIOLOGY 226 — Animal Physiology Laboratory
Section 007, LAB

Instructor: Pavgi, Sushama ; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 2
Reqs: BS

This laboratory course provides hands-on experience with physiological systems at the level of organisms and organ systems. Prior or concurrent enrollment in BIOLOGY 225 is required to take this course. The laboratory meets for one four-hour session a week. Students perform experiments in small groups, collate class data, and perform analyses. Students should be aware that this course uses live animals. Each student is expected to lead one or more summary presentations at the beginning of the laboratory session following the conclusion of a previous laboratory exercise. The presentations will be 10-15 minutes in length and cover the analyses and summary of the data as well as provide conclusions and implications. Following the presentation, all students will be expected to contribute to the discussion. A term paper, an oral presentation, and other short assignments are required during the term.

Laboratory Exercises in Animal Physiology, BIOLOGY 226, Current Term, edited by Dr. Sushama Pavgi is required for the course. It is available at Dollar Bill Copying, located at 611 Church Street (off South University Avenue).

Advisory Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent enrollment in BIOLOGY 225

BIOLOGY 226 — Animal Physiology Laboratory
Section 008, LAB

Instructor: Pavgi, Sushama ; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 2
Reqs: BS

This laboratory course provides hands-on experience with physiological systems at the level of organisms and organ systems. Prior or concurrent enrollment in BIOLOGY 225 is required to take this course. The laboratory meets for one four-hour session a week. Students perform experiments in small groups, collate class data, and perform analyses. Students should be aware that this course uses live animals. Each student is expected to lead one or more summary presentations at the beginning of the laboratory session following the conclusion of a previous laboratory exercise. The presentations will be 10-15 minutes in length and cover the analyses and summary of the data as well as provide conclusions and implications. Following the presentation, all students will be expected to contribute to the discussion. A term paper, an oral presentation, and other short assignments are required during the term.

Laboratory Exercises in Animal Physiology, BIOLOGY 226, Current Term, edited by Dr. Sushama Pavgi is required for the course. It is available at Dollar Bill Copying, located at 611 Church Street (off South University Avenue).

Advisory Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent enrollment in BIOLOGY 225

BIOLOGY 226 — Animal Physiology Laboratory
Section 009, LAB

Instructor: Pavgi, Sushama ; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 2
Reqs: BS

This laboratory course provides hands-on experience with physiological systems at the level of organisms and organ systems. Prior or concurrent enrollment in BIOLOGY 225 is required to take this course. The laboratory meets for one four-hour session a week. Students perform experiments in small groups, collate class data, and perform analyses. Students should be aware that this course uses live animals. Each student is expected to lead one or more summary presentations at the beginning of the laboratory session following the conclusion of a previous laboratory exercise. The presentations will be 10-15 minutes in length and cover the analyses and summary of the data as well as provide conclusions and implications. Following the presentation, all students will be expected to contribute to the discussion. A term paper, an oral presentation, and other short assignments are required during the term.

Laboratory Exercises in Animal Physiology, BIOLOGY 226, Current Term, edited by Dr. Sushama Pavgi is required for the course. It is available at Dollar Bill Copying, located at 611 Church Street (off South University Avenue).

Advisory Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent enrollment in BIOLOGY 225

BIOLOGY 226 — Animal Physiology Laboratory
Section 010, LAB

Instructor: Pavgi, Sushama ; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 2
Reqs: BS

This laboratory course provides hands-on experience with physiological systems at the level of organisms and organ systems. Prior or concurrent enrollment in BIOLOGY 225 is required to take this course. The laboratory meets for one four-hour session a week. Students perform experiments in small groups, collate class data, and perform analyses. Students should be aware that this course uses live animals. Each student is expected to lead one or more summary presentations at the beginning of the laboratory session following the conclusion of a previous laboratory exercise. The presentations will be 10-15 minutes in length and cover the analyses and summary of the data as well as provide conclusions and implications. Following the presentation, all students will be expected to contribute to the discussion. A term paper, an oral presentation, and other short assignments are required during the term.

Laboratory Exercises in Animal Physiology, BIOLOGY 226, Current Term, edited by Dr. Sushama Pavgi is required for the course. It is available at Dollar Bill Copying, located at 611 Church Street (off South University Avenue).

Advisory Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent enrollment in BIOLOGY 225

BIOLOGY 226 — Animal Physiology Laboratory
Section 011, LAB

Instructor: Pavgi, Sushama ; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 2
Reqs: BS

This laboratory course provides hands-on experience with physiological systems at the level of organisms and organ systems. Prior or concurrent enrollment in BIOLOGY 225 is required to take this course. The laboratory meets for one four-hour session a week. Students perform experiments in small groups, collate class data, and perform analyses. Students should be aware that this course uses live animals. Each student is expected to lead one or more summary presentations at the beginning of the laboratory session following the conclusion of a previous laboratory exercise. The presentations will be 10-15 minutes in length and cover the analyses and summary of the data as well as provide conclusions and implications. Following the presentation, all students will be expected to contribute to the discussion. A term paper, an oral presentation, and other short assignments are required during the term.

Laboratory Exercises in Animal Physiology, BIOLOGY 226, Current Term, edited by Dr. Sushama Pavgi is required for the course. It is available at Dollar Bill Copying, located at 611 Church Street (off South University Avenue).

Advisory Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent enrollment in BIOLOGY 225

BIOLOGY 226 — Animal Physiology Laboratory
Section 012, LAB

Instructor: Pavgi, Sushama ; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 2
Reqs: BS

This laboratory course provides hands-on experience with physiological systems at the level of organisms and organ systems. Prior or concurrent enrollment in BIOLOGY 225 is required to take this course. The laboratory meets for one four-hour session a week. Students perform experiments in small groups, collate class data, and perform analyses. Students should be aware that this course uses live animals. Each student is expected to lead one or more summary presentations at the beginning of the laboratory session following the conclusion of a previous laboratory exercise. The presentations will be 10-15 minutes in length and cover the analyses and summary of the data as well as provide conclusions and implications. Following the presentation, all students will be expected to contribute to the discussion. A term paper, an oral presentation, and other short assignments are required during the term.

Laboratory Exercises in Animal Physiology, BIOLOGY 226, Current Term, edited by Dr. Sushama Pavgi is required for the course. It is available at Dollar Bill Copying, located at 611 Church Street (off South University Avenue).

Advisory Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent enrollment in BIOLOGY 225

BIOLOGY 230 — Introduction to Plant Biology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Qiu,Yin-Long

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, NS

This course will provide a broad, integrated overview of plant biology including economic and environmental aspects. The general areas covered are:

  • Plant diversity —the basic biology and evolution of the bacteria, fungi, algae, bryophytes, and vascular plants. In addition, special aspects such as their environmental impacts, toxicology, cell biology, and molecular evolution will be covered.
  • Structure, function, and development from the cell-molecular level to the whole organism. Photosynthesis, internal transport, hormones, environmental controls, molecular biology, genetic engineering, and biotechnology will be included.
  • Ecology, adaptations to their environments, plant-animal interactions, ethnobotany, plant medicinals, biomes, biogeography, and evolution.

In addition to two hours of lecture each week, there will be a one-hour discussion and a three-hour lab with four field trips. Evaluations will be based on two one-hour exams, a final exam, four lab quizzes, and two short papers. Students will need to purchase a textbook and a lab manual.

Textbook: Biology of Plants, Raven, P.H., et. al. 6th edition. (W.H. Freeman & Co.)

Advisory Prerequisite: BIOLOGY 162 or 163 or 171 & 172 & 173 or 195 & 173.

BIOLOGY 252 — Chordate Anatomy and Phylogeny
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Fink,William L; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS

This course teaches the comparative method, using the 'three-fold parallelism' of anatomy, ontogeny, and paleontology. All examples are based on chordate animals, with emphasis on their anatomy and development. The introductory third of the course includes the theoretical basis of the comparative method, principles of evolutionary theory and speciation, and phylogenetics. The remainder of the course involves application of the method, with a survey of chordate structure, including the integument, skeleton, muscles, and the circulatory, urogenital, digestive, respiratory, and nervous systems. The laboratory provides practical experience in the comparative method, including dissections. There are three one-hour lectures per week and one three-hour laboratory. There are two hourly examinations and a final examination for the lecture, and a laboratory practical exam.

Advisory Prerequisite: BIOLOGY 162 or 163 or 171 & 172 & 173 or 195 & 173.

BIOLOGY 281 — General Ecology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: King,Aaron Alan; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, NS

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in EEB 381.

The course introduces the basic concepts and principles of ecology as applied to the study of individuals, populations, and communities of both plants and animals. Course topics include the roles of physical and biotic factors influencing the distribution and abundance of organisms; the dynamics of population growth; species interactions including competition, predation, mutualism; the structure of ecological communities; ecological succession; and applications of ecology to problems of environment and resource management. BIOLOGY 281 is a suitable prerequisite for intermediate and advanced courses in ecology.

There will be lectures and discussions. Three exams will constitute the main basis of evaluation.

Textbook: Elements of Ecology, Smith and Smith. 6th edition.

Advisory Prerequisite: BIOLOGY 162 or 163 or 171 & 172 & 173 or 195 & 173 AND a laboratory course in CHEM. BIOLOGY 172 and 173 are strongly recommended.

BIOLOGY 282 — General Ecology Laboratory
Section 011, LAB

Instructor: Rathcke,Beverly J; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS

This laboratory course introduces the basic concepts and methods used in ecological research. The laboratories consist of both field and laboratory research projects, field trips, computer analyses, and an individual independent research project that is designed and carried out by each student. Students collect and analyze data, write up laboratory reports and a scientific paper on their independent research project, give an oral presentation on their independent research, and participate in laboratory discussions. The BIOLOGY 282 lab manual is required.

Advisory Prerequisite: BIOLOGY 162 or 163 or 171 & 172 & 173 or 195 & 173 AND concurrent or prior enrollment in BIOLOGY 281/ENVIRON 281.

BIOLOGY 282 — General Ecology Laboratory
Section 021, LAB

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS

This laboratory course introduces the basic concepts and methods used in ecological research. The laboratories consist of both field and laboratory research projects, field trips, computer analyses, and an individual independent research project that is designed and carried out by each student. Students collect and analyze data, write up laboratory reports and a scientific paper on their independent research project, give an oral presentation on their independent research, and participate in laboratory discussions. The BIOLOGY 282 lab manual is required.

Advisory Prerequisite: BIOLOGY 162 or 163 or 171 & 172 & 173 or 195 & 173 AND concurrent or prior enrollment in BIOLOGY 281/ENVIRON 281.

BIOLOGY 282 — General Ecology Laboratory
Section 031, LAB

Instructor: Rathcke,Beverly J; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS

This laboratory course introduces the basic concepts and methods used in ecological research. The laboratories consist of both field and laboratory research projects, field trips, computer analyses, and an individual independent research project that is designed and carried out by each student. Students collect and analyze data, write up laboratory reports and a scientific paper on their independent research project, give an oral presentation on their independent research, and participate in laboratory discussions. The BIOLOGY 282 lab manual is required.

Advisory Prerequisite: BIOLOGY 162 or 163 or 171 & 172 & 173 or 195 & 173 AND concurrent or prior enrollment in BIOLOGY 281/ENVIRON 281.

BIOLOGY 282 — General Ecology Laboratory
Section 041, LAB

Instructor: Rathcke,Beverly J; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS

This laboratory course introduces the basic concepts and methods used in ecological research. The laboratories consist of both field and laboratory research projects, field trips, computer analyses, and an individual independent research project that is designed and carried out by each student. Students collect and analyze data, write up laboratory reports and a scientific paper on their independent research project, give an oral presentation on their independent research, and participate in laboratory discussions. The BIOLOGY 282 lab manual is required.

Advisory Prerequisite: BIOLOGY 162 or 163 or 171 & 172 & 173 or 195 & 173 AND concurrent or prior enrollment in BIOLOGY 281/ENVIRON 281.

BIOLOGY 305 — Genetics
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Tzfira,Tzvi

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS

Open to students concentrating in the natural sciences or intending to apply for graduate or professional study in basic or applied biology. This introduction to genetics includes the following sections: DNA and chromosomes; gene transmission in eukaryotes; linkage and recombination; genes and enzymes, the genetic code, and mutation; recombinant DNA, RFLP mapping, the Human Genome Project; gene regulation, transposons; population genetics; and quantitative genetics.

There are three hours of lecture each week and one discussion section directed by GSIs. The discussion sections expand on and review lecture material, and discuss problem assignments. Grading is based on three term exams and a final covering lectures, discussions, and reading assignments. Exams include new problems that test applications of basic concepts and genetic techniques. A practice problem set is available and is covered in discussion sections or the Genetics Study Center.

Textbook: Concepts of Genetics, Klug, W.S., M.R. Cummings, and C.A. Spencer. 8th edition. (Prentice Hall) ISBN: 0-13191-833-8

Enforced Prerequisites: BIOLOGY 162 or 163 or [171 and 172] or [195 and 173].

Advisory Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent enrollment in CHEM 210.

BIOLOGY 311 — Introductory Biochemistry
Section 001, PSI

Instructor: Balazovich,Kenneth J; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in BIOLOGY 310, BIOLCHEM 415, or CHEM 451.

Course meets one time only for the orientation meeting on September 4th. This course is taught by a self-paced, personalized system of instruction without scheduled lectures or discussion sections. Students interact, according to their own schedules, with undergraduate TAs. The student takes a written quiz for each of 12 units that is graded and evaluated by the TA. If mastery is attained, the student may proceed to the next unit. Grades are assigned according to the number of units successfully completed and performance on the midterm and final examinations. This system is designed to take into consideration different rates of individual learning as well as to eliminate competition among students. TAs are available approximately 50-60 hours per week in a central teaching facility.

Textbooks:
Lehninger Principles of Biochemistry, Cox, D.L., et al. 4th edition. (W.H. Freeman)
Absolute, Ultimate Guide to Lehninger Principles of Biochemistry, Osgood, M., et al. 4th edition. (W.H. Freeman)

Enforced Prerequisites: BIOLOGY 162 or 163 or [171 and 172] or [195 and 173] and CHEM 210.

Advisory Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent enrollment in CHEM 215

BIOLOGY 390 — Evolution
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Tucker,Priscilla K; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS

This lecture course covers the fundamentals of evolutionary biology with a focus on living organisms. It includes a historical survey of the development of evolutionary theory from ancient philosophers to the present, and critical examination of phylogenetic systematics, natural selection, population genetics, molecular evolution, micro evolution, and macro evolution. Weekly discussions will focus on primary literature.

Three exams will test students' knowledge of the lecture material. Writing assignments based on readings from the primary scientific literature will be required.

Textbook: Evolution, D.J. Futuyma. (Sinauer, 2005).

Advisory Prerequisite: BIOLOGY 162; prior or concurrent enrollment in BIOLOGY 305.

BIOLOGY 630 — Genetics Short Course
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Schwartz,Jessica; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Minicourse

Each semester the CMB Program offers a "Short Course" entitled Advanced Topics in Molecular Biology. The course is a mini-symposium composed of a series of 4-5 presentations over several weeks on a specific thematic topic. The topic and speakers are selected by CMB student volunteers. Leading investigators in the field are invited by students to visit the University as symposium speakers. These courses enable students to obtain intensive exposure to high-profile research areas, and to have opportunities to interact with the speakers in multiple contexts, including formal discussions, informal meals, chalk talks, and one-to-one meetings (particularly if they are hosting the speaker). Such interactions have helped some senior CMB students find excellent postdoctoral labs.

The sessions are open to the University community, and attract large audiences who attend for updates on state-of-the-art research.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

BIOLOGY 684 — Organogenesis of Complex Tissues
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: O'Shea,Kathy Sue; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 2

Two course modules are offered, one covering an aspect of stem cell biology (embryonic or adult stem cells) and the other focused on a specific organ system (development, maintenance, organ disease, artificial organs). Course content is different each year. Current module topics are listed at: http://www.med.umich.edu/cdb.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate Cell biology recommended, but not required. Graduate standing.

 
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