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LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Fall 2007, Dept = CAAS
 
Page 1 of 1, Results 1 — 38 of 38
Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
CAAS 103 — First Year Social Science Seminar
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Partridge,Damani James

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS
Other: FYSem

From the lynching advocated in D.W. Griffith's Birth of a Nation to the feminization of East Asian bodies in David Henry Hwang's M. Butterfly, to ethnographies of mail order brides and sex tourism, this course will examine the intimate links between race and sexuality. Through ethnography, film, literature and diverse histories, we will investigate how race gets sexualized and how sexualities get racialized through processes of globalization and in particular local and national settings.

This course will include midterm and final papers, as well as short weekly reading responses. Grades will be based on the quality of written work, on class participation, and on attendance.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

CAAS 103 — First Year Social Science Seminar
Section 002, SEM

Instructor: Young Jr,Alford A; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS
Other: FYSem

For most of the last half the twentieth century, scholars, journalists, and policy advocates have considered African American men to be in a state of crisis. This course provides a critical examination of works that aim to document and interpret that crisis. We will explore a range of arguments produced in the past thirty years that aim to define the state of Black masculinity and the social condition of African American men. These works will stimulate our effort to pose and answer questions about what, if anything, constitutes a condition of crisis for African American men and what needs to happen to and for them in order to improve their prospects in American society.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

CAAS 103 — First Year Social Science Seminar
Section 005, SEM
I, Too, Sing America: A Psychology of Race & Racism

Instructor: Behling,Charles F

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: RE, SS
Other: FYSem

Taking its title from the Langston Hughes poem, this seminar will explore psychological aspects of race, ethnicity, and other cultural differences in the United States. What are some of the opportunities and obstacles to our joining with Hughes in affirming, "They'll see how beautiful I am . . . I, too, sing America?" Topics include stereotyping, communication, cooperation, conflict, justice, and discrimination. What psychological theories address how individuals and groups might benefit most from life in pluralistic societies? What are some psychological dynamics of stereotyping? What are possible connections between various forms of discrimination, e.g. racism, sexism, homophobia, and anti-Semitism? (meets with CAAS 103.005)

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

CAAS 103 — First Year Social Science Seminar
Section 006, SEM
Justice For All? Difference & Oppression in U.S. Society

Instructor: Gurin,Patricia Y

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: RE, SS
Other: FYSem

How do issues of race, intergroup relations, and social group identity impact possibilities for building community in a democratic society? Students will explore issues of civic engagement and community building in a democratic society, taking into account issues of power and celebration, conflict and coalition, differences and common ground. This course is part of a larger program called FIGS (First-year Interest GroupS).

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

CAAS 104 — First Year Humanities Seminar
Section 001, SEM
Interracial America

Instructor: Briones,Matthew M

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: RE, HU
Other: FYSem

This course will examine the interaction between different racial groups in the U.S. from the 19th century to our present moment. Conventionally, such studies focus solely on the relationship between African Americans and whites, relying on the hackneyed Black-white paradigm of U.S. race relations. This seminar explodes that dichotomy, searching for a broader historical model, which includes yellow, brown, red, and ethnic white.

  • In other words, how did African Americans respond to the internment of Japanese Americans?
  • What made desegregation cases like Mendez v. Westminster important precedents in the run-up to Brown v. Board of Education?
  • What is a "model minority," and why did Asians inherit the mantle from Jews?
  • What is a "protest minority," and why were Blacks and Jews labeled as such during the Civil Rights Movement?
  • What is the relationship among Black Power, Yellow Power, the American Indian Movement, and Chicano Power, if any?

We will critically interrogate the history of contact that exists between and among these diverse "groups," and whether conflict or confluence dominates their interaction. If conflict, what factors have prevented meaningful alliances? If confluence, what roles have these groups played in collectively striving for a multiracial democracy?"

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

CAAS 108 — Introduction to African Art
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Doris,David T; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

Through the study of a selected group of African and African Diaspora cultures, we will investigate several pivotal issues and narratives that lie behind the surfaces of some extraordinary objects and practices. African people have their own stories to tell about these things, of course: stories of mythic power expressed as living form, stories of historical contact with other cultures, stories of struggle and redemption, stories of ordinary, everyday life. And over the past several centuries, we in the "West" also have had a decisive, often disturbing hand in the framing of African peoples, objects and stories. The coupled histories of colonialism and the slave trade, along with our inevitably distorted views and representations of what African people are and what they do, have affected Africa and its peoples to the core. When we look at and think critically about "African Art," then, we necessarily must look at and think critically about ourselves. Ultimately, the goal is to understand aspects of African cultures in the terms by which Africans understand them — to know African ideals and realities as they are shaped in word, sound, matter and movement. In this course we'll be taking a few steps towards that goal. In lectures and weekly discussion sections, in films, recorded sound, and perhaps even in live performance, we will examine objects and the many stories that surround them. Looking and listening closely, we will learn to see and to understand a wide range of African visual practices including architecture, textiles, body adornment, painting, graphic communication systems, photography, dance, ritual performance and, of course, sculpture — not only as these practices continue to unfold on the African continent, but also as they are transformed, and as they endure, in the African Diaspora.

II. V. 4

CAAS 111 — Introduction to Africa and Its Diaspora
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Whatley,Warren C; homepage
Instructor: Means Coleman,Robin Renee

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU, RE

CAAS 111 is a team-taught course that introduces students to the study of Africa and its Diaspora in the Americas, the West Indies, South America, and Europe. This course takes a multimedia, interdisciplinary approach to a range of historical, literary, artistic, religious, economic, and political questions crucial to the understanding of the experiences of people of African descent. Using maps, films, the visual arts, music, important historical texts, and short stories, the course will focus on four major themes:

  1. migration and the middle passage;
  2. slavery and resistance;
  3. segregation and freedom movements; and
  4. the arts and global Black consciousness.

This course is appropriate for both concentrators and non-concentrators. Concentrators should complete this course by the sophomore year.

Requirements The course will meet in a lecture and audio/film format twice a week, with one discussion section per week.

  1. Class and section attendance is an important part of the course. Students will be responsible for the assigned readings and for taking part in section discussions. (25%)
  2. A map quiz, sections (5%)
  3. A midterm in-class exam (short answer and identification questions) (25%)
  4. A 5-page essay (10%)
  5. A final exam (50% multiple choice, 50% short answer) (35%)

The essay and exams will be based on lectures, discussion sections, films, and readings.

Required texts:

  • Sundiata: An Epic of Old Mali, D. T. Niane, ed.
  • The Classic Slave Narratives, Henry Louis Gates, ed.
  • Africanisms in American Culture, Joseph E. Holloway, ed.
  • The Origins of American Slavery, Betty Wood
  • Classical Black Nationalism, Wilson J. Moses, ed.

Books are available for purchase at Shaman Drum Bookstore (313 South State St., 662-7407). The books are also on reserve, along with journal articles, at Course Reserves (Shapiro Library) and the CAAS Library (5511 Haven Hall). A course pack of additional required readings will be available for purchase at Kolossus (310 East Washington, 994-5400).

CAAS 246 — Africa to 1850
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Poteet,Ellen Spence

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS

This course will explore African pre-colonial history, from prehistory to 1850. The focus will be on the history of Ancient Egypt and the ancient kingdoms of the Nile and their relations with Black Africa; West Africa as a region; The rise of African kingdoms; African slavery and Saharan and Atlantic slave trade; the consequences of the Trans-Saharan trade relations in West Africa; the Atlantic Slave Trade, its organization, features and different impact on local African societies; The consequences of the growing relationship between Africa, Europe and the Americas on the continent societies and Oral traditions as documents for history writing and production.

CAAS 274 — Introduction to Afro-American Literature
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Gunning,Sandra R

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

This course provides a broad survey of African American and African Diasporic literature, from the 1700s to the present. Students will read poetry, fiction, autobiography, and essays by a range of authors, including Phillis Wheatley, Mary Seacole, Frederick Douglass, W.E.B. DuBois, Caryl Phillips, Edwidge Danticat, and Carroll Parrott Blue. The guiding questions for this course will be:

  • What does/should a Black literary tradition look like?
  • What has allowed or hindered its formation?
  • What has its impact been on "American" literature?
  • What kinds of assumptions are we as modern readers bringing to the texts?
  • How have these texts been shaped from both an aesthetic as well as a historical point of view?

Course requirement include short quizzes, midterm and final exams, and a formal paper (6-7 pages).

Advisory Prerequisite: CAAS 111.

CAAS 303 — Race and Ethnic Relations
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Chen,Anthony S

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS, RE

This course examines the central tensions underlying race and ethnic relations. Our focus is primarily on intergroup relations in America, though we will devote some attention to ethnic conflict beyond the borders of the United States. For more than sixty years, sociologists have preoccupied themselves with the study of intergroup relations, assimilation, and racial and ethnic conflict. Indeed these issues have grown more complex and nuanced as the United States becomes more racially and ethnically diverse. Our goal is to develop an appreciation for the social forces that facilitate or impede intergroup relations. We will devote attention to: (1) theoretical debates in the conceptualization and analysis of race and ethnicity (2) developing an historical understanding of the social and political meaning of race and ethnicity (3) understanding how various racial and ethnic groups construct and use their social identity.

Advisory Prerequisite: An introductory course in Sociology or CAAS; CAAS 201 recommended.

CAAS 305 — Histories of the Modern Caribbean
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Turits,Richard L

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Situated at the crossroads of African, European, Latin American, and United States history, the Caribbean has played a pivotal role in global transformations since 1492. The region's past illuminates many of the central contradictions of modernity: slavery and freedom, colonialism and independence, racial hierarchy and political equality, despotism and revolution, nationalism and transnationalism, and migration and creolization. This class will treat these themes that cut across the empires, nations, and cultures that have shaped the region. The course is not designed to provide a complete survey of the dozens of nations composing the Caribbean. Rather, focusing on the Greater Antilles — on Puerto Rico, Dominican Republic, Jamaica, and especially Haiti and Cuba — we will explore world historical themes in this region from the Haitian Revolution to the present. The class is structured around readings of history, fiction and film, active class discussion, and weekly papers on the assigned texts.

CAAS 330 — Urban and Community Studies I
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Ward,Stephen M

FA 2007
Credits: 4

This course is designed to help students develop historical perspectives and analytical frameworks that will guide them as they study and work in urban communities. Focusing on the collective experience of African Americans in the second half of the twentieth century, we will conduct an interdisciplinary investigation into the processes of community formation and social change impacting contemporary urban life. Course texts therefore include historical studies, urban sociology, social work, autobiography, ethnography, community studies, and film. We will begin with a review of the various meanings and uses of the idea of "community," moving next to a brief consideration of the historical development of American cities. Then we will explore the processes of African American migration and urbanization, including the exploration of specific urban areas and their dynamics of community formation. Finally, we will examine case studies of community organizing, leading us to consider broad questions concerning our understanding of contemporary urban communities, the challenges they face, and the prospects for engaged social action. Our guiding concern throughout the semester will be the relationship between universities and their surrounding communities — including the historical expressions, contemporary realities, and future prospects of this relationship.

CAAS 335 — African-American Religion Between Christianity and Islam
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Jackson,Sherman A; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

A study of African-American Religion, as a phenomenon that develops out of the experience of enslaved Africans in the Americas, and its dialectical relationship with the supertradition of Christianity, on the one hand, and Islam, on the other, studied diachronically from the 18th through the 20th centuries.

CAAS 338 — Literature in Afro-American Culture
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Awkward,Michael

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

This course is designed to examine the various ways in which literature and culture have interacted in the Afro-American experience of the New World. Shifting emphases shed light on a variety of issues: slave autobiography, frontier and colonial cultures, women's issues, and contemporary or popular narratives.

Advisory Prerequisite: CAAS 201

CAAS 358 — Topics in Black World Studies
Section 001, SEM
Homophobia in the Black World

Instructor: Haniff,Nesha Z

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course will entail an historical and ideological survey of the relationship between Islam and African Americans, from the earliest period of the transatlantic slave trade, through the antebellum and post-bellum periods in the Americas and the rise of the proto-Islamic movements in the early 20th century in the United States. From here we will look at the rise and dominance of Sunni (orthodox) Islam during second half of the 20th century, along with the continuing encounter and relationship between Black American and immigrant articulations of Islam. We will end with a review and analysis of the dialectical relationship between Islam and hip-hop, being guided by the question of what influence Islam has exerted on hip-hop, what influence hip-hop has had on Blackamerican Islam and what all of this bodes for the future of both. This will include a sampling of select works by Blackamerican Muslim hip-hop artists.

Texts:

  • M.A. Gomez, Black Crescent: The Experience and Legacy of African Muslims in the Americas.
  • S.A. Jackson, Islam and the Blackamerican: Looking Towards the Third Resurrection.
  • Course Packet: Available at AccuCopy

CAAS 358 — Topics in Black World Studies
Section 002, SEM

Instructor: Dillard,Angela Denise

FA 2007
Credits: 3

The international law of individual accountability for human rights atrocities, which emerged after World War II, has developed rapidly since the 1990s. A variety of mechanisms has been used to bring justice for atrocities committed by governments and others in a position of power against those under their control. These mechanisms include investigatory commissions such as the South African Truth and Reconciliation Commission; United Nation's ad hoc tribunals for trying perpetrators of human rights atrocities such as the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR); and a hybrid national-international court such as the special court for prosecuting atrocities in Sierra Leone. This course will focus on three transitional societies in Africa emerging from national nightmares and confronting their past: South Africa, Rwanda and Sierra Leone. Considering the political realities in each country, this course will explore the opportunities and limitations of the different forums, and the dilemmas they present for enforcement, for sovereignty, and for justice. Readings will be supplemented with documentary films documenting South Africa's quest for restorative justice, the uncovering of the truth, historical footage of Rwanda as a case study of the human rights challenge of the 21st century, and the story of a ten-year old boy who was forced to act as a young fighter with rebel forces in the jungles of Sierra Leone.

CAAS 358 — Topics in Black World Studies
Section 004, LEC
Detroit Politics and Community Organization

Instructor: Kurashige,Scott T; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

  • "How did Detroit get this way?"
  • "Why are the city and suburbs so divided?"
  • "What does it mean to revitalize Detroit?"
  • "Are sports stadiums and events the key to economic development?"
  • "Is gentrification a good or bad thing?"
  • These are some common questions that are frequently heard in relation to Detroit. Digging below the surface of popular discourse and disagreement, this course seeks to get at the roots of urban social, political and economic issues. It offers students an opportunity to gain an in-depth perspective on racism, poverty, political activism, and community organizing among diverse groups. First, we will study what historian Thomas Sugrue has called the "origins of the urban crisis." We will examine the effects of deindustrialization and racism in the post-World War II era alongside the emergence of protest movements which sought to promote social justice. Second, we will study the divergent ways that city and suburban politicians and residents interpret the "urban crisis," and we will critically analyze their response Third, we will probe the history of radicalism in Detroit and investigate the grassroots solutions to the "crisis" being enacted by community organizations.

    Designed to link the study of Detroit's past, present, and future, this interdisciplinary course should appeal to students in a variety of fields, including history, ethnic studies, urban studies, education, law, business, environmental justice and fine arts. There are no prerequisites or prequalifications. You may have lived in the city your entire life, or you might only know the Fox Theater, the Tigers and Xochimilco. Highly-motivated students may be offered opportunities to fulfill course requirements through community service-learning activities.

    CAAS 360 — Afro-American Art
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Lockard,John M

    FA 2007
    Credits: 3
    Reqs: HU

    This course:

    • introduces students to West African cultures and their relationships to Afro-American culture;
    • develops on a broad level an Afrocentric aesthetic point of view;
    • encourages greater insight and exploration into the arts of African and Afro-American people and the spirits and realities that motivate the 'arts,' and
    • creates a living vehicle for understanding and resolving problematic cultural patterns which disturb, confuse, and cancerize our historic and contemporary lives.

    Advisory Prerequisite: CAAS 201

    CAAS 390 — Homophobia in the Black World
    Section 001, SEM

    Instructor: Haniff,Nesha Z

    FA 2007
    Credits: 3

    This course will explore the presentation and meaning of homosexuality and homophobia in communities of color in the U.S., the Caribbean, and Africa. The cultural presentation and consequences of homophobia and discrimination vary greatly across these places. Therefore, an emphasis will be placed on understanding different social constructions of homosexuality and how these views are complicated by geographical region, race, gender, and social class.

    Intended audience: Upper-level students in Women's Studies, LGBTQ Studies, and CAAS.

    Course Requirements: Class participation and two 10-page papers.

    Class Format: Class meets three hours weekly in seminar format

    Advisory Prerequisite: One course in WOMENSTD or CAAS.

    CAAS 407 — Looking at African Things
    Section 001, SEM

    Instructor: Doris,David T; homepage

    FA 2007
    Credits: 3

    In southeastern Nigeria, an Igbo proverb tells us, "You can't view a performance standing in one place." In the West, however, our understanding of African visual culture has long been centered on the practice of exhibiting African objects out of their vital contexts — rendering them motionless, making them available to our consuming vision, mapping out onto them our own systems of value. Such a practice has unfolded especially in museums dedicated to the exhibition of objects categorized as "African Art." But it is not these objects alone that are made to represent "Africa" so problematically; in world's fairs, theme parks and other cultural expositions, living Africans too are transformed into things, into images of themselves. In this course, we will examine the history of how African objects have become "African Art": What are the terms by which African people describe the visual objects they create and use? What are the "exotic" terms that allow us to consider those objects within the canons of Art History? What is excluded from those canons, and why? And how are such strange and even violent transformations a metaphor for how African people have been transformed into objects?

    II. V. 4.

    Advisory Prerequisite: HISTART 108/CAAS 108

    CAAS 408 — African Economies: Social and Political Settings
    Section 001, SEM

    Instructor: Stein,Howard

    FA 2007
    Credits: 2 — 4

    The aim of this course is to provide an introduction to African development. The focus of the course is to understand the origin and nature of the developmental crisis in Africa along with the options available for reversing the economic malaise. The first part of the course will present and evaluate the challenges of African development with a focus on three issues debt and debt relief, health and development and conflict and crisis. The second will focus on a history of African development with an emphasis on understanding the legacy of the pre-colonial and colonial period. The third part of the course will aim at identifying the evolution of the crisis during the first two decades of independence. The final section offers a critical examination of the nature and impact of the World Bank/IMF-sponsored adjustment policies with a discussion of possible alternatives to adjustment.

    Advisory Prerequisite: CAAS 200

    CAAS 410 — Supervised Reading and Research
    Section 001, IND

    FA 2007
    Credits: 1 — 6
    Other: INDEPENDENT

    For students who can show appropriate preparation in courses previously taken, the Center for Afroamerican and African Studies offers course credit for independent study. A full-time faculty member must agree to supervise the undertaking and to meet with the student during the term. The proposed course of study may not duplicate the material of any course regularly offered by the Center. The reading and writing requirement should be comparable to that required in a regular course for the same number of credits; and all the work must be completed by the final day of class in the term. After consultation with and approval from a CAAS faculty member, applications for independent study along with statements describing the schedule of readings and of writing assignments must be filled out. Such applications must be signed by the faculty member involved and turned in before the end of the second week of the term. It is therefore advisable to submit applications (available in 200 West Hall) in advance of the beginning of the independent study term and, upon approval, a permission number will be issued.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

    CAAS 421 — Religions of the African Diaspora
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Johnson,Paul Christopher

    FA 2007
    Credits: 3

    This survey course offers an overview of the religions of the African Diaspora. Beginning with a theorization and genealogy of the concept of diaspora itself, the course provides introductions (both in historical context and contemporary manifestations) to the following: Brazilian Candomblé and Umbanda; Cuban Santería and Palo Monte; Haitian Vodou; Jamaican and globalized Rastafarianism; the ancestor religion of the Garifuna of Honduras, Guatemala and Belize; Obeah/ orisha practices of Trinidad; and the Afro-Baptist tradition and Pentecostal roots of the Black Church in the U.S. Key issues will include the way "Africa" is recreated in ritual practice, the experience of exile and transculturation, and common ritual tropes such as spirit possession, altars devoted to material exchange and sacrifice, performative codes of clothing and music, and many others.

    Intended audience: Upper-level undergrads and grad students

    Class Format: 3 hours/week in lecture format

    Course Requirements:Attendance; participation; short in-class presentations; critical reading reviews; midterm exam; final exam. Undergraduates will do weekly critical reading response/reflection papers of about 3 pages each, making a sum of around 40 pages during the term. They also write essays on midterm and final exams, in addition to doing an oral presentation. Grads will be required to do a research paper.

    CAAS 426 — Urban Redevelopment and Social Justice
    Section 001, REC

    Instructor: Chaffers,James A; homepage

    FA 2007
    Credits: 3

    A forum for exploring how our individual career pursuits might be collectively focused toward the achievement of common ideals.

    PEDAGOGIC STRUCTURE: Taught from the perspective of an urban scholar-architect, this course is organized around issues of Equity, Cosmology, Spirituality, Community, and Technology. These fluid points of departure are intended as guides for a spirited exploration of the explicit (and subtle) connections between people, land, and power in our cities and the specific effects of these linkages upon contemporary urban rebuilding. Intended primarily for students with non-architectural backgrounds, seminar explorations are aimed at providing a broadened philosophical understanding of the Who and Why of contemporary urban redevelopment policies — particularly as such policies impact on emerging back-to-the-city movements — here, and abroad. Building upon time-honored social intentions inherent in urban design and city planning practices, the seminar encourages each of us to gain a view of ourselves as vanguards and environmental stewards necessarily engaged in 'directed' change.

    CAAS 443 — Pedagogy of Empowerment: Activism in Race, Gender, and Health
    Section 001, SEM

    Instructor: Haniff,Nesha Z

    FA 2007
    Credits: 3

    The Pedagogy of Empowerment will explore race, gender, health and activism in the context of HIV/AIDS in United States Black communities. Through this two-tiered course, students will cultivate strong background knowledge of HIV in Black communities, and explore issues of accountability, apathy, and activism as they pertain to HIV prevention. The course will explore the multifaceted dimensions of the HIV/AIDS epidemic in Black communities including: its history and epidemiology; gendered dynamics of HIV prevention; intersectionality, HIV infection, and stigma; homophobia and the politics of inclusion and exclusion; and various community responses. Students will use what they learn about the context of the epidemic to critically analyze chosen HIV prevention interventions, and explore the intersection of academia and activism. All students will learn an HIV education module designed by Professor Nesha Haniff. As an exercise in praxis, each student will be required to use and experience this HIV prevention module in a community of her or his choice. There will be a new emphasis on microbicides — a subject that is critical to women's control over sexual safety. A part of the activism for this class is some level of involvement in advocacy for research and funding in this area. Advocacy in gyno-centered technologies is necessary in shifting the paradigm of condom use as the primary methodology in HIV prevention. This approach is detrimental for women's health and agency and leaves them the problematic of fighting a 21st-century epidemic with 18th- century technology, further women's sexual safety still resides in the hands of men who must make the decision to use a condom. This fact of HIV prevention is totally unacceptable for all women. It is time that women have in their hands methodologies that they can control to keep their own bodies safe. This will be a central theme in the pedagogy of empowerment.

    Advisory Prerequisite: WOMENSTD 240 or CAAS 201.

    CAAS 444 — Introduction to Caribbean Societies and Cultures, I
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Owusu,Maxwell K

    FA 2007
    Credits: 3

    This course provides an introduction to the peoples and cultures of the Caribbean. Topics covered include:

    • the historical origins of the social structure and social organization of contemporary Caribbean states;
    • family and kinship;
    • religion, race, class, ethnicity, and national identity;
    • Caribbean immigration; politics and policies of socioeconomic change.

    The course is open to both anthropology concentrators and non-concentrators.

    Films and videos on the Caribbean will be shown when available.

    Requirements: four 5-6 page or three 6-7 page typewritten papers, which ask students to review/synthesize reading and lecture materials; participation in class discussions; regular class attendance.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Junior standing or above

    CAAS 450 — Law, Race, and the Historical Process, I
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Woods,Ronald C

    FA 2007
    Credits: 3

    CAAS 450 is the first half of a two-course sequence on the constitutional and legal history of African Americans. It covers the phase of this history that begins with European exploration of the western hemisphere, and ends as we set the stage for the advent of the Modern Civil Rights movement. A unique backdrop for our work throughout the term will be the historical significance of the year 2005. This is, among other things, the 50th anniversary of two pivotal events in the history of the Modern Civil Rights Movement — the murder of 14 year old Emmett Till in Money Mississippi, and the beginning of the Montgomery Bus Boycott in Montgomery, Alabama. It is the 40th anniversary year of the passage of the monumental Voting Rights Act of 1965. If the events of 1955, along with the historic Brown decision of the year before, represented the opening salvo in the Modern Civil Rights Era, the Voting Rights Act of 1965, combined with the other legislative foundation posts initiated in that era, and was the practical policy steps taken to usher in an era of operational equality in American life.

    CAAS 450 will look, however, at the origins of this central challenge of the 20th and 21st centuries. That challenge, essentially is to resolve the "birth conflicts" present as the North American colonies and later the United States take shape. In looking at the how and why questions of law in the time period from 1400-1900, CAAS 450 will focus upon the conceptual underpinnings of the study of race and law in the U.S., the era of Constitutional formation, the dynamics of law in the antebellum period, the possibilities and limitations of law in Reconstruction and thereafter, and the halting nature of the quest for power and presence during the period of Jim Crow segregation.

    Two tests, final examination and writings analyses. Readings by Derrick Bell, Annette Gordon Reed, Thurgood Marshall, and others.

    CAAS 454 — African-American Culture
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Williams,Melvin D; homepage

    FA 2007
    Credits: 3

    This course examines the Afro-American as one example of how humans live. It places distinctive Black behavior within its social context and its history. It reminds of middle-class Jews in Nazi Germany who believed that success would make you full citizens. It ponders the great (although restricted) contributions that African Americans have made to white identity, the U.S. Nation and economy, fashion, youth rebellion, gay and women rights and entertainment. An understanding of African Americans enlightens the nature of systemic oppression and explains the anomalies of Native America, Jack Johnson, Paul Robeson, Joe Louis, Jackie Robinson, Tiger Woods, Michael Jordan, Venus Williams, W. Arthur Lewis, Toni Morrison, Ralph Bunche, E. Franklin Frazier and many others. This course looks at the future of African-Americans in a millennium in which the memory of their oppressions and reparations seem lost.

    Advisory Prerequisite: One introductory course in the social sciences. CAAS 201 recommended.

    CAAS 458 — Issues in Black World Studies
    Section 004, SEM

    Instructor: Stein,Howard

    FA 2007
    Credits: 3

    More than any other region sub-Saharan Africa has seen stagnation and even a marked deterioration in a wide variety of health indicators. Between 1990 and 2003, life expectancy at birth fell from 50 to 46 years with six countries falling into the 30s. Over the same period, we have seen a unprecedented integration of economies through foreign direct investment, financial flows, trade, information and technology along with an expansion in the power of global organizations like the World Bank, IMF and WTO. The course will investigate the two-way relationship globalization and African health. Topics will include globalization and informalization, urbanization and health, the influence of international property rights and access to pharmaceuticals, the impact of international trade on African incomes, the relationship between international debt, World Bank and IMF conditionality and the health of Africans, the impact of FDI on African livelihoods, the influence of commodity chains and global industries on Africa's standard of living, how the shifting global climate has affected rainfall patterns, agricultural production and the incidence of malnutrition and famine and finally the relationship between the health of Africans and new global diseases.

    CAAS 476 — Contemporary Afro-American Literature
    Section 001, REC

    FA 2007
    Credits: 3

    A study of literature written by Afro-Americans from World War II to the present. Wright, Yerby, Baldwin, Brooks, Hayden, Jones, Lee, and Cleaver are among the writers discussed.

    Advisory Prerequisite: CAAS 201 and permission of instructor.

    CAAS 478 — Ethnicity and Culture in Latin America
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Alberto,Paulina Laura

    FA 2007
    Credits: 3

    This course will explore texts that have helped to construct racial identities in Brazil from the late 19th century to the present. It will trace the ways that changing ideas of race — particularly regarding Brazilians of African descent — have shaped the terms of Brazilian national identity and citizenship. We will focus primarily on texts produced by Brazilians of African descent themselves — specifically, on the so-called "black press," newspapers written by and for African-descended Brazilians across Brazil in the 20th century. Students will work closely with articles from the black press (which will be available in digital form online), learning to place them in dialogue with a wider, more mainstream literature on race and national identity produced in the same period (broadly defined to include novels, short stories, essays, historiography, and song lyrics.) The course will be conducted in Portuguese, with readings in Portuguese and English; shorter writing assignments will be primarily in Portuguese, but students will have the option of completing the final paper in English. Prerequisites: students should be proficient in Portuguese (they should have completed, or placed out of, the Portuguese sequence through PORTUG 232), with particular emphasis on reading and speaking skills; completion of PORTUG 270 is suggested but not required.

    Advisory Prerequisite: CAAS 202

    CAAS 495 — Senior Seminar
    Section 002, SEM

    Instructor: Ward,Stephen M

    FA 2007
    Credits: 4
    Reqs: ULWR

    Despite their relatively small size, the neighboring nations of Haiti and Cuba have played disproportionately large roles in shaping world history. Each was the site of one of the world's most dramatic revolutions, variously inspiring, terrifying, and transforming the ideas of people around the globe. Indeed both the Haitian revolution (1791-1804) and the Cuban revolution (1959) embodied radical egalitarian dreams, probably the most radical in the history of the Americas, for eliminating class and race hierarchies. The Haitian revolution helped forge modern notions of freedom and equality and inaugurated a century-long process of abolition that dismantled the age-old institution of slavery around the world. And the 1959 Cuban revolution ended the island's capitalist economy and sought therein to eliminate racism. In the process of becoming the first and only socialist country in the Americas, Cuba also handed the U.S. one of its most embarrassing military defeats (at the Bay of Pigs in 1961). This course will treat the histories of Haiti and Cuba with a focus on their revolutions, their relations with the United States, and their overall significance within world history. In addition to examining these thematic concerns, the class will guide participants through completion of individual research papers, providing a collective workshop in which to develop one's research, bibliographic, and writing skills as well as one's ideas.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Upperclass standing.

    CAAS 495 — Senior Seminar
    Section 003, SEM

    Instructor: Taylor,Dorceta E; homepage

    FA 2007
    Credits: 4
    Reqs: ULWR

    Movement has been a central theme in African American history and culture. In this senior seminar, we will explore the meanings of travel — both domestic and international — in Black life and thought by investigating the visual and performing arts, sport, military service, politics, and literature.

    Given LSA's year long emphasis on citizenship, we will also examine how travel extends, emboldens, and complicates African American understandings and experiences of citizenship. Students will concentrate on honing writing skills while also developing competencies in visual and cultural analysis. To this end, students will produce several brief essays, one longer paper, and at least one graphic assignment that maps African American travel.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Upperclass standing.

    CAAS 510 — Supervised Research
    Section 001, IND

    FA 2007
    Credits: 1 — 6
    Other: INDEPENDENT

    Arrangements may be made for adequately prepared students to undertake individual study under the direction of a departmental staff member. Students are provided with the proper section number by the staff member with whom the work has been arranged.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor

    CAAS 558 — Seminar in Black World Studies
    Section 001, SEM

    Instructor: Awkward,Michael

    FA 2007
    Credits: 3

    An "interrogation of knowledge systems" approach to selected problem areas in the study of the Black experience in North America, Caribbean and Latin America, and in Africa. Specific area and issue are determined by instructor and indicated in the current Schedule of Classes.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permission of instructor.

    CAAS 558 — Seminar in Black World Studies
    Section 003, SEM

    Instructor: Gunning,Sandra R

    FA 2007
    Credits: 3

    This course will guide students in addressing the following questions: What do these related fields look like at the current moment, in terms of their intersection with feminist and gender studies, queer studies, cultural studies, and traditional literary studies? How did African-American and African diaspora literary studies become established in the first place? Has the resulting scholarship affected the way we study and teach traditional canons? As we continue to see the rising popularity of African diaspora studies, is the transnational really antithetical to the local? Last but not least, how (if at all) has identity politics shaped these fields, their methodologies, their canons, and our perceptions of who an African-Americanist ought to be? (Obviously this question has some bearing on the identity politics at play in so-called mainstream academia.) The course will be coordinated with visits of at least two scholars whose research will form part of our reading list.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permission of instructor.

    CAAS 629 — Studies in African History
    Section 001, REC
    Technology and Nature in Africa

    Instructor: Hecht,Gabrielle

    FA 2007
    Credits: 3

    Over the last two centuries, the African continent has been explicitly portrayed as a continent without technology. These portrayals reflect not only politics and cultures of colonial domination, but also politics and cultures of technology. In challenging assertions about the absence of "technology" in "Africa," this course explores ways in which African histories have been shaped by and through technological activities and conceptions of nature. We will pay special attention to technopolitical geographies, sometimes focusing on tightly circumscribed geographical regions, and other times situating localities in larger regional, national, continental, or global networks. We will explore the nature and meaning of technological knowledge, particularly as that knowledge involves the manipulation of nature (e.g., through agriculture, land management, transportation, mining, etc.). We will discuss the ways in which technologies mediate, represent, or perform power (for example, by focusing on the instruments of mobility, manipulations of human bodies, the deployment of expertise, and of course violence). We shall examine the role of technological infrastructures and technical experts in creating and sustaining networks, and also discuss what happened when those networks — or the technologies they involved, or the natural orders they organized — broke down.

    The course focuses mainly on the colonial and postcolonial periods, but includes some precolonial material. It proceeds thematically rather than chronologically. Readings are drawn primarily from the disciplines of history, anthropology, and geography. A typical week will require 250-350 pages of reading and a 2-3 page response paper. Twice per semester, students will do additional reading in order to present a literature review relevant to the theme under discussion; this will be accompanied by a formal book review. Students will also write a final paper (which will consist of a bilbiographic essay, a fellowship proposal, or a dissertation prospectus).

    CAAS 687 — Studies in Black History
    Section 001, REC

    Instructor: Scott III,Julius S

    FA 2007
    Credits: 2 — 3

    The life of Blacks in America and their impact upon American society from colonial time to the present. Focus is on such topics as the origins of slavery in America, the effects of slavery on Black personality and culture, Black nationalism, and the current movement for civil rights. Students will have the option of taking this course either as a studies course or as a seminar. Students in the studies course will also spend time identifying and analyzing a variety of key primary sources from a specific period (topics vary be term) of African American history. Students electing the seminar option will spend the academic term preparing original research papers related in some way to African history.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing; seniors with permission of instructor.

     
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