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LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Fall 2007, Dept = CLARCH
 
Page 1 of 1, Results 1 — 16 of 16
Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
CLARCH 221 — Introduction to Greek Archaeology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Herbert,Sharon C

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

The Ancient Greeks are always with us, in high places and low, from the halls of our democratic institutions to the pages of the Sports Illustrated swimsuit edition. How can we explain their ubiquitous presence in our lives? Why won't they go away? This course explores the art and archaeology of ancient Greece, beginning in the Bronze Age (the famous Minoan and Mycenaean civilizations) through to Hellenistic times (the age of Alexander the Great). We will explore all aspects of Greek life as reflected in the materials they left behind, objects that range from mighty marble temples such as the Parthenon, to discarded drinking vessels from their parties, from cities to theaters, from houses to palaces. Such artistic and archaeological evidence allows us to consider how Greek society worked, and how they understood the relations of humans and gods, men and women, Greeks and barbarians. Having taken this course, you will understand far better just why they Greeks are so hard to forget.

CLARCH 323 — Introduction to Field Archaeology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Terrenato,Nicola

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

Archaeology is an endlessly fascinating subject for the specialists and the general public alike. For many, it calls to mind treasure hunts, exotic locales and perhaps even alien civilizations, but the real magic of archaeology is that it allows the reconstruction of ancient behaviors on the basis of the material traces they produced. Ordinary people like you and me lived complex lives in the past, and the only way for us to find out what they were up to is to look very carefully at the ‘footprints' they left behind when they farmed, built, traveled and died. The course covers the major archaeological field methods, from excavation and survey to dating with carbon isotopes and tree-rings. Examples drawn from all around the world are used to illustrate what archaeologists do and how they sometimes discover ancient lifeways thanks to the faintest traces and the most puzzling clues.

CLARCH 340 — Archaeology of Ancient Housing
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Nevett,Lisa C

FA 2007
Credits: 3

All of us have a home, whether it consists of a whole house or a single room, and most of us have strong views about how our home should be furnished and decorated. We all know that entering into someone else's house can reveal much about his or her character. In the same way, studying the physical remains of domestic buildings — including their decoration and furnishings — reveals much about the behaviour and character of the ancient Greeks and Romans.

The course will tackle a series of topics, starting with the emergence of private housing in the Greek Dark Ages (tenth and ninth centuries B.C.) and moving forward in time through the Classical and Hellenistic periods, looking at housing from sites such as Athens, Olynthos and Vergina. Questions raised will include how and why the organisation and decoration of houses changed so dramatically over a relatively short time, and what the remains of houses tell us about broader issues such as the character of the Greek economy and the nature of social relationships. We will then move on to compare the Greek ‘core' with the ‘diaspora' areas, using the evidence from sites such as Himera in Sicily and Euesperides (Benghazi) in Libya. The second half of the course will cover households in various areas of the Roman world, starting in Italy itself with Rome, Pompeii, Herculaneum, and Ostia, and moving outwards to look at contrasting groups of evidence from some of the provinces, including North African settlements (such as Dougga, Bulla Regia, Volubilis, Timgad and especially, the Michigan excavations at Karanis in Egypt) and the Greek East (Ephesos, Doura Europos, Antioch). Questions raised will include the extent to which it is possible to talk about a standardised ‘Roman house' and the degree to which housing in different areas provides evidence for the continuity of indigenous cultural traditions.

CLARCH 436 — Hellenistic and Roman Architecture
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Ratte,Christopher John

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course surveys the art and archaeology of Greece and the Greek-speaking world in the Roman period. From the time of Alexander the Great in the 4th century B.C.E. to the Arab conquests of the 7th century C.E., the dominant civic culture of the entire eastern Mediterranean region extending from Greece proper through Asia Minor, Syria, the Lebanon, Palestine, and Egypt as far as Libya was Greek. The complex relations between the indigenous cultures of these regions and their Greek and Roman conquerors will form the major subject of the course; it will focus on the evidence of architecture and architectural decoration, and on the evolution of urban form. Special topics of investigation will include: the Romanization of Greek civic architecture in early imperial Asia Minor; material evidence for the history of Judaism in the Roman empire, and for the spread of Christianity; the various and changing meanings of Greek mythological images in media ranging from floor mosaics to funerary sculpture; the archaeological excavations sponsored by the University of Michigan at Karanis in Egypt and the evidence they recovered for daily life in the Roman period; the complex relationship between Roman imperial portraiture and local self-representation; and the foundation and urban development of Constantinople.

Advisory Prerequisite: Upperclass standing, and HISTART 101 or CLARCH 221/HISTART 221 or CLARCH 222/HISTART 222.

CLARCH 440 — Cities and Sanctuaries of Classical Greece
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Nevett,Lisa C

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: WorldLit

In the ancient Greek world cities and religious sanctuaries formed two complementary and interdependent types of built environment, each with its own characteristic function, architecture and layout.

  • But how did these distinctive architectural complexes arise, and how did they change through time and space?
  • What were their characteristic roles?
  • How can we detect those roles in the buildings and layouts of individual sites?
  • And to what extent did major political and cultural changes, such as the introduction of democracy, shape the various structures and the sites on which they stood?

In this course we address these questions and evaluate some of the answers (both ancient and modern) which have previously been offered, by looking in detail at the evidence from a variety of sites, including sanctuaries such as Delphi, Olympia and Samos, and cities such as Athens, Megara Hyblaia and Priene. We cover a wide geographical area, stretching from the Greek communities of southern Italy in the west, through Greece itself, to the eastern Greek settlements on the west coast of modern Turkey. We also span a long period of time, from the ninth and eighth centuries BCE, down to the third century BCE. The aim of the course is to enable students with some prior experience of Greek art and archaeology (for example through CLARCH/HISTART 221 and/or CLARCH/HISTART 384) to explore in more depth some of the cultural, social and political factors influencing the architectural form and spatial organisation of sites and structures in the Greek world during this period.

Advisory Prerequisite: Upperclass standing, and a course in archaeology.

CLARCH 495 — Senior Honors Research
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 3
Other: Honors, Indpnt Study

Work on the senior Honors thesis in Classical Archaeology, under the supervision of a faculty advisor. It provides students with an appropriately designated course in which to undertake research, consultation, and writing necessary for the successful completion of the Senior Honors theses.

Advisory Prerequisite: Upperclass standing

CLARCH 496 — Practicum in Museum Studies
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 3
Other: Honors, Expr

Allows student to acquire technical and research skills in the field of museum studies.

Advisory Prerequisite: Junior or seniors, or permission of instructor.

CLARCH 497 — Practicum in Field Archaeology
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 3
Other: Honors, Expr

Allows student to acquire technical and research skills in the practice of field archaeology.

Advisory Prerequisite: Junior or seniors.

CLARCH 499 — Supervised Reading
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 3
Other: INDEPENDENT

Regular reports and conferences required.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

CLARCH 599 — Supervised Study in Classical Archaeology
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: INDEPENDENT

Regular reports and conferences required.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

CLARCH 600 — Proseminar in Classical Archaeology
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Gazda,Elaine K

FA 2007
Credits: 1

In order to nurture common and complementary intellectual interests within the broad field of Classical Archaeology, and to introduce students to the resources of the University and faculty members both within and outside IPCAA, IPCAA offers a Proseminar each Fall semester. This is a required course, for one credit, for every incoming student (even those with a Master's degree from another institution). The Proseminar is organized by the IPCAA Director, but is team-taught by faculty from all of the departments participating in the Program.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

CLARCH 841 — Topography of Rome
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Terrenato,Nicola

FA 2007
Credits: 3

The course deals with the development of settlement in Rome from its origins to the 5th century AD, within the context of contemporary urban developments in Italy. The students are exposed to the basic methodologies that allow the combination of textual and visual sources with the archaeological evidence. A series of case-studies, from the archaic Sacra Via to the Temple of Divus Augustus will provide opportunities to discuss controversial problems and different approaches to their solution. Reading knowledge of Italian is necessary.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

CLARCH 855 — Problems in Roman Archaeology
Section 001, SEM
Cities of Asia Minor in Late Antiquity

Instructor: Ratte,Christopher John

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Greek speaking Asia Minor was one of the most prosperous and extensively urbanized regions of the Roman empire.? This seminar examines the archaeological evidence for the civic culture of this region from the 3rd through the 7th centuries A.D.? This period is bracketed by invasions by Gothic raiders in the mid-3rd century A.D., and by the near-total abandonment of urban settlements in rural areas in the early 7th century A.D.? Its central event is the foundation of Constantinople in A.D. 324, and the subsequent growth of Constantine?s city as the new center of the Roman world.

Special topics of investigation will include: imperial patronage of urban building projects, especially fortifications; the early development of eastern church architecture, culminating in the Haghia Sophia; late Roman civic and imperial portrait sculpture; domestic architecture and interior decoration, and the changing role of private space in public life; relations between town and countryside; and the reasons for the collapse of urban life outside Constantinople in the early 7th century A.D.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

CLARCH 990 — Dissertation/Precandidate
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 8

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Advisory Prerequisite: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing.

CLARCH 993 — Graduate Student Instructor Training Program
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 1

A seminar for all beginning graduate student instructors, consisting of a two day orientation before the term starts and periodic workshops/meetings during the Fall Term. Beginning graduate student instructors are required to register for this class.

Advisory Prerequisite: Must have GSI award. Graduate standing.

CLARCH 995 — Dissertation/Candidate
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 8

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Enforced Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate

 
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