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LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Fall 2007, Dept = CLCIV
 
Page 1 of 1, Results 1 — 9 of 9
Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
CLCIV 101 — Classical Civilization I: The Ancient Greek World (in English)
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Acosta-Hughes,Benjamin B

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR
Other: WorldLit

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GTBOOKS 191 or 201.

How did the Greeks come to invent the first democracy?
Why did the freedom-loving Greeks condone slavery?
Why was the god Dionysus so important to Greek culture

This course is an introduction to the history and culture of this fascinating but paradoxical civilization. We will laugh with the ancient comedians and think with the ancient philosophers. We will also confront the contradictions of this complex society. There will be approximately 75-100 pages of reading per week, two short projects (for example, a presentation and a short paper), a midterm and a final examination. No previous knowledge is required.

Advisory Prerequisite: FR./SO./PER.

CLCIV 120 — First-year Seminar in Classical Civilization (Humanities)
Section 001, SEM
Law and Society in Greek and Roman Egypt

Instructor: Verhoogt,Arthur Mfw

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem, WorldLit

Tens of thousands of papyri from Egypt provide an intimate view of daily life in Egypt during the Greek and Roman periods. Many of these documents are legal and detail transactions and agreements of actual people. In this class we are going to read legal documents in translation and discuss the contents and the legal practices (Egyptian, Hellenistic, Roman) we see at work in them, and the social realities lying behind them.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

CLCIV 120 — First-year Seminar in Classical Civilization (Humanities)
Section 003, SEM
Food and Society in the Ancient Roman City

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem, WorldLit

What did Romans think about when eating dormice rolled in honey and sesame seeds? What was the cultural place and significance of food in ancient Roman society? This course will examine ancient Roman texts on food and cooking such as Petronius' Satyricon, Apicius' cookbooks, the satires of Horace, Persius and Juvenal and Seneca's Apocolocyntosis as literature and as cultural artifacts. Contemporary readings on food and culture will provide a theoretical framework for our analyses. The seminar will also include a workshop session on cooking Roman recipes from Apicius.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

CLCIV 350 — Topics in Classical Civilization
Section 001, LEC
Love and Affection in the Ancient World

Instructor: Caston,Ruth Rothaus

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

This course will focus on the representation of love and affection in Greece and Rome, both between lovers and among the members of a household. We will look at literary sources, artistic depictions, and philosophical arguments (both for and against), as well as historical source material. Major themes include the vocabulary of love and its symptoms (especially pain and pleasure); love as madness; love within and outside of marriage; the object of desire; the importance of vision; and familial bonds of affection. Throughout the course we will pay close attention to differences in ancient traditions, periods and genres, not to mention the preconceptions and obsessions we ourselves bring to the discussion.

Three short papers; final exam

Readings will be drawn from:

  • Cupid and Psyche
  • Plato, Symposium and Phaedo
  • Euripides, Mede
  • Peter Bing and Rip Cohen, Games of Venus. An Anthology of Greek and Roman Erotic Verse from Sappho to Ovid
  • Apollonius of Rhodes, Argonautica
  • Plautus, Menaechmi
  • Terence, Adelphoe
  • Vergil, Aeneid
  • Jo-Ann Shelton, As the Romans Did
  • Longus, Daphnis and Chloe

Advisory Prerequisite: CLCIV 101 and 102

CLCIV 372 — Sports and Daily Life in Ancient Rome
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Potter,David S

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

The amphitheater full of gladiators, the circus full of chariots (with or without Charleton Heston) are among the most abiding images of Roman, and perhaps, any western culture. The Olympic Games were as much a Roman institution as they were Greek — indeed the Roman empire was the first great age of public entertainment. But what did it all mean? How is entertainment related to the interests of society as a whole? These are two of the questions that we will explore through a discussion of the place of Roman entertainment in Roman society. We will start by looking at the broad structures of Roman life, and then move through the diverse entertainments of the Romans from athletic events to the theater, from chariot racing to public execution, beast hunts, and gladiators. Readings include selections from ancient authors and from recent scholarship.

CLCIV 388 — History of Philosophy: Ancient
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Caston,Victor; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

Western philosophy from its historical beginning through the Hellenistic period and including the Pre-Socratics, Sophists, Plato, Aristotle, Epicurus, Stoicism, and Scepticism.

Advisory Prerequisite: One philosophy introduction. A knowledge of Greek or Latin is not required.

CLCIV 464 — The Ancient Epic
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Scodel,Ruth S

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR
Other: WorldLit

Epic was the most ambitious, grand, culturally prized form of literature in antiquity. This course will look at ancient epics individually and at epic as a genre. The central questions will be why epic was once so important, but is no longer possible-and why, when we can no longer imagine writing epics, we still read them and can be deeply moved by them. (The instructor uses the Iliad as a guide to life; she realizes that this is odd, but hopes students will come to see how this could happen). The focus will be on the most canonical classical epics: Iliad, Odyssey, Apolloniu's Argonautica, Vergil's Aeneid, and Lucan's Pharsalia. We will consider performance, characterization, narrative method, ideology, and relation to the tradition. Each student will also choose a selection from another ancient or modern epic to read for comparison. For one paper, students will read secondary literature, but otherwise the emphasis will be on the poems themselves. The writing component will try to develop the ability to write in various formats and with varying amounts of opportunity for revision, since so much real-world writing is done under pressure. So besides two relatively short formal papers that will be revised and resubmitted, there will be in-class writing and short assignments meant to be done quickly.

CLCIV 495 — Senior Honors Research
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 3
Other: Honors, Indpnt Study, WorldLit

Work on the senior Honors thesis in Classical Civilization, under the supervision of a faculty advisor. It provides students with an appropriately designated course in which to undertake research, consultation, and writing necessary for the successful completion of the Senior Honors theses.

Advisory Prerequisite: Upperclass standing

CLCIV 499 — Supervised Reading
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 3
Other: INDEPENDENT, WorldLit

Undergraduate supervised reading in Classical Civilization.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor.

 
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