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LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Fall 2007, Dept = COMPLIT
 
Page 1 of 1, Results 1 — 23 of 23
Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
COMPLIT 122 — Writing World Literatures
Section 001, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

An intensive writing course focusing on multiple translations of works, asking students to consider how these translation reflect different cultural times and milieu as well as choices in language. Students work intensely with issues of composition, argument, and source material related to the creative texts.

COMPLIT 122 — Writing World Literatures
Section 002, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

An intensive writing course focusing on multiple translations of works, asking students to consider how these translation reflect different cultural times and milieu as well as choices in language. Students work intensely with issues of composition, argument, and source material related to the creative texts.

COMPLIT 122 — Writing World Literatures
Section 003, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

An intensive writing course focusing on multiple translations of works, asking students to consider how these translation reflect different cultural times and milieu as well as choices in language. Students work intensely with issues of composition, argument, and source material related to the creative texts.

COMPLIT 122 — Writing World Literatures
Section 004, REC

Instructor: Merrill,Christi Ann; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

An intensive writing course focusing on multiple translations of works, asking students to consider how these translation reflect different cultural times and milieu as well as choices in language. Students work intensely with issues of composition, argument, and source material related to the creative texts.

COMPLIT 140 — First-Year Literary Seminar
Section 001, SEM
Women Writers and Classical Myth

Instructor: Prins,Johanna H; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem

Over the last century, why have women writers returned to Greek and Roman mythology as a source of inspiration? How do they rewrite the gendered plots of particular myths in order to engender new meanings? This seminar will consider revisions of Classical myth in various literary genres (including fiction, poetry, and drama) written by various women (including Mary Renault, H.D., Christa Wolf, Marguerite Yourcenar, Rita Dove, and Anne Carson).

Students will develop skills in critical analysis of literature, by writing a series of short essays and also creating their own version of a Classical myth.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

COMPLIT 240 — Introduction to Comparative Literature
Section 001, LEC
A Mystery to Me: The Puzzle, Desire, and Meaning

Instructor: Brown,Catherine; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

The stories we will read in this class are woven of mysteries and enigmas. They want very much to answer questions of life and death (what went wrong? who done it? why?), but often pose more questions than they answer. Some of our questions, then: What makes a detective? What does she or he want? What does it mean to solve a problem? How do we know when it's completely solved? We will explore these questions, working under the hypothesis that asking questions is as important as answering them. Readings will be drawn across genres, time, and cultures, from ancient Greece to the present in New York and Martinique.

COMPLIT 280 — America and Its Others
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Ramirez-Christensen,E

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

The seminar will examine the world's briefest known poem, the haiku.

  • How does this 17-syllable, 3-line poem signify?
  • What assumptions about the nature of language and meaning lie behind its composition and interpretation?
  • What social milieu produced it?
  • What is its link to Zen practice and other Zen arts?

Readings will be from the poetry and critical commentaries of the master Bashô and his disciples, with later poets such as Buson and Issa, as well as haiga (haiku paintings), providing opportunities for comparative study. The Western understanding of haiku in the Imagist movement, Ezra Pound, the beat generation, and Barthe's Empire of Signs will also be examined. Secondary sources are available in English, but given the brevity of the poems, analysis of some Japanese texts and their various English renditions will often be possible.

Requirements: 4 short papers, a 36-verse haikai linked sequence by the class, and individual English haiku compositions through the academic term.

COMPLIT 340 — Travels to Greece
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Leontis,Artemis S

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

What inspires people to travel? What is the allure of Greece, and what happens to expectations once people reach this popular destination? Why do people take to the road in the first place, abandoning the comforts of home and routine? This course explores travels to Greece: visits to islands, mountains, villages, ancient sites as they are described in travel narratives. It leads readers from the Ionian Islands to Sparta and Attica, on to Northern Greece and the Aegean, conjuring up the history and mythology, civilization and wildness, heat and beauty that have lured writers from Homer to Byron, Flaubert to Freud, Mark Twain to Henry Miller, Virginia Woolf to Patricia Storace. It raises questions about the relations of travelers to the worlds they encounter but also the interior world they sometimes set out to discover. Films, novels, short stories, diaries, essays, letters, poems, paintings, drawings, photographs, and the Internet are rich sources of exploration.

COMPLIT 372 — Literature and Identity
Section 001, SEM
Home and Homelessness in Israel and Palestine

Instructor: Tsoffar,Ruth; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

This course explores the emergence of literary works in relation to identity, tracing how literary and human kind relate and how this relation changes.

COMPLIT 376 — Literature and Ideas
Section 001, SEM
Freud, Kinship and Law

Instructor: Masuzawa,Tomoko

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

The principal goal of this graduate seminar is two-fold: first, to acquire sufficiently broad familiarity with Freud's corpus by reading some representative texts spanning the forty years of his psychoanalytic publishing career; secondly, to explore the question of the origin of law/kinship/social organization — a favorite topic of his time, in which he was himself deeply engrossed — specifically in relation to his work, as well as some of the works that inspired his, or concurrent with his, and those inspired by his ruminations.

Course requirements:

Short paper: on a topic to be discussed at the first meeting, due end of September

Term paper: due toward the end of term

Seminar presentation

Readings may include:

Sigmund Freud, The Interpretation of Dreams

Three Essays on the Theory of Sexuality

From the History of an Infantile Neurosis (Wolf-Man case)

Psychoanalytic Notes Upon an Autobiographical Account of a Case of Paranoia (Schreber case)

Totem and Taboo

Moses and Monotheism

G. E. Lessing, Nathan the Wise

Numa Denis Fustel de Coulange, Ancient City

W. Robertson Smith, Kinship and Marriage in Early Arabia

The Religion of the Semites

Carl Schmitt, Political Theology: Four Chapters on the Concept of Sovereignty

Carl Schmitt, The Concept of the Political

Peter Goodrich, Oedipus Lex: Psychoanalysis, History, Law (1995)

Alice Kuzniar, Melancholia's Dog: Reflections on Our Animal Kinship (2006)

Eric Santner, My Own Private Germany: Daniel Paul Schreber's Secret History of Modernity (1996)

Marc Shell, The End of Kinship: ‘Measure for Measure,' Incest, and the Ideal of Universal Siblinghood (1995)

COMPLIT 382 — Literature and the Other Arts
Section 001, SEM
Greek Myth in Film

Instructor: Lambropoulos,Vassilios; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

Cinema has often tried to depict the Greek gods, heroines, and lands in the same terms as the ancients talked about them. But it has also often tried to update them and bring them closer to our own reality. What happens when films adapt Greek tales to modern times? When Medea, Antigone, and Electra appear in South Africa, Poland, or Tunisia? When Orpheus, Ulysses, and Oedipus suffer in the American South, Yugoslavia, or Italy? This course will examine the uses of Greek myth in movies that remove the stories from their original setting and take them to different lands and times. The goal of the course is to examine the mutually reinforcing overlap between myth, literature, and cinema. The movies will have neither ancient columns nor mythical monsters but they will show how fate can still turn us all into wandering, questioning Greeks. Requirements: class participation, short class presentation, midterm, final.

COMPLIT 384 — Literature and Other Disciplines
Section 001, SEM
Literature, Art and Anthropology in Modern Europe

Instructor: Clej,Alina M

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

In this course we will explore the relation between literature, art, and anthropology in Europe, during the second half of the 19th century and the first half of the 20th century. While Western Europe claimed a civilizing role and an indisputable supremacy over less developed countries in Africa and Asia, in order to better justify its expansionist goals, many European writers and artists fell under the spell of the "primitive Other," which they viewed as a source of spiritual enrichment in a (European) culture increasingly devoid of spirituality. This is the case of many Impressionist artists and Symbolist writers and painters in Fin-de-Siècle Europe. Ethnographic travel and discoveries also played a significant role on the development of the avant-garde and of modernist movements, including Dada, Surrealism, and Négritude.

Readings will include ethnographic texts by contemporary ethnographers, such as Malinowski, Lévi-Bruhl, Frobenius, Mauss, and Lévi-Strauss, and more recent perspectives in anthropology represented by Clifford Geertz, James Clifford, and Victor Turner. Literary and visual materials (including film) will be drawn from various 20th century artistic movements.

Evaluation will be based on a midterm paper, and a final essay, a presentation on a self-designed topic, and participation in class. Students from all disciplines are welcome.

Other departments: Art History, Anthropology

Advisory Prerequisite: One course in literary studies.

COMPLIT 492 — Comparative Literary Theory
Section 001, SEM
Intro to Theory & Criticism Introduction to Theory and Criticism

Instructor: Shammas,Anton; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

An advanced introduction to comparative studies in literary theory.

Advisory Prerequisite: Junior standing.

COMPLIT 495 — Senior Seminar in Comparative Literature
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Dufallo,Basil J

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course will introduce students to the theoretical issues surrounding the relationship between verbal and visual art by concentrating on Greco-Roman antiquity and a specific era from neoclassical modernity (probably the English Gothic or 20th-century American neoclassicism). Course material would include major theoretical texts (e.g. Lessing, Krieger, Mitchell), literary examples of ecphrasis (description of art objects), and visual images.

Advisory Prerequisite: Senior standing and concentration in Comparative Literature.

COMPLIT 496 — Honors Thesis
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Honors, Indpnt Study

In the Honors Thesis course the Honors student typically develops the seminar work done in Comparative Literature 495 (Senior Seminar) into a longer, more thorough study under the auspices of a faculty thesis director. Students who need help in arranging for a thesis director should contact the Comparative Literature office, 2015 Tisch Hall, 763-2351.

Advisory Prerequisite: COMPLIT 495 and Honors concentration in Comparative Literature. Permission of instructor.

COMPLIT 498 — Directed Reading
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: INDEPENDENT

This course is intended for Comparative Literature concentrators. It offers a student the opportunity to work closely with a faculty member associated with Comparative Literature on a comparative topic chosen by the student in consultation with the professor. Together they will develop a reading list; establish goals, meeting times, and credit hours (within the range); and plan papers and projects which the student will execute with the tutorial assistance of the instructor. The student will be required to submit a written proposal of his or her course to the Program office. For further information, contact the Program in Comparative Literature, 2015 Tisch.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

COMPLIT 600 — Topics in Theory
Section 001, SEM
Close Reading

Instructor: Lambropoulos,Vassilios; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Is close reading good for you? For those close to you? For the text? For the field? For the country? For emancipation? For capital?

This course will examine a wide variety of 20th-century critical approaches based on meticulous, thorough reading like those collected in Close Reading: The Reader by Frank Lentricchia and Andrew DuBois. Reading will be broadly understood as a technique applied to non-textual artifacts and phenomena as well but it will be studied primarily in the domain of literature. The emphasis will be on questions of method (how we approach), discourse (which language we speak), and ideology (what we believe). In addition to the skills and rules of close reading, the course will consider critiques which reject it as philosophically inadequate and politically suspect.

Students will be encouraged to bring to class their own interpretive projects and reflect on the practices informing them. Short weekly assignments based on the readings, no term paper.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

COMPLIT 698 — Directed Reading in Comparative Literature
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 4

Designed for individual students who have an interest in a specific topic (usually that has stemmed from a previous course). An individual instructor must agree to direct such a reading, and the requirements are specified when approval is granted.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

COMPLIT 760 — Seminar in Literature and the Other Arts
Section 001, SEM
The Matter of Aesthetics

Instructor: Porter,James I; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 2 — 3

This seminar will explore the materiality of art and aesthetics, as distinct from form and formalism (though we will entertain the idea of the materiality of form). The coverage will range from ancient to modern and especially contemporary thought, with an equally wide sampling of media and media-specific theories: texts, visual and sound objects, and mixed media that co-involve the senses, e.g., performance art.

Readings will be drawn from the Presocratics (esp. Xenophanes), who coined the philosophical notion of matter, Plato and Aristotle (sel.), who resisted it, (briefly) Baumgarten, who coined modern aesthetics, Hegel (on sculpture), Delacroix and Baudelaire, who thought about pigment, lines, and surfaces, Pater (sel.), A. Riegel on post-classical and Byzantine aesthetics, Dewey (Art as Experience), who founded modern pragmatist aesthetics, Wm. James (Essays in Radical Empiricism, sel.), Shklovsky (essays), a sensualist wrongly labeled a formalist, Merleau-Ponty (sel.), M. Douglas on matter as disgrace and defilement, F. Jameson (sel.), S. Heath (sel.), J. McGann on textual materialism, J. Rancière, (The Division of the Sensible and The Flesh of Words, sel.), S. Stewart (Poetry and the Fate of the Senses, sel.), G. Bruns (The Material of Poetry), Laura Marks (Touch), Rei Terada (essays), Daniel Heller-Roazen (The Inner Touch: An Archaeology of Sensation), plus excerpts from poets, Homer and Pindar to the L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E poets, etc., though we won't limit ourselves to texts, as part of the pleasure of materialism is its confrontation with matter in all its forms. I'd like to examine some visual art: Cycladic sculpture, Greek vases, modern painting, screen arts.

The final shape of the class will depend on input from students, who will be asked to contribute two class presentations (one short, one on a research project) and a final seminar paper of article length.

No language requirements. Students from all fields are welcome.

Inquiries and suggestions to jport@umich.edu.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

COMPLIT 780 — Seminar: Studies in Form and Genre
Section 001, SEM
Turning to the Everyday

Instructor: Chambers,L Ross

FA 2007
Credits: 2 — 3

To celebrate the publication of The Flowers of Evil (Baudelaire) and Madame Bovary (Flaubert) 150 years ago, this course investigates what it means, in a literary context, to "turn to the everyday" as Baudelaire and Flaubert so effectively did. Don't expect answers, only questions. For example: what is the everyday, given that we can't attend to it without infringing its most salient characteristic, which is that it is so familiar as to pass unnoticed? Or: what does noticing the everyday have to do with the experience of modernity? Or again: what are the implications of the fact that to attend to the everyday is to become involved in a problematics of genre? This last question will be our main focus. For not only does the kind of knowledge that is literary knowledge differ from the kind of knowledge that is philosophical (or sociological, or historical…), but also within the literary field "novelistic" knowledge constitutes a different form of attention from, say, "poetic" or "essayistic" modes of attending. Furthermore, all these kinds of knowledge and forms of attention are constantly prescriptive human interaction, and subject to the effects of habitus.

By reading some intriguing texts together, we will approach these and other questions obliquely. We will match Baudelaire with some modern American poets, Flaubert with later novelists and perhaps short-story writers; go back to Baudelaire as an essayist and relate his writing to that of Roland Barthes and Meaghan Morris; and look at some genres that have emerged as a result of attention to the everyday (Perec and the inventory, Maspero and the travel-without-leaving-home narrative). A knowledge of French will be useful; but we will make use of translations wherever feasible. Participants in the seminar will be encouraged to draw on their own knowledge-store and experience of the everyday. Expect to make at least one in-class presentation and to write a term-paper (which may be scholarly, or literary, or of course both).

Books to buy (tentative) Nicholson Baker, The Mezzanine; Mark Doty, Atlantis; Gustave Flaubert, Madame Bovary; Francois Maspero, Roissy Express; Frank O'Hara, Lunch Poems Coursepack: (Barthes, "Incidents"; Baudelaire, prose poems and "The Painter of Modern Life"; Morris, "Things to Do With Shopping Centres," etc.) For preliminary or background reading: E. Auerbach, Mimesis R. Chambers, Loiterature M. de Certeau, The Practice of Everyday Life H. Lefebure, Critique of Everyday Life, 2 vols; The Production of Space M. Sheringham, Everyday Life Etc.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

COMPLIT 790 — Seminar in Literary Theory
Section 001, SEM
Deleuze and Guattari

Instructor: Colás,Santiago; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 2 — 3

In this course, we will undertake a close study of the collaborative works of the late French philosopher Gilles Deleuze and the late French analyst and activist Felix Guattari: the two volumes of _Capitalism and Schizophrenia_ (Anti-Oedipus, and A Thousand Plateaus), as well as _Kafka: Towards a Minor Literature_ and their last work together, _What is Philosophy?_. Deleuze and Guattari's work has been highly influential for a number of disciplines in the humanities and social sciences. Like other such work, however, it has suffered from reductive over-simplifications, both pro and con. The purpose of the seminar is to give participants the opportunity for close, first-hand study of these important thinkers. In addition to the required primary works listed above, students will be given short supplementary texts by Deleuze or Guattari (interviews and short essays).

Students will be required carefully to read all required primary materials, to lead at least one of the seminar discussions on the reading for that week, and to present, in a small group with others, one outside work on Deleuze and Guattari to the other participants. The major emphasis of the course, however, will be carefully reading, thinking about, and discussing the four primary texts listed above.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

COMPLIT 990 — Dissertation/Precandidate
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 8

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Advisory Prerequisite: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing.

COMPLIT 995 — Dissertation/Candidate
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 8

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Enforced Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate

 
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