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LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Fall 2007, Dept = ECON
 
Page 1 of 1, Results 1 — 81 of 81
Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
ECON 101 — Principles of Economics I
Section 100, LEC

Instructor: Gerson,Janet

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS, QR/2

ECON 101 examines the microeconomics of capitalism — the behavior of households and businesses, the generation of prices and outputs in markets, and applications to public policy. Specific topics in ECON 101 include: supply and demand; the differences between competition and monopoly; environmental problems and policies; labor markets; and international trade. ECON 101 is the first part of the two-term introduction to economics — the second part (ECON 102, for which ECON 101 is a prerequisite) examines macroeconomics. Prerequisites for ECON 101: high school algebra and geometry and a willingness to use them.

Midterm exams for this class are given in the evening (outside regular class time) from 8-10 PM on Wed Oct 10, Wed Nov 7, and Tues Dec 11.

Textbooks:

  • Taylor's Principles of Microeconomics
  • Miller's Economics of Public Issues

Advisory Prerequisite: High school algebra and geometry.

ECON 101 — Principles of Economics I
Section 200, LEC

Instructor: Malone,Paula A; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS, QR/2

ECON 101 examines the microeconomics of capitalism — the behavior of households and businesses, the generation of prices and outputs in markets, and applications to public policy. Specific topics in ECON 101 include: supply and demand; the differences between competition and monopoly; environmental problems and policies; labor markets; and international trade. ECON 101 is the first part of the two-term introduction to economics — the second part (ECON 102, for which ECON 101 is a prerequisite) examines macroeconomics. Prerequisites for ECON 101: high school algebra and geometry and a willingness to use them.

Midterm exams for this class are given in the evening (outside regular class time) from 8-10 PM on Wed Oct 10, Wed Nov 7, and Tues Dec 11.

Textbooks:

  • Taylor's Principles of Microeconomics
  • Miller's Economics of Public Issues

Advisory Prerequisite: High school algebra and geometry.

ECON 101 — Principles of Economics I
Section 300, LEC

Instructor: Sedo,Stanley Anthony; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS, QR/2

ECON 101 examines the microeconomics of capitalism — the behavior of households and businesses, the generation of prices and outputs in markets, and applications to public policy. Specific topics in ECON 101 include: supply and demand; the differences between competition and monopoly; environmental problems and policies; labor markets; and international trade. ECON 101 is the first part of the two-term introduction to economics — the second part (ECON 102, for which ECON 101 is a prerequisite) examines macroeconomics. Prerequisites for ECON 101: high school algebra and geometry and a willingness to use them.

Midterm exams for this class are given in the evening (outside regular class time) from 8-10 PM on Mon Oct 8, Mon Nov 5, and Mon Dec 10.

Textbooks:

  • Taylor's Principles of Microeconomics
  • Miller's Economics of Public Issues

Advisory Prerequisite: High school algebra and geometry.

ECON 102 — Principles of Economics II
Section 100, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS, QR/2

ECON 101 and 102 are required as prerequisites to the concentration and to upper-level courses in Economics.

In ECON 102, the fundamental concepts and theories of macroeconomics are developed and used to analyze problems of current interest. Major topics include the determinants of aggregate output, employment and unemployment, inflation, the balance of international trade, and economic growth. The course format consists of three hours of lecture per week (Section 100) by the professor and a one and a half hour section meeting (Sections 101-111) led each week by a graduate student instructor. The section meetings are limited to 35 students. Contact Undergraduate Office, Dept. of Economics, 240 Lorch Hall.

The midterm exams for this class are in the evening (outside regular class time) from 8-10 PM on Thurs Oct 11 and Thurs Nov 15.

For textbook information, please visit the ECON Textbook Information Website. Information will be posted for each class as soon as it is available.

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON 101

ECON 102 — Principles of Economics II
Section 200, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS, QR/2

ECON 101 and 102 are required as prerequisites to the concentration and to upper-level courses in Economics.

In ECON 102, the fundamental concepts and theories of macroeconomics are developed and used to analyze problems of current interest. Major topics include the determinants of aggregate output, employment and unemployment, inflation, the balance of international trade, and economic growth. The course format consists of three hours of lecture per week (Section 200) by the professor and a one and a half hour section meeting (Sections 201-211) led each week by a graduate student instructor. The section meetings are limited to 35 students. Contact Undergraduate Office, Dept. of Economics, 240 Lorch Hall.

The midterm exams for this class are given in the evenings (outside regular class time) from 8-10 PM on Thurs Oct 11 and Thurs Nov 15.

For textbook information, please visit the ECON Textbook Information Website. Information will be posted for each class as soon as it is available.

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON 101

ECON 108 — Introductory Microeconomics Workshop
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Gerson,Janet

FA 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: SS
Other: Honors

Course meets weekly for discussion of current Wall Street Journal articles related to the week's ECON 101 topics, stressing the use and application of the microeconomics tools being learned in ECON 101.

Students will select a topic, open the discussion on their week's topic, keep a journal throughout the term on their topic and summarize their findings at the end of the term in a brief (2 page max) paper. This paper and journal will be turned in at the end of the term.

Workshop attendance is mandatory, and each student will be required to subscribe to the Wall Street Journal for the term. Evaluation of students will be entirely on the basis of their paper, journal, and attendance.

Students in ECON 108 MUST BE enrolled in ECON 101. Please contact Jan Gerson if you are interested in enrolling for ECON 108.

For textbook information, please visit the ECON Textbook Information Website. Information will be posted for each class as soon as it is available.

Advisory Prerequisite: First-year standing and concurrent enrollment in ECON 101.

ECON 108 — Introductory Microeconomics Workshop
Section 002, LEC

Instructor: Gerson,Janet

FA 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: SS
Other: Honors

This section of ECON 108 focuses on economic analysis through service-learning. Service-learning is a teaching-learning process that involves students in the community for both service and learning reasons. The service this academic term will be at one of a number of local agencies where you will serve in capacities that are negotiated with the staff there. The learning will focus on observation and analysis at the service agency. As you serve in the agency, you will observe and actively analyze incentives, decision-making and the costs and benefits of the agency.

ECON 108 meets weekly for discussion. Written assignments include keeping a structured journal and an end-of-term paper summarizing your observations and analysis.

Students in ECON 108 MUST BE enrolled in ECON 101. Please contact Jan Gerson if you are interested in enrolling for ECON 108.

For textbook information, please visit the ECON Textbook Information Website. Information will be posted for each class as soon as it is available.

Advisory Prerequisite: First-year standing and concurrent enrollment in ECON 101.

ECON 299 — Undergraduate Internship
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Expr

Credit is granted for a full-time internship of at least eight weeks that enriches a student's academic experience and/or allows a student to explore careers related to his/her academic studies. Verification of the internship (after completion) must be provided by the student on company letterhead. Internship applications can be downloaded from the Economics homepage or obtained from the Economics Office. A student normally enrolls for Econ 299 during the Fall Term, after satisfactory completion of the summer internship.

Advisory Prerequisite: Economics concentrators, with permission of concentration advisor; application required.

ECON 299 — Undergraduate Internship
Section 036, IND

Instructor: Malone,Paula A; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Expr

ECON 299 allows economics concentrators to receive credit (1 credit only) for a full-time internship of at least 8 weeks or equivalent (at least 320 hours) in part-time work in an approved job or internship position that enriches the student's academic experience and/or allows the student to explore careers related to his/her academic studies. To receive the credit, students must obtain approval for the proposed job or internship experience from an economics concentration advisor and must submit a letter on company letterhead from the job or internship supervisor confirming the satisfactory completion of the work described in the internship application.

ECON 299 MAY NOT be used to satisfy economics elective credits for an economics concentration. Internship credit is offered mandatory credit/no credit.

ECON 299 is available only for declared economics concentrators with permission of an Economics Concentration Advisor. http://www.econ.lsa.umich.edu/uofm/content/econ/document/internship.html

Advisory Prerequisite: Economics concentrators, with permission of concentration advisor; application required.

ECON 299 — Undergraduate Internship
Section 059, IND

Instructor: Wolfe,Janet C

FA 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Expr

ECON 299 allows economics concentrators to receive credit (1 credit only) for a full-time internship of at least 8 weeks or equivalent (at least 320 hours) in part-time work in an approved job or internship position that enriches the student's academic experience and/or allows the student to explore careers related to his/her academic studies. To receive the credit, students must obtain approval for the proposed job or internship experience from an economics concentration advisor and must submit a letter on company letterhead from the job or internship supervisor confirming the satisfactory completion of the work described in the internship application.

ECON 299 MAY NOT be used to satisfy economics elective credits for an economics concentration. Internship credit is offered mandatory credit/no credit.

ECON 299 is available only for declared economics concentrators with permission of an Economics Concentration Advisor. http://www.econ.lsa.umich.edu/uofm/content/econ/document/internship.html

Advisory Prerequisite: Economics concentrators, with permission of concentration advisor; application required.

ECON 299 — Undergraduate Internship
Section 087, IND

Instructor: Gerson,Janet

FA 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Expr

ECON 299 allows economics concentrators to receive credit (1 credit only) for a full-time internship of at least 8 weeks or equivalent (at least 320 hours) in part-time work in an approved job or internship position that enriches the student's academic experience and/or allows the student to explore careers related to his/her academic studies. To receive the credit, students must obtain approval for the proposed job or internship experience from an economics concentration advisor and must submit a letter on company letterhead from the job or internship supervisor confirming the satisfactory completion of the work described in the internship application.

ECON 299 MAY NOT be used to satisfy economics elective credits for an economics concentration. Internship credit is offered mandatory credit/no credit.

ECON 299 is available only for declared economics concentrators with permission of an Economics Concentration Advisor. http://www.econ.lsa.umich.edu/uofm/content/econ/document/internship.html

Advisory Prerequisite: Economics concentrators, with permission of concentration advisor; application required.

ECON 310 — Money and Banking
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Hogan,Chad Augustine

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS

The role of money, banking, and finance in the economy. At the macroeconomic level, we study how monetary policy influences interest rates, prices, and overall economic activity.

For textbook information, please visit the ECON Textbook Information Website. Information will be posted for each class as soon as it is available.

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON 101 and 102.

ECON 320 — Survey of Labor Economics
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS

Overview of the economics of labor markets and income distribution (topics covered more intensively in ECON 421 and 422).

For textbook information, please visit the ECON Textbook Information Website. Information will be posted for each class as soon as it is available.

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON 101 and 102.

ECON 330 — American Industries
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Adams,William J; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS

Big business in the United States today. Considerable attention is devoted to specific industries, such as petroleum, beer, prescription medicines, electricity, and air transport. Emphasis is placed on establishing the linkages between market structure, public policy, business behavior, and economic performance. Students should plan to participate actively in lecture as well as section meetings.

For textbook information, please visit the ECON Textbook Information Website. Information will be posted for each class as soon as it is available.

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON 101 and 102.

ECON 340 — International Economics
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Deardorff,Alan V; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS

The course provides a general overview of international economics.

Topics covered include: the reasons for and the effects of international trade; trade policies such as tariffs, quotas, and voluntary export restraints; trade arrangements and institutions such as the NAFTA and WTO; determination of exchange rates; the role of the international economy in influencing national income, unemployment, and inflation; and international constraints on macroeconomic policy. Emphasis is on concepts, ideas and institutions, rather than on rigorous analysis.

Course grade is based on two midterm exams and a final exam only. Students also are expected to stay abreast of international economic news by reading the Wall Street Journal or other news source, and the course includes weekly class discussions of the current international economic news.

For textbook information, please visit the ECON Textbook Information Website. Information will be posted for each class as soon as it is available.

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON 101 and 102.

ECON 395 — Topics in Economics and Economic Policy
Section 001, LEC
Topics in Risk and Uncertainty

Instructor: Hogan,Chad Augustine

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course aims to introduce students to economic models of decision making under uncertainty. We will begin with an introduction to utility theory, and then develop the expected utility hypothesis. We will review some of the classical criticisms of the expected utility hypothesis, and review of the recent alternative models that have been popularized in the behavioral economics literature. We will devote the remainder of the term to a range of market applications of expected utility theory, with special attention paid to insurance markets and asset markets.

For textbook information, please visit the ECON Textbook Information Website. Information will be posted for each class as soon as it is available.

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON 101 and 102.

ECON 395 — Topics in Economics and Economic Policy
Section 002, LEC
Growth Inflation and Depression

Instructor: Barsky,Robert B; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 1

During the last quarter century, America has woken up to the fact that we have waste problems. As a result, waste of all kinds has become heavily regulated. In this course, the entire waste-scape is viewed — mining waste, agricultural waste, packaging waste, household trash collection, landfills, incinerators, litter, mandatory deposits (on beverage containers and on hazardous wastes), interstate and international waste trade, recycling (lots on this), composting, toxic waste, Superfund, low-level radioactive waste, and spent nuclear fuel. This one-credit course will examine how federal, state, and local governments have undertaken the regulation of waste and what the effects of regulation have been on economic efficiency, health, and the environment. There are three prerequisites:

  1. ECON 101;
  2. an interest in learning how to analyze economic policy issues, especially those concerned with waste, its creators, and its handlers; and
  3. a willingness to recall and use algebra, graphs, and the other tools of analysis that you studied in the introductory microeconomics course.

Each class (except, of course, the first) will begin with a short quiz to ensure your attendance and careful prior reading of that day's assignment (265 pages total, some 38 pages per class). Following the quiz, since the textbook is the lecture, each class will be entirely discussion. The course grade will be: 2/3 the average of the quiz grades (and there will be no early, late, or make-up quizzes); and 1/3 the grade on a cumulative take-home exam, which requires an essay of four double-spaced typed pages, produced during the final week of the course. The textbook ('The Economics of Waste' published by Resources for the Future Press 2002) is in the UM libraries, so prospective enrollees can see what they are getting into. New copies cost $28, but used copies are available locally.

Note the course times carefully (Tuesdays and Thursdays, 4:10-5:30 PM, 6-29 January only). Priority will be given to sophomores and juniors.

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON 101 and 102.

ECON 398 — Strategy
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Ozdenoren,Emre; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in ECON 409 or RCSSCI/SOC 222.

This course is an introduction to the science of strategic thinking. Basics of non-cooperative game theory will be covered, and applied to a variety of topics. These topics may include collective action problems; situations involving adverse selection, signaling or moral hazard; strategic voting; auctions and bidding behavior; bargaining; and competitive markets.

For textbook information, please visit the ECON Textbook Information Website. Information will be posted for each class as soon as it is available.

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON 101.

ECON 401 — Intermediate Microeconomic Theory
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, QR/1

A systematic study of the role of the price system in organizing economic activity and an evaluation of its effectiveness. Analytical tools are developed and applied to the activities of the household, the firm, and to their interactions in the market under varying degrees of competition.

The Midterm Exams for this class are held in the evenings (outside regular class time) from 8-10 PM on Thursday Oct 4 and Thursday November 8.

For textbook information, please visit the ECON Textbook Information Website. Information will be posted for each class as soon as it is available.

Enforced Prerequisites: MATH 115, 116, 121, 156, 175, 176, 185, 186, 215, 295, or 296; with C or better

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON 101 and 102

ECON 402 — Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, QR/1

This course in macroeconomics deals with the determination of broad economic aggregates such as national income, employment, the price level, and the balance of payments in both the short run and the long run. Rigorous analysis is used to understand the forces that determine these economic variables, and how they are affected by public policies.

ECON 402 is predominantly a lecture course, with grades based on hour test(s), written exercises, and final exam. ECON 402 is a prerequisite for many other courses offered in Economics. Concentrators in Economics are required to elect this course and are encouraged to complete it early in their concentration program. It is strongly recommended that students take ECON 401 before ECON 402.

For textbook information, please visit the ECON Textbook Information Website. Information will be posted for each class as soon as it is available.

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON 101 and 102, and MATH 115. It is strongly recommended that students take ECON 401 before 402.

ECON 404 — Statistics for Economists
Section 100, LEC

Instructor: Sedo,Stanley Anthony; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in ECON 405 or STATS 265, 311, 350, 400, 405, or 412.

This course is designed to equip students to read empirical literature in economics and other social sciences. Topics include tabular and regression analysis and emphasize multiple regression.

For textbook information, please visit the ECON Textbook Information Website. Information will be posted for each class as soon as it is available.

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON 101 and 102 and MATH 115

ECON 405 — Introduction to Statistics
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Davis,Lucas William

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in IOE 265, STATS 265, 400, or 412. Students with credit for ECON 404 can only elect STATS 405/ECON 405 for 2 credits and must have permission of instructor.

This course is designed for economics concentrators but is sufficiently general to serve non-economics concentrators as well. The emphasis is on understanding rather than on "cookbook" applications. Students are expected to know basic algebra and basic calculus. Since the course emphasizes the foundations of statistical inference, it is recommended that after finishing the course students elect ECON 406 or a similar course in the Statistics department to gain experience with applications and computational methods.

This course is designed for quantitatively oriented students who are comfortable with abstract concepts and mathematical techniques. Students who prefer a broader, less rigorous approach to statistics should elect ECON 404. Evaluation of students in the course is based on examinations and homework assignments. There are three hours of lectures and one hour of discussion per week. ECON 405 is a prerequisite for ECON 406 (Econometrics).

Principles of statistical inference, including: probability, experimental and theoretic derivation of sampling distributions, hypothesis testing, estimation, and simple regression.

Advisory Prerequisite: MATH 116. Jrs/Srs may elect 405 concurrently with ECON 101 or 102. No credit granted if completed or enrolled in IOE 265, STATS 265, 400, or 412. Students with credit for ECON 404 can only elect 405 for 2 credits and must have permission of instructor.

ECON 406 — Introduction to Econometrics
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Lee,Yoonseok

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS

This course, a continuation of ECON 405, is intended to prepare students to conduct empirical research in economics. The classical linear regression model is developed with special emphasis on the basic assumptions of the model, economic situations in which the assumptions are violated, and alternative estimation procedures that are appropriate in these cases. Computer exercises are used to introduce students to special problems encountered in the analysis of economic data.

For textbook information, please visit the ECON Textbook Information Website. Information will be posted for each class as soon as it is available.

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON 405 or STATS 426.

ECON 408 — Philosophy and Economics
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Thompson,Frank W; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

Questions in and about economics that are of philosophical interest arise in at least three areas. First, there are questions about the scientific status of economics. E.g., if economic models are literally false representations of reality, how can they aid understanding?

Second, there are puzzles arising within economic theory, especially concerning the notion of rationality. E.g., why model economic agents as homo economicus if such a being would be a 'rational fool'? And third, there are matters concerning the relation between economics and normative questions of economic policy. E.g., what would be an optimal savings rate in very long run? Such questions are conceptually challenging and there is no consensus on answers. This course explores a selection of such questions.

For textbook information, please visit the ECON Textbook Information Website. Information will be posted for each class as soon as it is available.

Enforced Prerequisites: ECON 401 with a C- or better

ECON 409 — Game Theory
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Nakajima,Daisuke

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS

This course provides a rigorous introduction of game theory, which is the most important analytical tool in economics and other fields of social science. You will study how to analyze strategic situations (games), which can be static or dynamic and which may involve incomplete information, along with many examples such as oligopolistic markets, monetary policies, bargaining, repeated games, auctions, signaling in a labor market, reputation formations and so on.

MATH 217 is not at all needed to take this course. However, students should be familiar with basic calculus and logics. Knowledge of basic probabilities is helpful. The first one or two discussion sections will be devoted to reviewing these topics.

For textbook information, please visit the ECON Textbook Information Website. Information will be posted for each class as soon as it is available.

Enforced Prerequisites: ECON 401 with a C- or better

Advisory Prerequisite: MATH 217.

ECON 412 — Topics in Macroeconomics
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Barsky,Robert B; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This is an advanced course in applied macroeconomics and monetary theory. It involves theoretical and empirical analysis of such phenomena as depression, inflation, stagflation, stock market fluctuations, and productivity slowdowns. Probably topics include the Great Depression, the German hyperinflation, the stagflation of the 1970s, stabilization of inflation, gold and bimetallic standards, macroeconomic determinants of stock price fluctuations, growth and development, consumer confidence, and macroeconomic implications of oil price changes.

For textbook information, please visit the ECON Textbook Information Website. Information will be posted for each class as soon as it is available.

Enforced Prerequisites: ECON 402 with a grade of at least C-; or Graduate standing

ECON 421 — Labor Economics I
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Analysis of the determination of the levels and distribution of skills, wages, employment, and income in a market economy. Applications of the theories of consumer choice, production, and investment in human capital to a wide range of real-world problems.

For textbook information, please visit the ECON Textbook Information Website. Information will be posted for each class as soon as it is available.

Enforced Prerequisites: ECON 401 with a grade of at least C-; or Graduate standing

ECON 422 — The Structure of Labor Markets
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Brown,Charles C; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Emphasis on institutional complications of labor markets such as trade unionism and discrimination. Intensive investigation of impact of policies concerning collective bargaining, equal opportunity, and unemployment.

For textbook information, please visit the ECON Textbook Information Website. Information will be posted for each class as soon as it is available.

Enforced Prerequisites: ECON 401 with a grade of at least C-; or Graduate standing

ECON 431 — Industrial Organization and Performance
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Theory and empirical evidence on the causes and effects of market power, especially in industrial markets. The focus on the relations between market structure and performance as a guide to policy formation.

Enforced Prerequisites: ECON 401 with a grade of at least C-; or Graduate standing

ECON 435 — Financial Economics
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Chabot,Benjamin Remy; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4

The financial economics course provides the student with an examination of a wide array of financial instruments and institutions in today's global marketplace. Students who take this course will develop an understanding of the numerous money-market and capital market instruments and rates, the determinants of equity and bond values, and the workings of various financial markets. Financial derivatives, specifically futures and options, are introduced, and their relationship to portfolio management and hedging strategy is analyzed.

The course introduces the Capital Asset Pricing Model, Markowitz diversification, duration and bond portfolio management, and the Black-Scholes option-pricing model. As part of the coursework, you will apply the concepts presented in class and investigate the fundamental components that determine the value of major U.S. corporations.

Text: Capital Markets: Institutions and Instruments, 2nd ed., Fabozzi & Modigliani.

Enforced Prerequisites: ECON 401 (C- or better) or Graduate

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON 404 or 405

ECON 441 — International Trade Theory
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course deals with international trade theory and trade policy. It addresses why countries trade with one another, how trade policy works, and what role international institutions such as the WTO play in the global trading system. Think of this course as Globalization in Theory and in Practice.

Enforced Prerequisites: ECON 401 with a grade of at least C-; or Graduate standing

ECON 442 — International Finance
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Zhang,Jing

FA 2007
Credits: 4

The subject of International Economics, which analyses open economies (interacting with the rest of the world) is divided traditionally in two parts. International Trade deals with flows of goods and services among countries. On the other hand, International Finance, our subject, deals with flows of capital. We will start with introducing gains from participating international trade and financial markets. Next we will study the foreign exchange market, which is the biggest financial market, dwarfing any other market by any measure. We will apply no arbitrage ideas to derive parity conditions for exchange rates. We will next turn our attention to the Euromarkets, futures, options and swaps and focus on the pricing of these new financial products. Finally, we will study developments in international portfolios and the measurement and management of risk in international financial positions.

After taking this class you should be able to fully understand what is at stake in the debates surrounding International Finance issues. You will have a framework for understanding the evolution of exchange rates, currency crises, etc. Also if you interview for a job related to International Finance, you should appear to be aware of important issues and equipped with a good grasp of the pertinent tools.

Enforced Prerequisites: ECON 402 with a grade of at least C-; or Graduate standing

ECON 453 — The European Economy
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Adams,William J; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4

The structure, function, and performance of the European economy since World War II. Emphasis is placed on description and analysis of European economic integration. Topics include the origins and institutions of the European Community, creation of the customs union, unification of the internal market, implementation of common policies for agriculture and competition, monetary union, geographic enlargement, and progress toward social Europe. Students should be prepared to participate frequently in class discussions. Students who miss the first two days of class without permission will be dropped automatically from the course.

Enforced Prerequisites: ECON 401 with a grade of at least C-; or graduate standing

ECON 461 — The Economics of Development I
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in ECON 360.

This course surveys contemporary economic thinking as to why some countries are poor and others are rich, and how underdeveloped economies function. The course has four topics: the macroeconomic accumulation of capital, labour, and technology; the co-ordination of production processes; the role of political and legal conventions in determining income levels; and the operation of formal and informal financial markets in developing countries

Enforced Prerequisites: ECON 401 with a grade of at least C-; or Graduate standing

ECON 466 — Economics of Population
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Lam,David A; homepage
Instructor: Bailey,Martha J

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

This course uses an economic perspective to analyze the dramatic changes in fertility, mortality, marriage, and household structure in recent decades in both industrialized and developing countries. The course includes a computer lab component built around statistical analysis of household survey data. Students will use the statistical package Stata to analyze demographic and economic change in South Africa, Brazil, the United States, and other countries, applying recent innovations in the application of microeconomic theory and econometrics to the analysis of demographic behavior, labor markets, poverty, and inequality. Topics include: economics of fertility and marriage; economic and demographic analysis of population growth; intergenerational transmission of income inequality; impact of changing age structure on social security systems. Coursework includes: computer-based problem sets and writing exercises; a paper based on computer analysis of household survey data; written midterm and final examinations. Given the emphasis on statistical analysis in the course, ECON 404 or 405 are strongly recommended.

Enforced Prerequisites: ECON 401 with a grade of at least C-; or Graduate standing

ECON 471 — Environmental Economics
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Helfand,Gloria E; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

From an economic perspective, environmental problems arise due to the inability or inadequacy of markets to address environmental goods. This course examines the sources of these market failures, methods to correct them (especially pollution control policies), and methods for valuing nonmarketed environmental goods. It uses the modeling tools of ECON 401, and it also draws on examples from the economics literature.

Enforced Prerequisites: ECON 401 with a grade of at least C- or Graduate standing

Advisory Prerequisite: NRE 570

ECON 481 — Government Expenditures
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Silverman,Daniel Susman; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in ECON 380.

Normative theory of public expenditures, expenditure decision-making processes, historical trends and determinants of government expenditures, benefit-cost analysis and other techniques of program evaluation, and intergovernmental fiscal relations.

Enforced Prerequisites: ECON 401 with a grade of at least C-; or Graduate standing

ECON 490 — Current Topics in Economics
Section 001, LEC
Experimental Economics

Instructor: Rigdon,Mary Lisa; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Experimental Economics is an area of economic inquiry that investigates economic phenomena and tests economic theories by conducting controlled experiments. These experiments are usually conducted in laboratories under controlled conditions, but can also be conducted in the field. This course is designed to give students a background in the subject and to expose students to new and ongoing experimental research. Topics will include behavioral game theory, bargaining and cooperation, public goods, auction markets, individual decision making, among others.

Enforced Prerequisites: ECON 401 and 402 with a grade of at least C-

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON 404 or 405.

ECON 490 — Current Topics in Economics
Section 002, LEC
Behavioral Economics

Instructor: Masatlioglu,Yusuf Can

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Behavioral decision making is the study of how people make decisions. At present, it is quite an active field, drawing together people from psychology, economics, political science, and management, among other fields. In economics, the original interest was in "normative" decision making (how best to?; "reflection"). That is why standard economic theory is based on the idea that economic agents are rational. Empirical research revealed discrepancies between derived "optimal" strategies, and the actual behavior of everyday folk making decisions. This approach is termed "descriptive" or "behavioral" decision making (how do we?; "observation"). So behavioral economics questions the assumption of perfect rationality and uses insights from psychology to improve theoretical insights and empirical predictions of standard economic theory. The main objective of the course is to introduce students to this rapidly emerging and important field.

Enforced Prerequisites: ECON 401 and 402 with a grade of at least C-

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON 404 or 405.

ECON 490 — Current Topics in Economics
Section 003, LEC
Open-Economy Macroeconomics

Instructor: Dominguez,Kathryn Mary; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

The objective will be to develop expertise with economic models used for the analysis of global macro issues. Readings and discussions will focus on theoretic and policy work related to: investment and debt in the open economy, capital mobility and financial crisis, and choice of exchange rate regimes. Students will be required to develop research ideas, use data and theory to analyze one of these ideas, and write about the idea in a series of assignments which will culminate in a term-paper.

Enforced Prerequisites: ECON 401 and 402 with a grade of at least C-

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON 404 or 405.

ECON 495 — Seminar in Economics
Section 001, SEM
Applied Microeconomic Modeling

Instructor: Salant,Stephen W; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This seminar will illustrate how elementary microeconomic tools can be used to illuminate observed real-world phenomena and to evaluate alternative policy interventions. Each student will complete a problem set and writing assignment. In addition, students will be required — as part of a team of three — to investigate in depth a single local, national, or international topic. Students on the same team who want to use their project toward honors will be encouraged to focus on different aspects of the overall topic. Students will choose from a list of topics either suggested by the instructor or by students in the class. A preliminary list of suggested topics will be available at the first meeting and it usually evolves during the first weeks of the seminar.

Students interested in enrolling in ECON 495 must submit an application.

Enforced Prerequisites: ECON 401 and 402 with a grade of at least C-

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON 404 or 405

ECON 495 — Seminar in Economics
Section 002, SEM
Evaluation of Social Programs

Instructor: Smith,Jeffrey Andrew; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course provides an introduction to the theory and practice of econometric evaluation of social programs such as job training programs, welfare-to-work programs and public health interventions.

The course has the following components:

  1. a series of lectures that introduce the basics of the economics and econometrics underlying the evaluation of social programs by economists;
  2. a lecture that describes the evaluation industry and how it functions;
  3. a critical review of the evaluation literature on three programs in class via seminar-style presentations of published evaluation research;
  4. completion of an analytical literature survey by the students on an evaluation literature of their choice (with some guidance from the professor).

Students will come away from the course understanding how economists learn about the effects of programs and able to thoughtfully evaluate the evaluations they read or read about.

Students interested in enrolling in ECON 495 must submit an application.

Enforced Prerequisites: ECON 401 and 402 with a grade of at least C-

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON 404 or 405

ECON 498 — Honors Independent Research
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: Honors, Indpnt Study

This course is for undergraduates writing senior Honors theses. Each student's grade for the course and levels of honors achieved will depend entirely on the quality of the thesis, as evaluated by the thesis advisor with whom the student has arranged to work.

Advisory Prerequisite: Open only to students admitted to Honors concentration in economics. Permission of instructor.

ECON 499 — Independent Research
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: INDEPENDENT

Student and instructor agree on a substantial piece of work involving reading or research. Evaluation is based on the written work, either papers or examinations.

Advisory Prerequisite: Written permission of staff member supervising research, and permission of the Economics concentration advisor.

ECON 500 — Quantitative Methods
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Hogan,Chad Augustine

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Many real-world decision problems look impossibly complex. Mathematics is a language for translating these problems into concise, exact and logical framework. The use of mathematics enables economists to describe and solve the problems that cannot be tackled effectively in any other way. A modern economist must know how to turn economic problems into mathematical problems, how to solve them, and how to interpret the results.

The course will focus on general techniques of solving several important classes of mathematical problems frequently encountered in economics. In the first part of the course, we will learn the language of mathematics: how to manipulate mathematical objects such as sets, functions, graphs, derivatives, equations and matrices. The second part will describe the basic techniques of solving the systems of equations and finding the maxima of functions. The third part will introduce probability theory and elements of statistical inference.

Textbooks: Klein, Michael W., Mathematical Methods for Economics, 2nd edition, Addison Wesley, ISBN 0-201-72626-2.

Course requirements: There will be two midterm exams and a final exam. Each exam will account for 25% of your grade. You will be assigned problem sets on each topic we cover. You are strongly encouraged to work through them to see how well you keep up with the course. Problem sets will not be graded, but almost each Wednesday (see specific dates below) I will give a 15-minute quiz with similar problems. Best six out of nine quizzes will jointly account for the remaining 25% of your grade.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

ECON 501 — Microeconomic Theory
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 3

ECON 501 is a course in applied micro-economic theory designed for (but not restricted to) students in the MAE program. While providing a rigorous introduction to Bayesian sequential decision-making, game theory, and both partial and general equilibrium theory, the emphasis is on real world applications of these analytical concepts. Models and modes of thinking which proved most useful during his decade as a government policy analyst receive emphasis in this course.

Student obligations: two midterms, one final, five problem sets, but no paper.

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON 401.

ECON 541 — International Trade Policy
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Deardorff,Alan V; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course examines the policy issues of international trade, including trade in both goods and services and also international flows of direct investment and migration. It builds on microeconomic theory, first to examine the basic theories of international trade and factor movements, including the classic Ricardian theory of competitive advantages, the neoclassical factor proportions theory, and the New Trade Theories that incorporate increasing returns to scale, imperfect competition, and product differentiation. These models are then used to examine the major policies and institutions that constrain and influence international trade and factor movements. Special attention is given to the WTO, to various elements of U.S. trade policy, and to the growing number of regional arrangements such as the European Union and NAFTA. Empirical evidence and applications of the theories are addressed, including their applicability for less developed and emerging economies. Although the major emphasis of the course is on the microeconomics of international transactions, a portion of the course will also put this into macroeconomic context. Topics here include the role and determination of exchange rates in the world economy, as well as how international movements of financial capital interact with trade and exchange rates in determining the balance of trade and the vulnerability of a country's macroeconomic variables to events abroad. This course presumes a prior knowledge of intermediate economics.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing. This course presumes a prior knowledge of intermediate economics.

ECON 571 — Applied Econometrics
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Ranchhod,Vimal

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course is an introduction to econometric methods and their use in policy analysis. Most of the course focuses on multiple regression analysis, beginning with ordinary least squares estimation, and then considers the implications and treatment of serial correlation, heteroskedasticity, specification error, and measurement error. The course also provides an introduction to simultaneous equations models, time series analysis, models for binary dependent variables, and methods for longitudinal analysis.

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON,Graduate standing.

ECON 599 — Special Tutorial
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 3

Special topics course developed by individual faculty members and offered as requested.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

ECON 600 — Math for Economists
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Silverman,Daniel Susman; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 2

This course offers an introduction to the mathematics used in contemporary economics. The course is tailored to first-year students in the Economics Ph.D. program, and has two purposes: (1) to provide students with some mathematical tools that will be useful both for graduate courses and for research, and (2) to (re)acquaint students with the mathematical rigor and problem solving necessary for studying economic theory. The course begins with an intensive, 2-week session at the end of the summer.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and graduate standing. Highly recommended for students taking ECON 601/602 and required for all PhD students in ECON.

ECON 601 — Microeconomic Theory I
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Smith,Lones A; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 1.5

Individual choice, classical demand theory, aggregation, and producer theory. It also includes topics in partial equilibrium analysis, competitive markets, externalities, Coase Theorem, and public goods.

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON 600, Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

ECON 602 — Microeconomic Theory II
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Borgers,Tilman M

FA 2007
Credits: 1.5

This is an introduction to game theory. We discuss the normal form and the extensive form representations of non-cooperative games. Then we study solution concepts for games, ranging from dominance considerations and rationalizability to Nash equilibrium, subgame-perfect equilibrium, and sequential equilibrium. We also cover static and dynamic games of incomplete information. Simple examples illustrate the relevance of game theory to a variety of areas of applied economics.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

ECON 605 — Macroeconomic Theory I
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Laitner,John P; homepage
Instructor: Stolyarov,Dmitriy L; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Begins with an overview of aggregate income determination. It continues with an in-depth treatment of dynamic models: the Solow, neoclassical, and new growth models. The course proceeds with an introduction to rational expectations models and techniques with application to output determination and price adjustment in closed and open economies.

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON 600. Graduate standing.

ECON 611 — Stabilization Policy
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Barsky,Robert B; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course deals with recent developments in macroeconomic theory. Particular attention is given to the application of the techniques of optimal control to Real and New Keynesian business cycle theory. Other likely topics include New Keynesian foundations, imperfect competition macroeconomics, q-theory, monetary and financial theory, growth theory, efficiency wages, Ricardian equivalence, precautionary saving, and Stochastic optimization.

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON 602 and 604; 611. Graduate standing.

ECON 617 — Game Theory
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Smith,Lones A; homepage
Instructor: Borgers,Tilman M

FA 2007
Credits: 3

An advanced game theory course. Topics include: solution concepts (iterated dominance, rationalizability, Nash equilibrium, subgame perfection, sequential equilibrium), infinitely repeated games (dynamic programming, self-generation, stick-and-carrot punishments, renegotiation, folk theorems), evolutionary game theory (evolutionary stable strategies, replicator dynamics, adaptive play), games with incomplete information (revelation principle, single crossing property, mechanism design), and implementation theory (social choice functions, voting schemes, implementation in dominant strategies and Nash equilibrium). Many examples illustrate these concepts: Vickrey auctions, signalling games, entry-deterrence, bargaining models, oligopolistic supergames, optimal auction design, and nonlinear pricing.

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON 600, 601, 602, 603, 604, and 609.

ECON 621 — Labor Economics I
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: McCrary,Justin Reed

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Develops theoretical models of the labor market, presents related empirical research, and discusses policy application. Topics include labor supply, labor demand, market equilibrium and compensating wage differentials, and investment in human capital.

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON 601, 603, 673, 674; and Graduate standing.

ECON 631 — Industrial Organizations and Public Policy
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Kühn,Kai-Uwe; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

The focus of this course is on theoretical analysis of behavior in markets. The main emphasis is on how firms compete with one another, and secondary emphasis is placed on organizational behavior and how firms interact with consumers. In recent years topics have included: price discrimination, oligopoly theory with and without differentiated products, strategic trade, mergers, markets with imperfectly informed participants, entry deterrence, predation, collusive behavior, cartel behavior, research and development competition, and the sale or rental of durable goods. Non-cooperative game theory is the predominant tool of analysis and is developed as needed during the course.

Advisory Prerequisite: Econ. 601 and 603 or permission of instructor. Graduate standing.

ECON 642 — International Finance
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Zhang,Jing

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course covers various topics in international finance and macroeconomics. Topics covered include exchange rate prediction, monetary exchange rate models and their building blocks, the international effects of monetary policy, international real business cycle models, risksharing and portfolio diversification, risk and volatility in foreign exchange markets, fixed exchange rate models for small open economies and stabilization programs.

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON 605, 607, and Graduate standing.

ECON 661 — Advanced Natural Resources Economics
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Salant,Stephen W; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course reviews the literature on the pricing of natural resources (agricultural goods, renewable and nonrenewable resources and durables) over time. The first half of the course considers resources which are privately owned; the second half considers resources that are common property. To provide a point of reference, the behavior of resource markets in the absence of government intervention is studied first. There is then an extensive treatment of the dynamic effects on market equilibria of widespread government policies (unanticipated, partially anticipated or fully anticipated). Policies analyzed include: bufferstocks used to affect prices (ceilings, floors, bands, and pegs); bans, embargoes, price controls and whatever else is timely or of interest to participants. To simplify the mathematics, discrete-time methods are used predominately. The Kuhn-Tucker theorem is utilized when studying competitive equilibrium under certainty. Dynamic-programming is used to study single-agent (planning or monopoly) problems under uncertainty (with or without learning). Multi-stage game theory is used to investigate dynamic common-property problems. A working understanding of these methods is developed during the course.

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON,Intermediate economic theory

ECON 664 — Topics in World Economic History, II
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Whatley,Warren C; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This class introduces students to a variety of topics in the economic history of the world. The class is a combination of lectures and discussions leading to a research paper. Topics are added each year and students are encouraged to introduce new topics from around the world. Topics covered in the recent past include: conceptual issues concerning path dependence, institutions, anthropometrics, transactions cost and markets in economic history; the importance of fundamentals (endowments, geography, disease and climate) in the broad sweep of world history; the Paleolithic revolution and world economic inequality before 1500 A.D.; the economics of early long-distance trade; increasing world inequalities after 1500; the economics of constitutions; economic history of the Pre-Columbian Americas; Colonialism; the rise of an Atlantic economy; the industrial revolution in comparative perspective; the sources of U. S. economic growth; gender and racial inequality across industrialized countries; the history of technology; the history of slavery and freedom in the West; and the Great World Depression of the 1930s.

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON,Intermediate economic theory/statistics

ECON 665 — Economic Development of Underdeveloped Countries
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Yang,Dean C

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course focuses on microeconomic issues in economic development, focusing on modeling approaches, empirical applications, and randomized field experimental techniques. The course examines household decision-making, including risk-coping strategies, technology adoption, international migration, intra-household resource allocation, microfinance, and human capital (health and education). The course will also cover frontier research on institutions, corruption, and social conflict.

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON,ECON 600, 601, 602, 603, 604, 671, and 672

ECON 667 — The Economics of Population Growth
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Bailey,Martha J
Instructor: Lam,David A; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Reviews current knowledge on the relationship between economic and demographic behavior. Major sections of the course are: Economic theories of fertility, marriage, and divorce; economic applications of mathematical demography; economic consequences of population growth; economics of population policy.

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON,ECON 600, 601, 602, 603, 604, and 609.

ECON 671 — Econometric Analysis I
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Kilian,Lutz; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS

ECON 671 and 672 form the basic required sequence in econometrics for all doctoral students. Their purpose is to provide Ph.D. students with the training needed to do the basic quantitative analysis generally understood to be part of the background of all modern economists. This includes: the theory and practice of testing hypotheses, statistical estimation theory, the basic statistical theory underlying the linear model, an introduction to econometric methods, and the nature of the difficulties which arise in applying statistical procedures to economic research problems.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

ECON 675 — Applied Microeconometrics
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Smith,Jeffrey Andrew; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

The purpose of this course is to expose students to econometric techniques frequently used in applied microeconomic research. One way to think about the course is that it will introduce you to the tools in toolbox. The course does not go into great technical detail in regard to any particular applied econometric method, but instead aims to provide the student with enough knowledge about each method to know when, and when not, to use it in their empirical research. The course combines lectures with numerous empirical problem sets. Methods covered include binary choice models, multinomial choice models, censored regression models, duration models, quantile regression, instrumental variables (and related parametric selection models), longitudinal methods and discontinuity designs, as well as issues of variance estimation including complex survey designs and the bootstrap.

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON,ECON 671 and 672

ECON 679 — Advanced Econometrics II
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Ng,Serena; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS

Generalized least squares, multivariate multiple regression, simultaneous equation models (including problems of identification, estimation by equation and system methods, and forecasting), introduction to asymptotic theory, and estimation problems in time series models.

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON 678/STATS 575 or equivalent.

ECON 683 — Government Expenditures
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Davis,Lucas William
Instructor: Silverman,Daniel Susman; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Emphasizes theory and evidence on government expenditure policy. Topics covered include the theory of public goods, state and local public goods, welfare economics and income distribution, political economy and voting mechanisms, and the design and evaluation of social insurance programs.

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON 601. Graduate standing.

ECON 695 — Introduction to Economic Research I
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Solon,Gary Rand; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course is designed to introduce third-year graduate students to 'how to do economic research.' Students will be required to produce a polished research paper by the end of the course which can be incorporated into their thesis. Some class time will focus on topics such as identifying a relevant research idea, but most of the effort will be involved in research group meetings, presentations, and writing the research paper.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

ECON 700 — Research
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 6

Particular topics course developed by individual faculty member and offered as requested.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of Graduate advisor. Graduate standing.

ECON 739 — Topics in International Economic Policy
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Stern,Robert M; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 2

This course is taught as two separate half-term seminars. Students may take one or both miniseminars. Recent topics have included crisis management in the Asian financial and foreign exchange markets and issues of economic and monetary unification in the European Union.

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON,ECON/ SPP 540

ECON 739 — Topics in International Economic Policy
Section 002, SEM

Instructor: Stern,Robert M; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 2

This course is taught as two separate half-term seminars. Students may take one or both miniseminars. Recent topics have included crisis management in the Asian financial and foreign exchange markets and issues of economic and monetary unification in the European Union.

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON,ECON/ SPP 540

ECON 811 — Seminars in Monetary Theory
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Elsby,Michael William Leamington
Instructor: Stolyarov,Dmitriy L; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 2

The Seminars in Monetary Theory are devoted to critical discussion of new research in the field. Each week an original research study is presented by a graduate students, a Michigan faculty member, or a faculty member visiting from another university.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

ECON 821 — Seminars in Labor Economics
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Solon,Gary Rand; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 2

The Seminars in Labor Economics are devoted to critical discussion of new research in the field. Each week an original research study is presented by a graduate students, a Michigan faculty member, or a faculty member visiting from another university.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

ECON 831 — Seminar in Applied Micro Theory
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Kühn,Kai-Uwe; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 2

The Seminars in Public Policy toward Business are devoted to critical discussion of new research in the field. Each week an original research study is presented by a graduate students, a Michigan faculty member, or a faculty member visiting from another university.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

ECON 841 — Research Seminar in International Economics
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Deardorff,Alan V; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

The Research Seminar in International Economics is a University of Michigan center that is operated jointly by the Ford School of Public Policy and the Department of Economics. It was founded by Professor Robert M. Stern in the Department of Economics in 1963. It has been distributing discussion papers since 1968, and it became affiliated with the Ford School of Public Policy in 1980. The activities of the Research Seminar include a weekly seminar or workshop, an ongoing program of faculty and graduate student research, linkages with developing country institutions, conferences involving academics and policy makers, training of graduate students specializing in international economics and international economic law, and the distribution of a series of RSIE Discussion Papers.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

ECON 851 — Advanced Economic Theory
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Ozdenoren,Emre; homepage
Instructor: Masatlioglu,Yusuf Can
Instructor: Nakajima,Daisuke

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This is not really a course at all, but a research seminar. Here you enjoy the best economic theory research that Ann Arbor money can buy from around the world. Students enrolled are encouraged not to be silent during the seminars, but to ask piercing questions that display deep understanding, as well as help the seminar speaker.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

ECON 859 — Seminars in Comparative Economic Development
Section 001, SEM

FA 2007
Credits: 2

The Seminars in Comparative Economic Development are devoted to critical discussion of new research in the field. Each week an original research study is presented by a graduate students, a Michigan faculty member, or a faculty member visiting from another university.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

ECON 864 — Seminar in Economic History
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Chabot,Benjamin Remy; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

The seminar in Economic History is devoted to critical discussion of new research in the field. Each week an original research study is presented by a graduate student, a University of Michigan faculty member, or a faculty member visiting from another university.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

ECON 875 — Research Seminar in Quantitative Economics
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Ng,Serena; homepage
Instructor: Lee,Yoonseok

FA 2007
Credits: 3

RSQE is an economic modeling and forecasting unit which has been in operation at the University of Michigan since 1952. RSQE provides forecasts of the economic outlook for the U.S. and Michigan economies based on quarterly econometric models.

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON 673, 674; and Graduate standing.

ECON 881 — Seminars in Public Finance
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Hines Jr,James R; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 2

The Seminars in Public Finance are devoted to critical discussion of new research in the field. Each week an original research study is presented by a graduate students, a Michigan faculty member, or a faculty member visiting from another university.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

ECON 990 — Dissertation/Precandidate
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 8

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Advisory Prerequisite: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing.

ECON 995 — Dissertation/Candidate
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 8

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Enforced Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate

 
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