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LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Fall 2007, Dept = ENGLISH
 
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Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 001, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This course studies the intersection between critical thinking and persuasive writing, and, using literary texts as the point of reference, takes as its goal the development of the student's skill at writing cogent expository and argumentative prose.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 002, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This section of English 124 will focus on the construction of childhood and adolescence in literature. To this end, we will explore works "for" young adults –Harry Potter, Anne of Green Gables — as well as literary works "for" adults that depict key moments in adolescent development. Examples of the latter may include works by J.D. Salinger, Carson McCullers, Toni Morrison, and others.

In addition to its thematic and personal importance, our attention to the construction of adolescence in fiction is designed to heighten our awareness of language and audience. Is youth portrayed differently in works *for* youth, as opposed to works merely *about* youth? How might the depictions change if we investigate works by young authors? What is the relationship between the writing style of these works and the topics they portray?

While these literary concerns will be at stake throughout the course, English 124 is designed fundamentally as a writing course. Emphasis will be placed on the thesis-centered persuasive paper that uses literary analysis. Other assignments may include descriptive papers, peer evaluations, exploratory essays, personal response papers, creative response papers, argumentative essays, and research/citation/bibliographic papers.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 003, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This course studies the intersection between critical thinking and persuasive writing, and, using literary texts as the point of reference, takes as its goal the development of the student's skill at writing cogent expository and argumentative prose.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 004, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

In this course we will examine a range of texts — poetry, short stories, philosophy, and psychology — written between the years 1887-1945 to investigate the literary period that has come to be known as "modernism." We will focus on the tension inherent in the modernist impulse to use materials from the past in order, as Ezra Pound puts it, to "make it new." How do these allusive yet iconoclastic texts dismantle the distinction between writer and reader? How do the modernists represent authorial identity and individual identity? What happens to character and the lyric "I" in modernist fiction and poetry? What theory of the "self" does modernist psychology construct? What problems do modernist texts — which not only appropriate prior material, but also often involve extensive collaboration between a writer and an editor — pose to our understanding of authorship and identity?

Assigned readings will include selections from Nietzsche, Freud, Virginia Woolf's polemical treatment of the relationship between gender and authority in *A Room of One's Own*, the manuscript and published versions of T.S. Eliot's poem *The Waste Land* (to which the poet Ezra Pound made extensive revisions), essays by Eliot and Pound, short stories by James Joyce and Gertrude Stein, and poems and essays by Marianne Moore, H.D., Mina Loy, W.H. Auden, and others.

As we explore how the modernists borrowed from and challenged their literary predecessors, you, too, will learn to engage literature through your own writing. This intensive introduction to composition will help you develop the tools to understand books by writing about them. You will write short responses to your reading in preparation for each class, and I will assign in-class writing assignments from time to time. You will submit four formal essays over the course of the semester (4-6 pp.). Self-assessment and peer critique will comprise a substantial part of the course: you will revise and expand one of your essays (6-8 pp.) through class workshops.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 005, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This course studies the intersection between critical thinking and persuasive writing, and, using literary texts as the point of reference, takes as its goal the development of the student's skill at writing cogent expository and argumentative prose.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 006, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This course studies the intersection between critical thinking and persuasive writing, and, using literary texts as the point of reference, takes as its goal the development of the student's skill at writing cogent expository and argumentative prose.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 007, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This course studies the intersection between critical thinking and persuasive writing, and, using literary texts as the point of reference, takes as its goal the development of the student's skill at writing cogent expository and argumentative prose.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 008, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This is an introduction to college composition using as its focus for discussion and writing 20th (and 21st) century American literature of war. If war heightens our own human dramas, highlighting our capacity for good and evil, heroism and humiliation, what can we learn about ourselves from reading remarkable works of war literature? What are the clichés of war (such as those used in the preceding sentence) and how do clichés about "the other" or about war or masculinity or patriotism function? Is it possible to formulate ideas of good and evil, heroism and humiliation that go beyond their movie-worn versions? For example, since war entails killing, how must we think about other people before we — you and I (let's be personal here) — can kill them? What makes a person into an enemy? What makes us into people capable of killing? Is war gendered? Why is war so often associated with masculinity and what are the nature and implications of the association?

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 009, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This course studies the intersection between critical thinking and persuasive writing, and, using literary texts as the point of reference, takes as its goal the development of the student's skill at writing cogent expository and argumentative prose.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 010, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This course studies the intersection between critical thinking and persuasive writing, and, using literary texts as the point of reference, takes as its goal the development of the student's skill at writing cogent expository and argumentative prose.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 011, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This course will look at how writers of the last sixty years have interpreted and re-imagined history through the lens of fiction. More specifically, we will look at "magic realism," a genre of literature that incorporates elements of folklore, surrealism, fantasy, and the grotesque, while also being wedded to the realities and problems of history. How might works of magic realist fiction engage, subvert or reinscribe official "textbook" histories, which have silenced certain marginalized voices? How might a narrative that suspends reality from its historical moorings, actually allow us to understand better the past and our present? Readings may include works by Alejo Carpentier, Toni Morrison, Emile Habiby, Mahasweta Devi, Bertolt Brecht, Gü nter Grass, Walter Benjamin, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, and Salman Rushdie. This course will require a substantial amount of reading, including both fictional and historical material, as well as writing: four 3-5 page essays, including the revision and expansion of one of these into a 6-7 page paper.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 012, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This course studies the intersection between critical thinking and persuasive writing, and, using literary texts as the point of reference, takes as its goal the development of the student's skill at writing cogent expository and argumentative prose.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 013, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This course studies the intersection between critical thinking and persuasive writing, and, using literary texts as the point of reference, takes as its goal the development of the student's skill at writing cogent expository and argumentative prose.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 014, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This writing course focuses on the creation of complex, analytical, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. Students work closely with their peers and the instructor to develop their written prose. Readings cover a variety of different genres, with a primary focus on literary texts.

This section will focus on place: how we observe and inhabit it, what meaning setting can convey in fiction, how poets bring us to other places in their pointillistic ways. Come prepared to explore ideas about buildings, language, Ann Arbor, and wild and urbanized landscapes of all kinds.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 015, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

The notion of travel is a rich and varied subject used by many writers in all genres of literature. In this class, we will be using the overarching theme of travel as an opportunity for each of you to develop your individual voices as writers while developing essay-writing skills in a variety of styles to help meet your college writing needs. To accomplish these skills, we will engage with an assortment of travel essays, fictional accounts of characters who travel, and poems about journeys, which we will then discuss in terms of style and content. Reading and writing themselves can also be acts of traveling and we will pay attention to these metaphorical notions of journeying as well.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 016, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This course studies the intersection between critical thinking and persuasive writing, and, using literary texts as the point of reference, takes as its goal the development of the student's skill at writing cogent expository and argumentative prose.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 017, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

The notion of travel is a rich and varied subject used by many writers in all genres of literature. In this class, we will be using the overarching theme of travel as an opportunity for each of you to develop your individual voices as writers while developing essay-writing skills in a variety of styles to help meet your college writing needs. To accomplish these skills, we will engage with an assortment of travel essays, fictional accounts of characters who travel, and poems about journeys, which we will then discuss in terms of style and content. Reading and writing themselves can also be acts of traveling and we will pay attention to these metaphorical notions of journeying as well.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 018, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

In this course, we will be reading literature written by women that provocatively addresses issues of women's lives. Throughout the term, we will be discussing and analyzing such topics as sexuality, body image, family, the politics of gender, and how ethnic, religious and other identities affect women's lives. We will be developing academic writing skills through the framework of these texts, and you will be producing four essays ranging from autobiographical writing to critical analyses of particular literary texts. Texts will include a short novel, short stories, non-fiction essays, and poetry.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 019, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This writing course, "Diversity and American Literature" focuses on the creation of complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. Students work closely with their peers and the professor to develop their written prose. Readings cover a variety of different genres, with a primary focus on literary texts. This course, "Diversity and American Literature," is designed to hone your critical thinking and writing skills and to accustom you to thinking about writing as a multi-step process.

Together we will explore poems, short stories, plays, and films that offer diverse perspectives on what it means to be "American." In class discussion and written assignments, we will contemplate how gender, race, class, and sexuality shape understandings of Americanness at different historical moments.

You will complete rough and final drafts of several essays that you workshop with a peer group, as well as a number of shorter writings to be assigned throughout the term. Your essays will yield a total of 20-30 pages of polished prose by the end of the semester; in addition, you will submit some form of writing each week. Put simply, to become a better writer, you must do quite a lot of writing.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 020, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This course studies the intersection between critical thinking and persuasive writing, and, using literary texts as the point of reference, takes as its goal the development of the student's skill at writing cogent expository and argumentative prose.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 021, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This course studies the intersection between critical thinking and persuasive writing, and, using literary texts as the point of reference, takes as its goal the development of the student's skill at writing cogent expository and argumentative prose.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 022, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This section of English 124 will focus on the construction of childhood and adolescence in literature. To this end, we will explore works "for" young adults –Harry Potter, Anne of Green Gables — as well as literary works "for" adults that depict key moments in adolescent development. Examples of the latter may include works by J.D. Salinger, Carson McCullers, Toni Morrison, and others.

In addition to its thematic and personal importance, our attention to the construction of adolescence in fiction is designed to heighten our awareness of language and audience. Is youth portrayed differently in works *for* youth, as opposed to works merely *about* youth? How might the depictions change if we investigate works by young authors? What is the relationship between the writing style of these works and the topics they portray?

While these literary concerns will be at stake throughout the course, English 124 is designed fundamentally as a writing course. Emphasis will be placed on the thesis-centered persuasive paper that uses literary analysis. Other assignments may include descriptive papers, peer evaluations, exploratory essays, personal response papers, creative response papers, argumentative essays, and research/citation/bibliographic papers.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 023, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This course studies the intersection between critical thinking and persuasive writing, and, using literary texts as the point of reference, takes as its goal the development of the student's skill at writing cogent expository and argumentative prose.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 024, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

New York, San Francisco, Los Angeles, Minneapolis, Detroit, Santa Fe, Seattle, Miami, Atlanta, Houston, Tulsa, Denver — these simple words call up complex associations and emotions. In this course, we'll be exploring that provoking modern space — the American city. Our reading will examine cities across the United States and sample from a number of genres and historical eras. The breadth of this material will allow you to consider the many ways a writer may choose to tackle a similar subject. Our syllabus may include such works as Allen Ginsberg's "Howl," Edgar Allen Poe's "Man of the Crowd," N.W.A.'s "Straight Outta Compton," Edwidge Danticat's "New York Day Woman," op-ed articles from newspapers, Chester Himes' If He Hollers, Let Him Go, and Eudora Welty's "Curtain of Green," among others.

The focus of this course is your own writing. You will craft short weekly response papers, and we will take time in class to write. You will submit two formal essays (3-5 pages), one of which you will develop into a final paper (6-7 pages) through peer review and workshops. The primary goal of this course is to help you develop a set of strategies for approaching and understanding the critical writing required at the university level.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 025, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This writing course focuses on examining contemporary culture through reading, discussing, and analyzing various texts (both literature and film). We will read and discuss a half dozen or so short stories, at least two novels (Chuck Palahniuk's FIGHT CLUB and Don DeLillo's WHITE NOISE) and at least three films. This is a writing-intensive course and in addition to short written responses to EACH of the readings, you will be expected to write and revise three analytical papers on topics of your choice.

The primary goal of this course is to help you learn to write clear, compelling, and sophisticated prose. We will develop these skills through a range of methods: readings, discussions, writing exercises, peer critiques, and responses to other forms of expression such as media, visual art, music, and film. Because writing is an organized way of thinking, our engagement with the subject matter will be focused primarily on issues of style, craft, and execution.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 026, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This course studies the intersection between critical thinking and persuasive writing, and, using literary texts as the point of reference, takes as its goal the development of the student's skill at writing cogent expository and argumentative prose.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 027, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This course studies the intersection between critical thinking and persuasive writing, and, using literary texts as the point of reference, takes as its goal the development of the student's skill at writing cogent expository and argumentative prose.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 028, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This course studies the intersection between critical thinking and persuasive writing, and, using literary texts as the point of reference, takes as its goal the development of the student's skill at writing cogent expository and argumentative prose.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 029, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

In this course we sharpen our writing skills as we discuss and think about representations of the American Road Trip in literature, art, film, music and journalism. Who goes on Road Trips and why? How do Road Trips open our eyes to diverse people and experiences within our own country? What types of writing and representation result from road trips? Is there an "American Road Trip Aesthetic?" Are there specific politics and social responsibilities attached to the American Road Trip? Have you gone on a good Road Trip? We consider all of these questions about the genre of the American Road Trip in conjunction with some disciplined work on writing skills.

Students can expect to come away equipped to write at a college level especially in the Humanities and related fields. We focus on developing a strong writer's voice, mastering written grammar, organizing clear, insightful essays and revising drafts thoroughly and productively. Much of the course will be devoted to collaboration with classmates in peer workshopping sessions. By the end of the term each student will produce no less than 20 pages of polished prose.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 030, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

From celebrity tell-alls, autobiography fads, Sunday confessions to psychotherapy, there seems to be, in us, a desire to tell our own stories, as a form of self-understanding — a form of self-disclosure and self-discovery. Literature has always been a hotbed of this practice, and in this course, we will read a selection of "confessional" literature across genres and time periods, such as "confessional" poetry of the 20th century (Plath, Sexton), classic fictional autobiographies (Dostoevsky's Notes from the Underground), and contemporary American personal essays (Grealy, Ehrlich); we will examine the urges behind confession in these works and explore the ideas and life experiences that form and inform the interiority of an individual and of humanity. Some of the questions we'll ponder over the course of the semester include: where does our desire for self-disclosure come from? How does self-disclosure lead to self-discovery — how are the two related to one another? And what does it mean to "discover" oneself?

The writing assignments for this course will entail the standard English 124 requirement (roughly four papers of about 5-7 pages), along with short informal writings and journal assignments in response to the assigned readings, in which you may, if you wish, do a bit of your own "confession." We will guide ourselves through the process of writing as an act of discovery in itself — exploring meaning in the making, analyzing our thoughts in action — and learn to become independent writers through extensive workshops and revisions.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 031, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

In Western culture, we often think of the "self" as a separate, distinct thing of its own. But in this class, we'll try to think about the fact that each "self" is bound up with lots of other "selves" — mothers, fathers, brothers, sisters, lovers, friends, enemies. This semester, we will be trying to answer the question: To what extent does our identity depend on our relationships with all the people that matter in our lives, for good or ill (or, more likely, both)? We'll read short stories by James Joyce, Tillie Olsen, William Faulkner, and Charlotte Gilman, poetry by Walt Whitman, Robert Haydn, William Blake, e.e. cummings, and William Wordsworth, and a novel, _Mama Day_, by Gloria Naylor as we analyze and explore the ways identities are built from relationships of all kinds. And, most importantly, we will be writing; this is a serious writing class, with four carefully revised papers and multiple shorter writing assignments. You will have the opportunity to think closely about your own writing process, while learning to write complex, analytic, persuasive arguments about literature.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 032, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This is an introduction to college composition using as its focus for discussion and writing 20th (and 21st) century American literature of war. If war heightens our own human dramas, highlighting our capacity for good and evil, heroism and humiliation, what can we learn about ourselves from reading remarkable works of war literature? What are the clichés of war (such as those used in the preceding sentence) and how do clichés about "the other" or about war or masculinity or patriotism function? Is it possible to formulate ideas of good and evil, heroism and humiliation that go beyond their movie-worn versions? For example, since war entails killing, how must we think about other people before we — you and I (let's be personal here) — can kill them? What makes a person into an enemy? What makes us into people capable of killing? Is war gendered? Why is war so often associated with masculinity and what are the nature and implications of the association?

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 033, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This course studies the intersection between critical thinking and persuasive writing, and, using literary texts as the point of reference, takes as its goal the development of the student's skill at writing cogent expository and argumentative prose.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 034, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

Each day we come across a wide variety of images — advertisements in magazines, comics in the newspaper, paintings in the art museum, snapshots of our friends and families — images that make us buy things, feel a certain way, or remember certain events. In this section of ENGLISH 124 we will be reading and writing about works of literature that deal with looking at visual images. How does a poet write about the Mona Lisa? What does a Marxist have to say on advertising? Why do two of the writers we will read in this class represent a painting as killing the subject it depicts? We will be reading poems by William Wordsworth, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Edith Wharton, Charles Baudelaire, and W.H Auden, as well as a story by Edgar Allan Poe and Oscar Wilde's The Picture of Dorian Gray.. We will talk about what images communicate to these writers, and how they write what they see. To guide our readings of these works, we will also be looking at two non-fiction pieces: John Berger's Ways of Seeing and Mark Doty's Still Life with Oysters and Lemon.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 035, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This course studies the intersection between critical thinking and persuasive writing, and, using literary texts as the point of reference, takes as its goal the development of the student's skill at writing cogent expository and argumentative prose.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 036, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

In this course we will examine how writers have represented the human mind in all its complexity. We will think about how words are capable (or incapable) of capturing thought, and consider how literary language is uniquely suited to psychological exploration. We will also ask how literature not only represents the mind, but shapes it, as well; that is, how literature affects our personal patterns of thinking.

In order to answer these questions, we will read psychologically-complex works by authors that are likely to include Freud, Hemingway, and Flannery O'Connor. We will also study two longer works: Shakespeare's Othello and Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment.

This course will also focus on helping you represent your own complex thoughts in writing. Our primary goal will be to help you develop the analytical and stylistic skills that are fundamentally important to the college-level writer. We will be thinking together about how to approach each step of the writing process, from initial questions and observations of a text to the revision of your work. With devotion and effort, you will leave the course equipped to compose insightful and well-constructed essays.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 037, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This course studies the intersection between critical thinking and persuasive writing, and, using literary texts as the point of reference, takes as its goal the development of the student's skill at writing cogent expository and argumentative prose.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 038, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

The primary purpose of this course is to develop and refine each student's analytic and writing skills in preparation for the challenges of academic life at the University. In addition to general readings on the writing process, this section of English 124 will utilize the literature of immigration from various periods of American history to explore form, voice, structure, and to analyze the elements of compelling writing. Immigration is central to the American experience and the current debate over the topic spans across political, cultural, social, economic, and philosophical concerns. Readings will include stories, narratives and essays on immigration from the early settlers of "The New World" to the present day national discussion of immigration. This is not a course on current affairs although the timeliness of the subject matter should help inspire our thoughts, discussions, and writing.

Students will work with the instructor, small groups, and in open class discussion to produce 4 polished essays by the end of the semester. Students will be asked to write regularly both in and out of class to produce: reading summaries/responses, discussion questions, peer critiques, and in-class timed writing.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 039, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This course studies the intersection between critical thinking and persuasive writing, and, using literary texts as the point of reference, takes as its goal the development of the student's skill at writing cogent expository and argumentative prose.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 040, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

Tenements, factories, the stock market, crime, telephones, railroads, electricity, museums, newspapers, photography, department stores, and automobiles: how did American writers experience and describe these now-familiar elements of our society for the first time? The period of 1880-1920 in America was one of incredible technological, economic and social change, and writers like Stephen Crane, Edith Wharton, Frank Norris and Theodore Dreiser depicted these changes with a vivid urgency. Some of these writers sought to expose the social problems of modern urban life; some praised the new opportunities it offered, and some did both. Yet despite their varying attitudes toward modernity, all of these writers shared an interest in portraying its ordinary, nitty-gritty details in an accurate and life-like manner. What can investigating these literary efforts to provide accurate portrayals of the modernization of American life during the early part of the 20th century teach us about reading critically and writing persuasively?

Despite any appearances or claims of accuracy and objectivity, each of the works we will be studying is a human creation, crafted and constructed not only by observation, but also by the imagination and logic of a writer. In this course, you will be called upon to interrogate these constructions of reality with your own writing. Throughout the course, we will focus on helping you find and develop your voice as an academic writer. In order to do this, you will be engaged in various kinds of writing throughout the term. You will keep a reading journal, tracking your notes, observations and ideas about the texts we read and our class discussions; you will also be writing three short essays (4-6 pages). For each of these essays, you will receive feedback from me and from your classmates at various stages of the writing process. We will focus on "macro" concepts like developing strong overall arguments and using textual evidence effectively, but we will also spend considerable time on "micro" issues of sentence structure, punctuation, grammar and vocabulary.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 041, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This writing course focuses on the creation of complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. Students work closely with their peers and the instructor to develop their written prose. Readings cover a variety of different genres, with a primary focus on literary texts.

This section of English 124 shall focus on "literatures of witness" — those narratives predicated on the authenticity of having "been there." We will read fiction, poetry, and memoir, interrogating the ways in which literary works make truth claims regarding characters, events, and settings we might presume, despite the definitive artifice of the literary, to be "real."

Some of our readings and all of our written assignments for this course will be posted to the Ctools site, as PDF documents, no later than a week before they are due. Students are responsible for printing these documents and bringing them to class on days when they will be discussed, in addition, of course, to reading them at least once (but preferably twice). Although we will discuss writing assignments in class, they will be posted in their definitive, written forms on our Ctools site. Readings appear in the "Resources" section of the site, while writing assignments appear in the "Assignments" section. Other than a repository for assigned readings and descriptions of writing assignments, the site will be practically inactive. Changes to course schedule or other matters pertaining to the syllabus will be announced in class or, in a pinch, via email.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 042, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This course studies the intersection between critical thinking and persuasive writing, and, using literary texts as the point of reference, takes as its goal the development of the student's skill at writing cogent expository and argumentative prose.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 043, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This course studies the intersection between critical thinking and persuasive writing, and, using literary texts as the point of reference, takes as its goal the development of the student's skill at writing cogent expository and argumentative prose.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 044, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This course studies the intersection between critical thinking and persuasive writing, and, using literary texts as the point of reference, takes as its goal the development of the student's skill at writing cogent expository and argumentative prose.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 045, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This course studies the intersection between critical thinking and persuasive writing, and, using literary texts as the point of reference, takes as its goal the development of the student's skill at writing cogent expository and argumentative prose.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 001, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

In this course, we will work on improving your confidence and competence in writing collegiate essays. We will focus on developing the critical thinking, reading, writing, and argumentation skills necessary to produce effective, competent college writing.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 002, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

All sections of ENGLISH 125 focus on creating complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. Students work closely with their peers and instructor to develop their writing, and readings cover a variety of different genres and academic disciplines.

This section, in particular, focuses on the power of language and literacy. Learning to use literacy as a tool will help you in your classes and in your personal and professional endeavors. This course is designed to guide you as you develop your literacy skills through a rich exploration of language. You will have the opportunity to practice critical reading and writing on a regular basis and in a collaborative learning environment. Class meetings will often be devoted to group work and will focus on the interplay of author, text, reader, and context or community.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 003, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This writing course focuses on the creation of complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. You will work closely with your peers and with me to develop your written prose. The readings will cover a variety of genres.

In this class, you will learn and practice working with the essential building blocks of writing. You will apply these skills to a variety of written assignments, aided by discussions, workshops, and individual conferences with me. We will emphasize constructing the thesis, developing and organizing content, planning an essay, drafting, and revising.

This class is for motivated students who truly want a solid foundation of writing skills, but also want to build upon that foundation with imagination and originality.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 004, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

All sections of ENGLISH 125 focus on creating complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. Students work closely with their peers and instructor to develop their writing, and readings cover a variety of different genres and academic disciplines.

In this section of 125 we will consider the role of memory in writing. In what ways does memory effect writing? Does writing effect our memories? Is it possible to accurately remember or narrate an experience? Is there a cultural experience of memory or is remembering necessarily an individual act? To answer these questions and others, we will examine our own personal histories, cultural memories, and other narrative representations in order to consider the ways that writers (re)collect memories and translate them into text.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 005, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

Texts: The Bedford Reader, X. J. Kennedy, available at Shaman Drum on State Street; course pack available at Accu-Copy, two blocks down from State Street on William.

ENGLISH 125 is designed to bridge the difficult transition between high school and college level writing, writing for different subjects. An essay that might have earned an A in high school might earn a D in college. The reason for this involves the new set of criteria expected at the college level. You will need to engage original ideas in your writing with a clear thesis statement that includes tension and supports your main argument. This also includes challenging your own first, second, and third idea about a subject or situation. College writing requires more original argument, clear thesis and developed support and analysis. It also involves writing for different audiences and in different formats. For example, your assessment of a stand of redwoods would necessarily be different if you were writing an article for a nature magazine, a letter to advocates of oil drilling, an annual report to a board of directors, a grant for panel review, or a scientific analysis for a biology journal. The required format of each of the above is also different. Also, you will need to imagine "the other side" and not only answer but convince your audience with counter argument.

Course Goals:The above means that assignments are designed to elicit original thinking, careful consideration, analysis and interpretation from the writer NOT to give obvious, illogical or, frankly, clichéd or boring writing. Also, be wary of trying to guess what I would like to hear. Your job is to challenge your own ideas as well as others. What do you really think and why? Why is the MOST important aspect. What evidence, examples, considerations, analysis supports your point of view? We will use different lenses to place over our writing and others in this process of examination and revision. By the end of the course, you should be able to critique your own writing and others using the frame of introduction (subject and tension), body (support, examples, evidence), conclusion (interpretation, final point of view). Also, you should be able to adequately put the lenses of logic, clarity/cohesion, syntax, texture, and grammar over various types of writing. As well, you should be able to consider various writing and how different appeals the writer uses aids their credibility: emotional, value, logic and facts, character and humor. You will be asked to comment on others' writing as well as revise your own. This will aid in the writing process. You will also be asked to read and digest the structure and methods of published writers.

The Work: You will be asked to write six papers total. Two will be three-page papers that will be workshopped either in small group workshops or in the large group workshop. The other two papers will be longer, five- to six-page papers that may develop further your earlier shorter papers. However, if the ideas of either shorter paper don't seem worthwhile to be revised into a longer paper, you have the option of using one of two one-page papers as either longer paper. The one-page papers will be assigned later in the semester. This way you have a choice in subjects. Writers tend to write well about subjects in which they are interested. That is the case here. Within a framework, you will be able to choose your own subjects to write about. Each student will have the opportunity to have one paper workshopped in small group workshop with their peers and one paper workshopped in the large group workshop with myself and their peers. Essay options will include personal, comparison/contrast, definition, persuasive, and exploratory. You will also be asked to complete written peer critiques of other students' work and to contribute to workshop discussion. Peer critiques are due on email to me and the student author. Inclass writings respond to the assigned readings and are graded.

Workshop Your name already appears on the schedule for workshop. For the large group workshop ONLY, and ONLY ONCE, you are asked to bring 19 copies of your paper to class. Workshop is an in depth process and you'll be asked to comment on many levels of the writing including the different lenses mentioned above. Because it is always difficult to see your OWN writing, it is imperative that you attend workshop, especially when your own writing is NOT discussed, to receive an adequate grade. It is usually easier to see others' writing more clearly than your own. That is why this is part of the process of applying standards to your own work. You need to attend to the complex issues of other writing to then be able to internalize that process for your own writing. That is one of the real pleasures of workshop: collaborative learning, being able to assimilate techniques from others. Missing more than one workshop can result in your being graded down one third of your overaall class grade.

How will I be evaluated?

A rough outline of standards for what each grade means is online on CTools under Grade Outline. Generally, the quality and originality of the thinking is evaluated, along with other aspects of writing. How insightful, interesting, cohesive are the ideas? What types of appeal do you successfully use to convince your audience? What support is well developed? How in depth is your counter argument? What cements the bridge between your argument and your support? What is the level of analysis? Do you address obvious counter arguments or not? The breakdown is below.

Two two-page papers 15 percent each Written peer critiques 10 percent Two Five- to six-page papers 20 percent each Inclass writings 10 percent Two One-page papers 5 percent each Class Participation and Attendance I no longer give a direct grade for class participation. However, if, at the end of the semester, you are between two grades and your class participation has been extremely high, consistently commenting on others' work in workshop, contributing to class discussion, and you have not missed more than one class session, I will award you the higher grade. Otherwise, you will receive the lower grade. Your grade may also be decreased by up to one half-grade for failing to attend to other students' contributions during workshop and/or class discussion. Attendance at all class sessions is considered mandatory. Your grade may also be decreased by up to one-half grade down for missing more than three class sessions. Be sure to contact me about any missed classes.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 006, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This writing course focuses on the creation of complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. Students work closely with their peers and the instructor to develop their written prose. Readings cover a variety of different genres and academic disciplines.

In this section, we will read, think and write analytically about various topics like space, citizenship and diversity. Students will learn to generate ideas and express them in clear and well-supported argumentative writing.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 007, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This writing course focuses on the creation of complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. Students work closely with their peers to develop their written prose. Readings cover a variety of different genres.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 008, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

A study of rhetoric, both as a body of principles, and as a practical art, emphasizing the writing of expository and argumentative essays.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 009, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

A study of rhetoric, both as a body of principles, and as a practical art, emphasizing the writing of expository and argumentative essays.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 010, REC

Instructor: Scheidt,Donna Lynn

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR
Other: FYSem

A study of rhetoric, both as a body of principles, and as a practical art, emphasizing the writing of expository and argumentative essays.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 011, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

Texts: The Bedford Reader, X. J. Kennedy, available at Shaman Drum on State Street; course pack available at Accu-Copy, two blocks down from State Street on William.

ENGLISH 125 is designed to bridge the difficult transition between high school and college level writing, writing for different subjects. An essay that might have earned an A in high school might earn a D in college. The reason for this involves the new set of criteria expected at the college level. You will need to engage original ideas in your writing with a clear thesis statement that includes tension and supports your main argument. This also includes challenging your own first, second, and third idea about a subject or situation. College writing requires more original argument, clear thesis and developed support and analysis. It also involves writing for different audiences and in different formats. For example, your assessment of a stand of redwoods would necessarily be different if you were writing an article for a nature magazine, a letter to advocates of oil drilling, an annual report to a board of directors, a grant for panel review, or a scientific analysis for a biology journal. The required format of each of the above is also different. Also, you will need to imagine "the other side" and not only answer but convince your audience with counter argument.

Course Goals:The above means that assignments are designed to elicit original thinking, careful consideration, analysis and interpretation from the writer NOT to give obvious, illogical or, frankly, clichéd or boring writing. Also, be wary of trying to guess what I would like to hear. Your job is to challenge your own ideas as well as others. What do you really think and why? Why is the MOST important aspect. What evidence, examples, considerations, analysis supports your point of view? We will use different lenses to place over our writing and others in this process of examination and revision. By the end of the course, you should be able to critique your own writing and others using the frame of introduction (subject and tension), body (support, examples, evidence), conclusion (interpretation, final point of view). Also, you should be able to adequately put the lenses of logic, clarity/cohesion, syntax, texture, and grammar over various types of writing. As well, you should be able to consider various writing and how different appeals the writer uses aids their credibility: emotional, value, logic and facts, character and humor. You will be asked to comment on others' writing as well as revise your own. This will aid in the writing process. You will also be asked to read and digest the structure and methods of published writers.

The Work: You will be asked to write six papers total. Two will be three-page papers that will be workshopped either in small group workshops or in the large group workshop. The other two papers will be longer, five- to six-page papers that may develop further your earlier shorter papers. However, if the ideas of either shorter paper don't seem worthwhile to be revised into a longer paper, you have the option of using one of two one-page papers as either longer paper. The one-page papers will be assigned later in the semester. This way you have a choice in subjects. Writers tend to write well about subjects in which they are interested. That is the case here. Within a framework, you will be able to choose your own subjects to write about. Each student will have the opportunity to have one paper workshopped in small group workshop with their peers and one paper workshopped in the large group workshop with myself and their peers. Essay options will include personal, comparison/contrast, definition, persuasive, and exploratory. You will also be asked to complete written peer critiques of other students' work and to contribute to workshop discussion. Peer critiques are due on email to me and the student author. Inclass writings respond to the assigned readings and are graded.

Workshop Your name already appears on the schedule for workshop. For the large group workshop ONLY, and ONLY ONCE, you are asked to bring 19 copies of your paper to class. Workshop is an in depth process and you'll be asked to comment on many levels of the writing including the different lenses mentioned above. Because it is always difficult to see your OWN writing, it is imperative that you attend workshop, especially when your own writing is NOT discussed, to receive an adequate grade. It is usually easier to see others' writing more clearly than your own. That is why this is part of the process of applying standards to your own work. You need to attend to the complex issues of other writing to then be able to internalize that process for your own writing. That is one of the real pleasures of workshop: collaborative learning, being able to assimilate techniques from others. Missing more than one workshop can result in your being graded down one third of your overall class grade.

How will I be evaluated?

A rough outline of standards for what each grade means is online on CTools under Grade Outline. Generally, the quality and originality of the thinking is evaluated, along with other aspects of writing. How insightful, interesting, cohesive are the ideas? What types of appeal do you successfully use to convince your audience? What support is well developed? How in depth is your counter argument? What cements the bridge between your argument and your support? What is the level of analysis? Do you address obvious counter arguments or not? The breakdown is below.

Two two-page papers 15 percent each Written peer critiques 10 percent Two Five- to six-page papers 20 percent each Inclass writings 10 percent Two One-page papers 5 percent each Class Participation and Attendance I no longer give a direct grade for class participation. However, if, at the end of the semester, you are between two grades and your class participation has been extremely high, consistently commenting on others' work in workshop, contributing to class discussion, and you have not missed more than one class session, I will award you the higher grade. Otherwise, you will receive the lower grade. Your grade may also be decreased by up to one half-grade for failing to attend to other students' contributions during workshop and/or class discussion. Attendance at all class sessions is considered mandatory. Your grade may also be decreased by up to one-half grade down for missing more than three class sessions. Be sure to contact me about any missed classes.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 012, REC

Instructor: Cornelius,Tyler Adam

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR
Other: FYSem

A study of rhetoric, both as a body of principles, and as a practical art, emphasizing the writing of expository and argumentative essays.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 013, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

Texts: The Bedford Reader, X. J. Kennedy, available at Shaman Drum on State Street; course pack available at Accu-Copy, two blocks down from State Street on William.

Course Description: ENGLISH 125 is designed to bridge the difficult transition between high school and college level writing, writing for different subjects. An essay that might have earned an A in high school might earn a D in college. The reason for this involves the new set of criteria expected at the college level. You will need to engage original ideas in your writing with a clear thesis statement that includes tension and supports your main argument. This also includes challenging your own first, second, and third idea about a subject or situation. College writing requires more original argument, clear thesis and developed support and analysis. It also involves writing for different audiences and in different formats. For example, your assessment of a stand of redwoods would necessarily be different if you were writing an article for a nature magazine, a letter to advocates of oil drilling, an annual report to a board of directors, a grant for panel review, or a scientific analysis for a biology journal. The required format of each of the above is also different. Also, you will need to imagine "the other side" and not only answer but convince your audience with counter argument.

Course Goals:The above means that assignments are designed to elicit original thinking, careful consideration, analysis and interpretation from the writer NOT to give obvious, illogical or, frankly, clichéd or boring writing. Also, be wary of trying to guess what I would like to hear. Your job is to challenge your own ideas as well as others. What do you really think and why? Why is the MOST important aspect. What evidence, examples, considerations, analysis supports your point of view? We will use different lenses to place over our writing and others in this process of examination and revision. By the end of the course, you should be able to critique your own writing and others using the frame of introduction (subject and tension), body (support, examples, evidence), conclusion (interpretation, final point of view). Also, you should be able to adequately put the lenses of logic, clarity/cohesion, syntax, texture, and grammar over various types of writing. As well, you should be able to consider various writing and how different appeals the writer uses aids their credibility: emotional, value, logic and facts, character and humor. You will be asked to comment on others' writing as well as revise your own. This will aid in the writing process. You will also be asked to read and digest the structure and methods of published writers.

The Work: You will be asked to write six papers total. Two will be three-page papers that will be workshopped either in small group workshops or in the large group workshop. The other two papers will be longer, five- to six-page papers that may develop further your earlier shorter papers. However, if the ideas of either shorter paper don't seem worthwhile to be revised into a longer paper, you have the option of using one of two one-page papers as either longer paper. The one-page papers will be assigned later in the semester. This way you have a choice in subjects. Writers tend to write well about subjects in which they are interested. That is the case here. Within a framework, you will be able to choose your own subjects to write about. Each student will have the opportunity to have one paper workshopped in small group workshop with their peers and one paper workshopped in the large group workshop with myself and their peers. Essay options will include personal, comparison/contrast, definition, persuasive, and exploratory. You will also be asked to complete written peer critiques of other students' work and to contribute to workshop discussion. Peer critiques are due on email to me and the student author. Inclass writings respond to the assigned readings and are graded.

Workshop Your name already appears on the schedule for workshop. For the large group workshop ONLY, and ONLY ONCE, you are asked to bring 19 copies of your paper to class. Workshop is an in depth process and you'll be asked to comment on many levels of the writing including the different lenses mentioned above. Because it is always difficult to see your OWN writing, it is imperative that you attend workshop, especially when your own writing is NOT discussed, to receive an adequate grade. It is usually easier to see others' writing more clearly than your own. That is why this is part of the process of applying standards to your own work. You need to attend to the complex issues of other writing to then be able to internalize that process for your own writing. That is one of the real pleasures of workshop: collaborative learning, being able to assimilate techniques from others. Missing more than one workshop can result in your being graded down one third of your overall class grade.

How will I be evaluated?

A rough outline of standards for what each grade means is online on CTools under Grade Outline. Generally, the quality and originality of the thinking is evaluated, along with other aspects of writing. How insightful, interesting, cohesive are the ideas? What types of appeal do you successfully use to convince your audience? What support is well developed? How in depth is your counter argument? What cements the bridge between your argument and your support? What is the level of analysis? Do you address obvious counter arguments or not? The breakdown is below.

Two two-page papers 15 percent each Written peer critiques 10 percent Two Five- to six-page papers 20 percent each Inclass writings 10 percent Two One-page papers 5 percent each Class Participation and Attendance I no longer give a direct grade for class participation. However, if, at the end of the semester, you are between two grades and your class participation has been extremely high, consistently commenting on others' work in workshop, contributing to class discussion, and you have not missed more than one class session, I will award you the higher grade. Otherwise, you will receive the lower grade. Your grade may also be decreased by up to one half-grade for failing to attend to other students' contributions during workshop and/or class discussion. Attendance at all class sessions is considered mandatory. Your grade may also be decreased by up to one-half grade down for missing more than three class sessions. Be sure to contact me about any missed classes.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 014, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

A study of rhetoric, both as a body of principles, and as a practical art, emphasizing the writing of expository and argumentative essays.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 015, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

A study of rhetoric, both as a body of principles, and as a practical art, emphasizing the writing of expository and argumentative essays.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 016, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This writing course focuses on the creation of complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. Students work closely with their peers and instructor to develop their written prose. Readings cover a variety of different genres and academic disciplines.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 017, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

How important are our assumptions about language, culture, and environment to the process of thinking and writing? In this course we will take a rigorous analytical look at the subjects of our reading and writing in the hope of challenging some of our safe and easy assumptions about them. By clearing away these assumptions, not only will our writing become sharper and stronger, but the enhanced capacity for critical thinking should lead us to develop more detailed, more interesting, and more original expository and argumentative essays.

We will look at a wide range of professional essays, but will also spend a good bit of time examining writing from within our class. By engaging in peer editing, reading both classic essays and the discourse of contemporary culture, and writing and rewriting pages of carefully considered prose, students will gain knowledge and skills for further academic writing. Each formal paper will have a prescribed approach and a specific aim, but students will have free reign to invent their own paper topics.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 018, REC

Instructor: Sampson,Christopher Michael

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR
Other: FYSem

A study of rhetoric, both as a body of principles, and as a practical art, emphasizing the writing of expository and argumentative essays.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 019, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

Introduction to English Composition focuses on the rhetorical strategies and research skills students need to succeed in their academic endeavors. This course is also a themed course examining the ramifications of "literacy" throughout academic, professional, and pupular cultures. Students will have an opportunity to explore their personal interests by engaging in dialogue between common and academic disciplines.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 020, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This writing course focuses on the creation of complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. Students work closely with their peers and instructor to develop their written prose. Readings cover a variety of different genres and academic disciplines.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 021, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This course is designed to help you develop skills necessary for effective college-level writing. Over the course of the semester you will learn how to write personal narratives, persuasive essays, and summaries in a fashion suitable for academic discourse. We will spend a good deal of time on the process of revision; learning to work in steps towards prose that is marked by coherence, clarity, and intellectual force. You will also learn how to synthesize academic arguments efficiently and effectively.

What you read is the result of a process of writing. Reading a well-written piece is therefore helpful in acquiring good writing skills. In order to be able to practice various writing skills, you will need to have sufficient knowledge about issues and topics on which you will write. You will therefore read about various themes and issues that already exist, and respond to them in your writing. This will provide an opportunity for reflection and critical analysis of the topics discussed in the reading, which in turn will serve as a background for your writing assignments. The clarity of your writing will, to an extent, depend on how closely you have done the readings.

The college of LS&A states that at the end of ENGLISH 125, students should be able to: 1. Revise argumentative/expository writing in order to improve correctness, appropriateness of expression, and development of ideas. 2. Organize essays of varied lengths. 3. Use outside sources correctly and effectively in developing ideas. 4. Set appropriate individual goals for improving writing and devise effective plans for achieving those goals. 5. Collaborate with peers to define revision strategies for particular pieces of writing and to set goals for improving writing.

My goals for this course are to help you to develop meaningful, persuasive prose; to emphasize that thinking and writing are often an intertwined process; and finally, to give you a greater appreciation for the complexity and richness of language (both written and spoken) that is so often taken for granted.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 022, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

We will aim for lively and efficient communication in this class — our goal is writing that "bites," that is sharp, focused, concise, and elegant. Class will be informed by a textbook, and by a coursepack of useful essays and other compositions. Student work will be critiqued in the workshop environment.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 023, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

Composing the Society of Our Dreams: The Social Role of Language in College Writing This course will provide an introduction to the study of composition and rhetoric, both as a body of principles, and as a practical art, emphasizing the writing of expository and argumentative essays. You will begin this course by writing a personal essay about yourself and your life experiences, but we will by no means remain at that level of composing. By the end of the course, you should be comfortable writing in the academic register across genres, which will prepare you for the specialized demands of writing at the University of Michigan.

To that end, the authors whose work we will read hail from a broad variety of disciplines and historical periods. They include great contemporary writers and thinkers who have contributed to our understanding of society such as Azar Nafisi, Audre Lorde, Stephen King, Jonathan Kozol, and Mari Matsuda. Later, as you prepare to write your position paper, we will consider ideal societies (also known as utopias) as conceived by some of the greatest thinkers of all time: Sir Thomas More, Niccolo Machiavelli, Jonathan Swift, Thomas Jefferson, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Ursula K. LeGuin, and others. However, this work will only serve as a backdrop for our main focus: your development as an academic writer.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 024, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

A study of rhetoric, both as a body of principles, and as a practical art, emphasizing the writing of expository and argumentative essays.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 025, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

The year is 1955. Americans are watching their first color television, going to Disneyland, and eating McDonald's hamburgers for the first time. The Civil Rights movement gains prominent attention when Rosa Parks refuses to ride in a segregated bus. The term AI (articificial intelligence) is coined by Dartmouth mathematician John McCarthy. Bill Gates is born. Albert Einstein dies.

How do these pieces of information inform one another? How do you connect them? How does your intended major or personal experience affect what is most important? This is a writing based course where you have the opportunity to practice engaged academic work through the course title theme. Emphasis will be on the formation of analysis, how to be relevant and engage ongoing dialogues, and how to sustain/complicate your ideas. The theme of this course gives you the opportunity to practice these skills in a common environment with other students. Texts may include Allen Ginsberg's book of poetry _Howl_, Flannery O'Connor's short story collection _A Good Man is Hard to Find_, speeches, newspaper articles, a viewing of the film noir classic _Kiss Me Deadly_ and Disney's _Lady and the Tramp_.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 026, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

The films, political manifestos, essays on cultural history and other documents we will examine in this course all work in one way or another to present and defend a particular point of view. As we progress through the term we will concentrate not only on what a given text appears to be arguing but also on how that text works to achieve its ends.

This course has been designed with cumulative learning in mind. As we progress through each week's focus of study, you will see how the readings build into and out of one another. Students will be required to write three substantial essays, and each essay will grow out of a series of pre-draft assignments.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 027, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

College-level writing calls for clear, concise prose and focused critical analysis, but it also calls for originality, creative thinking, and a strong individual "voice." The best academic essays are sophisticated and thought-provoking, but they balance analytical work with a human voice, an attention to the details of prose in English, and a fluid, conversational logic that draws the argument forward. In this course, we will work toward that perfect balance of poetic language and academic analysis.

The college states that ENGLISH 125 should teach Michigan students to:

• Produce complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. • Read, summarize, analyze, and synthesize complex texts purposefully in order to generate and support writing. • Demonstrate an awareness of the strategies that writers use in different rhetorical situations. • Develop flexible strategies for organizing, revising, editing, and proofreading writing of varying lengths to improve development of ideas and appropriateness of expression. • Collaborate with peers and the instructor to define revision strategies for particular pieces of writing, set goals for improving writing, and devise effective plans for achieving those goals.

We will approach these goals from several angles, beginning with personal narrative, moving into description and argument, and finishing with a longer, individual research project. In the first part of this course, you will have many opportunities to practice and perfect your own style of interesting, grammatical prose. You will be responsible for one 4-5 page expository essay and one 3-4 page descriptive essay, in addition to various shorter writing assignments.

In the second part of the course, we will expand our writing horizons to the kind of thesis-driven, argumentative essay that appears on nearly every university syllabus. Keep in mind that this is not your basic five-paragraph essay! We will start by considering the argumentative structure of newspaper editorials, then we will apply the basics of persuasion to cultural critique and academic research projects. During this time, you will be responsible for one 2 page editorial essay, one 5-6 page cultural critique, and a final 6-8 page research paper in the style of your anticipated major.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 028, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

My goal in this course is simple: to help each of you become a better writer. Articulating your ideas well on paper and in conversation can be one of your greatest assets in college and professional life. In this course you will learn to identify and analyze the components of good persuasive and expository prose, and you'll develop the essential skills for writing critical and persuasive essays at the college level. You will learn to express and support your own opinions in a way that is appropriate to the genre and clear and interesting to the reader. We will closely study the work of established writers as well as the writing of our peers, and workshops and peer critiques will play a central role in this course. Assignments will include four formal, revised essays, peer critiques, weekly exercises, and readings.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 029, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

First-year composition course devoted to the writing and revising of several different kinds of essays.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 030, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This course is a college writing course exploring argument through fiction and non-fiction to teach students to write more effectively.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 031, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

Think of the best party or gathering you can imagine. Is it a room filled with clones, moving in unison to repetitive music, talking about the same topics with unvarying perspectives? Or is it an occasion of diversity, one where a variety of faces and shapes dance to unique internal beats, bringing multiple experiences and opinions, each movement and thought fresh and intriguing? Well, if you prefer the latter type of gathering, then this section of ENGLISH 125 is right for you. In it, you will explore, discuss and critique issues of diversity and identification intelligently and respectfully with your peers.

Also, you will improve your critical reading, writing, listening and thinking skills. We will read and view a variety of texts and explore a number of issues and writing styles that will enhance your university experience and prepare you for communication outside of the university. Your writing assignments will help you to identify and explore a central position, and present it in a coherent, well-developed response. Additionally, you will develop your research skills and will learn to use and document sources.

Group discussion, drafting, peer editing, workshopping, conferencing and hard work are essential to successful completion of this course. Come and join the party!

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 032, REC

Instructor: Carbonell,Vanessa

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR
Other: FYSem

A study of rhetoric, both as a body of principles, and as a practical art, emphasizing the writing of expository and argumentative essays.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 033, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

The year is 1955. Americans are watching their first color television, going to Disneyland, and eating McDonald's hamburgers for the first time. The Civil Rights movement gains prominent attention when Rosa Parks refuses to ride in a segregated bus. The term AI (articificial intelligence) is coined by Dartmouth mathematician John McCarthy. Bill Gates is born. Albert Einstein dies.

How do these pieces of information inform one another? How do you connect them? How does your intended major or personal experience affect what is most important? This is a writing based course where you have the opportunity to practice engaged academic work through the course title theme. Emphasis will be on the formation of analysis, how to be relevant and engage ongoing dialogues, and how to sustain/complicate your ideas. The theme of this course gives you the opportunity to practice these skills in a common environment with other students. Texts may include Allen Ginsberg's book of poetry _Howl_, Flannery O'Connor's short story collection _A Good Man is Hard to Find_, speeches, newspaper articles, a viewing of the film noir classic _Kiss Me Deadly_ and Disney's _Lady and the Tramp_.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 034, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This writing course focuses on the creation of complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. Students work closely with their peers and their instructor to develop their written prose. Readings cover a variety of genres and academic disciplines.

The primary goal of this course is to help you learn to write clear, compelling, and sophisticated prose. We will develop these skills through a range of methods: readings, discussions, writing exercises, peer critiques, and responses to other forms of expression such as media, visual art, music, and film. Because writing is an organized way of thinking, our engagement with the subject matter will be focused primarily on issues of style, craft, and execution.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 035, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This writing course focuses on the creation of complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. You will work closely with your peers and with me to develop your written prose. The readings will cover a variety of genres.

In this class, you will learn and practice working with the essential building blocks of writing. You will apply these skills to a variety of written assignments, aided by discussions, workshops, and individual conferences with me. We will emphasize constructing the thesis, developing and organizing content, planning an essay, drafting, and revising.

This class is for motivated students who truly want a solid foundation of writing skills, but also want to build upon that foundation with imagination and originality.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 036, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

The primary goal of this course is to develop the ability to tackle effectively the essay form as a medium of writing. We will learn how to use textual and non-textual evidence in the construction of a complex but lucid argument. Hopefully throughout the course students will also see that the ability to write a substantial essay is connected to the ability to read critically. In addition to rigorous writing exercises, a considerable portion of time and effort will therefore be devoted to a close and careful discussion of the assigned readings drawn from different fictional and non-fictional sources such as articles. short stories, poems, etc.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 037, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

First-year composition course devoted to the writing and revising of several different kinds of essays.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 038, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

Twenty-first century health professionals face a challenging, multidisciplinary professional environment. The public of the twenty-first century needs health professionals dedicated to the practice of medicine as a public discipline of responsible citizenship. The creative practitioner must possess strong analytic thinking and writing skills to distill the maelstrom of maelstrom of medical information into understandable prose that speaks to the publics he or she is called to serve. This course will prepare the student ready to learn to write clearly and to interest and speak to the intended audience.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 039, REC

Instructor: Ides,Matthew Allan

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR
Other: FYSem

A study of rhetoric, both as a body of principles, and as a practical art, emphasizing the writing of expository and argumentative essays.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 040, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

The primary objective of this course is to prepare you to write effectively. Together, we will study what it means to create the complex, analytic, and well-supported arguments so important in a university setting. Extensive practice and careful examination of the writing and revision processes will contribute to your academic success at the University of Michigan as well as your successful communication outside the classroom — interpersonally, as community members, and professionally. You will be required to write across the disciplines and to hone your skills as an intellectual and a critic, thinking in a variety of modes across the arts and humanities.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 041, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This writing course focuses on the creation of complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. Students work closely with their peers and the instructor to develop their written prose. Readings cover a variety of different genres and academic disciplines.

Whether you're interested in business school, law school, or rock school, the ability to communicate in a clear and compelling manner is key to success in college, and in life. Balancing our time between personal, argumentative, and analytical writing, we will aim to produce essays that are equally deft in vision and execution, displaying purpose, clarity, and elegance. To provide inspiration and lend guidance, we will read a broad selection of writers from varied ages, backgrounds and perspectives, and discuss how they manipulate and exercise their craft.

We will also spend a bit of time in the freshman English trenches, reviewing grammatical fundamentals and rules for research and citation. Perhaps most crucial to our class, however, will be the class time we spend "workshopping" each other's work — providing sensitive constructive criticism toward thoughtful revision and improvements.

You'll find that writing well is a skill that takes effort, discipline, and time, but the rewards — both pragmatic and figurative — are very real.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 042, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This course concentrates on acquiring the skills for the kind of writing that is required at the college level. In order to cultivate your ability to think and write critically and analytically, we will read various texts (including essays, advertisements, literary texts, and possibly graphic novels) that deal with diverse topics in regard to our contemporary culture (both in domestic and international contexts). We will treat those reading materials as a sort of sample writings that enable us to think about the ways in which a good analytic writing can be crafted. Major assignments include writing four essays, peer critiques, a short response paper, a discussion question, as well as leading one discussion on a given text.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 043, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This course develops student writing using a range of materials that explore the role of the visual in literature and culture.

Literacy today has become "literacies." We live in a world were learning to read visual texts has become as important as learning to read verbal ones. For this course, we will examine closely the rhetorical strategies used when producing both visual images and written works. Objects for our study will include art, essays, advertising, film, photographs, and cartoons. Seeing and writing have much more in common than you might think, and as you sharpen your tools of perception, you will also develop the ability to write with deeper insight and greater persuasiveness. Along with exploring the connections between the visual and verbal, we will spend a great deal of time developing the skills necessary for writing in college — a mastery of grammar and syntax, the ability to write with clarity, and an understanding of what it means to engage in academic discourse.

We are here to develop our craft as writers, and our classroom will function primarily as a workshop environment. As we work toward perfecting our craft, all of us will become comfortable with sharing our work in the classroom and quickly familiar with each other's words and writing. For the purposes of learning, we will become a community of writers. As a community, we will read texts, critically and write about what we see.

Our primary text will be Donald and Christine McQuade's Seeing and Writing 3 (Bedford/St. Martin, 2006).

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 044, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This writing course focuses on the creation of complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. Students work closely with their peers and the instructor to develop their written prose. Readings cover a variety of different genres and academic disciplines.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 045, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

The films, political manifestos, essays on cultural history and other documents we will examine in this course all work in one way or another to present and defend a particular point of view. As we progress through the term we will concentrate not only on what a given text appears to be arguing but also on how that text works to achieve its ends.

This course has been designed with cumulative learning in mind. As we progress through each week's focus of study, you will see how the readings build into and out of one another. Students will be required to write three substantial essays, and each essay will grow out of a series of pre-draft assignments.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 046, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

College-level writing calls for clear, concise prose and focused critical analysis, but it also calls for originality, creative thinking, and a strong individual "voice." The best academic essays are sophisticated and thought-provoking, but they balance analytical work with a human voice, an attention to the details of prose in English, and a fluid, conversational logic that draws the argument forward. In this course, we will work toward that perfect balance of poetic language and academic analysis.

The college states that ENGLISH 125 should teach Michigan students to:

• Produce complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. • Read, summarize, analyze, and synthesize complex texts purposefully in order to generate and support writing. • Demonstrate an awareness of the strategies that writers use in different rhetorical situations. • Develop flexible strategies for organizing, revising, editing, and proofreading writing of varying lengths to improve development of ideas and appropriateness of expression. • Collaborate with peers and the instructor to define revision strategies for particular pieces of writing, set goals for improving writing, and devise effective plans for achieving those goals.

We will approach these goals from several angles, beginning with personal narrative, moving into description and argument, and finishing with a longer, individual research project. In the first part of this course, you will have many opportunities to practice and perfect your own style of interesting, grammatical prose. You will be responsible for one 4-5 page expository essay and one 3-4 page descriptive essay, in addition to various shorter writing assignments.

In the second part of the course, we will expand our writing horizons to the kind of thesis-driven, argumentative essay that appears on nearly every university syllabus. Keep in mind that this is not your basic five-paragraph essay! We will start by considering the argumentative structure of newspaper editorials, then we will apply the basics of persuasion to cultural critique and academic research projects. During this time, you will be responsible for one 2 page editorial essay, one 5-6 page cultural critique, and a final 6-8 page research paper in the style of your anticipated major.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 047, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This course focuses on the creation of complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. The goal of this course is to teach students the discipline and skills needed for college writing. By the end of this course, students will possess an awareness for strategies that successful writers use in different rhetorical situations. They will develop their own strategies for organzing, revising, editing and proofreading essays of varying lengths to prepare students for future academic writing. This is a collaborative effort among peers and the instructor to help define these strategies for each writer. Readings cover a variety of different genres and academic disciplines.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 048, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

Have you ever wondered what constitutes "good writing"? Ever found a writer's description of something so vivid that you felt as though you had experienced it yourself? Have you ever wanted to persuade others about a topic you believed strongly in? Or simply paused over a familiar word like "intelligence" to consider what it really meant? Have you ever wondered how writing pertains to fields other than English? If so, this course is for you.

This course is designed to introduce you to the challenges and rewards of joining a community of college writers. As undergraduates at the University of Michigan, you will all be expected to contribute at some point to the discourse of whatever major you decide to specialize in. These contributions can take many forms, including speaking in oral discussions, collaborating with faculty or fellow students on research, and writing in a wide variety of genres for an equally wide variety of audiences. We will focus primarily on the last of these skills — preparing you to write for college discourse communities — while also addressing the close connections writing has with oral discussion and research. You will write four major essays that ask you to practice an assortment of rhetorical methods (including, but not limited to, description, definition, comparison and contrast, and argument), and we will attend to how such methods can be effectively combined. You will workshop drafts of all four essays in class, and you will have a number of shorter writing assignments designed to help you with the longer ones. In addition, you will keep a journal of informal writing in response to class readings. These readings will cover a variety of topics, and the writing assignments will encourage you to explore academic or personal interests beyond this class. If, by the end of the term, you have a better sense of what constitutes "good writing" across different disciplines, greater confidence in your ability to write effectively at the college level, and sharpened critical thinking skills, this course will have been a success.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 049, REC

Instructor: Button,Seth Lowell

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR
Other: FYSem

A study of rhetoric, both as a body of principles, and as a practical art, emphasizing the writing of expository and argumentative essays.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 050, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

Communicating ideas clearly and persuasively on the page is an essential part of being an educated person. In the classroom and beyond, your ability to organize, develop and express thoughts will serve the authority of your opinions. Along with writing skills, the critical reading skills gained in this class will enable you to become a more-informed critic of the social and political issues that affect your daily life.

In this course, you will learn how to define a thesis, or an organizing idea, and then support and develop that idea in a focused, thorough and stylistically sophisticated essay. The three papers you will draft and revise for this course are not simply exercises in writing, but rather they are opportunities for you to hone your critical reading and thinking skills while exploring topics of interest. We will be reading a number of published essays as models for your own work and also to generate class discussion about relevant social issues. These essays may spur ideas for your own writing as you examine various perspectives on issues such as race and class in America, mass media, consumer culture and more. Furthermore, as you express your ideas on the page, you will learn how to write for a specific audience, how to consider both sides of an issue by utilizing counter-arguments, how to organize an argument, as well as how to write with precision and flourish.

By the end of the semester, you will be able to develop a clear, focused and well-supported position within an essay of substantial length. Your essays will be workshopped in class with at least one of your peers; while this process is aimed at improving your critical reading and writing skills, you will also benefit by seeing how others in class are handling the assignment. Through workshopping and revising, you will obtain a better grasp on how significantly your writing can improve with each draft. Simply stated: Writing is revising. And, like a muscle, writing only gets stronger with use.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 051, REC

Instructor: Ben-Ishai,Elizabeth

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

What does it mean to "Argue with Images"? To present an argument using images as evidence or to challenge the images themselves? Both. In this intensive writing course, we will question how images make meaning and also learn to use those images to write persuasive academic arguments. In this course, you will write papers on advertisements, on photographs, on films, and on literary texts published in a field of visual images. We will read and discuss many different kinds of images as well as critical works on visual culture including pieces by Roland Barthes, John Berger, and Susan Sontag. How is a photograph different from a painting? What do techniques like "airbrushing" say about the status of the "real" in a visual image? How can we think about texts differently when they are read in the context of images? How can we think about images differently when they are read through critical texts? Why would a director choose to shoot a film scene in a specific way? In addition to questioning the meanings of images, we will work to simultaneously enhance our understanding of the images and texts we read and the ways in which we write by continually questioning assumptions that we may have about thinking, reading, and writing. We will challenge our comfortable categories of value and discuss why certain images affect us more than others — and we will analyze how they accomplish these effects.

Most importantly this class will focus on improving your writing. We will approach writing as a process: you will learn that you don't have to have all the answers when you sit down to write — in fact, you shouldn't. We will be working collaboratively on a daily basis to develop your writing techniques within the supportive community of the class — your classmates will be instrumental sites of learning in this course. There will be four revised papers due for this course as well as several shorter assignments to improve your writing processes. The best way to improve your writing is through practice and thoughtful feedback and thus every paper will have drafts and "workshopping" will be a central activity in the class. Each student will have feedback from smaller peer groups on every paper. Also, every student will have one opportunity over the course of the semester to receive feedback from the full-class workshop (i.e. the whole class will read your paper and give advice, encouragement, and constructive criticism). In this course, you will learn to argue with images and to adapt and to refine your writing processes to succeed in college writing.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 052, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This course will introduce ways to construct strong, sophisticated essays and persuasive arguments. Our focus will be to transcend the notion of evaluating written work on the basis of personal aesthetics or preferences: rather, we will investigate the strategies authors employ to develop compelling arguments and document personal experiences. Students will submit short writing assignments every week, as well as two longer (5-7) page essays and a final paper. Collaboration is highly encouraged, and therefore students will be expected to submit critiques of their peers' work and present their own pieces during in-class workshops.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 053, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

A study of rhetoric, both as a body of principles, and as a practical art, emphasizing the writing of expository and argumentative essays.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 054, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

Writing is a skill you will use for the rest of your life and throughout your college career. In this class we will practice writing several different types of argumentative and analytical essays while focusing on the themes of both place and politics. How does our environment shape our attitudes and our political views? How do the place we're from and our memories and feelings about that place fit into our ideas about our place in the world, both politically and in terms of our individual identity? These are questions we will attempt to answer by looking at the ways other authors deal with these issues in novels, poetry, and non-fiction essays. This course focuses on developing a broad range of writing skills for use both in college and afterward.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 055, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This writing course focuses on the creation of complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. You will work closely with your peers and with me to develop your written prose. The readings will cover a variety of genres.

In this class, you will learn and practice working with the essential building blocks of writing. You will apply these skills to a variety of written assignments, aided by discussions, workshops, and individual conferences with me. We will emphasize constructing the thesis, developing and organizing content, planning an essay, drafting, and revising.

This class is for motivated students who truly want a solid foundation of writing skills, but also want to build upon that foundation with imagination and originality.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 056, REC

Instructor: Cooper,George H

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

Taught in conjunction with the Michigan Community Scholars Program, this course challenges students to reflect on and articulate social tensions that constitute what we live in as a community. We have two community partners to help us in this work: COURSE, Community Organization for Urban Revitalization and Sustainable Environment; and HERO, Homeless Empowerment Relationship Organization. Guided by these community, non-profit organizations, we will direct our attention to issues of homelessness, low income living, suburban sprawl, food consumption and production, especially as they become themes for investigation and writing. Some of this writing will be designed to assist our community partners in their work, and in that way students have an opportunity to effect change in the community and to write for an audience beyond each other and the teacher. Students will write frequent short reaction papers to their reading and experiences in the community. Students will also write three longer essays that cover a range of styles, from personal narrative, to exposition, to academic argument. The combination of these two, non-profit organizations with the principles and goals of a writing course is challenging, and we will need to remember the role writing plays in knowledge transmission and possession. The combination of our different parts — the demands of language with the demands of curriculum — will need constant attention, patience, and creativity, recognizing that a successful integration might very well defy understanding and explanation. And yet, that is what we will attempt — to understand and explain. We will read. We will talk. We will explain. We will argue. We will listen. We will pursue success, success in writing, in reading, in understanding a culture that might seem intent on destroying itself, but that also retains the possibility of reconstruction and its own re-visioning and articulation.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 057, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

The office of First and Second Year Studies says that ENGLISH 125 "focuses on the creation of complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. Students work closely with their peers and the instructor to develop their written prose. Readings cover a variety of different genres and academic disciplines." (FSYS, A Guide to English 124 and 125, pg 20).

I submit to you the following: the ability to express yourself effectively in writing is the single most important skill that you will acquire in college. No, I take it back. In life. People who can communicate clearly write the best grant proposals, job applications, academic essays, emails, love letters, etc. Though not all essays begin as explicitly persuasive (when you sit down to begin writing, you might not even know your own aims), writing is at bottom an attempt to get what you want. You may want people to laugh, to understand your perspective, to interrogate their own assumptions, to rethink their stance on an issue, and/or to trust you; but whatever your goal, you are trying to manipulate people with your words.

In this course, we will focus on crafting essays (personal and analytic) with a clear sense of purpose, an awareness of audience, a complex understanding of all sides of an issue, and the kind of technical elegance that makes a reader want to trust a writer. We will do at least the following: read a lot of published essays, engage in the occasional in-class writing assignment, dedicate an enormous amount of class-time to (constructively) critiquing one another's work, and revise our own essays beyond recognition. Expect to be writing more or less constantly, but also, except to like some of it. By the end of the semester, you will each be the proud owner of at least 25-30 pages of really polished prose.

(Disclaimer: I am what some people consider a Grammar Fascist. I believe that a mastery of the technical aspects of formal writing endows the author with credibility necessary to gain/maintain a reader's trust. I *will* waste as much class time as I have to on this stuff. You've been warned.)

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 058, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This writing course focuses on the creation of complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. Students work closely with their peers to develop their written prose. Readings cover a variety of different genres.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 059, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

Writing helps us envision, influence, and contextualize our global community. Through the processes of reading, writing, and editing, this course will explore what it means to live a global community. Writing will serve as a way to generate, revise, and articulate thoughts as we explore a variety of questions: How do we define ourselves and others within the context of community? Since language is often a location of power, how do silence and naming contribute to global conflicts? How do we communicate to affect change within these larger communities?

While exploring these questions, we will focus on the creation of complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. Students will work closely with their peers to develop their written prose, as they engage in all aspects of the writing process. Readings will cover a variety of different genres and academic disciplines, while focusing on issues of globalization.

In this section, writing will be considered as both a student activity and as an object of study. Communicating knowledge in a variety of academic contexts is crucial to academic success. Therefore, exploring issues of grammar, usage, mechanics, and style will also be central to this course. Students will be expected to engage actively in a workshop style class, which requires openness to giving and receiving feedback.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 060, REC

Instructor: Tessier,Randall L

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

Using a course text, Everything's an Argument, we will seek to improve our writing by focusing on the connection between reading, writing and thinking.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 061, REC

Instructor: Tessier,Randall L

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

Using a course text, Everything's an Argument, we will seek to improve our writing by focusing on the connection between reading, writing and thinking.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 062, REC

Instructor: Zimmerman,Enid J

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

A study of rhetoric, both as a body of principles, and as a practical art, emphasizing the writing of expository and argumentative essays.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 063, REC

Instructor: Zimmerman,Enid J

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

A study of rhetoric, both as a body of principles, and as a practical art, emphasizing the writing of expository and argumentative essays.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 064, REC

Instructor: Bankowski,Geoffrey Martin

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

It is often heard that writing well is a natural phenomenon, that some people have what it takes and others do not, and that this is somehow determined at birth. One of the goals of this course is to prove this wrong. While it may be true that some writers produce smooth, powerful prose in a way that makes their work seem effortless, there is a very good chance that they have worked hard somewhere along the way. Writing well, like anything really valuable, is difficult. Though it is directly related to thinking and speaking, it is a process quite different. We will attempt to distinguish how this is so, determining as we do the difficulties particular to writing, and will proceed gradually to develop your ability to write clearly and with authority.

The first few weeks of the course will be spent taking a closer look at the actual process, the experience of getting words down. It is usually at this early stage, before we barely begin, that anxiety or confusion takes us from the path. My hope is that a continued exploration of this difficult first stage of writing, and the sharing of experiences with it, will develop a level of familiarity and comfort that will allow each of you to take the risks necessary to understand and communicate your complex ideas, emotions and insights more successfully.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 065, REC

Instructor: Bankowski,Geoffrey Martin

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

It is often heard that writing well is a natural phenomenon, that some people have what it takes and others do not, and that this is somehow determined at birth. One of the goals of this course is to prove this wrong. While it may be true that some writers produce smooth, powerful prose in a way that makes their work seem effortless, there is a very good chance that they have worked hard somewhere along the way. Writing well, like anything really valuable, is difficult. Though it is directly related to thinking and speaking, it is a process quite different. We will attempt to distinguish how this is so, determining as we do the difficulties particular to writing, and will proceed gradually to develop your ability to write clearly and with authority.

The first few weeks of the course will be spent taking a closer look at the actual process, the experience of getting words down. It is usually at this early stage, before we barely begin, that anxiety or confusion takes us from the path. My hope is that a continued exploration of this difficult first stage of writing, and the sharing of experiences with it, will develop a level of familiarity and comfort that will allow each of you to take the risks necessary to understand and communicate your complex ideas, emotions and insights more successfully.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 066, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This writing course focuses on the creation of complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. Students work closely with their peers and the instructor to develop their written prose. Readings will cover a variety of different genres and academic disciplines. Special emphasis will be placed on the effects of the way we present ourselves in writing, how it both shapes and reflects our identities or allows us to create personas, including an academic one. This course also aims to help students cultivate a sense of pride and investment in their work as discussants, readers (of class assignments and their peers' papers), and writers.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 067, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This writing course focuses on the creation of complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. Students work closely with their peers and the instructor to develop their written prose. Readings cover a variety of different genres and academic disciplines.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 068, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This course focuses on the creation of complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. Students work closely with their peers and the instructor to develop their written prose. Readings cover a variety of different genres and academic disciplines. This section of ENGLISH 125 will be divided into two parts. The first half of the class will invite students to examine the process of writing, both in terms of their experience with writing and in terms of their budding careers as academic writers. The second part of the course will examine the intersection of science and politics, meaning how scientific ideas that have political significance are treated in both academic and non-academic discourses.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 069, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

"The essay form as a whole has long been associated with an experimental method," Philip Lopate writes, "To essay is to attempt, to test, to make a run at something without knowing whether you are going to succeed." In teaching the essay, I want you to carry away not only improved writing skills, but, beyond that, the capacity to try on new ideas, to take risks, and to question. Since most of you, though you will, of course, need to write in the future, will not decide to be writers, this capacity is the most useful skill a writing course can teach, a skill you will need in whatever profession you choose. Most university classes require this capacity for questioning, but a writing course is uniquely suited to teach it; the human ability to reason has developed alongside our ability for language, and articulating an idea will often force you to see its flaws, to question and address them.

The focus of this class, therefore, is not what one should do, but rather why. Instead of giving you "rules" for writing, I will ask you to question why such rules exist, how you can use them to your advantage, and when they can be broken: we'll read published essays which frequently resist conventions — they delay the thesis, use first and second person, use sentence fragments or run-ons — and we'll assess why and when such conventions can be ignored.

A good essay is half good writing and half good ideas, though this kind of division is false. Clear writing leads to clear ideas, and vice versa. I want you to think brilliantly in this class, and the writing will follow; I want to write brilliantly, and the thoughts will follow.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 070, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

"The essay form as a whole has long been associated with an experimental method," Philip Lopate writes, "To essay is to attempt, to test, to make a run at something without knowing whether you are going to succeed." In teaching the essay, I want you to carry away not only improved writing skills, but, beyond that, the capacity to try on new ideas, to take risks, and to question. Since most of you, though you will, of course, need to write in the future, will not decide to be writers, this capacity is the most useful skill a writing course can teach, a skill you will need in whatever profession you choose. Most university classes require this capacity for questioning, but a writing course is uniquely suited to teach it; the human ability to reason has developed alongside our ability for language, and articulating an idea will often force you to see its flaws, to question and address them.

The focus of this class, therefore, is not what one should do, but rather why. Instead of giving you "rules" for writing, I will ask you to question why such rules exist, how you can use them to your advantage, and when they can be broken: we'll read published essays which frequently resist conventions — they delay the thesis, use first and second person, use sentence fragments or run-ons — and we'll assess why and when such conventions can be ignored.

A good essay is half good writing and half good ideas, though this kind of division is false. Clear writing leads to clear ideas, and vice versa. I want you to think brilliantly in this class, and the writing will follow; I want to write brilliantly, and the thoughts will follow.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 071, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

In this section of ENGLISH 125, I hope we can defeat the myth that academic writing is such a burdensome process. Hopefully, through studying literature, studying each other's essays, and studying our own, as a group, we will discover a working definition of academic writing and how it works to our own advantage. As students responding to and interacting with what we're learning in our classes, it benefits us just as much as the professor who requires the finished, polished paper.

Through open class discussion, and workshopping your essays in small groups and as a class, I hope this semester amounts to a collaborative, open and fun experience that helps us all understand a little better the way the writing process adds depth and diversity to our relationship with our college courses.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 072, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

A study of rhetoric, both as a body of principles, and as a practical art, emphasizing the writing of expository and argumentative essays.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 073, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This writing course focuses on the creation of complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. Students work closely with their peers and the instructor to develop their written prose. Readings cover a variety of different genres and academic disciplines.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 074, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

College-level writing calls for clear, concise prose and focused critical analysis, but it also calls for originality, creative thinking, and a strong individual "voice." The best academic essays are sophisticated and thought-provoking, but they balance analytical work with a human voice, an attention to the details of prose in English, and a fluid, conversational logic that draws the argument forward. In this course, we will work toward that perfect balance of poetic language and academic analysis.

The college states that ENGLISH 125 should teach Michigan students to:

• Produce complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. • Read, summarize, analyze, and synthesize complex texts purposefully in order to generate and support writing. • Demonstrate an awareness of the strategies that writers use in different rhetorical situations. • Develop flexible strategies for organizing, revising, editing, and proofreading writing of varying lengths to improve development of ideas and appropriateness of expression. • Collaborate with peers and the instructor to define revision strategies for particular pieces of writing, set goals for improving writing, and devise effective plans for achieving those goals.

We will approach these goals from several angles, beginning with personal narrative, moving into description and argument, and finishing with a longer, individual research project. In the first part of this course, you will have many opportunities to practice and perfect your own style of interesting, grammatical prose. You will be responsible for one 4-5 page expository essay and one 3-4 page descriptive essay, in addition to various shorter writing assignments.

In the second part of the course, we will expand our writing horizons to the kind of thesis-driven, argumentative essay that appears on nearly every university syllabus. Keep in mind that this is not your basic five-paragraph essay! We will start by considering the argumentative structure of newspaper editorials, then we will apply the basics of persuasion to cultural critique and academic research projects. During this time, you will be responsible for one 2 page editorial essay, one 5-6 page cultural critique, and a final 6-8 page research paper in the style of your anticipated major.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 075, REC

Instructor: Feigenbaum,Paul T

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

How is history written? How is memory written? Who writes either, and who decides who will read what? What is the distinction between these two genres? Are the differences about style? About facts? About truth? About point of view and voice? And what is the relationship between them? Are there ways that history and memory are similar? What are the consequences — both broadly and personally — of making that claim? This class is designed to help you become better writers of argumentative, analytical papers. The readings I have chosen are designed to give you a jumping off point for your own thinking, both in what they argue and how they argue. This means that sometimes they may be challenging on the first reading, but never fear! That's what the class discussions are for. Through the discussions and your own in-class and out-of-class writings, you will learn to demystify both the arcane land of college writing and college reading. To help you achieve this proficiency, you will be writing and rewriting several essays of increasing length, focusing on developing well-thought out and carefully analyzed arguments. This class is not supposed to terrify you, but to help you make the transition into a more rigorous model of academic writing and to familiarize you with its conventions so that you can use them to your own advantage. The essays and articles we read are the stepping off place and inspiration for our writing, but the most important texts in this class will be your own writing. We will focus our energy on writing and rewriting papers you have produced for class, using the initial texts as grounding. Let me emphasize: this class is intended to help you develop better skills as a reader and writer.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 076, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

The primary goal of this course of ENGLISH 125 for the Health Sciences Scholars Program is to help you learn to write clear, compelling, and sophisticated prose. In short, this course is designed to help you to learn to write well at the college level, regardless of your field of study. After all, as we will talk about from day one, good writing is good writing. We will work to develop writing skills through a wide range of methods: readings, discussions, writing exercises, peer critiques, and responses to other forms of expression. Writing is an organized way of thinking, and our engagement with the subject matter will be focused primarily on issues of style, craft, and execution. By learning to identify and evaluate the craft elements and prose strategies used by other writers (both published authors and your own classmates), my hope is that you will begin to employ them more effectively in your own pieces of writing. Of course, the most important part of a piece of good writing is its significance. No matter how well crafted a line, how beautiful a transition, good writing has to say something, show us a new way of seeing something, and we will also examine different ways authors imbue their work with relevance and meaning. Each of you bring something unique to the classroom; each of you has a unique voice. Voice gives life to writing, whether creative or scholarly, by imbuing it with individuality and texture and by allowing you to interpret culture through your own identity. Writing, after all, is a process of filtering. But voice is not only a way to explore identity and significance. Awareness of an appropriate voice can lead you to consider the concept of audience and to realize that you may have many different voices; a personal narrative calls for a different voice, say, than does an analysis of a foreign film or a scientific challenge. Over the course of this semester we will explore the ways in which individuals — including ourselves — negotiate and examine the different aspects of our contemporary culture, and how these investigations might lead to an authentic voice.

ESSAYS, IN-CLASS EXERCISES, SHORT ASSIGNMENTS, AND READINGS If I had a dollar for every person who told me, "I have a great idea for a novel/screenplay/essay, if I only could write it," I would be a rich, rich woman. There is a strange assumption that having the great idea is all that writing takes, and once you have it, writing is a piece of cake, just a matter of getting those brilliant ideas down on paper in whatever order they come. In a sense, perhaps, the idea is part of it, but I wish writing were this easy. Writing is a craft, an art, and a skill. Writing is not a piece of cake. It takes work, thought, and lots and lots of revision. Writing is a process. Sometimes, we don't know how we feel about a topic until we begin to write about it. Writing helps us work out different issues in our heads, to reflect, to analyze, to answer questions. First and foremost, there's no way around it: the best way to improve your writing skills is through practice, and lots of it. You should expect to work very hard in this class. You should expect in-class writing exercises that respond to and reflect on our readings. Several short essays will be assigned to help develop your skills of observation and reflective thought. The major essay projects that you will complete as the class progresses will be based on the various forms of writing we will explore this semester. When trying to communicate your ideas, technical skills count, too. The most compelling, provocative ideas are only well served if they are articulated well, and proper grammar and punctuation can make all the difference. Secondly, we become better writers through reading. A writer who claims he or she doesn't read is probably, well, a very limited writer. I hope this class will expose you to a wide range of styles. I hope that our discussions of the published work will be as helpful to your writing as our in-class workshops and my comments on your work. In many classes you might have been in, you may have used the readings as prompts for essays: analyzing a character or theme or comparing or contrasting a certain element in two different works. Here, while we will surely be paying attention to theme and character, among many other things, the readings we will examine will serve more as models for the essays I will ask you to write. Finally, we will also be reading some craft essays: different writers' thoughts and ideas about the actual process, art, and craft of writing. A myth exists, perhaps, that good college writing involves using million-dollar words or always writing in a high diction, that is, writing in a way that "sounds smart." Rather, I think good college writing is not about sounding smart, per se, but about sounding authentic. I'd like you, as writers and students, to be able to think through complex ideas, to challenge comfortable assumptions, and to write like you mean it. If you don't believe in what you're writing, or if you're using meaningless, convoluted phrases or giant words just to sound impressive, you most likely will come up with a very boring, stilted, or unimpressive essay. Write what you believe. Believe what you write. Say it clearly. Write like you mean it.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 077, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

The films, political manifestos, essays on cultural history and other documents we will examine in this course all work in one way or another to present and defend a particular point of view. As we progress through the term we will concentrate not only on what a given text appears to be arguing but also on how that text works to achieve its ends.

This course has been designed with cumulative learning in mind. As we progress through each week's focus of study, you will see how the readings build into and out of one another. Students will be required to write three substantial essays, and each essay will grow out of a series of pre-draft assignments.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 078, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This is a normal college writing course, in which you will practice thinking/reasoning clearly and writing out your thoughts in easily understood language. Throughout this particular section of the course, however, we will be focussing on the question: "what makes sense?"; that is, what can we say about a topic or object so that we can make an argument about it such that other people understand and can respond to? This obviously involves some understanding of the audience we write for, but it also involves a constant awareness of the form of writing itself, the way we construct an argument in the same way we construct buildings or bikes or whatever else, that is, out of units or pieces that we put together or carefully pile on top of each other. I hope that the class will enable you to see that the art of "reasoning" as this construction of units is both binding and liberating: it disallows claims that don't have either evidence or some sense of causality behind them, but it also doesn't follow one absolute, pre-given set of rules. There are many ways of making sense of a given topic, each of them with both their blind-spots and points of insight; much of our work in the class will revolve around identifying these methods in other writers and, of course, practicing our own methods of reasoning and exercising our abilities to reason in our writing. In order to keep ourselves focussed on reasoning and writing, we won't be doing extensive reading; rather we will look at small pieces of writing — sometimes only paragraphs at a time — in order to see how they are reasoning or making sense of an issue. These readings will vary and will include philosophical texts, standard academic essays, sports/fashion writing, fiction, historical writings, and whatever happens to be in the paper that day. Assignments will consist of frequent short essays — sometimes only a few sentences and (probably) never more than a page — which will lead up to either one or two longer papers. In these essays and paper(s), students will practice talking both about themselves and their opinions and about more objective things, such as a historical event, a theory, a biological phenomenon, etc. Students should expect to do an unusual amount of thinking and talking while in class, and those students with a critical or analytical bent are encouraged to enroll.

Enjoy the rest of summer, and see you in September.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 079, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

A study of rhetoric, both as a body of principles, and as a practical art, emphasizing the writing of expository and argumentative essays.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 080, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

A study of rhetoric, both as a body of principles, and as a practical art, emphasizing the writing of expository and argumentative essays.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 081, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

COURSE DESCRIPTION: The pulse of this writing workshop is your voice. In order to explore the art of writing you must begin with what you value, what moves you, how you communicate, how you listen, and how you observe. What you have that no other writer has is your own way of phrasing, your own way of seeing, your own history that shapes your lens. This class is designed to give you the structure and tools you need to realize your own intentions and to reach your audience. Revising is the most important thing we do as writers, and we will spend the majority of our time doing so. Essays are a place for you to think, and by doing so on the page — allowing your ideas to dictate your essay's form — you can interest even those who disagree with your point of view.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 082, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

You are in college. You must write. In this course, you will learn skills of the writing craft to take into whatever discipline you choose. We will create essays that emphasize discovery, analysis, and clarity. We will read a broad variety of essays, deconstructing them in class discussion and using them as models for our own work. You will produce new writing, workshop (both peer group and whole class), and revise. This class will give you a foundation for solid writing and will encourage brilliant thought.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 083, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

A study of rhetoric, both as a body of principles, and as a practical art, emphasizing the writing of expository and argumentative essays.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 084, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This section of ENGLISH125 will focus on the peculiar construction of counter- and sub-cultures, those groups whose identities are generated negatively within a larger, dominant culture. The course consists of three units: 1) defining culture; 2) a brief history of American counterculture; 3) comparative documentarian histories of British "punk" [the Sex Pistols story]. Students should be advised that a few of the assigned texts contain frank language.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 085, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

Fifteen percent of the population nationally and worldwide are categorized as people with disabilities, making them a large physical minority. Despite their numbers, they have been historically disenfranchised and marginalized in society at large. Only within the last twenty years has disability gained visibility within the discourses of knowledge.

In this section of ENGLISH 125, we will look at representative texts from the field of disability studies, texts which present important writings about disability. We will examine texts written by experts in cultural studies, literary criticism, sociology, biology, the visual arts, pedagogy, and postcolonial studies, in order to gain a comprehensive overview to the issue of disability and to practise writing abilities.

Good writing is a process combining engaged, complex thinking, close reading of sources and last, but not least, technical competence. Thus, we will thoroughly practise each one of these skills within the field of disability studies, which is ideal for our purpose. By examining the notion of the normal body, revealing assumptions in the politics and poetics of social and physical space, sexuality, language, textuality, access to resources, and public policy decisions concerning the body, you will further your abilities through a wide range of methods: readings, discussions, writing exercises, peer critiques, and responses to other forms of expression, including visual art and film. Apart from learning how to organize essays of varied lengths or how to use and quote outside sources correctly by completing a variety of writing exercises and projects in and out of class, this section should also help you develop an authentic and mindful voice as an individual. Basic course requirements are, among others, a portfolio with at least 25-30 pages of revised prose and other writing assignments.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 086, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

A study of rhetoric, both as a body of principles, and as a practical art, emphasizing the writing of expository and argumentative essays.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 087, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This section of ENGLISH 125 will focus on the peculiar construction of counter- and sub-cultures, those groups whose identities are generated negatively within a larger, dominant culture. The course consists of three units: 1) defining culture; 2) a brief history of American counterculture; 3) comparative documentarian histories of British "punk" [the Sex Pistols story]. Students should be advised that a few of the assigned texts contain frank language.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 088, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

Welcome to ENGLISH 125.088. This is an intensive writing course that will focus on the creation of complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. You will work closely with your peers and your instructor to develop your written prose. Readings will cover a variety of genres and academic disciplines.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 089, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

Fifteen percent of the population nationally and worldwide are categorized as people with disabilities, making them a large physical minority. Despite their numbers, they have been historically disenfranchised and marginalized in society at large. Only within the last twenty years has disability gained visibility within the discourses of knowledge.

In this section of ENGLISH 125, we will look at representative texts from the field of disability studies, texts which present important writings about disability. We will examine texts written by experts in cultural studies, literary criticism, sociology, biology, the visual arts, pedagogy, and postcolonial studies, in order to gain a comprehensive overview to the issue of disability and to practise writing abilities.

Good writing is a process combining engaged, complex thinking, close reading of sources and last, but not least, technical competence. Thus, we will thoroughly practise each one of these skills within the field of disability studies, which is ideal for our purpose. By examining the notion of the normal body, revealing assumptions in the politics and poetics of social and physical space, sexuality, language, textuality, access to resources, and public policy decisions concerning the body, you will further your abilities through a wide range of methods: readings, discussions, writing exercises, peer critiques, and responses to other forms of expression, including visual art and film. Apart from learning how to organize essays of varied lengths or how to use and quote outside sources correctly by completing a variety of writing exercises and projects in and out of class, this section should also help you develop an authentic and mindful voice as an individual. Basic course requirements are, among others, a portfolio with at least 25-30 pages of revised prose and other writing assignments.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 090, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

Communicating ideas clearly and persuasively on the page is an essential part of being an educated person. In the classroom and beyond, your ability to organize, develop and express thoughts will serve the authority of your opinions. Along with writing skills, the critical reading skills gained in this class will enable you to become a more-informed critic of the social and political issues that affect your daily life.

In this course, you will learn how to define a thesis, or an organizing idea, and then support and develop that idea in a focused, thorough and stylistically sophisticated essay. The three papers you will draft and revise for this course are not simply exercises in writing, but rather they are opportunities for you to hone your critical reading and thinking skills while exploring topics of interest. We will be reading a number of published essays as models for your own work and also to generate class discussion about relevant social issues. These essays may spur ideas for your own writing as you examine various perspectives on issues such as race and class in America, mass media, consumer culture and more. Furthermore, as you express your ideas on the page, you will learn how to write for a specific audience, how to consider both sides of an issue by utilizing counter-arguments, how to organize an argument, as well as how to write with precision and flourish.

By the end of the semester, you will be able to develop a clear, focused and well-supported position within an essay of substantial length. Your essays will be workshopped in class with at least one of your peers; while this process is aimed at improving your critical reading and writing skills, you will also benefit by seeing how others in class are handling the assignment. Through workshopping and revising, you will obtain a better grasp on how significantly your writing can improve with each draft. Simply stated: Writing is revising. And, like a muscle, writing only gets stronger with use.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 091, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

Writing, like most forms of performance, demands creative application of polished skills. In order to acquire and practice these skills, we will look back to the contexts in which they were first formalized and studied under the concept of rhetoric: the Greek city states and Roman republic of classical antiquity. As we gain familiarity with the forms, processes, and strategies of argument practiced by the ancients, we will begin to apply them to analyses of readings drawn from a range of historical periods and fields and employ them in a variety of writing assignments.

Although classical antiquity does not represent the last word on theories of rhetoric and composition, it affords contemporary writers a particularly strong foundation, in part because its social context bears many parallels with the challenges we face. These include complexities of cultural diversity and economic inequality, questions of elitism versus populism, and conflicting views regarding the power of tradition and the possibilities of the future.

Students in this course will learn how to "invent" or discover arguments, recognize fallacies, and make calculated decisions regarding kinds of appeal (logical, ethical, or emotional). Where is your composition strengthened by deduction and where by induction? How can awareness of your subject matter and target audience help you choose the most effective tone and style? Such considerations will contribute to your development as a writer on the level of the sentence, paragraph structure, and the organization of an essay. Ultimately, the goal is to increase your facility with language in order to sharpen your analytical faculties and to exercise your own voice with increased effectiveness.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 092, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This writing course focuses on the creation of complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. Students work closely with their peers and their instructor to develop their written prose. Readings cover a variety of genres and academic disciplines.

The primary goal of this course is to help you learn to write clear, compelling, and sophisticated prose. We will develop these skills through a range of methods: readings, discussions, writing exercises, peer critiques, and responses to other forms of expression such as media, visual art, music, and film. Because writing is an organized way of thinking, our engagement with the subject matter will be focused primarily on issues of style, craft, and execution.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 093, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This writing course focuses on the creation of complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. Students work closely with their peers and their instructor to develop their written prose. Readings cover a variety of genres and academic disciplines.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 094, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This writing course focuses on the creation of complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. Students work closely with their peers and the instructor to develop their written prose. Readings cover a variety of different genres and academic disciplines.

The aim of this course is to make students more comfortable with academic writing. Since college writing demands lengthy and complex papers, the process of writing will be emphasized. The course writing requirements will consist of essays (one 2-3 pages in length, one 4-5 pages in length, and one 7-8 pages in length) and summaries (one 1-2 pages in length and one 3-4 pages in length). Students will have the opportunity to workshop their work in progress and revise drafts.

The reading and discussion of a variety of texts (printed, oral, and visual; theoretical, professional, and creative) will aid students in the process of constructing viable arguments and in developing personal style. Students will be asked to critically assess their own goals and progress and encouraged to find their own balance between the personal and the public in their writing. The class will also address theoretical questions connected with the ethics and politics of writing.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 095, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This writing course focuses on the creation of complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. Students work closely with their peers to develop their written prose. Readings cover a variety of different genres.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 096, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

How important are our assumptions about language, culture, and environment to the process of thinking and writing? In this course we will take a rigorous analytical look at the subjects of our reading and writing in the hope of challenging some of our safe and easy assumptions about them. By clearing away these assumptions, not only will our writing become sharper and stronger, but the enhanced capacity for critical thinking should lead us to develop more detailed, more interesting, and more original expository and argumentative essays.

We will look at a wide range of professional essays, but will also spend a good bit of time examining writing from within our class. By engaging in peer editing, reading both classic essays and the discourse of contemporary culture, and writing and rewriting pages of carefully considered prose, students will gain knowledge and skills for further academic writing. Each formal paper will have a prescribed approach and a specific aim, but students will have free reign to invent their own paper topics.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 097, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

A study of rhetoric, both as a body of principles, and as a practical art, emphasizing the writing of expository and argumentative essays.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 098, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This writing course focuses on the creation of complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. Students work closely with their peers and the instructor to develop their written prose. Readings cover a variety of different genres and academic disciplines.

This section takes its title from the opening pages of The Practical Guide to Writing, which maintains that writing is, in part, a physical act, a skill that can be learned and improved by reading, writing, and revising as much as possible and by receiving critical feedback from others. Good writing is also interconnected with good reading, so we will discuss assigned readings together with an eye toward what choices go into writing an essay and how they affect the final product. An essential component of this course is the workshop, where we will read and critique each other's papers. The goal of the workshop is to provide a variety of viewpoints and suggestions from which the author may draw when revising his or her paper. This requires participation from everyone.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 099, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

My goal in this course is simple: to help each of you become a better writer. Articulating your ideas well on paper and in conversation can be one of your greatest assets in college and professional life. In this course you will learn to identify and analyze the components of good persuasive and expository prose, and you'll develop the essential skills for writing critical and persuasive essays at the college level. You will learn to express and support your own opinions in a way that is appropriate to the genre and clear and interesting to the reader. We will closely study the work of established writers as well as the writing of our peers, and workshops and peer critiques will play a central role in this course. Assignments will include four formal, revised essays, peer critiques, weekly exercises, and readings.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 100, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

Students will draw on their own memories and impressions of place to discover techniques for travel writing, personal narrative, and critical essay. Relevant reading material will inform discussion and provide writing models.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 101, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

So much of life is about dealing with change. The world is a flux of new technologies and old problems. Our sense of security has been altered by tragic events. The environment is shifting before our eyes. As college students, many of you live in a constant state of transition as you deal with new classes, new friends, new places to call home. In this class, while we engage with the topics of college academic writing, such as pre-writing, rhetoric, audience, persuasion, editing for correctness, and citing sources, we will also consider what it means to be in transition, whether the shift is global, local, or personal. This theme will also lend itself to our discussions about writing. As writing is best approached from a position of inquiry, the process of drafting requires us to remain in a transitory state as we pursue questions from different angles. The more we view writing as a process, not a final product, and the more comfortable we are with writing through the unknown, the more surprising and effortless our writing will become.

Over the course of the term, you will write three to four essays of increasing length, each of which will be workshopped, revised, and turned in for a final grade. The final essay will be accompanied by an annotated bibliography. Shorter assignments will help you transition into the longer essays by engaging with individual components of the overall tradition of college writing. We will discuss grammar as standards that reflect a static image of a living language, and you will work in groups to create your own grammar lesson. To help with your engagement with discussions and skills acquisition, you will also keep a writing journal, which will contain reading questions, free-writes, vocabulary notes, and pre- and post-class transitional exercises. The goal of this class is for you to challenge yourself by exploring complex ideas in your writing, without being overwhelmed by the new skills, attitudes, and ideas these explorations will inevitably require and ultimately produce.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 102, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

So much of life is about dealing with change. The world is a flux of new technologies and old problems. Our sense of security has been altered by tragic events. The environment is shifting before our eyes. As college students, many of you live in a constant state of transition as you deal with new classes, new friends, new places to call home. In this class, while we engage with the topics of college academic writing, such as pre-writing, rhetoric, audience, persuasion, editing for correctness, and citing sources, we will also consider what it means to be in transition, whether the shift is global, local, or personal. This theme will also lend itself to our discussions about writing. As writing is best approached from a position of inquiry, the process of drafting requires us to remain in a transitory state as we pursue questions from different angles. The more we view writing as a process, not a final product, and the more comfortable we are with writing through the unknown, the more surprising and effortless our writing will become.

Over the course of the term, you will write three to four essays of increasing length, each of which will be workshopped, revised, and turned in for a final grade. The final essay will be accompanied by an annotated bibliography. Shorter assignments will help you transition into the longer essays by engaging with individual components of the overall tradition of college writing. We will discuss grammar as standards that reflect a static image of a living language, and you will work in groups to create your own grammar lesson. To help with your engagement with discussions and skills acquisition, you will also keep a writing journal, which will contain reading questions, free-writes, vocabulary notes, and pre- and post-class transitional exercises. The goal of this class is for you to challenge yourself by exploring complex ideas in your writing, without being overwhelmed by the new skills, attitudes, and ideas these explorations will inevitably require and ultimately produce.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 103, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

Through reading and intensive writing, we'll explore how place, memory, and the workings of the mind build our sense of who we are and how we exist in the world — all the while working toward a mastery of college writing skills.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 104, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This introductory writing course will encourage students to explore their ideas, experience, and critical skills using the navigational tools of language. Balancing our time between personal, argumentative, and analytical writing, we will stake our own unique claims on written communication. To provide inspiration and lend guidance, we will read a broad selection of writers from varied ages, backgrounds and perspectives, and discuss how they manipulate and exercise their craft.

We will also spend a bit of time in the freshman English trenches, reviewing grammatical fundamentals and rules for research and citation. Perhaps most crucial to our class, however, will be the class time we spend "workshopping" each other's work — providing sensitive constructive criticism toward thoughtful revision and improvements.

SPECIAL NOTE FOR FALL, 2006: In commemoration of the fifth anniversary of the 9/11 attacks, this semester's course will feature a unit of readings/writings on the event and its cultural and emotional aftermath. While this focus will in NO way seek to exploit, morbidly, the events and emotions of 9/11, students who elect this section should be prepared to revisit some of the difficult images and realities of that tragic day.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 105, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This introductory writing course will encourage students to explore their ideas, experience, and critical skills using the navigational tools of language. Balancing our time between personal, argumentative, and analytical writing, we will stake our own unique claims on written communication. To provide inspiration and lend guidance, we will read a broad selection of writers from varied ages, backgrounds and perspectives, and discuss how they manipulate and exercise their craft.

We will also spend a bit of time in the freshman English trenches, reviewing grammatical fundamentals and rules for research and citation. Perhaps most crucial to our class, however, will be the class time we spend "workshopping" each other's work — providing sensitive constructive criticism toward thoughtful revision and improvements.

SPECIAL NOTE FOR FALL, 2006: In commemoration of the fifth anniversary of the 9/11 attacks, this semester's course will feature a unit of readings/writings on the event and its cultural and emotional aftermath. While this focus will in NO way seek to exploit, morbidly, the events and emotions of 9/11, students who elect this section should be prepared to revisit some of the difficult images and realities of that tragic day.

ENGLISH 140 — First-Year Literary Seminar
Section 001, SEM
The Sincerest Form

Instructor: Delbanco,Nicholas F

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem

A course in the nature and technique of contemporary short fiction, from the reader-writer's point-of-view. Close analysis of twelve examples of recent American prose, with an eye on authorial technique. Written work will consist of exercises in imitation, an effort to enter the style and specific rhetoric of the examples at hand. We will read short stories from Andrea Barrett, John Barth, Charles Baxter, Raymond Carver, Ernest Hemingway, Richard Ford, Jamaica Kincaid, Bernard Malamud, Lorrie Moore, Bharati Mukherjee, Tim O'Brien, and Flannery O'Connor. The article of faith on which this course is based is that imitation is not merely the sincerest form of flattery, but also a good way to grow.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

ENGLISH 140 — First-Year Literary Seminar
Section 003, SEM
Contemporary American Poetry and "the Personal"

Instructor: White,Gillian Cahill

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem

In his introduction to Contemporary American Poetry, critic Alfred Poulin asserts that one of the most notable differences between modern and contemporary American poetry is that "the latter is more personal and intimate." He almost immediately withdraws the claim, arguing that poems can't ever really be personal, because they call attention to themselves as fabrications. In this seminar, we explore and test the limits of both Poulin's claims: What is it about (some) contemporary poems that justifies calling them "personal?" What does that word imply — private, truthful, shocking, sincere, bodily, emotional, beyond interpretation, testimonial? What ideas about writing, reading and experience does the question of a poem's personality assume? In order to answer these questions, we begin by considering a range of short writings from the disciplines of psychology, philosophy, and literary criticism that help us to sharpen our understanding of what is meant by "personal." We then move on to a range of contemporary poems to test the "personal" as a critical rubric. Likely readings include work by T.S. Eliot, Robert Lowell, Sylvia Plath, Frank Bidart, Rita Dove, Sigmund Freud, Michel Foucault, and Roland Barthes. Students write weekly two page response papers, which will form the basis of two longer essays for the course. Short presentations may also be assigned.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

ENGLISH 223 — Creative Writing
Section 001, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: CE

Introductory creative writing course in which students compose pieces in fiction, poetry or drama.

ENGLISH 223 — Creative Writing
Section 002, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: CE

In this writing course we will read and write both poetry and fiction that, in addition to hopefully entertaining us, will help to inform and instruct our own creative writing in these two genres. Class time will incorporate a combination of both the discussion of assigned readings, and workshop, where we will critique and talk about your own writing that you bring to class.

ENGLISH 223 — Creative Writing
Section 003, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: CE

In this class we will practice the crafts of poetry and fiction. After reading published stories and poems and discussing what makes them work, we will apply the same procedure to our own writing. This course is designed to cultivate individual technique and appreciation for the techniques of other writers, both in the canon and in the classroom.

ENGLISH 223 — Creative Writing
Section 004, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: CE

The HitchWriter's Guide to the Galaxy* A writer's work relies on the realities of the world, yet a writer must also experience a disconnect from the expected in order to enter the imaginative realm. This course will serve as a guide into those creative worlds of poetry and short fiction. The class will be comprised of discussions on craft as well as a workshop in which we will conscientiously critique each others' work. In order to illuminate certain concepts, specific 20th century writers will be studied. Students will develop their own imaginations as well as a critical eye for the written word. As a result, the students will learn to view the world with perceptive eyes and write accordingly, creatively or otherwise. At the term's end, students will turn in writing journals and a final, polished portfolio of poetry and short fiction.

*Altered from The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams

ENGLISH 223 — Creative Writing
Section 005, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: CE

This course will introduce students to a range of approaches to the writing of literary poetry and fiction. Throughout the course, students will be expected to read and discuss a wide range of literature from the point of view of craft: we will be concerned with what mechanisms a poem or story employs to achieve its ultimate effect, and how we may incorporate these ideas into our own writing. Though a majority of the required reading will be American, students will also become familiar with the approaches and sensibilities of other, particularly European, literary traditions. Students will write and submit several poems and short stories to be workshopped in class and subsequently revised, the ultimate goal being a portfolio of polished, original creative work.

ENGLISH 223 — Creative Writing
Section 006, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: CE

This class is intended as an introduction to the writing and revision of poems and short stories. Herein, creative writing will be approached as both an art and a craft — in other words, as a process demanding equal parts academic rigor and a rigorous brand of emotional honesty. To this end, students will be expected to write four poems during the first section of the course and two short stories totaling at least twenty pages during the second. We will read and discuss numerous published poems and stories with an eye toward the lessons we can glean from them as writers; the crux of this course, though, will be our daily peer workshops, in which student work is read and commented upon in a thoughtful and respectful manner. From these workshops, students will generate ideas for revising their writing — that is to say, ideas for crafting their initial artistic impulses into works of emotional significance and resonance. Because of this focus on discussions and workshops, participation will be essential and attendance mandatory.

ENGLISH 223 — Creative Writing
Section 007, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: CE

"To find a form that accommodates the mess, that is the task of the artist now." — Samuel Beckett In this class, we'll explore poetry, fiction, lyrics, language-based visual art, jokes, movies, and drama as we entertain and discuss questions about what we do to words and what they do to us. Books will be read, work written, presentations given, and many analogies made.

ENGLISH 223 — Creative Writing
Section 008, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: CE

Introductory creative writing course in which students compose pieces in fiction, poetry or drama.

ENGLISH 223 — Creative Writing
Section 009, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: CE

Do you have a story to tell and don't quite know how to start? Do you love reading? If you answer yes, then this section of English 223 is for you. Class consists of in-class exercises, comments on assigned poems/stories, and the thoughtful workshop discussion of your writing. We'll read many contemporary stories and poems to learn the skills we need to communicate our ideas. These models and our discussion will aid you as you work towards your two finished portfolios of revised work (one poetry and one prose). Moreover, you'll become better readers of your own work and others as you begin to notice the skills a writer employs. Writing can be fun.

ENGLISH 223 — Creative Writing
Section 010, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: CE

This introductory course will focus exclusively on fiction writing. In the first half of the course, students will gain experience workshopping stories as they critique as a group a variety of published short fiction. The second half of the course will be devoted to students producing original short fiction that they will then have workshopped by the class.

ENGLISH 223 — Creative Writing
Section 011, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: CE

This course is designed to provide students with the skills necessary to execute college-level writing. Students will learn how to compose solid and thoughtful arguments in an elegant and sophisticated manner — skills that will be invaluable not only to the academic experience but in the "real world" as well. In other words, students will learn how to articulate ideas and opinions — arguments — vis-à-vis writing. To that end, we will dissect the vital parts of "good writing" (paragraphs, theses, etc.) so that students will be able to leave this course with a "tool box" of writing skills that they can take with them, not only on the rest of their college journey but into their professional lives and beyond.

Writing will be our top priority in this class and Asian/American Popular Culture will be the focused lens through which we explore, interrogate and learn what may seem like a daunting and nebulous field. As we shall see, good writing is both a process that requires practice and a skill set that can be acquired. Asian/American Popular Culture will provide us with a stimulating context from which to think critically about the writing process. While the theme is specific, writing assignments are designed to provide writing skills and experiences that will be useful in other class settings and in writing about other issues/topics. Thinking and writing about the material objects (food, clothing, etc.), visual creations (films, photography, etc.) and other cultural productions of Asian/America will help us answer the following theoretical question: Is there a unified field that we can call Asian/American popular culture? Attempting to answer this question will provide us entry into the culture of writing and as such, students will produce their own original contributions to the fields of Asian American Studies and Cultural Studies as they become proficient in the art of writing.

ENGLISH 223 — Creative Writing
Section 012, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: CE

This course will serve as an introduction to the art of writing poetry and fiction and how it contributes to human expression and experience. Through the complementary use of workshop and academic discussion, students will explore the range of their own writing while studying the work of other authors. The class will share and improve one another's work, and also address larger issues that surround creative writing as a dynamic art. Most importantly, students will be encouraged to experiment with language, and to discuss its nature and use. In addition to writing poetry and fiction, students will be responsible for weekly readings and other creative assignments.

ENGLISH 223 — Creative Writing
Section 013, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: CE

The focus of this course is to introduce students to the range of voices and styles found in contemporary fiction and poetry and to enable them to discover and hone their own distinctive voices as writers of poetry and prose. Extensive weekly readings of contemporary writers will be an essential component of this course. We will discuss the stylistic elements that make each writer distinctive and further explore these elements in frequent short writing exercises. Students will be expected to participate in thoughtful, constructive workshops of their peers' stories and poems and to repond to critiques of their own work with attentive, imaginative revisions. By semester's end students will be expected to produce a polished final portfolio consisting of at least five poems and twenty pages of prose that reflect their efforts in revision and their attention to the nuances of language and voice.

ENGLISH 223 — Creative Writing
Section 014, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: CE

"The man who can't visualize a horse galloping on a tomato is an idiot."
-Andre Breton

This will be a challenging course, so if you signed up for creative writing hoping it would be a cake-walk, or an "easy A", you might want to consider changing sections. That said, if you're truly interested in becoming a better writer, I've planned a very exciting semester for us!

There will be twelve books (don't panic — they're all fairly short & we won't be reading them in their entirety!). The writers we will be reading include Octavia E. Butler, Italo Calvino, Michael Chabon, Amy Gerstler, A.M. Homes, Jennifer L. Knox, Ben Lerner, Sharon Olds, Breece D'J Pancake, D.A. Powell, Jim Shepherd & Frank Stanford.

Our Monday sessions will be devoted to examining the readings, viewing films, and discussing a variety of writing-related topics such as making chapbooks, submitting for publication, performing your work in public, and bending genres in your writing.

Our Wednesday sessions will be devoted to blind workshop. That is, we will be reading selected student writing (from which the names have been removed) and discussing that work in a roundtable format.

There will be no tests, papers or quizzes in this class. Your grade will consist of 12 short creative writing assignments, participation/attendance, two 2 pg. reviews of local readings, a final portfolio of work in the form of a small homemade book called a chapbook, and evidence that you have submitted your work to 10 journals.

ENGLISH 223 — Creative Writing
Section 015, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: CE

In this course, we will devote our time to the writing and discussion of both poetry and short prose fiction. The majority of class time will be dedicated to workshopping original student writing, but we will also discuss the work of various established authors in both genres. To write well, I believe, one must also read well. We will work hard to become proficient readers of each other's work and to develop our skills of critical expression. We will perform numerous short improvisational writing exercises in class, and we will also discuss key issues related to the writing life through essays by writers on the process of writing.

ENGLISH 223 — Creative Writing
Section 016, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: CE

Introductory creative writing course in which students compose pieces in fiction, poetry or drama.

ENGLISH 223 — Creative Writing
Section 017, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: CE

This class will look at drama and fiction — students will spend half the semester on each and experience how the writing of dramatic scenes can in fact transition into the writing of fiction. Here's what dramatic writing and fiction share in common: plot, characterization, narrative tension, action, resolution, dialogue and what Aristotle called "the catharsis" — the reader or viewer coming away changed by the experience. Students should expect to write several play scenes and short stories and hand in a final portfolio of at least 30 pages of material.

ENGLISH 223 — Creative Writing
Section 018, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: CE

Craft will be our primary concern in this introductory creative writing course. In particular, we will work to develop a foundational understanding of the craft of writing short stories and lyric poems. A mastery of craft can free you up to explore your imagination as widely and deeply as you desire. Without craft, imagination must resign itself to stumbling about inside your head and heart, trying to find a door, a window, a key, a way out.

In your work to secure an understanding of craft and free your imagination, you will be required to read and discuss assigned work by published authors, participate in in-class exercises, thoughtfully critique the work of your peers in a workshop setting, and produce a portfolio of work that you began in this class — both fiction and poetry — that demonstrates thoughtful engagement with the material and cumulative learning over the course of the semester. Participation and disciplined study are essential, and attendance is mandatory.

ENGLISH 223 — Creative Writing
Section 019, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: CE

Be yourself. Yes, that is the first task at hand in this course. Sounds easy? Consider that the who you are can sing a tune or tell a story in a way that no one else would. Consider that knowing yourself means knowing how your vision relates to others who have come before you or who are writing right now. How do you fit in? Or, more importantly, how do you not fit in? The revered poet Walt Whitman wrote in his poem "Song of Myself," which kicked off the last century, "I celebrate myself and sing myself/And what I shall assume, you shall assume,/For every atom belonging to me as good belongs to you. . ." We may all be part of a whole and made up of the same atoms, but each of us has a unique song to sing or story to tell, without which the whole is incomplete. How will you celebrate who you are on the page? How will you kick off your century? Serious attention to your own individuality balanced with active investigation of the work of great poetry and prose writers, past and present, will give you direction and help you to shape your vision.

Fiction and poetry will be given equal time in this course, though some discussion of the blurry line between these two genres will also be discussed. Imitation of authors' whose work you find striking will be required alongside writing based solely on your own invention. Revision will be considered as an essential part of the creative process; after this class you will look forward to revision and its potential offering of new ways to see. Much class time will be spent on workshopping. Be prepared to share your work with your peers. Your writing will be collected and commented on throughout the term, but the revision of the work presented in your portfolio will carry the heavier grade component.

ENGLISH 223 — Creative Writing
Section 020, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: CE

Introductory creative writing course in which students compose pieces in fiction, poetry or drama.

ENGLISH 223 — Creative Writing
Section 021, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: CE

The goal of this course is to teach the serious beginning writer the art and craft of writing. Now, some people believe that fiction or poetry can't be taught. I will admit that the ability to write well is partly an innate talent — like the ability to play football well or sing well — however, I firmly believe that good writing is mostly the product of practice and patience, combined with a true-blue love of words and sentences.

The course will be divided into two sections: fiction and poetry. We will study the "rules" for both genres and then read numerous examples of how established writers break them. Although we will dissect and discuss various published works throughout the semester, the core of the class will consist of peer-to-peer workshops, in which student-work is commented upon with respect and intelligence. In addition to readings and workshops, we will concentrate on specific craft issues, such as transforming personal experience into a narrative worth reading or tapping into the imagination when personal experience is inadequate to tell the best story. I will encourage everyone to "step outside of themselves" and notice the world around them. This might entail working with found objects to discuss perspective or noticing street signs to understand the objective correlative or pretending to be CIA operatives and eavesdropping on conversations to learn about dialogue. All of these explorations should come in handy during the in-class writing exercises, which I hope will inspire you (or at the very least loosen you up) for the writing you will do at home, of which you will do plenty.

This course will require dedication, perseverance and a lot of reading and writing time. Hopefully, you will find all of your efforts worthwhile, especially when you submit, at the end of the term, a writing portfolio you yourselves are proud of.

ENGLISH 223 — Creative Writing
Section 022, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: CE

This class will look at drama and fiction — students will spend half the semester on each and experience how the writing of dramatic scenes can in fact transition into the writing of fiction. Here's what dramatic writing and fiction share in common: plot, characterization, narrative tension, action, resolution, dialogue and what Aristotle called "the catharsis" — the reader or viewer coming away changed by the experience. Students should expect to write several play scenes and short stories and hand in a final portfolio of at least 30 pages of material.

ENGLISH 225 — Argumentative Writing
Section 001, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

Instruction in composition with weekly papers and overall review of style and arrangement.

Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement.

ENGLISH 225 — Argumentative Writing
Section 002, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

Instruction in composition with weekly papers and overall review of style and arrangement.

Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement.

ENGLISH 225 — Argumentative Writing
Section 003, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

Instruction in composition with weekly papers and overall review of style and arrangement.

Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement.

ENGLISH 225 — Argumentative Writing
Section 004, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

This advanced writing course focuses on the elements of evidence and argument. ENGLISH 225 encourages you to analyze the various components of a given issue in order to explore and defend their positions, ideas, and beliefs in writing. In the process, you will concentrate on the testing of assumptions and claims, the questioning of beliefs, and the analysis and rigorous articulation of evidence in written discourse. The course stresses the compilation of strong evidence, specifically the use of outside sources and the smooth integration of such material into the prose of an essay.

That's the official course description. In this particular section, we will be doing all that, but we will focus on the documentary. I'm interested in exploring documentary precisely because it seems so anti-argument: most documentaries present themselves as objective, and, yet, nearly all have underlying arguments. Exploring these and the ways these take form will force us to reconsider and expand our idea of argument. In this class, we will delve into what exactly a documentary is and what it can teach us about good writing.

Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement.

ENGLISH 225 — Argumentative Writing
Section 005, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

The aim of this course is to develop the skills necessary to write clear, considered, and reasoned arguments. Because critical reading ability is essential to rhetorical ability, we will be examining a range of texts that will be instructive in formulating better arguments. We will also study tone and audience, the effect that nuanced syntax and diction can have on persuasive discourse, and the hazards of logical fallacies. Persuasive methods such as emotional appeals, ethics, reasoning, and presentation of evidence will be discussed in the class sessions and practiced in the papers.

Students can expect to write and rewrite papers on topics of their own choosing, although general guidelines will be issued. Most of these papers will go through a process of revision and peer editing. The hope is that students will seek paper topics which will demand fresh approaches and inventive arguments, and that in writing these papers students will develop critical thinking and rhetorical skills that can have practical applications outside of the classroom.

Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement.

ENGLISH 225 — Argumentative Writing
Section 006, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

This is a course in rigorous written argumentation. As such, the majority of graded work will come in the form of intensive writing assignments. Emphasis will be on the fundamental tools of persuasion: including identifying issues worthy of debate, innovative assertions on such issues, and defense of these assertions through logical reasoning and strong evidence. As a unifying thematic question, we will be considering "work" and social class in its many forms. All of us must do some kind of work in order to sustain ourselves in our society. In daily writing assignments and longer projects, we will approach the many personal and political issues knotted up with working for a living. Workshopping peer work will be a prominent feature of the course, and the instructor expects a high level of commitment to candid, contructive critique from all students in this process.

Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement.

ENGLISH 225 — Argumentative Writing
Section 007, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

Next year LS&A will dedicate both Fall and Winter semesters to issues of citizenship, and this course will be linked to that theme. We will discuss and do a lot of writing (both formal and informal) about what it means to be a citizen today, as well as thinking about what civic role students can and should play in local and national communities. Students will observe and analyze local civic activities such as a city council or school board meeting, and in response to the upcoming mid-term elections, we will think about the ways politicians use various media (or the media uses them) to shape their images. Toward the end of the semester students will make some intervention of their choice into the public sphere — possible examples include setting up a blog on a political issue of interest to them, writing a charter for a new student organization, or studying and ultimately calling a politically-themed radio show.

In the process of addressing these questions about citizenship, we will determine and negotiate our standards for effective argumentation, and write about that experience. This process will include discussions about what an effective argument is, as well as various attendant questions including, but certainly not limited to: What are the standards for judging the quality of an argument? How might these standards differ depending on the context in which the argument is made, as well as the audience? What must be present (and what absent) in an argument in order to be considered effective?

This course depends on student involvement and contributions. Your ideas, analyses, creativity and ability to help one another will determine the tone and direction of the course.

Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement.

ENGLISH 225 — Argumentative Writing
Section 008, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

When Abraham Lincoln met Harriet Beecher Stowe in 1862, ten years after the publication of her novel Uncle Tom's Cabin, a story about sympathetic slaves and monstrous overseers, he famously quipped, "so you're the little woman who wrote the book that started this great war." Though this line rings with the tones of legend, it does suggest how Stowe's novel, arguing against the institution of slavery as a moral problem confronting the entire nation, rallied the political energy of the Abolition movement before the Civil War. Our aims in this course will be a little bit smaller, but no less rigorous. Argumentative writing is always a call to action — an invitation for an audience to agree or disagree, to act or ignore — regardless of whether the argument was motivated by social ills or prompted by personal opinion. In this class, we will work towards understanding how powerful arguments can be when presented through a combination of style, strategy, and purpose. In order to produce writing that can successfully influence a targeted audience, we will learn how to deploy evidence carefully to defend positions, ideas and beliefs using the rhetorical strategies honed through centuries of theory and practice. Along the way, we will explore how written arguments can help us identify and clarify what is important to us as we interact with the culture at large. This class will relentlessly pursue the art of persuasion through some of some of the most successful and enduring written arguments in American discourse: readings will be drawn from Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, Mark Twain, Ralph Ellison, James Baldwin, and Walker Percy, as well as others. Course requirements will include three 8 — 10 page essays and a final portfolio.

Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement.

ENGLISH 225 — Argumentative Writing
Section 009, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

If you're paying attention, you'll find arguments all around. A political speech, an op/ed piece in the Ann Arbor News, a CD review posted on pitchforkmedia.com — all these may be familiar. However, consider what elements of argument may exist in less familiar places — a Far Side cartoon, your favorite poem, your favorite painting, the menu at Bob Evans, the movie poster for United 93, Burger King's "Big Bucking Chicken" TV commercial, the homepage for theonion.com, Letterman's nightly monologue, the cover of your textbook. Living in the Information Age, which is largely defined by the ubiquity of media, means that you encounter more arguments — and arguments of a greater variety, subtlety and sophistication — than any previous generation. Therefore, understanding the nature and variety of appeals aimed at your heart, your conscience, your reasoning becomes of paramount importance. In this course, you will have an opportunity to explore components of argumentation through study and practice. Specifically, you will learn the following: how identify and construct various types of arguments and understand their respective purposes; how to recognize and use appeals to reason, emotion and character; strategies for analyzing arguments; how to identify and avoid logical fallacies; how to use figurative language to persuade; what counts as evidence; and more. Learning strategies of argumentation will help you identify methods of persuasion common to political discourse, advertising and other arenas; furthermore, by applying strategies of effective argumentation, you will be better equipped to present your own ideas in a convincing and appealing way.

Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement.

ENGLISH 225 — Argumentative Writing
Section 010, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

While argumentation as a key to power is an ancient idea, it is certainly not an obsolete one. Argumentation has all kinds of influence in today's world. Think of it this way: when you make an argument, you make a contribution to a collective understanding of an idea or situation. When people listen to or read your argument, it may be a way for them to clarify their own thinking on a given topic. Presenting good arguments is a way to influence the thinking and actions of others, for good or for ill. Because arguments can lead people to action, and because actions have the potential to be both good and bad, those who study argument are very concerned with the ethics of argument as well as the content, the words, of the argument. (A powerful speaker or writer can lead people to unethical actions.) The question of which arguments are ethical is grounded in an understanding of time, place, audience, and the goals of the person presenting the argument. The question of ethics rarely begins or ends in what is said, but always seeks to understand how, why, and to whom that something was said.

In this argumentative writing course, we will study some of the theories of argument that ancient rhetoricians outlined, asking always what can and should be said in a given case, in a given encounter between writer (you), audience, and idea. We will do this following the assumption of the ancients that the power that resides in language is available to anyone who is willing to study rhetoric and work at the craft of argument.

Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement.

ENGLISH 225 — Argumentative Writing
Section 011, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

In this argumentative writing course we will practice writing strong argumentative papers based on evidence. Students will learn how to successfully use different kinds of rhetorical strategies, investigate claims, question beliefs and assumptions and will use research and discussion skills in their writing. We will use workshops to improve student writing and we will be reading various diverse non-fiction texts to learn from other good writers.

Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement.

ENGLISH 225 — Argumentative Writing
Section 012, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

This advanced writing course focuses on the elements of evidence and argument. Unlike ENGLISH 325 with its emphasis on exploration and style, ENGLISH 225 encourages students to analyze the various components of a given issue and the writing conventions of different disciplines in order to explore and defend their positions, ideas, and beliefs in writing. In the process, they will concentrate on the testing of assumptions and claims, the questioning of beliefs, and the analysis and rigorous articulation of evidence in written discourse. The course stresses the compilation of strong evidence, specifically the use of outside sources and the smooth integration of such material into the prose of an essay. The readings are primarily non-fiction, and discussions and writing assignments emphasize considerations of style, rhetorical strategies, and revision as integral to precision in developing a line of argument for the purposes of reflection as well as persuasion.

Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement.

ENGLISH 225 — Argumentative Writing
Section 013, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

In our culture, the notion of argument is frequently associated with confrontation or the heated debate between two parties, each of whom is intent on changing their opponent's mind. But classical thinkers, writing over two-thousand years ago, had a much more robust understanding of argument: for them arguments were means of inquiry, ways of exploring and testing out ideas and interrogating one's beliefs. Thinkers like Aristotle and Cicero recognized that individuals living in a democracy needed tools to craft well-reasoned and compelling arguments, so they taught their students rhetoric, which they defined as the practice of finding the appropriate argument for any given situation. As contemporary rhetoricians Sharon Crowley and Debra Hawhee have noted, "Rhetoric helped people to choose the best course of action when they disagreed about important political, religious, or social issues. In fact, the study of rhetoric was equivalent to the study of citizenship." The ancient rhetoricians also acknowledged language's ability to alter peoples' convictions or move them to action. Language, in other words, can be used in powerful ways, and learning the art of rhetoric involves learning how to control that power.

In this course, we will study the theories that ancient and contemporary rhetoricians developed in an attempt to learn how to craft effective and powerful arguments of our own, not simply as a means of confronting opponents but also as a means of inquiry and analysis. We will do so following the claims of the ancients that the power that resides in language is available to anyone who is willing to study rhetoric and work at the craft of argument.

Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement.

ENGLISH 225 — Argumentative Writing
Section 014, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

The course is aimed at students who will experience over their careers positions of leadership in situations where there are no easy answers. Such situations demand two skills: (1) the ability to identify and focus on the critical issues of the situation and (2) the ability to listen to and evaluate varying points of view about those issues. Therefore three basic assumption guide this argumentative writing course: (1) An argument entails differing points of view. An argumentative essay explores such differences through analysis of an issue under question. Hence, at the heart of an argumentative essay is an issue about which reasonable adults might differ. (2) Arguments are most convincing when they are most informed. Opinion and hearsay "evidence" may be a starting point, but a convincing essay must offer more, and "offering more" means library research. (3) Arguments are most complete when they are informed through feedback. Every essay written for the course will be critiqued by at least two other students, and each student may elect to have an essay critiqued by the entire class. The course will cover the basic tools of argument: basic approaches to argument (Toulmin, Rogers), basic forms of argument, rules of evidence, fallacies. Note that this is NOT a course in simply and persuasively stating opinions you already have. Rather, this course assumes that real argument begins with authentic inquiry into important questions, questions to which you do not already have the answers; an argument then proceeds by formulating opinions via critical thinking about differing approaches to a real question.

Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement.

ENGLISH 225 — Argumentative Writing
Section 015, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

Course Description: The purpose of this course is to explore what makes good argumentative writing. One of the best approaches to understanding argument is the ancient theory of rhetoric, what Aristotle defines as "the ability in a given case to see the available means of persuasion." However, another important theorist of rhetoric, Quintilian, takes issue with Aristotle's definition, claiming instead that rhetoric is "the good man speaking well." What these two definitions suggest is that the idea of what makes a good argument is already, and has been for centuries, related to the concept of what makes a good and ethical person. So in addition to learning how to test assumptions and claims, evaluate and analyze evidence, craft arguments for a variety of audiences, and build arguments by using multiple sources, we will also undertake a semester-long discussion of how each of these topics is related to ethics. You can expect to produce approximately 25-30 pages of polished prose over the course of the term (in an explication essay, rhetorical analysis, and an argumentative essay) as well as a significant body of shorter, informal writing assignments. You can also expect to read approximately 60 pages per week. Our readings will be wide-ranging, drawing on memoir, philosophy, politics, rhetoric, literature, critical and legal theory, film, psychology, drama, and graphic novel.

Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement.

ENGLISH 225 — Argumentative Writing
Section 016, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

Instruction in composition with weekly papers and overall review of style and arrangement.

Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement.

ENGLISH 225 — Argumentative Writing
Section 017, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

We will examine the origins and approaches to modern argument, beginning with Aristotelian oral and written models and ending with a discussion of how visual components and simultaneity of media have both adopted and complicated these classic rhetorical approaches to persuasion. Recommended for students of visual, written or musical arts.

Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement.

ENGLISH 225 — Argumentative Writing
Section 018, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

Instruction in composition with weekly papers and overall review of style and arrangement.

Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement.

ENGLISH 225 — Argumentative Writing
Section 019, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

Instruction in composition with weekly papers and overall review of style and arrangement.

Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement.

ENGLISH 225 — Argumentative Writing
Section 020, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

This course is designed as an in-depth exploration of arguments. We will analyze the construction of arguments in verbal, written, and visual forms, and create written arguments that both reflect on and utilize the techniques studied.

Particular emphasis will be placed on arguments-about-arguments: analysis of, and argument about, texts that themselves contain arguments. These texts will range from Aristotelean commentaries to contemporary advertisements, television, and film.

Course Units May Include:

Construction of Argument Refutation of Argument (Verbal and Written) Common Argumentative Strategies Statistical Analysis and Application Logical Flaws and Fallacies Implicit and Explicit Arguments Mixed Messages/When Arguments Contradict Cognitive Learning Styles Assessing and Writing for Audience Analysis of Visual Imagery and Argument Arguing about the Visual Primary Course Text:

_Everything's an Argument_ by Andrea Lunsford et al.

Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement.

ENGLISH 225 — Argumentative Writing
Section 021, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

This course is designed to introduce students to the various methodologies and strategies available in argumentative writing. Students enrolled in this class will learn how to identify, critique, and apply the three central argumentative models — Classical, Rogerian, Toulmin, to various texts including: non-fiction prose, fictional narratives, films and material culture. In addition, students will also learn how to use "appeals of logos", "pathos", and "ethos" in their writing to construct more persuasive arguments. By highlighting the ways in which arguments can be found in "everything" and "everywhere", students in this class will acquire an understanding of how arguments impact and structure their day to day lives.

Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement.

ENGLISH 225 — Argumentative Writing
Section 022, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

The primary goal of this course is to teach you to write strong, well-reasoned, and well-crafted arguments. Having an opinion or thinking something is unfair does not constitute a strong argument; your opinions must be rigorously backed up with logic and evidence. In this class, we will stress analyzing and exploring various components of a particular issue to craft strong, persuasive arguments, whether you are, for example, arguing from personal experience, challenging a commonly held belief that you see as a misconception, or analyzing evidence to support your claim. We will stress the smooth integration of evidence and outside sources into the prose of an essay. By learning to identify and evaluate the prose and argumentative strategies used by other writers (both published authors and your own classmates), my hope is that you will begin to employ them more effectively in your own written arguments. Writing, after all, is an organized way of thinking, and our engagement with the subject matter will be focused primarily on issues of style, craft, and execution. Most importantly, all good writing must have significance. Without significance, an argument has no point. No matter how well crafted a line or how beautiful a transition, a well-written argument says something, show us a new way of seeing. Finally, writing a well-crafted argument takes work and time, and as such, we will stress in-depth revision as integral to developing strong, persuasive pieces of writing.

Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement.

ENGLISH 225 — Argumentative Writing
Section 023, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

The primary goal of this course is to teach you to write strong, well-reasoned, and well-crafted arguments. Having an opinion or thinking something is unfair does not constitute a strong argument; your opinions must be rigorously backed up with logic and evidence. In this class, we will stress analyzing and exploring various components of a particular issue to craft strong, persuasive arguments, whether you are, for example, arguing from personal experience, challenging a commonly held belief that you see as a misconception, or analyzing evidence to support your claim. We will stress the smooth integration of evidence and outside sources into the prose of an essay. By learning to identify and evaluate the prose and argumentative strategies used by other writers (both published authors and your own classmates), my hope is that you will begin to employ them more effectively in your own written arguments. Writing, after all, is an organized way of thinking, and our engagement with the subject matter will be focused primarily on issues of style, craft, and execution. Most importantly, all good writing must have significance. Without significance, an argument has no point. No matter how well crafted a line or how beautiful a transition, a well-written argument says something, show us a new way of seeing. Finally, writing a well-crafted argument takes work and time, and as such, we will stress in-depth revision as integral to developing strong, persuasive pieces of writing.

Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement.

ENGLISH 225 — Argumentative Writing
Section 024, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

In this class, we will work on composing lucid, persuasive, and productive arguments that can stand up to the rigors of college-level writing. Students will learn how to test assumptions and claims, question beliefs, and analyze and conscientiously articulate evidence in writing — all toward the purpose of producing essays that enrich and challenge their audience.

Because writing effective argumentative essays requires that we thoughtfully question beliefs and assumptions, students should be prepared to work to understand the ideas, values, and positions of other people. We will work together to figure out how best to question and examine others' ideas in productive ways. We will also question the purpose of argument in general and explore its ethical implications.

To that end, we will draw upon classical notions of argument, bringing the ideas of Aristotle into conversation with contemporary issues. While writing assignments will be specific, students will have a good deal of leeway in terms of essay topics. This is in order to allow students to write not only about issues that they care about, but also issues that are relevant to their chosen fields of study and professional aspirations.

Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement.

ENGLISH 225 — Argumentative Writing
Section 025, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

Instruction in composition with weekly papers and overall review of style and arrangement.

Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement.

ENGLISH 225 — Argumentative Writing
Section 026, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

Instruction in composition with weekly papers and overall review of style and arrangement.

Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement.

ENGLISH 225 — Argumentative Writing
Section 027, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

Instruction in composition with weekly papers and overall review of style and arrangement.

Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement.

ENGLISH 225 — Argumentative Writing
Section 028, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

Instruction in composition with weekly papers and overall review of style and arrangement.

Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement.

ENGLISH 225 — Argumentative Writing
Section 029, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

As the catalogue title indicates, this course is all about argumentative writing and seeks to improve your skills in constructing, developing, and supporting strong arguments. Throughout the semester we will closely analyze the various elements of argumentative writing, and employ these strategies in the writing of a wide variety of different argumentative types. All of the essay in the class will rely on outside support (sometime heavily), and thus the course will also focus on research techniques and the smooth integration of secondary sources. In true "ripped from the headlines" Law and Order tradition, topics for essays and class discussion will be drawn from current issues and events.

Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement.

ENGLISH 225 — Argumentative Writing
Section 030, REC

Instructor: Taylor III,Charles Lavelle

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

In this course, you are assumed to have learned the basics of grammar and citation formats, as well as how to assemble a coherent argument. Here you will learn how to develop more sophisticated arguments, and how to present effective theses while avoiding logical pitfalls. With those goals in mind, we will discuss ways to make use of the "Four Classes of Argument," and to eliminate the most damaging "Logical Fallacies."

My Argumentative Writing course differs from most, I think, in that we make such extensive use of discussion. I try to get students to recognize how Standard Essay Form (intro/body/conclusion) is part of every meaningful communication transaction, including simple conversations, advertisements, and print and broadcast news reports. Learning to recognize the format in a variety of situations helps students to acquire a comfort with the patterns of organized expression, with the result that they are able to control and refine their own writing. Our discussions about these, and other concepts, gives students the chance to brainstorm collectively, and to enter the writing process through a communicative medium with which they are more at ease.

The extra time outside the classroom that CSP instructors receive allows me to meet with students within a flexible appointment schedule. I find that fixed office hours can accommodate the schedules of only a relatively small number of students, while the latitude available within our program affords the opportunity to offer them a much wider range of meeting options. More contact means more chances to walk students through the process of revising, that so-important aspect of writing with which many of them seem least comfortable.

I require four papers for my course, and insist that two of them be submitted in at least two drafts. Students also receive at least two opportunities to workshop their papers: one mandatory and one optional. Many of them have told me that the work-shopping component — intimidating at first — has turned out to be the most helpful aspect of the course. I sometimes incorporate an overall theme for the term, and often give to students who request it permission to deal with multiple facets of a single topic over more than one paper. This freedom has helped some to think in complex ways about issues for which only a single point of view might have been evident at first.

Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement.

ENGLISH 225 — Argumentative Writing
Section 031, REC

Instructor: Taylor III,Charles Lavelle

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

In this course, you are assumed to have learned the basics of grammar and citation formats, as well as how to assemble a coherent argument. Here you will learn how to develop more sophisticated arguments, and how to present effective theses while avoiding logical pitfalls. With those goals in mind, we will discuss ways to make use of the "Four Classes of Argument," and to eliminate the most damaging "Logical Fallacies."

Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement.

ENGLISH 225 — Argumentative Writing
Section 032, REC

Instructor: Story,Ralph D

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

English 225 (032) is designed to improve a student-writer's proficiency in persuasive discourse — argumentative writing which seeks to persuade a reader to a specific point of view by means of reason. Most often the subject matter of argumentative essays is controversial and contemporary; yet, the forms for the delivery of ideas on those topics you will be introduced to are quite classical. By the end of the semester the student-writer should be on the road to becoming an effective communicator, skilled in a number of literary techniques and, hopefully, be able to convey ideas in a precise, provocative and logical manner.

In the past, literature was used almost exclusively as model and inspirational catalyst for analyses and essays on topics in written form. In this course, student writing, professional non-fiction, popular culture and, occasionally, literature will be employed as subject matter for discussions as well as in-class and out of class essays. This semester the discourse will revolve around some specific issues and subjects: argumentation; black secular music; black male/female relationships (gender) ; and class and race. The essays you will write during the term will focus on these topics (and / or sub-topics within these areas).

Policies & Procedural Requirements:

Attendance is required. Four or more absences will adversely affect the final grade you receive, e.g., from a B+ to a B, a C+ to a C, etc. Tardiness is also inexcusable. If you are late 3 times, this counts as an absence.

Late papers are unacceptable. Period. (If, however, there are legitimate and reasonable circumstances that necessitate you asking for an extension, you must ask for more time well in advance of the paper's due date.) Revised Papers are due no later than seven days from the day the paper is returned to you.

Class Participation is very important and will be considered when computing your final grade.

Visual Stimuli. Throughout the course of the semester, I will show quite a few videotapes — documentaries, news segments, etc., — which are provided to supplement your knowledge on the topics, enhance your classroom experience and function as additional (and perhaps more recent) support for your arguments. These visual stimuli constitute "visual evidence. " You are expected to watch these quietly, take notes and analytically consider the connections between these materials and the writing contained in the course-packs on the topics.

For Help With Your Writing:

Each student is strongly recommended to see me if s/he is really serious about improving his/her writing. Although my schedule is usually "open" to allow me the possibility of seeing students who just "drop by," if you want help with your writing you should make a standing appointment with me by calling Ms. Della Weatherspoon at 764-9129. (I might also add that our review of a draft is no guarantee that your paper will receive an "A" because it was somewhat error-free at the time.) When you want help with your writing please bring the work on an IBM diskette (which will make it a lot easier to make the necessary revisions). This term I'm going to schedule individual, mandatory bi-weekly conferences for us to discuss your essays once you have created drafts.

Written Assignments: Three (3) 4 — 6 page out of class (oc) essays, typed, double-spaced and substantiated by outside sources ( In other words, you'll be writing research papers which include quotes from authorities on the subject. Only 2 of these sources can be internet or www sources. ) Four (4) in class essays, 2 — 3 pages (not skipping a line) on readings from the coursepack or issues discussed in class related to the readings.

One (1)Mid-Term Examination One (1) Take-Home Final Examination related to the last topic covered in the course.

Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement.

ENGLISH 226 — Directed Writing
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 3
Other: INDEPENDENT

Registration only by arrangement with the instructor.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

ENGLISH 229 — Professional Writing
Section 001, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4

Texts The Business Writer's Companion, 8th Edition; Gerald J. Alred, Charles T. Brusaw, Walter E. Oliu The American Heritage College Dictionary, 4rd Edition, hard cover CTools documents In Professional Writing, we will talk about the differences between academic discourse and business writing, keeping in mind that the two most important points of academic writing — audience and purpose — also apply here. To achieve the result you want from a business communication, you will need to know your audience and your purpose, and you will need to design your documents with your audience and purpose in mind. Class discussions and peer evaluations of your drafts will help you produce effective documents.

This course will focus in part on professional examples and in part on student writings, which will be discussed in small-group workshops. I do not plan to lecture at any great length, and you will not have to laboriously scribble notes during each class. Rather, we will have a semester-long discussion about writing and, more importantly, about rewriting―the key to successful writing.

Because the class has a workshop component, be prepared to talk (when it's your turn, of course). Your participation in class discussion is vital. Vigorous (that is, helpful and friendly) discussion is not only fun but also a relatively painless way to learn. From our discussions, we (and I do mean we because I will be learning from you, my students) will learn not only about writing well but also about how our opinions and our styles of writing affect others in ways we might not previously have considered.

The requirements for the class include various professional documents, collaborative-writing assignments, and several presentations.

Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement.

ENGLISH 229 — Professional Writing
Section 002, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4

In this course, you will acquire the skills needed to write clear and straightforward prose. Assignments will introduce you to the forms, methods, standards, and issues central to writing in the workplace. You will learn to shape your writing to suit a range of readers, purposes, and professional contexts. You will learn effective strategies to analyze writing situations, and work in the class may include your own technical instructions, promotions, reports, proposals, correspondence, and application materials. Emphasis in this intensive writing course will be on the writing process, collaboration, research methods, and technology and document design.

Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement.

ENGLISH 229 — Professional Writing
Section 003, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4

This intensive writing course focuses on the process of creating effective written communication for professional contexts. Students work closely with their peers and the instructor to develop project-based assignments relevant to the work world. The philosophical heart of the course is the notion that thinking critically and writing well in professional contexts will greatly enhance your success — whether your field is biotechnology, investment banking, antique imports, medicine, arts, or education — and further, that good thinking and writing result from sound and repeatable processes.

In your work to secure an understanding of successful writing practices for work, you will be required to read and discuss assigned readings, participate in in-class exercises and group projects, thoughtfully critique the work of your peers in a workshop setting, and produce a portfolio of work that you began in this class and that demonstrates a thoughtful engagement with the material and cumulative learning over the course of the semester. Participation and disciplined study are essential, and attendance is mandatory.

Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement.

ENGLISH 229 — Professional Writing
Section 004, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4

A straightforward approach to the practicalities of writing clear descriptive and explanatory prose whose subject matter is centered on process and sequence.

Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement.

ENGLISH 229 — Professional Writing
Section 005, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4

A straightforward approach to the practicalities of writing clear descriptive and explanatory prose whose subject matter is centered on process and sequence.

Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement.

ENGLISH 229 — Professional Writing
Section 006, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4

A straightforward approach to the practicalities of writing clear descriptive and explanatory prose whose subject matter is centered on process and sequence.

Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement.

ENGLISH 229 — Professional Writing
Section 007, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4

A straightforward approach to the practicalities of writing clear descriptive and explanatory prose whose subject matter is centered on process and sequence.

Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement.

ENGLISH 229 — Professional Writing
Section 008, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4

A straightforward approach to the practicalities of writing clear descriptive and explanatory prose whose subject matter is centered on process and sequence.

Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement.

ENGLISH 229 — Professional Writing
Section 009, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4

This course focuses on meeting the writing demands of professional writing, namely in the business world. While the class emphasizes writing, it is also attentive to the influence of technology on the genre, and relies heavily on the use of computers (the class is held in a computer classroom).

Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement.

ENGLISH 229 — Professional Writing
Section 010, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4

A straightforward approach to the practicalities of writing clear descriptive and explanatory prose whose subject matter is centered on process and sequence.

Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement.

ENGLISH 229 — Professional Writing
Section 011, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4

This intensive writing course focuses on the process of creating effective written communication for professional contexts. Students work closely with their peers and the instructor to develop project-based assignments relevant to the work world. The philosophical heart of the course is the notion that thinking critically and writing well in professional contexts will greatly enhance your success — whether your field is biotechnology, investment banking, antique imports, medicine, arts, or education — and further, that good thinking and writing result from sound and repeatable processes.

In your work to secure an understanding of successful writing practices for work, you will be required to read and discuss assigned readings, participate in in-class exercises and group projects, thoughtfully critique the work of your peers in a workshop setting, and produce a portfolio of work that you began in this class and that demonstrates a thoughtful engagement with the material and cumulative learning over the course of the semester. Participation and disciplined study are essential, and attendance is mandatory.

Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement.

ENGLISH 239 — What is Literature?
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Hartley,Lucy

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

This course, prerequisite to the major, is to introduce students to the chief terms and practice of English studies.

Advisory Prerequisite: Prerequisite for concentrators in English and Honors English.

ENGLISH 239 — What is Literature?
Section 002, REC

Instructor: Herrmann,Anne C

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: Honors

This course will address the question of why and how we read literature, not by providing an answer to "what is literature?" but by considering the strategies we use as readers to make meaning of literary texts. The focus will be less on what we read, than on how we read. The first half of the course will consider Edith Wharton's House of Mirth (1905) in light of five literary critical approaches: cultural, feminist, deconsructive, psychoanalytic and marxist. How does the literary text change depending on our assumptions about what to read for? The second half will examine Daniel Defoe's Robinson Crusoe (1719) in relationship to subsequent rewritings, including J.D. Wyss' Swiss Family Robinson (1812), J.M. Coetzee's Foe (1986), Elizabeth Bishop's "Crusoe in England" (1976) and Jamaica Kincaid's in A Small Place (1988). Why are some stories told again and again?

Assignments include a literary critical essay and its revision, a group presentation and a take-home final.

Advisory Prerequisite: Prerequisite for concentrators in English and Honors English.

ENGLISH 239 — What is Literature?
Section 003, REC
Genres of Loss

Instructor: Mullaney,Steven G

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

In this course we will examine the ways in which different genres and periods have employed literature to understand and reflect upon historical catastrophes and crises. The genres considered will include drama, narrative poetry, novels, and perhaps short stories or non-fictional memoirs. They will range from the seventeenth century to contemporary fiction, and selected so that works different genres or periods can be compared with one another. Shakespeare's King Lear, for example, will be read alongside Jane Smiley's A Thousand Acres; Milton's Paradise Lost will be contrasted with Mary Shelley's Frankenstein. Grades will be based on short weekly writing assignments and two longer essays. Approximate book cost: $100 (books will be available at Shaman Drum Bookshop).

Advisory Prerequisite: Prerequisite for concentrators in English and Honors English.

ENGLISH 239 — What is Literature?
Section 004, REC

Instructor: Sanchez,Maria

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

This section of "What Is Literature?" will focus upon U.S. fiction and the practice of close reading (detailed analysis of a text's language and structure). We will read a range of short stories and novels from the 19th century to the present day, including works by Jhumpa Lahiri, Ana Castillo, Ralph Ellison, Henry James, Charles Chesnutt and Charlotte Perkins Gilman. Assignments will consist of several short essays and a final exam.

Advisory Prerequisite: Prerequisite for concentrators in English and Honors English.

ENGLISH 239 — What is Literature?
Section 005, REC
Race and Narrative

Instructor: See,Maria S

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

An introduction to narrative theory, critical race theory, and feminist cultural analysis alongside fictive and non-fictive prose by U.S. writers, this course focuses on the construction and distortion of basic aspects of narrative, such as perspective, sequence, and setting, in order to analyze a variety of writers' experimentation with visual, temporal, and spatial order. As we will pay much attention to the visual aspects of the texts at hand, our emphasis on narrative prose will form the basis for more wide-ranging discussions and analyses of other mediums such as visual art, museum exhibitions, and film and video.

Possible authors include: Fae Ng, Jessica Hagedorn, Sigrid Nunez, Herman Melville, William Faulkner, Nella Larsen, James Weldon Johnson, Sui Sin Far, Kate Chopin, Mark Twain, Lonny Kaneko, Peter Ho Davies, Jamaica Kincaid.

Workload: several short responses, an oral presentation, an essay, and an exam.

Advisory Prerequisite: Prerequisite for concentrators in English and Honors English.

ENGLISH 239 — What is Literature?
Section 006, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

This course, prerequisite to the major, is to introduce students to the chief terms and practice of English studies.

Advisory Prerequisite: Prerequisite for concentrators in English and Honors English.

ENGLISH 239 — What is Literature?
Section 007, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

This course, prerequisite to the major, is to introduce students to the chief terms and practice of English studies.

Advisory Prerequisite: Prerequisite for concentrators in English and Honors English.

ENGLISH 239 — What is Literature?
Section 008, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

This course, prerequisite to the major, is to introduce students to the chief terms and practice of English studies.

Advisory Prerequisite: Prerequisite for concentrators in English and Honors English.

ENGLISH 239 — What is Literature?
Section 009, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

This course, prerequisite to the major, is to introduce students to the chief terms and practice of English studies.

Advisory Prerequisite: Prerequisite for concentrators in English and Honors English.

ENGLISH 239 — What is Literature?
Section 010, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

This course, prerequisite to the major, is to introduce students to the chief terms and practice of English studies.

Advisory Prerequisite: Prerequisite for concentrators in English and Honors English.

ENGLISH 240 — Introduction to Poetry
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Cureton,Richard D

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

The aim of this course is to introduce you to the art of poetry so that you can read and discuss any poem with understanding and delight. During the term, we will move from a general survey of the poetic symbolism, rhetoric, language, and rhythm to a more detailed study of the work of a selection of authors from the Renaissance to the present. For the former, we will use Poems, Poets, Poetry by Helen Vendler. For the latter, we will use a coursepack of selected poems. Formal writing will include three (ungraded) exercises in poetic analysis and four (graded) papers (3-5 pages) on individual authors and poems.

Advisory Prerequisite: Prerequisite for concentrators in English and Honors English.

ENGLISH 240 — Introduction to Poetry
Section 002, REC

Instructor: Goldstein,Laurence A

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: Honors

In this course, we shall study closely a variety of poems written in English from about 1600 to the present. The task of the course is a pleasurable and progressive understanding of how poems work, that is, what techniques poets use to articulate their visions of experience. We shall pay close attention to the language, forms, figures, and themes of verse, to literary-historical conditions that influence poetic craft, and to the intertextual connections that create constellations of poems across the centuries. The chief textbook will be Poems, Poets, Poetry: An Introduction to Poetry by Helen Vendler, supplemented by a second book of literary criticism and by a sequence of handouts. Because this is a discussion class, regular attendance and participation are required. Other requirements include a series of short papers, a reading journal, a midterm, and a final examination. Cost of books: $60.

Advisory Prerequisite: Prerequisite for concentrators in English and Honors English.

ENGLISH 240 — Introduction to Poetry
Section 003, REC

Instructor: Goodison,Lorna G

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

A disciplined introduction to the reading of poetry, English and American.

Advisory Prerequisite: Prerequisite for concentrators in English and Honors English.

ENGLISH 240 — Introduction to Poetry
Section 004, REC

Instructor: Meier,Joyce A

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

This course provides students with the tools for enjoying, understanding, and analyzing poetry, through the exploration of a range of genres, traditions, and forms. What makes language poetic? How is poetic form related to literary and social history? How does poetry appeal to the senses (eye and ear especially) as well as mind and heart? In-class activities include reciting a modicum of poetry from memory, introducing a poem (done in pairs), several non-graded poetry-writing exercises, and much discussion. Informal writing includes a poetry journal (weekly short responses to the assigned readings), and two short reflections to poetry readings attended outside of class time. Formal writing includes three (five-page) analytical papers and a final exam. Rough drafts of the formal papers will be peer-reviewed in class. Readings will be drawn from a standard book on / anthology of poetry (such as Western Wind, edited by David Mason and Frederic Nims).

Advisory Prerequisite: Prerequisite for concentrators in English and Honors English.

ENGLISH 240 — Introduction to Poetry
Section 005, REC

Instructor: Smith,Macklin

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

A course in ways to understand, feel, enjoy, evaluate, and interpret poems. Poetry differs from ordinary language and from prose in some fairly conventional and (for poetry) advantageous ways, and we shall try to understand how it does so. As we look at — and hear — poems, we'll consider such things as sound, diction, rhythm, figures of speech, the line, form, genre, authorship, audience, and context. Our readings will come from various cultures, old and now; most readings will be British and American, most of these recent or contemporary. We'll pay some attention to the histories of poetry, and try to get a feel for the contemporary poetry scene including song and hip-hop. Texts: an Introduction to Poetry in C-Tools; an Anthology in coursepack format. Everyone will write three essays on increasingly challenging topics. There will be a test on "technical terms," another on the course readings, and a final exam asking for the interpretation and evaluation of some new poetry.

Advisory Prerequisite: Prerequisite for concentrators in English and Honors English.

ENGLISH 240 — Introduction to Poetry
Section 006, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

A disciplined introduction to the reading of poetry, English and American.

Advisory Prerequisite: Prerequisite for concentrators in English and Honors English.

ENGLISH 240 — Introduction to Poetry
Section 007, REC

Instructor: Moss,Thylias

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

This section will explore poetic forms and theories through a lens that emphasizes the development of forms and theories as efforts to redefine poetry. We will examine why it has been necessary to redefine poetry in the past and why it remains necessary to redefine poetry. We will also consider the forms of redefinition that become possible through examining social and technological parallels in American life. We will consider both formal and informal redefinitions and how the formal and informal both converge and diverge. Rhyme and meter, for instance, seem to exert a more vital presence in hip-hop and popular music than in contemporary literary poetry. Students will work in teams to create websites and/or podcasts that can become a resource for others seeking information about the literary experiments that have led to current practices in formal and informal American poetry. Texts TBA.

Advisory Prerequisite: Prerequisite for concentrators in English and Honors English.

ENGLISH 240 — Introduction to Poetry
Section 008, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

A disciplined introduction to the reading of poetry, English and American.

Advisory Prerequisite: Prerequisite for concentrators in English and Honors English.

ENGLISH 240 — Introduction to Poetry
Section 009, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

A disciplined introduction to the reading of poetry, English and American.

Advisory Prerequisite: Prerequisite for concentrators in English and Honors English.

ENGLISH 240 — Introduction to Poetry
Section 010, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

Advisory Prerequisite: Prerequisite for concentrators in English and Honors English.

ENGLISH 240 — Introduction to Poetry
Section 011, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

A disciplined introduction to the reading of poetry, English and American.

Advisory Prerequisite: Prerequisite for concentrators in English and Honors English.

ENGLISH 245 — Introduction to Drama and Theatre
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Westlake,Jane; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RCHUMS 281.

The course aims to introduce students to the power and variety of theatre, and to help them understand the processes which go toward making a production. Five to seven plays will be subjects of special study, chosen to cover a wide range of style and content, but interest will not be confined to these. Each student will attend two lectures weekly, plays a two-hour meeting in section each week; the latter will be used for questions, discussions, exploration of texts, and other exercises. Students will be required to attend two or more theatre performances, chosen from those available in Ann Arbor. Three papers are required plus a final examination.

Required Texts: available at the Shaman Drum and on reserve at the Shapiro:

  • The Essential Theatre, Oscar Brockett
  • Waiting for Godot, Samuel Beckett
  • The Piano Lesson, August Wilson
  • The Heidi Chronicles, Wendy Wasserstein
  • Dream on Monkey Mountain, Derek Walcott

Online:

  • Oedipus Rex, Sophocles
  • Romeo and Juliet, William Shakespeare
  • and other online readings as assigned

Course Objectives

  1. To determine what "theatre" and "drama" have meant at different times in history and what they mean now, and to do so by examining landmark plays in their theatrical and social contexts.
  2. To gain a fundamental understanding of how each of the theatre's constituent arts (acting, directing, design, playwriting, architecture) contributes to the making of a theatrical whole.
  3. To develop a sense of how theatre is a discipline without clear boundaries and how other practices intersect with and shape theatrical performance.

ENGLISH 270 — Introduction to American Literature
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

ENGLISH 274 — Introduction to Afro-American Literature
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Gunning,Sandra R

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

This course provides a broad survey of African American and African Diasporic literature, from the 1700s to the present. Students will read poetry, fiction, autobiography, and essays by a range of authors, including Phillis Wheatley, Mary Seacole, Frederick Douglass, W.E.B. DuBois, Caryl Phillips, Edwidge Danticat, and Carroll Parrott Blue. The guiding questions for this course will be:

  • What does/should a Black literary tradition look like?
  • What has allowed or hindered its formation?
  • What has its impact been on "American" literature?
  • What kinds of assumptions are we as modern readers bringing to the texts?
  • How have these texts been shaped from both an aesthetic as well as a historical point of view?

Course requirement include short quizzes, midterm and final exams, and a formal paper (6-7 pages).

Advisory Prerequisite: CAAS 111.

ENGLISH 280 — Thematic Approaches to Literature
Section 001, LEC
The impact of Technology on Access, Authorship, and Ownership in Local and Global Communities

Instructor: Moss,Thylias

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

Some of the course intentions:

We will study how computer and other technologies with the ability to link populations and disseminate information quickly are changing notions of authority in information sources and the ability of official outlets to control information that becomes available. We will consider the advantages and disadvantages of this ongoing evolution of information exchange.

With the empowerment of individuals and groups of individuals to share visual, audio, and text-based information quickly, bypassing the usual controls (including publishing houses whose decisions of acceptance and rejection may be understood as forms of censorship), what does it mean to publish something? How is ownership and authorship to be understood and practiced in circumstances where anyone can assume authority over decisions of what to publish?

The ability to rapidly capture, duplicate, and manipulate information offers unprecedented opportunities for collaboration yet to take advantage of these opportunities might require revision of notions and policy that govern authorship and ownership, policy that could reduce some of the discoveries that could result from the encouragement of more vigorous open collaborations. We will consider the consequences of relaxed authorship and ownership practices.

As this empowerment of individuals and groups of individuals to share visual, audio, and text-based information quickly expands, the gap between those empowered and those without access to the devices of empowerment widens; we will consider the consequences of this gap on a variety of scales, including those without the economic resources to update devices or to acquire devices at all, those with various sensory compromises for whom use of certain devices is also compromised, those for whom literacy compromises the ability to take advantage of all modes of access, those whose own discomfort with technology compromises their ability to use technology considered too complicated.

We will attempt to define local and global community in the context of instantaneous connection with others and instantaneous transmission of information.

We will use technology to accomplish this, including remote viewing to extend the boundaries of the physical learning space and to extend who has access to course content. Students will work in teams and in solo capacity to work on a problem or issue of the group's devising related to questions raised by the course. We will take advantage of the technology-rich environment of the Digital Media Commons on north campus by meeting in Design Lab 1 (DL1). In spirit of course intentions, it is likely that we will rely more on digital and online resources than on physical books, though a few books may be included, titles TBA.

ENGLISH 299 — Directed Study
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 3
Other: INDEPENDENT

Registration only by arrangement with the instructor.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

ENGLISH 305 — Introduction to Modern English
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

The phonemic and grammatical structure of present-day English considered in the light of modern linguistic science, with some attention to problems of usage, word formation, meaning, and changes in meaning.

Advisory Prerequisite: Recommended for students preparing to teach English.

ENGLISH 308 — History of the English Language
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Toon,Thomas E

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

Our language has changed dramatically in the twelve hundred years of its recorded history. We would not recognize speech (Old English) of the first Germanic peoples who migrated to post-Roman Britain in the fifth century; Chaucer's Canterbury Tales (Middle English) might seem to be written in a foreign language; even Shakespeare's (early Modern) English requires special efforts. Our main task will be to understand something of sounds, words and structure of English at each of these earlier periods, but especially we will work to understand why and how a language changes (or doesn't). Course work will consist of frequent short assignments, group tasks, in class workshops, a midterm and final. The major prerequisite is that you come prepared to have fun.

ENGLISH 310 — Discourse and Society
Section 001, REC
The Henry Ford High School Project

FA 2007
Credits: 3

ENGLISH 310 teaches students to use their creative skills and social commitments to facilitate the powerful expressiveness of high school and incarcerated youth. It is rooted in respect for the youths' abilities and voices, in excitement about an educational process that promotes creativity, and in imaginative collaboration with the school and facility faculty, staff, and administration. Working two to three hours a week at Henry Ford and Cooley High Schools and Catherine Ferguson Academy in Detroit, and at the Adrian and Maxey Training Schools, Boysville, the Calumet Center, and Vista Maria, students assist youth in creating their own video tapes, plays, photographs, music, writings, art, etc. In two hour class meetings we discuss background reading, analyze and develop our work with the youth, and think out the implications of what we are doing. A further hour is devoted to meetings between each site team and the instructor. No exams.

Admission to the class is by permission of instructor. Check 3275 Angell Hall for specially posted hours for interviews for this course.

Advisory Prerequisite: ENGLISH 124 or 125 and permission of instructor.

ENGLISH 313 — Topics in Literary Studies
Section 001, LEC
Fantasy

Instructor: Rabkin,Eric S; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

This course explores the nature and uses of fantastic narratives from the beginning of the nineteenth century to the present, drawing texts from such widely different fields as fairy tales, science fiction, and the so-called New Novel. No special background in literature is required. The course requires attendance at two lectures and one discussion section per week. The written work for the course will revolve around a series of short papers and two medium-length papers. There will be no exams. Texts include: Household Stories of The Brothers Grimm; Tales of E. T. A. Hoffmann; The Portable Poe; The Alice books, Lewis Carroll; The Island of Dr. Moreau and Best Science Fiction Stories, H. G. Wells; The Complete Stories, Franz Kafka; Orlando, Virginia Woolf; The Erasers, Alain Robbe-Grillet; The Tolkien Reader; The Phantom Tollbooth, Norton Juster; Cosmicomics, Italo Calvino; Like Water for Chocolate; Laura Esquivel, and Woman on The Edge of Time, Marge Piercy.

ENGLISH 315 — Women and Literature
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

This course number is designed to accommodate a wide variety of courses on women and literature.

ENGLISH 315 — Women and Literature
Section 002, LEC
Being a Heroine

Instructor: Wolk,Merla; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

Despite the fact that a woman sat on the throne of England for most of the 19th century, Victorians were generally unable or unwilling to change their views about what women couldn't do and shouldn't do. The great novelists of the day, however, had no difficulty imagining strong, ambitious, brilliant, adventurous women and making them the heroines of their texts. Women's lack of power in 19th century life is well-known and well-documented. We will note it too, but our focus will be on the qualities with which writers from Jane Austen to George Gissing endowed their heroines. These heroines railed against the narrowness of their lives, sought choice in the midst of choicelessness, questioned what was deemed "unwomanly," and attempted to subvert the rules. We will begin before Queen Victoria, read Jane Austen's Emma, and then move to the great Victorian heroines, Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre, Dorothea Brooke, from Eliot's Middlemarch, Isabel Archer, from Henry James' The Portrait of a Lady, Tess of the D'Urbervilles, from Hardy's great novel of that name, and the lesser known Rhoda Nunn, the first activist feminist from Gissing's The Odd Women. We will also read about the culture that set restrictions on women and the lives of the authors who managed to break through. Requirements: a take-home mid-term and final; a 10-12 page annotated bibliography; regular attendance, class participation, and bi-weekly questions on the readings. The syllabus and other instructions pertaining to the course will appear on my web-site as they are completed. http://www.silicongroove.net/merlawolk/.

ENGLISH 317 — Literature and Culture
Section 001, LEC
How to be Gay: Male Homosexuality as a Cultural Practice

Instructor: Halperin,David M

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

Just because you happen to be a gay man doesn't mean that you don't have to learn how to become one. Gay men do some of that learning on their own, but often we learn how to be gay from others, either because we look to them for instruction or because they simply tell us what they think we need to know, whether we ask for their advice or not.

This course examines the role that the acquisition of cultural knowledge plays in learning how to be gay. It interrogates the curious notion that male homosexuality is not just a sexual orientation or behavior but also a cultural practice.

Many people nowadays, both gay and straight, seem to believe that what makes gay men different from everyone else is something that goes well beyond matters of sexual preference. Male homosexuality, on this view, is not just a sexuality; it is also a unique sensibility, featuring a set of distinctive tastes in books, music, movies, art, fashion, food, style, and, ultimately, a particular, non-standard way of relating to mainstream culture. Why? Do cultural forms have a sexuality? Is there a connection between sexuality and culture? What is meant when people talk as if there were a right way to be gay, as if being sexually attracted to persons of the same sex were not enough to do the trick, as if there were certain cultural items a gay man needed to know in order to be truly gay?

This course provides a survey of the traditional gay cultural curriculum. Are there a number of classically "gay" works such that, despite changing tastes and generations, all gay men, of whatever class, race, or ethnicity, need to know them, in order to be gay? What is there about gay identity that explains the gay appropriation of these works? What do we learn about gay male identity by asking not who gay men are but what it is that gay men do or like? What can an approach to gay identity that emphasizes cultural rather than sexual practices tell us about the sentimental, affective, or subjective dimensions of gay identity, including gay sexuality, that an exclusive focus on gay sexuality cannot? And how does such an approach alter our very understanding of what a social identity is and how it is formed?

At the core of gay experience there is not only identification but disidentification. Almost as soon as I learn how to be gay, or perhaps even before, I also learn how not to be gay. I say to myself, "Well, I may be gay, but at least I'm not like that!" Rather than attempting to promote one version of gay identity at the expense of others, this course will investigate the stakes in gay identifications and disidentifications, seeking ultimately to create the basis for a wider acceptance of the plurality of ways in which people learn how to be gay.

Additional note. This course is not a basic introduction to gay male culture, but an exploration of certain issues arising from it. It assumes some background knowledge. Students wishing to inform themselves about gay men and gay culture in a preliminary way should enroll in an introductory course in lesbian/gay/queer studies.

Courseload: light reading, four writing assignments, a couple of in-class presentations, attendance at evening film screenings. Approximate book cost: $110.

ENGLISH 317 — Literature and Culture
Section 003, LEC
The Arts of the Apocalypse

Instructor: Williams,Ralph G; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

For nearly two thousand years now, apocalyptic ideas have dominated theories about the shape of history and social experience. Up until about three centuries ago, those theories were almost exclusively focused on God's will and ways in history. Since then, various secularizing models of historical experience have emerged, but have formed themselves deeply on the general shape of the apocalytic model. Apocalyptic ideas also have pervaded much artistic production — in poetry, in painting, in music, in drama and film. And notions of apocalypse are also deeply embedded in current discussions of the relations between Christianity and Islam.

In this course we will study first the emergence of apocalyptic ideas in Jewish, Christian and Muslim materials, then we will follow the development of apocalyptic theories and representations in the works of such figures as Augustine, Dante, Savonarola, Botticelli, Michaelangelo, Shakespeare, Milton, Wordsworth, Wagner, Verdi, Marx, Nietzsche, Freud, Lindsay, and in a variety of films.

There will be two essays for the course, and one final examination.

ENGLISH 317 — Literature and Culture
Section 004, LEC
Codeswitch

Instructor: Carroll,Amy Sara

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

In Chicano Poetics: Heterotexts and Hybridities, Alfred Arteaga suggests, "for [Octavio] Paz, the border is a thin one and across it ‘Even the birds speak English' […] What is difficult for Paz is to consider a thick border." In this course, itself an "experiment" in hybridity — something in-between an academic and creative writing seminar — we will explore "thick descriptions" of thickening borders of the Americas. We will address the possibility of a bilingual poetics — laterally — examining written, visual, digital, and cinematic representations of bi- or multicultural subjectivities. Central to our discussion will be the conceit of codeswitching, a linguistic term, which designates a speaker or writer's facility to move between languages. We will approach codeswitching literally to acquaint ourselves with work that shuttles between Spanish and English. We will approach the term metaphorically to address the hybridity of twentieth/twenty-first century poetry as a genre. Finally, as we map an emerging canon of "thick borders," we also will attempt to create alternative cartographies, our own renditions of codeswitching.

ENGLISH 319 — Literature and Social Change
Section 001, LEC
Rhetorical Activism & U.S. Civil Rights Movements

Instructor: Portnoy,Alisse Suzanne; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: RE, HU

The signers of the United States Constitution recognized the power of rhetorical activism when they declared freedom of expression the most important right of United States citizens. Susan B. Anthony and dozens of other women spent eight decades using the only power they had, the power of language, to ensure women their right to vote in this country. The persuasive eloquence of Martin Luther King, Jr. changed this nation's consciousness as well as the experience of civil rights for all of its citizens. And although the United States did not ratify the Equal Rights Amendment, people like Shirley Chisholm and Betty Friedan forever altered the expectations and opportunities for women and men. How did these ordinary people accomplish extraordinary things by speaking up and speaking out? More broadly, how does our language define, sustain, reform, and even revolutionize the worlds in which we live? That will be our central question as we study texts representing a range of positions from several U.S. civil rights movements: the antislavery, early woman's rights, women's liberation, 1960/70s black freedom, and gay rights movements. Work for this course includes readings (hard copy and online), exams, and quizzes.

ENGLISH 320 — Literature in Afro-American Culture
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Awkward,Michael

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

This course is designed to examine the various ways in which literature and culture have interacted in the Afro-American experience of the New World. Shifting emphases shed light on a variety of issues: slave autobiography, frontier and colonial cultures, women's issues, and contemporary or popular narratives.

Advisory Prerequisite: CAAS 201

ENGLISH 321 — Internship
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Expr

The English department believes that English is one of the most versatile concentrations you can choose as an undergraduate at Michigan. We understand, too, that a number of our concentrators receive opportunities to work in various internship placements, especially over the summer months, putting their skills as writers and speakers to work in placements outside the classroom. Most businesses and organizations that allow internships require that the students receive some academic credit for their work (the students are not hired as regular employees of the company), and the English department is pleased to offer students one upper-level credit that can be counted toward an English concentration. The stipulations and requirements are as follows:

  • You must be a declared English concentrator to receive internship credit from our department.
  • You can only count one internship credit towards your English concentration.
  • This credit counts as elective credit; it cannot be used to fulfill the Department's distribution requirements.
  • You must apply for the internship at least three weeks before beginning your internship.
  • To receive credit for the internship, you will register for English 321 in the term following your internship (this is typically done in the fall following spring or summer internship work).
  • You are also required to submit a brief (c.5 pages) essay describing the kind of work you performed in your internship and talking a little bit about what that work meant to you. You should also include contact information for your internship. If you do not write up a description of your internship work for the department, you cannot receive credit for your work.
  • We ask that, when you have completed your internship, the organization for which you interned also submit a brief letter to the Department describing your work.
  • We are compiling a library of successful internship placements. If it is appropriate, we will be contacting the organization for which you did your internship and asking them if they would be willing to accept other interns from our department on a case-by-case basis.

You may pick up a registration form for internship credit at the main office of the English Department, 3187 Angell Hall. This form is also available on-line from our download forms section.

The English Department is delighted that you are thinking of ways to put your communication skills to work in situations outside the classroom. Best of luck to you.

Advisory Prerequisite: Concentration in English.

ENGLISH 323 — Creative Writing
Section 001, SEM
Fiction

Instructor: Orringer,Julie E

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: CE

In this workshop course we will study and practice the craft of fiction. We will look beneath the surface of the stories we read, approaching them from the perspective of writers, rather than as literary critics or scholars. We will read published fiction to examine the construction of character, the movement of narrative, the use of point of view, setting, dialogue, and language, and we will undertake exercises to explore elements of craft. Beginning the third week, we will read and discuss student work, drawing upon the points of craft we have examined in class. Students will complete two new stories or novel excerpts and put one of them through a thoughtful revision.

To enroll in this course, students need to,

  1. get on the waitlist.
  2. submit a 10-15 page portfolio of prose to the Main Office, Room 3187 Angell Hall to the Undergraduate Student Services Assistant by noon on Tuesday, September 4th.
  3. When you bring in your portfolio, please complete the ENGLISH 323 registration form.

You will be notified by the Department of acceptance into the course, shortly after.

Advisory Prerequisite: ENGLISH 223 and junior standing; submission of portfolio and application required.

ENGLISH 323 — Creative Writing
Section 002, SEM
Fiction

Instructor: O'Dowd,Patricia T

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: CE

Students are expected to maintain journals throughout the term, to comment thoughtfully and intelligently on one another's work and on short stories selected from the text, and to come up with forty pages of polished fiction. Attendance at the 4-5 readings sponsored by the English Department is also required.

To enroll in this course, students need to,

  1. get on the waitlist.
  2. submit a 10-15 page portfolio of prose to the Main Office, Room 3187 Angell Hall to the Undergraduate Student Services Assistant by noon on Tuesday, September 4th.
  3. When you bring in your portfolio, please complete the 323 registration form.

You will be notified by the Department of acceptance into the course, shortly after.

Advisory Prerequisite: ENGLISH 223 and junior standing; submission of portfolio and application required.

ENGLISH 323 — Creative Writing
Section 003, SEM
Fiction

Instructor: O'Dowd,Patricia T

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: CE

Students are expected to maintain journals throughout the term, to comment thoughtfully and intelligently on one another's work and on short stories selected from the text, and to come up with forty pages of polished fiction. Attendance at the 4-5 readings sponsored by the English Department is also required.

To enroll in this course, students need to, 1) get on the waitlist. 2) submit a 10-15 page portfolio of prose to the Main Office, Room 3187 Angell Hall to the Undergraduate Student Services Assistant by noon on Tuesday, September 4th. 3) When you bring in your portfolio, please complete the 323 registration form. You will be notified by the Department of acceptance into the course, shortly after.

Advisory Prerequisite: ENGLISH 223 and junior standing; submission of portfolio and application required.

ENGLISH 323 — Creative Writing
Section 004, SEM
Poetry

Instructor: Taylor,G Keith

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: CE

This course is a poetry writing workshop intended for student writers with some experience in the art. The hope is that these writers will produce new work and participate in the critical discussion of their own work and that of their colleagues. Members of the class will submit new poems every week for evaluation. A few formal and thematic assignments will be given as needed to help focus some of the writing.

Although the on-going process of writing poems is the central focus of the course, a fair amount of reading and some critical writing will also be required. Final evaluations will be based on 25-30 pages of poetry that has gone through some level of revision, 3 short papers about poetry readings, one classroom presentation on a living poet, and two short classroom presentations on different poetic forms or devices.

In order to enroll in this course, students need 1) Get on the Waitlist. 2) Submit a 10-15 page portfolio of poetry to the Main Office, room 3187 Angell Hall to the Undergraduate Student Services Assistant by noon on Tuesday, September 4th. 3) When you bring in your portfolio, please complete the 323 registration form. You will be notified by the Department of acceptance into the course, shortly after.

Advisory Prerequisite: ENGLISH 223 and junior standing; submission of portfolio and application required.

ENGLISH 325 — Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition
Section 001, SEM
The Demon, The Dwarf, and The Divided Self

Instructor: Back,Lillian L

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

Literature often attempts to transform "strangers" into "'friends" for us. "Works of fiction," Professor Paul Coates tells us, exist in a space between the Double and the Other." To enter into a work of fiction is in a sense an attempt to transform what is unfamiliar into something we can understand, something that becomes like "us," something that can become a Literary Double. In this writing seminar, we will want to concentrate our attention on how and why authors involve us in the most unlikely identifications. How does John Irving, in A Prayer for Owen Meany, create a hero for us out a little guy who looks translucent (his blue veins show through his skin), has a strange sounding voice, and is extremely manipulative? Or how does Katherine Dunn in Geek Love create a father, who, out of "love," produces a family of freaks, freaks who we actually become intrigued by. Moreover, these texts encourage us to find ways in which we recognize some of Ourselves imbedded in the most unlikely character images? Pretty much all semester we will be reading works that help us make meaning and connections out of the implications of the three unlikely joined subjects in the title of this class. And we will consistently be aware of that "space," between the text and ourselves, between the characters and our own identities. We want to consider the ways in which we, in the process of reading and writing, actually create the text and recreate our "selves." The work of the semester is to write and revise exploratory, analytical essays, the subject of which will be determined by each individual student. I intend to send out an exact syllabus to those enrolled in the class during summer break.The readings will be selected from a group of contemporary authors of different genders, ethnic backgrounds, socio-economic classes, sexualities, and religions.

ENGLISH 325 — Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition
Section 002, SEM
The Demon, The Dwarf, and The Divided Self

Instructor: Back,Lillian L

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

Literature often attempts to transform "strangers" into "'friends" for us. "Works of fiction," Professor Paul Coates tells us, exist in a space between the Double and the Other." To enter into a work of fiction is in a sense an attempt to transform what is unfamiliar into something we can understand, something that becomes like "us," something that can become a Literary Double. In this writing seminar, we will want to concentrate our attention on how and why authors involve us in the most unlikely identifications. How does John Irving, in A Prayer for Owen Meany, create a hero for us out a little guy who looks translucent (his blue veins show through his skin), has a strange sounding voice, and is extremely manipulative? Or how does Katherine Dunn in Geek Love create a father, who, out of "love," produces a family of freaks, freaks who we actually become intrigued by. Moreover, these texts encourage us to find ways in which we recognize some of Ourselves imbedded in the most unlikely character images? Pretty much all semester we will be reading works that help us make meaning and connections out of the implications of the three unlikely joined subjects in the title of this class. And we will consistently be aware of that "space," between the text and ourselves, between the characters and our own identities. We want to consider the ways in which we, in the process of reading and writing, actually create the text and recreate our "selves." The work of the semester is to write and revise exploratory, analytical essays, the subject of which will be determined by each individual student. I intend to send out an exact syllabus to those enrolled in the class during summer break.The readings will be selected from a group of contemporary authors of different genders, ethnic backgrounds, socio-economic classes, sexualities, and religions.

ENGLISH 325 — Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition
Section 003, SEM
Life Stories

Instructor: Meier,Joyce A

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

This course engages students in the practice of writing life-stories. Students read a range of autobiographical essays while developing their own versions of the form; smaller assignments culminate in a larger personal essay due by the course end. In addition, students facilitate life-writing exercises with a group of fifth-graders in a Detroit school; involving five trips total, from the 4th through the 9th week of the term, the school visits take place on Fridays (students choose either a morning or afternoon session; either way, the course requires a Friday time commitment). In class and in writing, students reflect deeply on this community work and their life-writing experiences, and comment on parallel essays by writers such as John Edgar Wideman and Annie Dillard. We address such questions as: how is life-story linked to body, place, and tradition? How might differences in race, gender, ability, and sexual preference inform life-stories? How do people sort and make sense of their lives? How do writers shape the material of their lives into essay form? Course grade is based on a writer's journal; three (4-page) analytical papers; three (4-page) personal writings; and the larger 10-page personal essay due by the course end; the final paper may be drawn from prior personal writing; it also goes through multiple drafts and is peer-reviewed by the class at large. Course readings are drawn from a list that may include Writing True: The Art and Craft of Creative Nonfiction (Sondra Perl/Mimi Schwartz) and The Truth of the Matter: Art and Craft in Creative Nonfiction (Dinty W. Moore), as well as a supplementary course packet (total estimated cost books/packet — $80).

ENGLISH 325 — Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition
Section 004, SEM

Instructor: Rubadeau,John W

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

Much like the ENGLISH 225 courses I taught during my first dozen years here, this course will focus on (1) improving your vocabulary, (2) strengthening your grammatical, mechanical, semantical, and syntactical skills, and (3) helping you find your voice. I insist that you make the private public (ideally, to illustrate a universal truth or a general principle) in order that you establish your authority to comment on the topic of your essay, that you pen an essay which is not generic, and, most importantly, that you write with a human voice (not dead, wooden prose written by an obscurantist majoring in philosophy [mea culpa to any philosophy major reading this course description]). Although this course is not difficult, it is perhaps the most labor-intensive course you will take.

Quid pro quo — be prepared to work hard for me, and, in the process, you'll learn much about writing. The reading material for this course is your peers' writing. This will be a fun, interesting, profitable, and practical course. Text: The American Heritage College Dictionary.

ENGLISH 325 — Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition
Section 005, SEM

Instructor: Rubadeau,John W

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

Much like the ENGLISH225 courses I taught during my first dozen years here, this course will focus on

  1. improving your vocabulary,
  2. strengthening your grammatical, mechanical, semantical, and syntactical skills, and
  3. helping you find your voice.

I insist that you make the private public (ideally, to illustrate a universal truth or a general principle) in order that you establish your authority to comment on the topic of your essay, that you pen an essay which is not generic, and, most importantly, that you write with a human voice (not dead, wooden prose written by an obscurantist majoring in philosophy [mea culpa to any philosophy major reading this course description]). Although this course is not difficult, it is perhaps the most labor-intensive course you will take.

Quid pro quo — be prepared to work hard for me, and, in the process, you'll learn much about writing. The reading material for this course is your peers' writing. This will be a fun, interesting, profitable, and practical course. Text: The American Heritage College Dictionary.

ENGLISH 325 — Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition
Section 006, SEM

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

A review of the fundamentals of composition with further practice in writing expository prose. Materials are drawn in part from the student's fields of interest.

ENGLISH 325 — Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition
Section 007, SEM

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

A review of the fundamentals of composition with further practice in writing expository prose. Materials are drawn in part from the student's fields of interest.

ENGLISH 325 — Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition
Section 008, SEM

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

A review of the fundamentals of composition with further practice in writing expository prose. Materials are drawn in part from the student's fields of interest.

ENGLISH 325 — Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition
Section 009, SEM

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

A review of the fundamentals of composition with further practice in writing expository prose. Materials are drawn in part from the student's fields of interest.

ENGLISH 325 — Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition
Section 010, SEM

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

A review of the fundamentals of composition with further practice in writing expository prose. Materials are drawn in part from the student's fields of interest.

ENGLISH 325 — Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition
Section 011, SEM

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

A review of the fundamentals of composition with further practice in writing expository prose. Materials are drawn in part from the student's fields of interest.

ENGLISH 325 — Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition
Section 012, SEM

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR
ENGLISH 326 — Community Writing and Public Culture
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Meier,Joyce A

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: CE

This course asks that students work at and to some extent write for an area non-profit organization, at the same time they reflect deeply in writing and in discussion about the meaning of this work. Community assignments may involve contributing to a grant proposal, newsletter, website, brochure, or fund — raising letter — all of which will be peer — reviewed in draft form by the class itself. In our meetings, we will discuss issues raised at our community sites and by the related, assigned readings — such as our motives for taking on this work, our respective roles as insider/outsider; the new listening, interactive, and organizational skills that may be required; and our community partner's often differing set of goals and identities. The course provides a way of thinking about community work and social justice not just as service but as interrogating one's own background as well as the professions themselves. How is knowledge produced, both in the university setting and in the non — profit agency? How do we form meaningful and mutually beneficial relationships with our community partners? How might we contribute to the formation of public culture? Readings that approach these issues from a variety of angles (social, historical, personal, statistical) will be available in a course packet. In addition to keeping a work log and community journal, students write four (4-page) analytical papers, a fact sheet, a mini — grant proposal that includes research, an organizational analysis, and a (8-page) paper that places the student work within the larger context of social issues encountered at the community site.

Advisory Prerequisite: ENGLISH 124 or 125.

ENGLISH 327 — Intermediate Playwriting
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Oyamo

FA 2007
Credits: 2 — 3

Students work toward writing a full-length play, concentrating on the first act. Writing skills are developed by in-class reading and other writing assignments.

Advisory Prerequisite: ENGLISH 227.

ENGLISH 330 — Major Directors
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Bauland,Peter M

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

This course teaches students to write a feature-length screenplay in acceptable format. Students will learn to develop an idea first into a written "concept," then into a "treatment," "step outline," and finally into a full script. The course will focus on such subjects as screenplay structure, plot and subplots, characterizations, shots, scene, sequence, dialogue, thinking visually, and soundtrack. Students will also learn the importance of rewriting their work. As part of the process, the class will study select screenplays, then view the films which were made from these scripts. Students will also read and discuss each other's work. Given this "workshop" approach, attendance is critical. Students can expect to write between five and ten pages a week.

Advisory Prerequisite: FILMVID/SAC 236.

ENGLISH 331 — Film Genres and Types
Section 001, LEC
The Animated Film

Instructor: Kligerman,Mark William

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

Representative films, about half by Allen, spanning the careers of these contrasting yet complementary American masters. Emphasis on their cinematic "languages" and dramatic themes — the relationship between what they say and how they say it — and the nature of their comedy. One film per week; three lecture hours; mandatory small discussion groups. Course may be repeated if content differs from previous election.

No prerequisites, but the course is not "An Introduction to the movies." The course's reading, Giannetti's Understanding Movies, will give beginners a solid foundation. Alternate text for seasoned veterans. Purchase of a pass admits you to all screenings, all at the Michigan Theater. Rigorous writing with high standards for analytical/critical prose. Two 2-page papers; one 5-page paper; final exam. Those who insist that "media" takes a singular verb flunk.

Advisory Prerequisite: FILMVID 236 or SAC 236

ENGLISH 349 — American Theatre and Drama
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Westlake,Jane; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

Required Texts:

  • Plays available through CTools or in the American Drama anthology
  • Web page: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~jewestla/
  • videos that we watch in class, also available for viewing at the Film and Video Library,
  • articles and plays on electronic reserve, and
  • plays available through the American Drama Database and the Black Drama Database

Course Objectives: In this course we will read and discuss plays that have been written and performed in the United States from colonial times to the present. Most of the plays cover a wide spectrum of American life and ideology. We will discuss the content, the form, and the performances of the plays as they bear upon the formation of an American identity, especially with regard to race, gender, and sexuality.

Attendance Policy: In this course I will mix discussion, lecture, and group projects. I will not repeat information that is already in the reading, but rather, use the texts as a springboard to talk about other issues. Because you are expected to share your thoughts about the reading and about your own observations, you must come to class prepared. You will only get out of this course what you put into it.

Participation 10% 100 pts
Group Project 10% 100 pts
5 Quizzes 8% each 400 pts
Final Paper 20% 200 pts
Final Exam 20% 200 pts

ENGLISH 349 — American Theatre and Drama
Section 002, REC

Instructor: Brater,Enoch

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

This survey course will examine the origin and development of U.S. Drama in the twentieth century. Beginning with playwrights like O'Neill, Glaspell, Rice, Odets, and Treadwell, the class will focus on the interrelationship of U/S. culture in American Drama and American Drama in U.S. culture, especially as it manifests itself in the mid-century plays of Miller, Williams, and Hellman.

Topics of class discussion will focus on:

  • the emergence of a nativist theater tradition,
  • the role of ethnicity, the situation of the female playwright,
  • the conflict between commercial and artistic values, and
  • the move to a more pluralistic and inclusive theater, one in which previously marginalized voices move to center stage.

Additional playwrights on the reading list include Hansberry, Albee, Mamet, Shepard, Fornes, Lanford Wilson, Kushner, Hwang, Suzan-Lori Parks, and August Wilson.

ENGLISH 350 — Literature in English to 1660
Section 001, LEC
Questioning Heroic, Singing Romance

Instructor: Williams,Ralph G; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4

The course will focus on the reading and enjoyment of the dazzling variety of texts which made of the English tradition one of the major cultural streams in the West. At the same time we will explore the implications of these texts in and for political, social, and cultural history more generally. We will give special attention in 2007 to the ongoing rewriting of the heroic, with its shifting models of male and female excellence and to Romance with its artful fables of desire. Readings will range widely from Beowulf to Paradise Lost. Major time will be devoted to Chaucer, Marlowe, Spenser, Shakespeare, Donne, and Milton. The course features lecture three hours a week; discussion groups will meet a fourth hour to discuss the material further and to work out writing assignments for the course. There will be two essays of approximately six pages each, a midterm and a final examination.

ENGLISH 367 — Shakespeare's Principal Plays
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Worthen,William B

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

This course will consider Shakespeare's plays from a range of perspectives: in the context of early modern literary and cultural history; as documents in the history of ideology, notably the ideologies of identity; and as designs animating dramatic performance in the early-modern theater, in subsequent theaters, and (glancingly) in a range of media today. We will develop a series of key terms for the analysis of drama, and consider how the plays conceive Shakespeare's theater as a site of theoretical inquiry. The course will be paced at roughly one play per week, in addition to a substantial critical/theoretical reading that will mark the point of departure for our discussion of the play. Plays to be chosen from the range of Shakespeare's career, and will include early and late comedies, a history cycle, several major tragedies and romances. Two papers, midterm, final examination. I will order the Norton Complete Works, but any recent edition of Shakespeare's plays will be fine.

Plays to be covered chosen from this list: Midsummer Night's Dream, Romeo and Juliet, Richard II, 1 Henry IV, 2 Henry IV, Henry V, Twelfth Night, As You Like It, Hamlet, Macbeth, Othello, King Lear, Troilus and Cressida, Coriolanus, Antony and Cleopatra, The Tempest


This course fulfills the Pre-1600 requirement for English concentrators.

ENGLISH 368 — Shakespeare and his Contemporaries
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Mullaney,Steven G

FA 2007
Credits: 4

A study of major dramatic works from the revenge tradition that flourished on the Elizabethan and Jacobean stage and included many of the most popular plays of the period. We will read plays by a number of Shakespeare's contemporaries and a select few Shakespearean plays which will highlight the energetic dialogue between playwrights and acting companies of the period. Designed along the lines of English 367, this course can be taken either as a sequel or as an alternative to 367. Plays will be read intensively as theatrical and literary works, and also will be considered in relation to complex social and political issues of the period. Among the plays likely to be studied: The Spanish Tragedy, The Jew of Malta, Titus Andronicus, Hamlet, The Revenger's Tragedy, The Changeling, The Duchess of Malfi. Approximate book cost: $100 (available at Shaman Drum Bookshop). There will be a midterm and a final exam, as well as two relatively short essays.

ENGLISH 370 — Studies in Medieval and Renaissance Literature
Section 001, REC
Bodies and Communities in Medieval and Early Modern Literature

Instructor: Sanok,Catherine

FA 2007
Credits: 3

In this class, we'll explore how representations of the body and community intersect in premodern English literature. From the heroic body of the Arthurian knight to the unruly body of Shakespeare's Falstaff, and from the deceitful body of Queen Guinevere to the desirable body of the beloved in John Donne's poems, early English literature uses the representation of the body to define both the individual and the community he or she inhabits. How are bodies defined as desirable and desiring? How is the body imagined as the center of ethical or political action? How do representations of the body help to define a larger community: the court, city or nation? Reading will include Beowulf, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Canterbury Tales, Morte Darthur, Fairie Queene, Henry IV part 1, and the poetry of Donne.

We will read Chaucer's poetry in Middle English; no prior experience is necessary, but a willingness to grapple with Chaucer in his own language is. Other requirements include two papers, a final exam, in-class writing, and active, informed participation.

ENGLISH 370 — Studies in Medieval and Renaissance Literature
Section 002, REC
The Elizabethan Mind

Instructor: Ingram,William

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Honors

The texts we commonly think of as "Elizabethan" are the ones that have done the best job of surviving into our own day. Thus the term "Elizabethan" will suggest to us primarily Shakespeare's plays, along with perhaps a handful of works by other writers like Donne or Jonson. But such an estimate is too narrow, too skewed by marketplace popularity, too filtered by old-fashioned criticism, too affected by the shifting of taste. The Elizabethans themselves (like us in our own time) took pleasure in a wide range of textual encounters, from street ballads to epic poems, prose romances to stage melodramas, texts both new and old, good and bad, long and short, easy and hard. Some of what they loved has survived, but much has not, so our reading range is more restricted than theirs was. And none of this material flourished in a vacuum, any more than our own literature does. Shakespeare, Marlowe, Spenser, Sidney and their fellows all had daily lives as active as any of our own. Most of them had families, aging parents, friends who weren't literary, children whom they loved and often lost; they worried about politics and the cost of living, and generally inhabited a world about which we know far too little. In this course we will try to recover some sense of the variety of writings produced and consumed by the age, and also attempt to recover some of the social, political, and economic "surrounds" of their lives and try to discover how such understanding enriches our reading of the texts they produced. We'll read some of the texts they would have known, like the bible, Ovid, Virgil, Petrarch, Ariosto, Malory, etc, so that we can have in our heads the same library they had in theirs. Our approach will be broadly cultural and historical as well as literary. You'll be expected to read intelligently, write clearly (and frequently), and become involved in discussion in every class session. There will be either a final exam or a final long essay.

ENGLISH 371 — Studies in Literature, 1600-1830
Section 001, REC
Narratives of Enlightenment

Instructor: Agnani,Sunil Mohan

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This class will examine literary texts in relation to pivotal themes of the Enlightenment. The course will be divided in three parts, organized thematically (authors to be read follow in parenthesis):

  1. Property, planters and ownership (Locke, Austen, Equiano, Marx)
  2. Homo-economicus or "economic man" (Adam Smith, Defoe's Robinson Crusoe, Ian Watt)
  3. Revolution (Rousseau's Discourse on Inequality, Burke, Diderot, Wollstonecraft, readings on Haitian/French revolutions)

Readings will generally relate fiction (primarily novels) from the period in relation to important philosophical, political or other prose documents. We will also aim, however, to connect these with other key concepts and arguments from after the period (e.g., Marx on property), and to theories of the novel.

A representative list of books (others may be added or dropped):

  • John Locke, Second Treatise on Civil Government [Cambridge Univ. Press]
  • Daniel Defoe, Robinson Crusoe [Norton Critical Edition]
  • Denis Diderot, Selections from The Encyclopedia, Supplement to Bougainville's Voyage [Cambridge Univ. Press]
  • Olaudah Equiano, Narrative of His Life [Penguin classics]
  • Jane Austen, Mansfield Park [Norton Critical Edition]
  • Jean-Jacques Rousseau, The Origin of Inequality [Hackett edition]
  • Mary Wollstonecraft, A Vindication of the Rights of Woman [Broadview Press]
  • Isaac Kramnick (editor), The Portable Enlightenment Reader [Penguin]

Theoretical texts on the rise of the novel will include selections from: Ian Watt, Michael McKeon, Nancy Armstrong.

Course Requirements

  1. Attendance is mandatory. Absences will be noted and unexcused absences will affect your grade.

  2. Class Participation is a crucial component of this course. The success of this class depends on the students' active engagement with the texts and with one another. Your grade will be based in part on participation in class.
  3. One Class Presentation will be asked of each student, in collaboration with another person.

  4. Four Written Responses + Two evaluations of other student responses. Over the course of the academic term, you are required to submit brief written responses (approx. 250 words, or 1-2 pages) to the week's reading assignment, posted to the course website under the option on the left hand side of the screen, "Discussion." Responses are due, posted to the discussion board, by midnight the day before class meets, and will be graded as "satisfactory," "unsatisfactory" or "fail." In addition to this, twice during the term you are also required to write an evaluation of one other student response paper that has already been posted to the web. The length of this is approximately 2-3 pages (750 words).

  5. Term Papers. Two term papers are due on the days marked in the assignment calendar. The penalty for late papers is one-third of a letter grade per calendar day. In other words, if you write an A paper and hand it in two days late, your grade will be reduced to B+.

  6. Exams. There may be a cumulative final exam, listed on the schedule. This will consist of written essay responses.

Grades for Course. The following approximate percentages will be used to calculate grades:

  • Class Participation 10%
  • Written Responses + Evaluation of other Responses 20%
  • Presentation 10%
  • Paper One 30%
  • Paper Two 30%

ENGLISH 371 — Studies in Literature, 1600-1830
Section 002, REC

Instructor: Levinson,Marjorie

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Honors

Just how different are poetry and philosophy? Is one by nature less serious than the other? Is one a better teacher? Ever since the early 19th century, the language arts (within which poetry is often titled the queen of the verbal arts) have refused the traditional distinction between art and philosophy. With that refusal goes the denial that philosophy — study of truth — is superior to aesthetics, the domain of feeling, of sensation, of the body. It is not that poetry in this period (?) abandons its inherited office of teaching by delighting, but rather that it radically re-defines the concepts of both teaching and delighting, sometimes in ways borrowed from the new philosophical positions. Poetry comes to offer itself as a practice of knowledge that is formally different from but no less serious or productive than philosophy proper. In fact, poetry will offer itself as the better muse.

In this course, we will study the poetry that first made this claim, poems associated with the literary historical term, "Romantic." We will examine these poems in the context of the philosophical works against and by means of which the poetry defined itself. We will see how poets as different as Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, and Shelley tilt against, incorporate, and revise positions established by the philosophical systems current in their time. Students will read from the works of Bacon, Locke, Descartes, Hobbes, Spinoza, Hume, and Kant.

Requirements: Because we meet only once a week, students must prepare thoroughly for class so that we can cover the ground and achieve the depth that will make it interesting. Students will present oral reports about three times during the term and hand in a written version of each talk in addition to a final term paper.

ENGLISH 371 — Studies in Literature, 1600-1830
Section 003, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 3

A course which ranges widely (by genre or theme) over literature in English 1660-1830.

ENGLISH 372 — Studies in Literature, 1830-Present
Section 001, REC
American Gothic

Instructor: Larson,Kerry C

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Popularly viewed as an artistic mode self-consciously steeped in the archaic past, the gothic first emerged in Europe during the second half of the 18th Century and soon migrated to American shores. In the past two hundred years it has made its presence felt in a surprising variety of literary forms and ideological causes. In this class we shall examine the various uses to which the themes, imagery, and styles associated with the gothic have been put, from the primarily psychological (stories by Poe and Henry James), to issues of social class (Hawthorne, The House of the Seven Gables), racial injustice (Faulkner, Sanctuary; Ellision, Invisible Man), crises of religious faith (stories by Flannery O'Connor, Kathy Acker).

Written requirements: three essays (5 to 7 pages) and a final exam.

ENGLISH 381 — Asian American Literature
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: See,Maria S

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

What does it mean to read and interpret Asian American literature?

This course is an introduction to Asian American texts that represent a range of genres: autobiography, poetry, drama, short story, novel, cultural history, stand-up comedy, and cultural criticism. An understanding of their sociohistorical context and political significance is crucial, so occasionally we will pair literary texts with historical and legal texts. Yet the latter also will be treated as "literary" material that relies on the power of rhetoric and figurative language. Generally, we will emphasize the constructed and crafted nature of the texts at hand, a challenging task for all students of literature but perhaps especially when it comes to analyzing literature by U.S. writers of color.

Course requirements: several short responses; an essay topic proposal; two essays; and an exam.

ENGLISH 382 — Native American Literature
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Faller,Lincoln B

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

All Americans know something about Native Americans — at least they think they do. Stereotypes abound and, for most of our history, most of them have been vicious. But all stereotypes are damaging to the people they include, even the most benign and supposedly positive. Where vicious stereotypes would silence and discredit those they target, stereotypes of the supposedly benign kind are all too ready to speak for them, preempting their own efforts to speak the truth as they see it.

Native Americans have been publishing their own writing in English since 1772. In focusing almost exclusively on twentieth — century novels, this course will consider only a small part of the large, rich, and various body of the literature, both oral and written, produced by the indigenous peoples of our country. Each of our readings will, in its own way, powerfully contradict the usual ways of imagining and thinking about "Indians."

The course will begin with an extended look at a work which is neither fictive nor entirely Native-authored, John Neidhardt's Black Elk Speaks. This book will help us to identify certain crucial problems in the reading and interpretation of texts infused with Native American cultural values and emerging from Native American experience, from a perspective outside those values and that experience. Subsequent readings will include, in this order, the following novels: D'Arcy McNickle's The Surrounded, N. Scott Momaday's House Made of Dawn, James Welch's The Death of Jim Loney, Leslie Marmon Silko's Ceremony, Louise Erdrich's Love Medicine and also Erdrich's Tracks, James Welch's Fools Crow.

Each class will begin with an oral presentation by a panel of students. Class sessions will operate as much as possible as discussions interspersed with mini-lectures by the instructor. Students will write weekly reaction papers, except during those weeks when they are giving an oral presentation. There will be two in — class essay exams as well as an end — of — term paper or other equivalent project. Class attendance is important and will be recorded.

ENGLISH 407 — Topics in Language and Literature
Section 002, SEM
Literatures of Hawaii

Instructor: Najita,Susan Y; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

As its literature attests, Hawai'i is simultaneously the uniquely multicultural fiftieth state of the Union, a colonial outpost, and the disputed sovereign nation of native Hawaiians. As might be expected, the literature of Hawai'i is a highly contested terrain ranging from works by native Hawaiian writers, "local" writers, and works by "foreigners." This course allows students to read and study the literary and oral traditions of Hawai‘i, including works by writers of native Hawaiian, Chinese, Puerto Rican, Japanese, Filipino, and Korean descent, through competing paradigms which place Hawaii's literatures and cultures within the historical, social, and political contexts of western imperial expansion, globalization, Asian American literature, and the native Hawaiian movement toward autonomy and self-determination. The literatures of Hawai‘i have been and can be read through these frameworks as well as how they also problematize and contest these categories. We will examine dominant representations of the islands by Melville, London and Twain as well as contestatory representations by "local" writers such as Balaz, Holt, Trask, Murayama, Pak, Yamanaka, Zamora Linmark, and Cobb Keller. The course will also contextualize these authors within the broader critical paradigms of mainland Asian American literature as well as Pacific Island literatures.

ENGLISH 407 — Topics in Language and Literature
Section 004, SEM
Old English

Instructor: Toon,Thomas E

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course is an introduction to the earliest texts written in English over a thousand years ago. We will begin with Old English, the language spoken by our forebears until the unpleasantness at Hastings — the Norman Conquest. Since Old English is so different from Modern English as to seem like another language, the first objective of this course will be to master the rudiments of the structure and vocabulary of the earliest attested form of English. The reward is being able to read an excitingly different corpus of prose and poetry. We will conclude with the study of the later texts which continue the Anglo-Saxon alliterative tradition. My chief aim is to help you develop a new appreciation of where our language, culture, and intellectual traditions come from.

ENGLISH 411 — Art of the Film
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 3

With 25 percent of the world's prisoners, the United States is the most incarcerating nation and has the longest sentences by far in the world. Thirteen percent of the U.S. population, African Americans are 50.8 percent of our prison population. In 1979, 1 in 14 Michigan state workers were employed in the state prison system; it is now close to 1 in 3. Michigan has built over 30 prisons in the past 17 years. We have eliminated higher education, instituted longer sentences, and handed down harsher punishments. Yet to most of us, prisons remain invisible places we ignore or know only through rumors, myths, and the speeches of politicians. This course will address prison reality and culture and the ways in which prisons are represented to us and to others. Discussions will focus on the works and their implications about personal attitudes and behavior and about social institutions. Expect journals and final projects. There will be no exams.

ENGLISH 415 — Interdisciplinary Approaches to Literature
Section 001, LAB
Technology & the Humanities

Instructor: Rabkin,Eric S; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This upperclass and graduate-level course is appropriate for both those who are technically sophisticated and those who are novices. The course offers technical training, exploration of the implications of modern digital technologies, and the opportunity to develop both technical and scholarly skills in advanced research subjects in the humanities. The course fosters both sharpened general analytic and presentational skills and technical mastery of a broad range of modern computer-based technologies for collaboration and for gathering, manipulating, analyzing, and presenting electronic data in the humanities, both locally and via networks, with special attention to creating and publishing "compound documents" (e.g., Web sites and CD-ROMS). The course begins with five weeks of intensive technical training and proceeds to five weeks of discussion of works that explore the impacts of technology. By the middle of the semester, restrained only by time and their imaginations, students also will be working in self-selected groups on creating sophisticated multimedia products using a variety of techniques to address some substantial issue in the humanities. Technical topics include information gathering from digital sources, HTML authoring, hypertext documents or novels, collaborative technologies, image manipulation, text analysis, and the meaning of the digital revolution. Prospective students may want to look at the course websites for some previous offerings of this course which can be found at Selected Student Humanities InfoTech Coursework (http://www.umich.edu/%7Emmx/humsit_coursework.htm) linked to Professor Rabkin's home page (http://www.umich.edu/~esrabkin). Further queries can be addressed to Professor Rabkin, preferably by e-mail but also by phone or during his office hours. Professor Victor Rosenberg of the School of Information is co-instructor of this course. Prospective students should also feel invited to visit his home page (http://www.umich.edu/~victorr) and to contact him via email or in person.

Advisory Prerequisite: Senior or graduate standing.

ENGLISH 417 — Senior Seminar
Section 001, SEM
Literature & the Law

Instructor: Bauland,Peter M

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: ULWR

Credit Exclusions: May not be repeated for credit.

From antiquity to the present, artists have been irresistibly drawn to the law as an institution and justice as an ethical concept as thematic material for their story telling. Based on intensive reading of works by or from Aeschylus, Sophocles, the Apocrypha, Shakespeare, Melville, Schnitzler, Kafka, Koestler, Camus, R. Shaw, and P. Roth, our discussions will examine how these selections treat the legal process as an object of analytical interest in itself, as an example of procedurally and ethically complex social phenomena, and as a testing ground for propositions of morality. We will also study two films. Limited class size should allow each student a chance to lead discussion. Requirements: one short paper, a longer critical/analytical essay, and your actively, intelligently participating presence. We will study how some artists' fascination with the law helps us come to terms with themes of ethical content within a social context.


Book cost: under $100 for new copies and course pack; less for used.

Advisory Prerequisite: Senior concentrator in English.

ENGLISH 417 — Senior Seminar
Section 002, SEM
Reading in Place

Instructor: Herrmann,Anne C

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: ULWR

Credit Exclusions: May not be repeated for credit.

This course will consider what it means to be a reader and what it means to read in particular places, with an emphasis on texts, both fictional and non-fictional, written in the 20th century. Questions to be addressed are: how are readers represented? What does it mean to go in search of an author? How does what we read mediate our relationship to where we live? How does where we live determine what we are allowed to read? The first part of the course will look at places where characters read, from the room, to the house, to the city, to the landscape and how this matters in the telling of a story. The second part will examine how readers think about where they live, from London to Tehran to Istanbul and how this influences their relationship to authors.

Texts include:

  • Woolf's A Room of One's Own and Jacob's Room,
  • Cather's The Professor's House,
  • Kincaid's Lucy and
  • Patricia Williams Open House, as well as
  • Schlink's The Reader,
  • Bartlett's Who Was That Man?,
  • Nafisi's Reading Lolita in Tehran, and
  • Pamuk's Istanbul,.

Class requirements include briefs essays, a seminar paper written in several stages, and a reflection on the writing you will have done for the class. Cost: $120

Advisory Prerequisite: Senior concentrator in English.

ENGLISH 417 — Senior Seminar
Section 003, SEM
Intergenerational Memory in U.S. Literature

Instructor: Miller,Joshua L

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: ULWR

Credit Exclusions: May not be repeated for credit.

In this course, our focus will be on the illuminating process of storytelling that transmits the experience of traumatic events to later generations. These novels, films, and musical works show that private, individual memories are often re-experienced by the storyteller's descendents in unexpected ways. In such works, individuals who have been told of crimes committed against their ancestors co-memorate, experience, and reproduce the violence of these events in their own lives. We'll examine the ways that writers, directors, musicians, and artists turn private memories into public documents — novels, films, songs, images — in order to demonstrate the lingering effects of ancestral memories on present-day lives. These stories raise important questions about art and the process of producing collective memory. What are the impulses and objectives of intergenerational stories? How do these artists come to terms with the burden of responsibility that such stories produce? What sort of creative methods of artistic expression do the inheritors of these memories invent in order to live up to this legacy of responsibility? How might intergenerational stories be viewed as foundational to identity?

We'll read texts featuring characters that seek to understand how their identities have been shaped — consciously and unconsciously — by inherited memories that they experience as their own. We'll also read and discuss theoretical approaches to memory issues. The readings may include novels, short stories, and poems by William Faulkner, Kate Chopin, Jean Toomer, Langston Hughes, Allen Ginsberg, Gayl Jones, Leslie Marmon Silko, Kara Walker, and Art Spiegelman, as well as films and jazz/blues recordings. Film screenings will be scheduled outside of class meetings; film and musical materials will also be available at the Film and Video Library and on reserve.

Advisory Prerequisite: Senior concentrator in English.

ENGLISH 417 — Senior Seminar
Section 004, SEM
Medical Visions/Medical Performances

Instructor: Kuppers,Petra

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: ULWR

Credit Exclusions: May not be repeated for credit.

This course will investigate medical imagery in visual art, performance art and poetry. We will read a number of theoretical texts that address the cultural placement of medical discourses and imagery, and also analyze popular representations such as CSI: Crime Scene Investigation and surgery programs. The emphasis in this course is on close textual reading skills, and on creative methodologies: you will engage in art- and performance-making yourself, and a course exhibit will be part of our journey together. Your assessment can include creative work, and we will set up individual assessment structures taking your working preferences into account.

Advisory Prerequisite: Senior concentrator in English.

ENGLISH 417 — Senior Seminar
Section 005, SEM
American Literary Regionalism: Local Stories, National Literature, Global Connections

Instructor: Howard,June M

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: ULWR

Credit Exclusions: May not be repeated for credit.

How much does place matter — in writing and reading literature, and more generally in culture and society? Everything that exists has to be somewhere. What vocabulary lets us talk precisely about that fact — should we make a distinction between place and space, for example? In our modern world, what are the connections and tensions between the regional and the national, the local and the global?

This class will examine "local color" writing, a popular and critically admired form in American literature from roughly 1870 to 1920, and also look at some recent fictions in which place plays a crucial role. Ways of imagining gender, race, class, nationality, politics, spirituality, nature all become visible through these works' representations of land, community, and mobility. We will ask what it meant that representations of the rural became intensely interesting to readers in the urbanizing United States of the late nineteenth century, what place local color fiction had in the literary system of its period, and what it means that regionalism has revived in the globalizing world of the early twenty-first century. Throughout, we will explore broad questions about the nature and significance of place and literature.

Authors to be read include Hamlin Garland, Mary Wilkins Freeman, Charles Chesnutt, Edith Wharton, and Fae Myenne Ng. Many of these writers are relatively little known today, but they are extremely rewarding to read. There will also be some secondary readings, and instructor will present perspectives from several disciplines. Students' responsibilities will be to read, contribute to our conversations, make an individual or collaborative oral presentation, and write several substantial papers (sometimes in several drafts).

Advisory Prerequisite: Senior concentrator in English.

ENGLISH 423 — The Writing of Fiction
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Byers,Michael Denis

FA 2007
Credits: 3

ENGLISH 423 is an advanced-level course in the writing and reading of short fiction. The primary focus of the course will be on original student work, but we'll also study a variety of published stories. Students will be required to write two complete stories for the workshop and revise both by the end of the term. Brief weekly critiques of stories to be discussed and occasional short writing exercises will also be assigned. Reading will usually consist of three to four stories each week.

Required text: Course pack

Admission: Applicants should bring a brief sample of fiction (5-10 pages) to the first meeting.

Students who want to enroll in the workshop should get on the waitlist and bring a manuscript to class the first evening. A list of those admitted will be posted shortly thereafter.

Advisory Prerequisite: Open to seniors and Graduate students; permission of instructor.

ENGLISH 423 — The Writing of Fiction
Section 002, SEM

Instructor: O'Dowd,Patricia T

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Students are expected to maintain journals throughout the term, to comment thoughtfully and intelligently on one another's work and on short stories selected from the text, and, to come up with forty pages of polished fiction. Attendance at the 4-5 readings sponsored by the English Department is also required. Students who want to enroll in the workshop should get on the waitlist and bring a manuscript to class the first meeting. A list of those admitted will be posted shortly thereafter.

Advisory Prerequisite: Open to seniors and Graduate students; permission of instructor.

ENGLISH 425 — Advanced Essay Writing
Section 001, SEM
Subject and Subjectivity

Instructor: Back,Lillian L

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

Upper level students who are interested in the writing of non-fiction, creative, prose should join us. We will want to uncover, in our discussions, how we go through a continuing process of creating and recreating ourselves. Primarily, we will obtain a focus in our discussions by immersing ourselves in "other" people's point of view. The literature we read will present a diverse group of writers. Although the final syllabus has not been made, selections will most likely include the following writers: M. Atwood, M. Cunningham, L. Erdrich, M. Chabon, Valerie Martin and other great books that surprise me this summer.

Requirements include: a continuing writing process with a final result of approximately twenty pages of polished prose and a weekly short response to fellow students' writing. You will determine the subject of your writing, but the form of the paper will be a critical analysis that is careful to consider both the emotional and intellectual responses of your reader.

Advisory Prerequisite: Open only to seniors and Graduate students.

ENGLISH 425 — Advanced Essay Writing
Section 002, SEM
Persuasive Writing

Instructor: Portnoy,Alisse Suzanne; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

The signers of the United States Constitution declared our freedom of expression the most important right of United States citizens. Susan B. Anthony and dozens of other women used the only power they had, the power of language, to ensure women their right to vote in the United States. And the persuasive eloquence of Martin Luther King, Jr., changed this nation's consciousness. These were ordinary people doing extraordinary things with language.

What about you? Do you aspire to extraordinary things, or do you simply hope to land a great job or appeal a parking ticket? Either way, you'll need to use persuasive writing. This semester, we will increase our awareness of, respect for, and facility with persuasive writing. But our enthusiasm for and understanding of argumentative writing can grow only if we care about what we're doing (and even have some fun), so usually you will choose your own topics as we play with, analyze, and practice argumentative writing. To guide us in these challenging but rewarding enterprises, we'll use a textbook, Ancient Rhetorics for Contemporary Students, and a handbook. We'll write almost daily, in the form of short exercises (hard copy and online), rhetorical analyses, and longer essays; plan on lots of informal writing and three formal essays of 4-8 pages each.

Advisory Prerequisite: Open only to seniors and Graduate students.

ENGLISH 425 — Advanced Essay Writing
Section 003, SEM

Instructor: Rubadeau,John W

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

This course is a continuation of ENGLISH 325 and will focus on

  1. improving your vocabulary,
  2. strengthening your grammatical, mechanical, semantical, and syntactical skills, and
  3. helping you find your voice.

I insist that you make the private public (ideally, to illustrate a universal truth or a general principle) in order that you establish your authority to comment on the topic of your essay, that you pen an essay which is not generic, and, most importantly, that you write with a human voice (not dead, wooden prose written by an obscurantist majoring in philosophy [mea culpa to any philosophy major reading this course description]). Although this course is not difficult, it is perhaps the most labor-intensive course you will take. Quid pro quo — be prepared to work hard for me, and, in the process, you'll learn much about writing. The reading material for this course is your peers' writing. This will be a fun, interesting, profitable, and practical course. Text: The American Heritage College Dictionary.

Advisory Prerequisite: Open only to seniors and Graduate students.

ENGLISH 426 — Directed Writing
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: INDEPENDENT

As a privilege for students who have displayed academic excellence and who can show appropriate preparation in courses previously taken, the Department of English offers course credit for independent study. Independent study provides an opportunity for highly motivated and capable students to pursue a rigorous course of study that is not accommodated elsewhere in the curriculum.

Independent study proposals require advance planning. Each must be developed in consultation with a full-time member of the English Department faculty who will serve as a faculty mentor for the project, and subsequently must be approved by the Undergraduate Chair of the Department. Interested students should begin consulting with their mentors during the semester before the proposed independent study in order to develop a feasible course. Only those proposing a carefully structured and intellectually viable course of study that is not already offered in the undergraduate curriculum should submit applications. Independent study requires that students design their own courses, create their own syllabi, and work closely with faculty mentors. Supervising professors must donate a great deal of time and effort, so students applying for independent study should be similarly committed to the project. Students must be in residence in order to undertake independent study projects. A three-credit independent study should involve at least one hour of student-faculty contact plus an additional eight hours of work per week. It is also possible to elect two or four credit hours with appropriate changes in workload.

Professors normally do not supervise independent studies during terms when they are on leave, nor do they supervise them on subjects which fall outside of their areas of specialization, or on subjects covered by regular course offerings. A limit of six credit hours of independent study may be accumulated in the English department. Independent study projects cannot be used to fulfill Department program requirements or College distribution requirements.

Please keep in mind, if you are planning on doing your independent study in writing (ENGLISH 426) and have already taken and applied a writing course to your English concentration, the credit will not count toward your 27 credits. You are allowed to use only one creative or expository writing course toward the concentration whether it is independent study or a regular ENGLISH course (ENGLISH 301, 323, 325, 423, 425, etc.)

To apply:

  • Pick up an Independent Study Application at the English Department office at 3187 Angell Hall.
  • Complete Part I of the independent study application and attach a statement addressing each of the questions posed there along with a copy of your transcript.
  • Part II of the application must be completed by the supervising faculty member.
  • Submit both parts of this proposal to the Undergraduate Secretary in 3187 Angell Hall.

Once a decision is made regarding your proposal, you will be notified either by phone or by email. All decisions on proposals submitted by the above due dates will be made by the Drop/Add deadline.

Advisory Prerequisite: JR.STD./P.I.

ENGLISH 429 — The Writing of Poetry
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Mattawa,Khaled Ahmad

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This is a poetry workshop for the student who has previous workshop and writing experience. The focus of the course will be on the writing and sharing of new poems. Additionally, we will read poems in a variety of styles and forms, with an eye to widening the range of our own poems. Class discussion will concern student poems as well as published poems. Experimentation will be encouraged. A final portfolio will be required.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor.

ENGLISH 430 — The Rise of the Novel
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Faller,Lincoln B

FA 2007
Credits: 3

The narrative form we call the English novel developed over the course of the eighteenth century in a series of brilliant formal, imaginative, and intellectual experiments. We will read some of the most remarkable of these experimental narratives, including Daniel Defoe's Moll Flanders (1722), Samuel Richardson's Clarissa (1748-9), Henry Fielding's Tom Jones (1749), Laurence Sterne's Tristram Shandy (1759-67), Frances Burney's Evelina (1778), and Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice (1813). In reading these works we'll be concerned with a variety of matters aesthetic and cultural, including the elaboration of action into plot; the development of authorial voice and authority; the shaping of reader response; the representation of individual consciousness amid other interacting and competing subjectivities; the use and implications of setting. We'll also be interested in these novels' representation and critique of cultural values and social practices, including their depiction of gender and class relations; the operations of the law, including its treatment of crime; the distribution and exchange of property; along as well with their treatment of themes large and small like love and marriage, death, good and bad manners, what it means to have justice done or to lead a 'good life.' Each class will begin with an oral presentation by a panel of students. Students will write weekly reaction papers, except during those weeks when they are giving an oral presentation. There will be a midterm exam and a final exam, as well as an end-of-term paper or other equivalent project. Class attendance is important and will be recorded.

This course satisifes the Pre-1830 requirement for English concentrators.

ENGLISH 431 — The Victorian Novel
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Wolk,Merla; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

For novel lovers, the Victorian era is the golden age. The novels produced during this period of British literature — 1937-1801 — combined all the riches of the novel form. In modern fiction, we separate the romance novel from the political, crime fiction from high art, a study of mores and manners from pot-boilers. The Victorian novelists put all of these elements together and what emerged was the Victorian novel. Commonly written for serialization, and thus designed to bring readers back for the next month's installment, their plots envelop and captivate the reader. Attempting to imitate the cultural life that produced them, authors represented the great conflicts of the day — e.g. the situation of women, the divisions between rich and poor, the political parlor games in which marriages were arranged like business deals. Most intriguing is the complicated relationship this fiction had to the strict moral and behavioral codes for which the Victorian era is known. Some novels at once endorsed and questioned these assumptions. Others boldly satirized the hypocrisies to which the code was liable and at the same time built plots that upheld the very values they satirized. We will immerse ourselves in the pleasures of the following texts: Charlotte Bronte's Villette, Charles Dickens' Great Expectations, George Eliot's Middlemarch, Henry James' The Turn of the Screw, R.L. Stevenson's Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, Thomas Hardy's The Mayor of Casterbridge, and Oscar Wilde's The Picture of Dorian Grey. Requirements include a 10-12 pp. annotated bibliography, a 5-6 pp essay that comes out of the research for the bibliography, a take-home final exam, bi-weekly questions on the texts, regular class attendance, and participation in class discussion.

ENGLISH 433 — The Modern Novel
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course focuses on the major developments in the modern novel with special attention to the form's relationship to intellectual and cultural trends in the modern world. Special emphasis is on works by authors such as Joyce, Woolf, Lawrence, Ford, Forster, Stein, West, Richardson, H.D.

ENGLISH 440 — Modern Poetry
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Goldstein,Laurence A

FA 2007
Credits: 3

In this course, we shall study the major poetry in English of the period 1900-1940. Our principal subject matter will be work by the most important poets — Thomas Hardy, W.B. Yeats, T.S. Eliot, Ezra Pound, D. H. Lawrence, H.D., W.C. Williams, Marianne Moore, Robert Frost, Hart Crane, and Wallace Stevens — but we will also devote some time to special topics like Imagism, the poetry of The Great War, and the Harlem Renaissance, as well as to the social, historical, and literary backgrounds of modern poetry. The objective of the course is a clear understanding of the techniques and themes of modern poetry, which are especially significant because they continue to influence and inform the poetry of our own time. The format is lecture and discussion. Requirements include two papers, a midterm, and a final examination.


Cost:$70.00.

ENGLISH 443 — History of Theatre I
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Woods,Leigh A

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: WorldLit

This course, a survey of the development of theatre from the ancient Greeks to the 17th century, should be elected by all Theatre concentrators. The focus is on the production of theatre in its historical and social context, but we shall also study representative plays.

ENGLISH 443 — History of Theatre I
Section 002, LEC

Instructor: Nkanga,Mbala D

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: WorldLit

This course, a survey of the development of theatre from the ancient Greeks to the 17th century, should be elected by all Theatre concentrators. The focus is on the production of theatre in its historical and social context, but we shall also study representative plays.

ENGLISH 447 — Modern Drama
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Worthen,William B

FA 2007
Credits: 3

In the "long twentieth century," the theory and practice of the theater engaged extraordinary and exciting change: from the box-sett naturalism of Ibsen and Chehov's haunted bourgeoisie to the claustal boxes of Beckett and Pinter; from the surreal dreamscapes of Strindberg and Pirandello and Genet to the postmodern nightmares of Mü ller and Koltès; and from the Marxist alienation of Brecht's theater to the political engagements of Peter Weiss, Peter Handke, Anna Deavere Smith, or Brian Friel, or Caryl Churchill. In this course, we will develop an extensive reading of the work of a wide range of modern playwrights, consider their figuration of theatrical practice, and examine their dialectical engagement with important modes of modern theatrical, literary, and performance theory. Specific attention will be given to the relationship between modern realism and its representation of race, class, and gender; to the practice of Marxist aesthetics in the work of Brecht and his inheritors. Although the focus on the course will be drama and theater 1880-1960, some attention will be given to more recent work.

Plays to be drawn from the following writers: Ibsen, Strindberg, Chekhov, Robins, Fleisser, Beckett, Pinter, Handke, Fornes, Churchill, Parks, Soyinka. Critical and theoretical reading: Nietzsche, Stanislavski, Freud, Brecht, Artaud, Jameson, Lehmann, others

Course will be a mixture of lecture and discussion; reading will be 1-2 plays and critical/theoretical reading/week. Writing: papers and examinations.

Advisory Prerequisite: Junior or graduate standing.

ENGLISH 450 — Medieval Drama
Section 001, LEC
Sex & Religion in Medieval Drama

Instructor: Tinkle,Theresa L

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Medieval drama encompasses a wide range of texts, from extremely bawdy secular literature to serious devotional plays. Some texts explore the comedy of human sexual desire, others the grotesque possibilities of the sexualized body. As we read these plays, we will come better to appreciate how literature invents sexuality. Still other texts seek to teach Christian biblical history to the laity, beginning with Creation and ending with the Last Judgment. Although the Christian Bible obviously inspires such literature, the actors speak distinctly unbiblical words, at times uttering blasphemous scatological curses, at other times mocking ecclesiastical rituals. These plays will allow us to explore the connections between serious religious aspiration and carnivalesque laughter. Throughout this course, we will discover that European culture changes significantly between the twelfth century and the sixteenth, leading to fascinating changes in definitions of both sexuality and piety.

Course requirements: active participation in discussions, reading response papers, peer critiques, two essays, and at least one performance.

ENGLISH 461 — English Romantic Literature
Section 001, REC
Romanticism in an Age of Revolutions: Origins, Debates, Legacies

Instructor: Agnani,Sunil Mohan

FA 2007
Credits: 3

A consideration of Romanticism in its own right, and as a literary and intellectual response to the Enlightenment and the age of revolutions (France, America, Haiti). Readings from pivotal writers (Wordsworth, Blake, Coleridge, Burke, Wollstonecraft, Rousseau, Hazlitt, De Quincey) and selections from lesser-read ones as we consider what oblique and direct relation they established to great (and global) issues of their day — rights of women, abolition of slavery, legitimacy of colonialism (or lack thereof) — in both poetry and prose. Romanticism's legacy (in aesthetics: the sublime; in politics: the idea of great individual/genius) upon later periods will also be a critical area of discussion.


Readings: approximately 150 pages per week (poetry and prose).
Writing assignments: two essays (7-8 pages each); final exam; brief in-class presentation; six one-page response papers to individual class readings.
Books:
(1) William Wordsworth, The Prelude: The Four Texts (1798, 1799, 1805, 1850) (Penguin Classics; ed. by Jonathan Wordsworth)
(2) Edmund Burke, The Portable Edmund Burke (The Viking Portable Library; ed. by Isaac Kramnick)
(3) Mary Wollstonecraft, A Vindication of the Rights of Men (Broadview; ed. by Macdonald & Sherf)
(4) Thomas De Quincey Confessions of an English Opium Eater: And Other Writings (Penguin; ed. by Barry Milligan)
(5) Samuel Taylor Coleridge, The Major Works (Oxford World's Classics; ed. by H. J. Jackson)
(6) Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Reveries of the Solitary Walker (ed. by Charles E. Butterworth). Hackett: 1992. ISBN: 0872201627
(7) William Blake. Selected Poetry (ed. by Michael Mason). Oxford University Press: 1998. ISBN: 0192834894
(8) William Hazlitt, Selected Writings (ed. by Ronald Blythe). Penguin: 1993. ISBN: 0140430504
Approximate cost of books for course: $87

ENGLISH 469 — Milton
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Gregerson,Linda K

FA 2007
Credits: 3

In this course, we will study the work of a poet whom many consider to be the most compelling, and the most maddening, in the language. His subjects were large: the loss of paradise, the origins of sin, the interdependence of free will and obedience, longing and intellect, sex and the state. His technical mastery — his sheer prosodic command — is unsurpassed. His career confounds our latterday theories of separate realms: Milton was at once an ivory tower intellectual and an practical servant to the Commonwealth, a poet of empire and an anti-imperialist. His prose tracts make the case for regicide and revolution, for radical reform in religion, governance, and relations between the sexes, but he was also a consummate spokesman for unreconstructed patriarchy. Reading broadly in the major poems (especially Paradise Lost, Paradise Regained, and Samson Agonistes) and selected prose, we will try to understand how this poet and his era — the complex social, political, and religious unfolding of the English Reformation — transformed the written word. Student contributions will include regular class participation and two essays.


Approximate book cost: $75

ENGLISH 470 — Early American Literature: Key Texts
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Parrish,Susan Scott

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course will introduce you to four major episodes and the literature surrounding them in the history of European expansion, colonialism and Revolution in the Americas. We will look at:

  • the Spanish narratives of contact and conquest in the Caribbean and in Mexico (in translation);
  • 17th-century experiences in New England, especially the events and texts surrounding King Philip's War (1676-7) between Puritans and native peoples;
  • the Atlantic slave trade and the African diaspora in the Caribbean and North America; and
  • the U.S. Revolution.

Genres encountered will range from travel narratives, natural histories, letters, novels, poems, histories, autobiographies, and political declarations. We will also look at paintings, engravings, and 20th century film. In each of these four segments, we will concern ourselves with the production of "truth" at the time of the events and in later reconstructions. You will have a 3-4pp written assignment associated with each of the four segments and a final exam.

ENGLISH 471 — Nineteenth-Century American Literature: Key Texts
Section 001, REC
American Selves

Instructor: Sanchez,Maria

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course will examine a variety of fictional and nonfiction texts that engage with issues of American identity: how we understand ourselves as individuals, as members of families and communities, as part of a national body politic, and as members of a particular sex, race, ethnicity, class, religion or region. Authors will most likely include: Charles Brockden Brown, Frederick Douglass, Harriet Jacobs, Ralph Waldo Emerson, María Amparo Ruiz de Burton, and Elizabeth Stoddard. Assignments will consist of weekly writing responses, a midterm exam, and a research paper.

ENGLISH 473 — Topics in American Literature
Section 001, REC
Multilingual Cultures in U.S. Identity

Instructor: Miller,Joshua L

FA 2007
Credits: 3

There is no national language of the United States, but Americans have never ceased imagining what such a collective language might sound like. We'll discuss the literary and political significances of African-American, Asian American, Latino/a, Jewish, Irish, Italian, French Creole, Southern, and other U.S. vernaculars that call attention to the invisible pressures of language on its speakers. In the process, we'll develop comparative approaches to the study of multi-ethnic U.S. cultures through the politics of language, "slanguage," vernacular, and multilingualism.

In recent years, the canon of U.S. literature has grown considerably more multicultural, but it has not become more multilingual. We'll examine the historical resistance to non-English and non-"standard" language cultures in the U.S. as well as the rich legacy of vernacular narratives that have argued for a more inclusive definitions of language and identity. This may lead us to new questions, such as whether globalization is leading to transnational languages and cultures. What is the global status of national languages? Is there a literary culture of the Americas?

There are no prerequisites for this course. The syllabus may include literary works by Walt Whitman, Jean Toomer, Claude McKay, Zora Neale Hurston, Kate Chopin, Henry Roth, Américo Paredes, Carlos Bulosan, John Okada, Gloria Anzaldúa, Jessica Hagedorn, and Junot Díaz, in addition to films directed by Ang Lee and John Sayles. Film screenings will be scheduled outside of class meeting times.

ENGLISH 478 — Contemporary Afro-American Literature
Section 001, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 3

A study of literature written by Afro-Americans from World War II to the present. Wright, Yerby, Baldwin, Brooks, Hayden, Jones, Lee, and Cleaver are among the writers discussed.

Advisory Prerequisite: CAAS 201 and permission of instructor.

ENGLISH 482 — Studies in Individual Authors
Section 001, REC
Robert Frost

Instructor: Cureton,Richard D

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course will study the life, ideas, and art of Robert Frost, one of the great poets and literary personalities of the modern period. In the first half of the course, we will read a long biography of the poet and study his plays, lectures, essays, stories, and letters. In the second half of the course, we will use this background to read his collected and uncollected poems. Requirements for the course will be a midterm, a short analytical paper (5-10 pages) between midterms and finals, and a longer research paper (15-20 pages) at the end of the term.

ENGLISH 482 — Studies in Individual Authors
Section 002, REC
Richard Wright — Black Radicalism and Art

Instructor: Wald,Alan M; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course will meet twice a week to discuss the art, politics and life of the extraordinary African American radical intellectual Richard Wright. We will read his most influential works of fiction, such as UNCLE TOM'S CHILDREN and NATIVE SON, as well as the more controversial writings of his period in Parisian exile, such as THE OUTSIDER and THE LONG DREAM. But we will also read some of Wright's non-fiction writings about culture, politics, and history, as well as some literary criticism about Wright, some writings about the political and cultural situation in the 1930s-50s era, and perhaps works of authors influenced by Wright. Some documentary films about Wright and relevant issues may be shown.

The reading load for this course is relatively heavy and there is the expectation of high quality writing. It is a course aimed at the needs of senior level students (although students at the junior level can enroll) with a background and interest in African American literature, Marxism, Existentialism, Modernism, Naturalism, the Black expatriate experience, and the political and cultural movements against colonialism. Requirements include a short diagnostic essay and a longer research paper that will explore these kinds of issues. There will also be periodic short quizzes and a term review quiz to make certain that the reading has been completed. Those enrolled are expected to participate in organizing one or more of the sessions, as well as in the presentation of material to the class. Only "official" (enrolled) auditors are permitted in this class, and they will be expected to participate in all the work except written assignments.

ENGLISH 484 — Issues in Criticism
Section 001, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 3

ENGLISH 486 — History of Criticism
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Hartley,Lucy

FA 2007
Credits: 3

A study of representative critics from classical times to the present.

ENGLISH 492 — Honors Colloquium: Drafting the Thesis
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Parrish,Susan Scott

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR
Other: Honors

Students develop the prospectus and first draft of their honors thesis during this course taken during the Fall term of their senior year with the final thesis submitted in March.

Advisory Prerequisite: Admission to the English Honors Program and permission of instructor.

ENGLISH 492 — Honors Colloquium: Drafting the Thesis
Section 002, SEM

Instructor: Sanok,Catherine

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR
Other: Honors

Students develop the prospectus and first draft of their honors thesis during this course taken during the Fall Term of the Senior year wit the final thesis submitted in march.

Advisory Prerequisite: Admission to the English Honors Program and permission of instructor.

ENGLISH 497 — Honors Seminar
Section 001, SEM
Literature and the War on Terrorism

Instructor: Wenzel,Jennifer A

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Honors

This course will consider conjunctions between literature and the post-9/11 "war on terrorism." Cultural critics and literary historians have sought to understand the relationships between the Cold War and cultural production; to the extent that the current "war on terrorism" represents another amorphous, protracted ideological conflict with global consequences, can we begin to understand analogous connections now? How have the events of the past six years shaped, and been shaped by, literature? What new kinds of narratives become possible or necessary after 9/11? What old texts find new life after 9/11? How can the modes and tools of literary analysis help to make sense of this ideological struggle? How does the Patriot Act change the conditions under which literature is produced, distributed, and consumed?

Some have found poetry in the pronouncements of Donald Rumsfeld; the late Saddam Hussein was, among other things, an aspiring novelist; poet Sam Hamill's refusal of an invitation to the White House in January 2003 sparked a movement of Poets Against War. Some of the texts that we might read for this seminar respond directly to the events of the past 6 years: Iraq war vet Brian Turner's poetry collection Here, Bullet, Gillian Slovo and Victoria Brittain's play Guantanamo: Honour Bound to Defend Freedom, Ian McEwan's novel Saturday, Art Spiegelman's graphic narrative In the Shadow of No Towers. Some old texts have been embraced by the Bush administration (Camus' The Stranger, Pontecorvo's Battle of Algiers), some by ordinary citizens (Auden's "September 1, 1939," Yeats' "The Second Coming") as touchstones for the times. What are we to make of the heightened popular demand in recent years for stories about the Islamic world, particularly stories about women (Satrapi's Persepolis, Nafisi's Reading Lolita in Tehran, Khouri's Forbidden Love/Honor Lost; also Hosseini's best-selling The Kite Runner)? How does the prominence of such texts shape readers' and citizens' opinions about the "war on terrorism"?

The reading list is yet to be determined but will likely include many of the texts mentioned above; assignments will include several short papers that ask you to engage with critical arguments that bear upon these texts and questions. You will be practicing the skills of literary and cultural scholarship, conducting research and situating your own arguments (both orally and in writing) within the context of existing critical conversations.

This course is directed at English Honors students preparing to write (or writing) Honors Theses. It is also open to other students by permission of the instructor.

Advisory Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing, and permission of instructor.

ENGLISH 498 — Directed Teaching
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: INDEPENDENT

Participation in the teaching of a regularly offered course. Involves readings in educational theory, written work relating to teaching activities, and regular contact with the instructor. (This is an English Department independent study number and is not to be confused with School of Education teaching courses).

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

ENGLISH 501 — Old English
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Toon,Thomas E

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course is an introduction to the earliest texts written in English over a thousand years ago. We will begin with Old English, the language spoken by our forebears until the unpleasantness at Hastings — the Norman Conquest. Since Old English is so different from Modern English as to seem like another language, the first objective of this course will be to master the rudiments of the structure and vocabulary of the earliest attested form of English. The reward is being able to read an excitingly different corpus of prose and poetry. We will conclude with the study of the later texts which continue the Anglo-Saxon alliterative tradition. My chief aim is to help you develop a new appreciation of where our language, culture, and intellectual traditions come from.

ENGLISH 516 — Literary Research and the Computer
Section 001, SEM
Technology and the Humanities

Instructor: Rabkin,Eric S; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This upperclass and graduate-level course is appropriate for both those who are technically sophisticated and those who are novices. The course offers technical training, exploration of the implications of modern digital technologies, and the opportunity to develop both technical and scholarly skills in advanced research subjects in the humanities. The course fosters both sharpened general analytic and presentational skills and technical mastery of a broad range of modern computer-based technologies for collaboration and for gathering, manipulating, analyzing, and presenting electronic data in the humanities, both locally and via networks, with special attention to creating and publishing "compound documents" (e.g., Web sites and CD-ROMS). The course begins with five weeks of intensive technical training and proceeds to five weeks of discussion of works that explore the impacts of technology. By the middle of the semester, restrained only by time and their imaginations, students also will be working in self-selected groups on creating sophisticated multimedia products using a variety of techniques to address some substantial issue in the humanities. Technical topics include information gathering from digital sources, HTML authoring, hypertext documents or novels, collaborative technologies, image manipulation, text analysis, and the meaning of the digital revolution. Prospective students may want to look at the course websites for some previous offerings of this course which can be found at Selected Student Humanities InfoTech Coursework (http://www.umich.edu/%7Emmx/humsit_coursework.htm) linked to Professor Rabkin's home page (http://www.umich.edu/~esrabkin). Further queries can be addressed to Professor Rabkin, preferably by e-mail but also by phone or during his office hours. Professor Victor Rosenberg of the School of Information is co-instructor of this course. Prospective students should also feel invited to visit his home page (http://www.umich.edu/~victorr) and to contact him via email or in person.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

ENGLISH 520 — Introduction to Graduate Studies
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Crane,Gregg David

FA 2007
Credits: 3

In their first term, doctoral students take a course entitled Introduction to Graduate Studies. Its primary aim is to review research methodologies and to survey dominant theoretical paradigms.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing in English or Women's Studies and permission of instructor.

ENGLISH 528 — Topics in Disability Studies
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Mulhorn,Kristine A; homepage
Instructor: Brown,Susan Holly Curwin

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 3

This course provides an interdisciplinary approach to disability studies, including focus on the arts and humanities, natural and social sciences, and professional schools. Some topics include history and cultural representation of disability, advocacy, health, rehabilitation, built environment, independent living, public policy. The point of departure of the course is the idea that disability provides a critical framework that reorients the basic assumptions of various fields of knowledge, from political science to architecture, from engineering to art history, from genetics to law, from public policy to education, from biology to poetry, and so on. Disability Studies views people with disabilities not as objects but as producers of knowledge whose common history has generated a wide variety of art, music, literature, and science infused with the experience of disability. Students will have the opportunity to interact with visiting speakers from a broad range of fields. The course is offered for 1 or 3 credits. Accessible classroom with realtime captioning. For more information, please contact Tobin Siebers at tobin@umich.edu.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing

ENGLISH 570 — Research in Composition
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Gere,Anne Ruggles; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course will explore the kind of essays that poets write, or want to write, or should write, using all the media we can think of. There will be weekly writing assignments and two larger projects.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

ENGLISH 571 — Workshop in Writing Fiction
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Harty,Richard Ryan

FA 2007
Credits: 6

The graduate program in creative writing is a two-year program leading to the Master of Fine Arts degree. Students concentrate in either fiction or poetry. At the heart of the MFA program are the writing workshops, where students assemble as a community of writers to read and comment on one another's work in progress. In addition to their instructional role in the workshops, faculty are available for individual conferences throughout the two-year program, and for thesis instruction and consultation during the second year.

Advisory Prerequisite: MFA students only; permission of instructor.

ENGLISH 571 — Workshop in Writing Fiction
Section 002, SEM

Instructor: Pollack,Eileen K

FA 2007
Credits: 6

The graduate program in creative writing is a two-year program leading to the Master of Fine Arts degree. Students concentrate in either fiction or poetry. At the heart of the MFA program are the writing workshops, where students assemble as a community of writers to read and comment on one another's work in progress. In addition to their instructional role in the workshops, faculty are available for individual conferences throughout the two-year program, and for thesis instruction and consultation during the second year.

Advisory Prerequisite: MFA students only; permission of instructor.

ENGLISH 574 — Workshop in Writing Poetry
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Gregerson,Linda K

FA 2007
Credits: 6

The graduate program in creative writing is a two-year program leading to the Master of Fine Arts degree. Students concentrate in either fiction or poetry. At the heart of the MFA program are the writing workshops, where students assemble as a community of writers to read and comment on one another's work in progress. In addition to their instructional role in the workshops, faculty are available for individual conferences throughout the two-year program, and for thesis instruction and consultation during the second year.

Advisory Prerequisite: MFA students only; permission of instructor.

ENGLISH 574 — Workshop in Writing Poetry
Section 002, SEM

Instructor: Kasischke,Laura Kay

FA 2007
Credits: 6

The graduate program in creative writing is a two-year program leading to the Master of Fine Arts degree. Students concentrate in either fiction or poetry. At the heart of the MFA program are the writing workshops, where students assemble as a community of writers to read and comment on one another's work in progress. In addition to their instructional role in the workshops, faculty are available for individual conferences throughout the two-year program, and for thesis instruction and consultation during the second year.

Advisory Prerequisite: MFA students only; permission of instructor.

ENGLISH 577 — Independent Study-Creative Writing
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 3

In lieu of the workshop, fourth-term MFA students receive six hours of independent study credit to enable them to concentrate on completion of the thesis project. Theses consist of a substantial body of poems, short stories, or portions of a novel.

Advisory Prerequisite: MFA students only; permission of instructor.

ENGLISH 578 — Creative Writing-Fiction
Section 001, SEM
The Art of the Novella

Instructor: Byers,Michael Denis

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Topics in creative writing: fiction. Content varies by term and instructor.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

ENGLISH 578 — Creative Writing-Fiction
Section 002, SEM

Instructor: Delbanco,Nicholas F

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Topics in creative writing: fiction. Content varies by term and instructor.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

ENGLISH 579 — Creative Writing-Poetry
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: White,Gillian Cahill

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Topics in creative writing: poetry. Content varies by term and instructor.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

ENGLISH 590 — Independent Study for M.A. Students
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 3

Directed readings or research in consultation with a member of the department faculty.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing in English, English and Education, or Women's Studies, and permission of instructor.

ENGLISH 627 — Critical Theories and Cross-Cultural Literature
Section 001, SEM
New Directions in African American Diaspora Studies

Instructor: Gunning,Sandra R

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course takes an interdisciplinary approach to the study of trauma by examining how the disciplines of clinical psychology and literary study attempt to understand and account for the effects of violence, war, social upheaval, and natural disasters in the modern world. The instructors for this course have studied the topic of trauma in their disciplinary fields as it appears in the lives of Asians and Pacific Islanders as well as in artistic and literary productions. The disciplines of psychology and literary study have developed different approaches and methodologies as they consider the problem of trauma. For example, clinical psychology research focuses primarily on the correlates and effects of trauma, the clinical phenomenon of posttraumatic stress disorder, the gathering of case studies, interviews, and questionnaires, and issues related to diagnosis and treatment recommendations. Post-trauma memory may be viewed as an artifact that can bias or limit one's research efforts. In contrast, literary study, while also focusing on the manifestations/effects of trauma, is more concerned with the nature of trauma itself and the problems it poses for representation and analysis of literary and historical texts. Questions of literary concern include: How does the fact of trauma affect the shape of literary and historical narrative? How does it require different modes of reading and interpretation? Post-trauma memory, in this context, is not viewed as a "nuisance" in research, but rather serves to focus legitimate analysis.

Our aim is to initiate thoughtful dialogue about these important differences: How do the methods, goals, and assumptions of literary and psychological inquiry differentially shape and contribute to our understanding of trauma — and specifically the experiences of Asians and Pacific Islanders? To what extent can knowledge generated from these two distinct fields inform one another? To what extent do the unique dynamics of Asian and Pacific Islander identities complicate the standard methods of academic work on trauma within these disciplines? How does each discipline address the historical context of experienced trauma, and to what degree are political, global factors addressed in their approaches? Specific topics of inquiry include immigrant and refugee experiences of trauma, trauma due to natural disasters and human rights violations, experiences of colonization and racialization, World War II internment of Japanese Americans, forced sexual slavery under Japanese military occupation of Korea, intergenerational transmission of trauma, and approaches to healing and intervention. Evaluation will be based upon papers, class participation, and class presentation.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

ENGLISH 627 — Critical Theories and Cross-Cultural Literature
Section 002, SEM
Queer of Color

Instructor: La Fountain-Stokes,Lawrence M; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This graduate seminar (also open to qualified advanced undergraduate students) will focus on literary, cultural, and performance theory of queer people of color in the US, with some discussion of social-science approaches (ethnography, migration studies, sociological critique) and of international perspectives. We will be discussing queer theory in a comparative ethnic studies framework, and in a sense carrying out a "queer of color critique," as Rod Ferguson has termed it. This will entail paying especially close attention to the intersections of race, ethnicity, gender, and sexuality, and how queer of color critics have deployed these analytical lenses to understand the experiences and cultural productions of Latinas/os, African Americans, Native Americans, Asian Americans, and Arab Americans in the US, as well as of global populations. Readings will include articles, books, anthologies, and special issues of journals. Some of the authors to be discussed are Gloria Anzaldúa, Cherríe Moraga, Audre Lorde, E. Patrick Johnson, José Quiroga, José Esteban Muñoz, Juana María Rodríguez, Licia Fiol Matta, Alicia Arrizón, Gayatri Gopinath, Martin F. Manalansan IV, David Eng, Craig Womack, Jasbir K. Puar, and Nadine Naber. Please contact professor for more information, including list of possible readings: lawrlafo@umich.edu.

Advanced undergraduates interested in this course are encouraged to contact the instructor via e-mail to explain their interest and request permission to enroll.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

ENGLISH 630 — Special Topics
Section 001, SEM
Theories of Love: Plato to Nabokov

Instructor: Halperin,David M

FA 2007
Credits: 3

The new scholarship on the body, arguably inaugurated by feminism has opened up fresh areas in the arts, the humanities, social sciences, and even the sciences. Discussions of bio-politics, discipline and governmentality, the body social, somatoscapes, performance, self-injury, now cut across disciplinary boundaries. So do questions of the body in medicine and law, popular imagery, fashion, and body art. In fact, some of the most important thinkers and original artists of our time have reflected on these issues, connecting in the process quotidian and intimate aspects of experience with pressing public issues.

This course will track some of the key new ways of thinking the body. It will draw on critical and theoretical writing from different fields, as well as on literature and the visual arts.

ENGLISH 641 — Topics in the Medieval Period
Section 001, SEM
Medieval Poetry

Instructor: Smith,Macklin

FA 2007
Credits: 3

A course on topics in literature of the medieval period. Content varies by term and instructor.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

ENGLISH 642 — Topics in the Renaissance
Section 001, SEM
Un-Read Shakespeare's

Instructor: Hodgdon,Barbara C

FA 2007
Credits: 3

The sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries comprised a period whose massive contradictions made it at once an age of rapid expansion, the first true moment of globalization, and an age of intense contraction, when Europe narrowed down into its various vernaculars and its new ethnicisms and emerging nationalisms. In England, the reformation and its aftermath produced an especially complex reorientation the "We-I balance," in Norbert Elias' formulation: the relation between various collective identities, from political and religious to communal and festive, and individuals of all ranks in society. Different media and genres played different roles in the formation of new publics and counterpublics, new forms of civic and private association, new varieties of cultural literacy. In this course, we'll examine a number of different media (such as printed, oral, performed, and scribal forms) and different modes of discourse (such as chronicle histories, romances, lyric and epic poems, and various genres of plays) to explore the porous and metamorphic nature of public and private spheres in the period. Among the texts we'll read (in excerpted form) will be Holinshed's Chronicles, Foxe's Book of Martyrs, Sydney's Arcadia, selected lyric poets from 1550 to 1650, and a variety of Elizabethan, Jacobean, and Caroline plays. Our discussions will be guided by selected social theorists and literary criticism. The course will be a muli-generic survey of the period, with a focus on an issue of emerging significance for early modern studies — the nature of the early modern public sphere(s) — that it shares with the Making Publics project at McGill, a multi-disciplinary, funded research team with which I am also involved. Work for the course will consist of reading, attendance and active participation, brief written and oral assignments throughout the term, and a term project of medium length.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

ENGLISH 646 — Topics in the Romantic Period
Section 001, REC
Philosophy and Romantic Literature

Instructor: Levinson,Marjorie

FA 2007
Credits: 3

A course on topics in literature of the Romantic period. Content varies by term and instructor.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

ENGLISH 647 — Topics in the Victorian Period
Section 001, SEM
Victorian Poetry

Instructor: Prins,Johanna H; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

A course on topics in literature of the Victorian period. Content varies by term and instructor.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

ENGLISH 653 — Topics in Twentieth Century American Literature
Section 001, SEM
The 20th Century Novel in the United States

Instructor: Wald,Alan M; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

We will survey the critical history of a genre in American Literature of the 20th century, and explore interdisciplinary frameworks for understanding its significance; there will be a substantial amount of secondary reading. The class will proceed primarily by discussion, and students will have considerable range in designing their written projects.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

ENGLISH 695 — Pedagogy: Theory and Practice
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Tinkle,Theresa L

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This two-semester course is designed to give students guidance, advice and support as they begin their teaching career. During the first term, the course addresses issues relevant to the job of teaching assistant. The second term is devoted to ongoing support, and to helping students prepare to teach their own course in the fall. One of the primary aims of the course is to provide students with a space to discuss anxieties and achievements, but the course also follows a structured program designed to focus on specific aspects of work in the classroom.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing in English, Women's Studies, or English and Education Program. This course is required of all 2nd year Language & Literature and English & Women's Studies Graduate students. Permission of instructor.

ENGLISH 831 — Seminar: The Study of Genre
Section 001, SEM
"Not Being a Man?" Representations of Black Masculinity in 20th Black American Expressive Culture

Instructor: Awkward,Michael

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Virtually all commentaries on literary works rely in some way or another on concepts of genre. Literary history too indispensably subtends critical practices that do not directly engage or theorize it. In this course we will strive to think systematically about the nature of literary classification, and to reflect critically on the received categories of our field. We will read some works of fiction, often ones that have served as sites of debate; some critical essays and book excerpts; and some theoretical works. One of the goals of the course is, certainly, for each of us to achieve a detailed understanding of these separate texts. We will also be working towards a grasp of the theoretical problems of genre criticism, a critical awareness of how various forms and traditions have been constituted as objects of study.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing in English, Women's Studies, or English and Education Program. Permission of instructor.

ENGLISH 851 — Seminar: American Literature
Section 001, SEM
19th Century American Poetry

Instructor: Larson,Kerry C

FA 2007
Credits: 3

A seminar in topics in American literature. Specific topics vary by term and by instructor.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing in English, Women's Studies, or English and Education Program. Permission of instructor.

ENGLISH 861 — Seminar; Authors
Section 001, SEM
Beckett and the Future of the Novel

Instructor: Brater,Enoch

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course has two central strands. On the one hand, it aims to investigate the histories and theoretical issues that have shaped and are currently shaping the emergent "discipline" (or "anti-discipline") of Shakespeare Performance Studies. On the other, it engages with the materials and methodologies that ground how we process, record, analyze, and remember performances present as well as past (the project of theatre history): the three-week Royal Shakespeare Company residency in Fall 2006 offers one "laboratory" for studying theatrical sign systems and reception histories at first-hand; an international Workshop/Conference titled "Watching Ourselves Watching Shakespeare (10-11 November; thirteen participants) provides another; visiting virtual or actual archives to study the documentation of performances past offers yet another.

Some more specific issues: Typically, we say: "I saw Cheek by Jowl's production of Othello or Nick Hytner's staging of Henry V." What do we mean by that "of"? In what sense is our understanding of performance — now, in what Michael Joyce calls (puns fully intended) "the late age of print culture" — still linked to the transmission of writing, and to what extent do language-based models of performance enable and frustrate the analysis and understanding of performance, aesthetic or otherwise? How does the idea / presence of Shakespeare-The-Author, stabilize (or destabilize) our sense of what a performance is, what it "should be"? In order to address these questions, this course will interrogate how Shakespearean performances are represented in the discourses of editing, criticism, and theatre history. Yet the major thrust of the course will put Shakespearean stagings (present and past) into dialogue with the critical terms and practices of performance studies — surrogation, restoration of behavior, performance ethnography, performative discourse(s), liminoid genres, performativity and so on. Among the problems in contemporary performance theory to be considered: space, subjects and subjectivities (gender, race, class), culture(s), technologies.

Requirements: Readings for the course will average one book (or parts thereof) and several critical essays per week. Each student will make one or more presentations on seminar readings to initiate discussion. Attendance at RSC performances; archival research (to the extent that this is possible). Major writing will consist of one article-length seminar paper, developed in stages; short weekly responses will address particular issues. Students should feel free to frame their writing to suit their own ongoing agendas. Approximate cost of books / course pack: $150-200.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing in English, Women's Studies, or English and Education Program. Permission of instructor.

ENGLISH 881 — Seminar: Comparative or Interdisciplinary Study
Section 001, SEM
Postcolonial Theory and Culture

Instructor: Najita,Susan Y; homepage
Instructor: Nagata,Donna Kiyo

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course takes an interdisciplinary approach to the study of trauma by examining how the disciplines of clinical psychology and literary study attempt to understand and account for the effects of violence, war, and social upheaval, in the modern world. The instructors for this course have studied the topic of trauma in their disciplinary fields as it appears in the lives of Asians and Pacific Islanders as well as in artistic and literary productions. The disciplines of psychology and literary study have developed different approaches and methodologies as they consider the problem of trauma. For example, clinical psychology research often examines the correlates and effects of trauma, the clinical phenomenon of posttraumatic stress disorder, the gathering of case studies, interviews, and questionnaires, and issues related to diagnosis and treatment. In contrast, literary study, while also focusing on the manifestations/effects of trauma, is more concerned with the nature of trauma itself and the problems it poses for representation and analysis of literary and historical texts. Questions of literary concern include:

  • How does the fact of trauma affect the shape of literary and historical narrative?
  • How does it require different modes of reading and interpretation? Post-trauma memory, in this context, serves to focus legitimate analysis.

Our aim is to initiate thoughtful dialogue about these important differences:

  • How do the methods, goals, and assumptions of literary and psychological inquiry differentially shape and contribute to our understanding of trauma — and specifically the experiences of Asians and Pacific Islanders?
  • To what extent can knowledge generated from these two distinct fields inform one another?
  • To what extent do the unique dynamics of Asian and Pacific Islander identities complicate the standard methods of academic work on trauma within these disciplines?
  • How does each discipline address the historical context of experienced trauma, and to what degree are political, global factors addressed in their approaches?

Specific topics of inquiry include immigrant and refugee experiences of trauma, trauma due to human rights violations, experiences of colonization and racialization, World War II internment of Japanese Americans, forced sexual slavery under Japanese military occupation of Korea, intergenerational transmission of trauma, and approaches to healing and intervention. Evaluation will be based upon papers, class participation, and class presentation.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing in English, Women's Studies, or English and Education Program.

ENGLISH 993 — Graduate Student Instructor Training Program
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Kowalski,Rosemary Ann

FA 2007
Credits: 1

A seminar for all beginning graduate student instructors, consisting of a two day orientation before the term starts and periodic workshops/meetings during the Fall Term. Beginning graduate student instructors are required to register for this course.

Advisory Prerequisite: Must have a GSI Award. Graduate standing. Permission of instructor.

ENGLISH 993 — Graduate Student Instructor Training Program
Section 002, REC

Instructor: Taylor,G Keith

FA 2007
Credits: 1

A seminar for all beginning graduate student instructors, consisting of a two day orientation before the term starts and periodic workshops/meetings during the Fall Term. Beginning graduate student instructors are required to register for this course.

Advisory Prerequisite: Must have a GSI Award. Graduate standing. Permission of instructor.

 
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