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LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Fall 2007, Dept = ENVIRON
 
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Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
ENVIRON 102 — Extreme Weather
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Ridley,Aaron James

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: NS

This course provides an introduction to the physics of extreme weather events. The course uses weather disasters and threats to illustrate the physical laws governing the atmosphere.

We examine solar eruptions, ice ages, climate change, monsoons, El Niño, hurricanes, floods, droughts, heat waves, thunderstorms, lightning, hail, tornados, and other extreme atmospheric events to illustrate the basic physical laws that produce these events. Participants are expected to apply these principles to a series of homework assignments including hands-on weather forecasting and analysis of storm events.

Required resources for this course include:

  1. An on-line subscription to XamPREP: Essentials of Meteorology by C. Donald Ahrens with
  2. (Optionally) A hard-copy version of Essentials of Meteorology by C. Donald Ahrens (it's redundant but some really prefer to also have the traditional paper copy), and
  3. A copy of Extreme Weather by Chris Burt.

ENVIRON 105 — Our Changing Atmosphere
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Keeler,Gerald J

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, NS

This course considers the science needed to understand human-induced threats to the atmospheric environment, with special emphasis on the global changes that are taking place, or are anticipated. We will discuss the greenhouse effect (and its impact on climate), ozone depletion, the polar ozone holes, and urban air pollution. Some basic meteorology will be presented, including how climate changes might affect the frequency and severity of hurricanes and tornadoes. Students will have access to real-time weather information via computer. This lecture course is intended for non-science concentrators, and there are no prerequisites. Grades will be based on three one-hour exams (no final exam) and homework.

ENVIRON 110 — Introduction of Global Change: Physical Processes
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: van der Pluijm,Ben A; homepage
Instructor: Allan,J David; homepage
Instructor: Kling II,George W; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: NS

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for a combined total of 12 credits elected in introductory biology.

Instructor(s):

Every day, millions of human and natural activities are altering the planet on which we live. Over the past century, through our ever-increasing population and mastery of technology, we have been changing the global environment at a pace unknown to natural history.

The University of Michigan Global Change Program offers an interdisciplinary, introductory course sequence which investigates the causes and potential impacts of these changes using a combination of traditional lecture-based and modern web-based teaching methodologies. The Fall Academic Term course deals with issues relating to the physical, chemical, and biological cycles contributing to Global Change. Students apply learned knowledge by using spreadsheet and systems modeling software to investigate the dynamics of natural systems.

The Web-based course curriculum provides unparalleled opportunities to conduct on-line Internet research. In fact, you will create your own web-based poster on a topic of your choosing. The interactive laboratory exercises provide you the opportunity to use computers to examine how natural systems function as well as develop projections of the future consequences of changes in the environment. And, perhaps most important of all, you will have ample time for discussion of the critical issues in human development and how they relate to the international business community, global economics, society as a whole and the individual. All topics are developed in a manner that students will find both accessible and enjoyable. The course grade is based on two midterm exams, a final exam, completion of laboratory modules, and a course project based on some aspect of global change. There are no prerequisites for the course and no science background is assumed. The course is appropriate for all undergraduate students, irrespective of intended concentration, and is the first of a series of courses that can be taken as part of the Global Change Minor.

You will discuss...

  • Current and Projected Global Change

  • The Role of the Individual as a Citizen of the Planet

  • Case Studies of Regional and Global Change Issues

You will create...

  • Models of Interacting Systems that Give Insight into the Collision Between Natural and Societal Processes

  • A Web-based Poster on a Related Topic of Your Choice

Topics that are covered ......

The Universe:

  • Big Bang Theory

  • Birth and Death of Stars

  • Radiation Laws

  • Origin of the Elements

  • Planetary Energy Budget

Our Planet:

  • The Age of the Earth

  • Primitive Atmospheres

  • Natural Hazards

  • Plate Tectonics

  • Chemical & Biological Evolution

  • The Building Blocks for Life

Earth's Atmospheric & Oceanic Evolution:

  • Life Processes and Earth Systems

  • The Great Ice Ages

  • Atmospheric Circulation and Weather

  • Climate and Paleoclimate

  • Greenhouse Gases and Global Warming

  • Sea Level Change

  • El Niño

The Tree of Life:

  • Emergence of Complex Life

  • Extinction and Radiation

  • The Five Kingdoms

  • Natural Selection

  • Respiration and Photosynthesis

  • Ecosystems

Projected Ecological Consequences:

  • Elevated Carbon Dioxide Levels

  • Environmental Pollutants

  • Ozone Depletion

  • Likelihood of Global Climatic Change

ENVIRON 118 — Introductory Geology Laboratory
Section 001, LAB

Instructor: Lohmann,Kyger C

FA 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS

Credit Exclusions: No credit if completed an introductory course in geology (GEOSCI/ENVIRON 116, 117, or 218).

A one-term laboratory course covering the laboratory portion of Introduction to Geology. The laboratory provides hands-on experience with minerals, rocks, and maps. Participants will learn to identify common minerals and rocks, use topographic and geologic maps, and draw and interpret geologic cross sections. Examples will be drawn from areas of recent glaciation, volcanism, and earthquakes to show how these features are depicted in maps.

Students who register for GEOSCI 118 must also be enrolled in GEOSCI 119 or they must have taken 119 in an earlier academic term.

Advisory Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent enrollment in GEOSCI 119, or 205 and 206, or 135.

ENVIRON 118 — Introductory Geology Laboratory
Section 002, LAB

Instructor: Lohmann,Kyger C

FA 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS

Credit Exclusions: No credit if completed an introductory course in geology (GEOSCI/ENVIRON 116, 117, or 218).

A one-term laboratory course covering the laboratory portion of Introduction to Geology. The laboratory provides hands-on experience with minerals, rocks, and maps. Participants will learn to identify common minerals and rocks, use topographic and geologic maps, and draw and interpret geologic cross sections. Examples will be drawn from areas of recent glaciation, volcanism, and earthquakes to show how these features are depicted in maps.

Students who register for GEOSCI 118 must also be enrolled in GEOSCI 119 or they must have taken 119 in an earlier academic term.

Advisory Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent enrollment in GEOSCI 119, or 205 and 206, or 135.

ENVIRON 118 — Introductory Geology Laboratory
Section 003, LAB

Instructor: Lohmann,Kyger C

FA 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS

Credit Exclusions: No credit if completed an introductory course in geology (GEOSCI/ENVIRON 116, 117, or 218).

A one-term laboratory course covering the laboratory portion of Introduction to Geology. The laboratory provides hands-on experience with minerals, rocks, and maps. Participants will learn to identify common minerals and rocks, use topographic and geologic maps, and draw and interpret geologic cross sections. Examples will be drawn from areas of recent glaciation, volcanism, and earthquakes to show how these features are depicted in maps.

Students who register for GEOSCI 118 must also be enrolled in GEOSCI 119 or they must have taken 119 in an earlier academic term.

Advisory Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent enrollment in GEOSCI 119, or 205 and 206, or 135.

ENVIRON 118 — Introductory Geology Laboratory
Section 004, LAB

Instructor: Lohmann,Kyger C

FA 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS

Credit Exclusions: No credit if completed an introductory course in geology (GEOSCI/ENVIRON 116, 117, or 218).

A one-term laboratory course covering the laboratory portion of Introduction to Geology. The laboratory provides hands-on experience with minerals, rocks, and maps. Participants will learn to identify common minerals and rocks, use topographic and geologic maps, and draw and interpret geologic cross sections. Examples will be drawn from areas of recent glaciation, volcanism, and earthquakes to show how these features are depicted in maps.

Students who register for GEOSCI 118 must also be enrolled in GEOSCI 119 or they must have taken 119 in an earlier academic term.

Advisory Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent enrollment in GEOSCI 119, or 205 and 206, or 135.

ENVIRON 118 — Introductory Geology Laboratory
Section 005, LAB

Instructor: Lohmann,Kyger C

FA 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS

Credit Exclusions: No credit if completed an introductory course in geology (GEOSCI/ENVIRON 116, 117, or 218).

A one-term laboratory course covering the laboratory portion of Introduction to Geology. The laboratory provides hands-on experience with minerals, rocks, and maps. Participants will learn to identify common minerals and rocks, use topographic and geologic maps, and draw and interpret geologic cross sections. Examples will be drawn from areas of recent glaciation, volcanism, and earthquakes to show how these features are depicted in maps.

Students who register for GEOSCI 118 must also be enrolled in GEOSCI 119 or they must have taken 119 in an earlier academic term.

Advisory Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent enrollment in GEOSCI 119, or 205 and 206, or 135.

ENVIRON 118 — Introductory Geology Laboratory
Section 006, LAB

Instructor: Lohmann,Kyger C

FA 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS

Credit Exclusions: No credit if completed an introductory course in geology (GEOSCI/ENVIRON 116, 117, or 218).

A one-term laboratory course covering the laboratory portion of Introduction to Geology. The laboratory provides hands-on experience with minerals, rocks, and maps. Participants will learn to identify common minerals and rocks, use topographic and geologic maps, and draw and interpret geologic cross sections. Examples will be drawn from areas of recent glaciation, volcanism, and earthquakes to show how these features are depicted in maps.

Students who register for GEOSCI 118 must also be enrolled in GEOSCI 119 or they must have taken 119 in an earlier academic term.

Advisory Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent enrollment in GEOSCI 119, or 205 and 206, or 135.

ENVIRON 119 — Introductory Geology Lectures
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Lohmann,Kyger C

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, NS

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted if completed or enrolled in GEOSCI/ENVIRON 116, 117, 120. No credit granted if completed both GEOSCI 205 AND GEOSCI/ENVIRON 206. Only 3 credits with GEOSCI 205 or GEOSCI/ENVIRON 206.

GEOSCI 119 is a basic single-term course in introductory geology concentrating on the evolution of the Earth in physical and chemical terms. Reference to the interaction of the external biosphere — atmosphere — hydrosphere with the earth's interior is an essential component of the course.

Topics covered include:

  • plate tectonics: continental collision and fragmentation
  • tsunamis, earthquakes and volcanoes
  • evolution and extinction: dinosaurs and the fossil record
  • glaciers, global warming and climate change
  • geologic time

Lectures three hours per week. A separate discussion section for one hour each week is scheduled for review and discussion of topics covered in class.

To also enroll in the Intro Geology Lab, register for any section of GEOSCI 118. The GEOSCI 118 laboratory provides a practical study of minerals, rocks, fossils and geologic maps. Students are strongly encouraged to enroll in both GEOSCI 119 and 118, since the lab sessions complement the lectures and discussions.

NOTE: GEOSCI 119 plus 118 replaces GEOSCI 117.

REQUIRED TEXTBOOK: Earth: Portrait of a Planet, by Marshak, second edition, W.W. Norton & Company, New York. ISBN: 0-393-92502-1

Advisory Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in ENVIRON or GEOSCI 118 for the lab

ENVIRON 120 — Geology of National Parks and Monuments
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Lange,Rebecca Ann; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, NS

Credit Exclusions: No credit if completed GEOSCI/ENVIRON 116, 117, or 119, or both GEOSCI 205 AND GEOSCI/ENVIRON 206. Only 3 credits with GEOSCI 205 or GEOSCI/ENVIRON 206.

This course approaches Earth history by examining the geology of places rather than by taking a process approach. It is designed for all interested undergraduates at the University of Michigan. The course format consists of three lectures each week and one two-hour demonstration-laboratory period, for four credits. Lecture material deals with the geologic history of selected national parks and monuments, which are chosen and scheduled so that those in which the oldest rocks are exposed (thus relating to the earliest portions of Earth history) are covered first. In so doing, we cover Earth history in a temporal progression, but do so by discussing different geographic areas. The demonstration-laboratory portion of the course will give you first-hand experience with rocks, minerals, and fossils; and an opportunity to discuss these in small groups.

Text: Parks and Plates: The Geology of Our National Parks, Monuments, and Seashores by Robert J. Lillie ISBN: 0393924076 W. W. Norton & Company

ENVIRON 139 — First-Year Seminar in the Environment
Section 001, SEM
Footprints Across Time

Instructor: Low,Bobbi S; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ID
Other: FYSem

Today, we humans are more numerous than ever before — and we consume more per person than ever before. How did we get here, and what (if we wish) can we do about it? In this course, we will examine how humans have left their imprint — ‘footprints' — on the earth. We begin by calculating our individual ecological footprints: how many planets would it take for the human population if everyone lived as you, or I, do? Then we find a very general definition for "resources," one that does not depend on culture or modernity. Next, we will trace our pre-human and human ecological footprints across time. First, why do we care more about ourselves, our families and friends, and the here-and-now, than about distant strangers or the far future? What differences did it make that we tamed fire? That we invented agriculture, and that it spread around the globe? That we harnessed mechanical energy, and solved some major public health problems? We will find that each of these inventions or transitions allowed us to survive better, to raise families more successfully, and to consume ever more of the earth's resources. Today, we are one of millions of species, but we consume the vast majority of the earth's productivity, and have a huge impact on those other species. And even within our species, there are huge differences in wealth and resources. After our trek across time, we will ask: what can we do to be effective in reducing our human impact?

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

ENVIRON 139 — First-Year Seminar in the Environment
Section 002, SEM
Environmental Conflict: Science, Political, Social

Instructor: Wondolleck,Julia Marie; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ID
Other: FYSem

Environmental problems are a tangled web of scientific, political, historical, social, economic, legal and psychological factors. This seminar will unravel the complexity of the challenging world of environmental problems by examining several conflicts through these different disciplinary lenses. The conflict over reintroduction of wolves to the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, the global climate change debate, and the conflict between fishermen and scientists over New England's declining cod fishery will be examined in detail. Other current conflicts will be discussed including oil exploration in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, preservation of endangered grizzly bears and bowhead whales, and rock climbing disputes at Native American sacred sites.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

ENVIRON 139 — First-Year Seminar in the Environment
Section 020, SEM
Environment, Religions, Spirituality and Sustainability

Instructor: Crowfoot,James E

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ID
Other: FYSem

Inquiry into the fundamental changes occurring in the natural environment (including humans) and in human social systems and culture, to explore the question "To what extent, in what ways and why are current trends in human impacts on the environment and social relations unsustainable/sustainable? The seminar will introduce the major contrasting responses being made to this question along with their differing scenarios of the future in terms of their visions, strategies, and examples of practices to be pursued.

Learning resources will be selected from four types of information: (1) scientific, (2) religious/spiritual, (3) documentation of innovative environmental, social (including economic and political) and technological practices and (4) personal experiences and commitments. Religions to be considered include those of Native Americans and other indigenous peoples as well as world religions, e.g., Buddhism, Islam, Judaism, and Christianity. The consideration of spirituality is based on individuals' experiences and recognition of "sacred" or "ultimate" realities that are variously understood and characterized.

Students will be asked to engage in interdisciplinary, seminar based inquiry through reading and thinking critically, reflecting on and analyzing their own values, beliefs and practices, sharing the results of their own inquiries through discussions, writing, and presentations and by comparing and contrasting their own beliefs and ideas with others who have different backgrounds and current values, beliefs and goals.

It is expected that students enrolling in this seminar will have differing backgrounds of knowledge and experience in relation to the environment, science, religion/spirituality, and unsustainability/sustainability. Both students with religious commitments are welcome as well as students who are agnostics, atheists or who would describe themselves as secular humanists, skeptics, and "undecided" or by some other name for their highest values and related belief systems and practices. This opportunity for participatory inquiry will require enrolled students to engage in respectful dialogue along with acceptance of people with backgrounds and present commitments and beliefs that are different from their own.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

ENVIRON 201 — Ecological Issues
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Diana,James Stephen; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, NS

A course involving lectures and discussions on ecological principles and concepts underlying the management and use of natural resources, with consideration of socioeconomic factors and institutional roles. Throughout the course, emphasis is placed on the importance of interdisciplinary approaches to matters concerning the allocation of natural resources and the quality of our environment. Topics covered include biodiversity, endangered species, exploitation practices, tropical deforestation, agriculture, air and water pollution, energy production and use, waste disposal, and the role of politics and economics in environmental issues.

ENVIRON 222 — Introduction to Environmental Justice
Section 001, LEC
Issues in Race & Ethnicity

Instructor: Bryant Jr,Bunyan I; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: RE, SS

This course will explore the environmental concerns of people of color and will specifically focus on the connections between environmental insults and communities of color and communities of low-income. We will grapple with questions such as:

  • To what extent do people of color and low-income communities bear a disproportionate share of environmental pollutants?
  • To what extent are they exposed to environmental conditions that threaten their health?

We will discuss and define environmental racism and environmental justice in this course as well as discuss and define race, white privilege, internalized oppression and non-violence. To understand the above concepts more fully we will review the current research literature in the field as well as place the concepts into the analytical frameworks of culture and the social structure of accumulation. We will also apply the analytical construct of resource mobilization and social movement theory to help us understand people and their struggle to protect themselves and their communities against environmental harm. Although the course focuses on domestic issues, some attention is given to the international perspective.

To maximize our understanding as we explore the above questions and topics, several pedagogical techniques will be used such as lectures, videotapes, case studies, guided interactive group discussion, outside speakers, and UM Lessons, which is a computer designed (guided) interactive study program. Two examinations will be required — a midterm and a final as well as one paper.

If you cannot attend a class or a discussion group, please let the Graduate Student Instructor know in advance.

For more information regarding the course contact me by e-mail at: bbryant@ulmich.edu or slashley@umich.edu. For more information on past work of students consult the web page address below. http://www.umich.edu/~snre492/cases.html

ENVIRON 232 — Introductory Oceanography
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/2

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in AOSS 203.

This course expores the oceans of Earth, their circulation, biology, chemistry, geology of the sea floor, and marine resources. Emphasis is on understanding the oceans as a single ecosystem.

While GEOSCI 222.001 students are encouraged to take the lab, GEOSCI 223, it is not required.

ENVIRON 232 — Introductory Oceanography
Section 002, LEC

Instructor: Owen,Robert M; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/2
Other: GateSci

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in AOSS 203.

This course introduces students to the scientific study of the oceans. Contents include: a brief history of ocean exploration; origins of the Earth, the oceans and life; the theory of plate tectonics; how ocean sediments serve as the Earth's history book; the composition of seawater and its influence on life and climate; waves, tides and currents; the life of the oceans and how it depends upon the marine environment; and the resources of the ocean. The course format consists of lectures and readings from an assigned textbook. The course grade will be based on three one-hour exams and a two-hour final exam.

Section 002 is a Gateway Science Course, designed especially for students considering an academic major or minor in one of the sciences. All students signing up for GEOSCI 222.002 must also take GEOSCI 223 Lab (any section).

NOTE: GEOSCI 222.001 is not a Gateway science course and does not require the GEOSCI 223 lab.

ENVIRON 233 — Introductory Oceanography, Laboratory
Section 001, LAB

FA 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/2

Laboratory course to be elected concurrently with GEOSCI 222. One two-hour lab each week.

Advisory Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in GEOSCI 222/ENVIRON 232

ENVIRON 233 — Introductory Oceanography, Laboratory
Section 002, LAB

FA 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/2

Laboratory course to be elected concurrently with GEOSCI 222. One two-hour lab each week.

Advisory Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in GEOSCI 222/ENVIRON 232

ENVIRON 233 — Introductory Oceanography, Laboratory
Section 003, LAB

FA 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/2

Laboratory course to be elected concurrently with GEOSCI 222. One two-hour lab each week.

Advisory Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in GEOSCI 222/ENVIRON 232

ENVIRON 233 — Introductory Oceanography, Laboratory
Section 004, LAB

FA 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/2

Laboratory course to be elected concurrently with GEOSCI 222. One two-hour lab each week.

Advisory Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in GEOSCI 222/ENVIRON 232

ENVIRON 270 — Our Common Future: Ecology, Economics & Ethics of Sustainable Development
Section 001, LEC
Social and Environmental Impacts of Globalization

Instructor: Perfecto,Ivette; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4

An interdisciplinary foundation of the concepts and strategies of sustainability from an ecological, economic, and socio-political perspective. The quest for sustainable development is the most critical, yet challenging, issue of our times. Defining what sustainable development is and how it ought to be accomplished is profoundly influencing government, academics, business, science, and people's culture and livelihoods at the local, national, and global levels.

ENVIRON 281 — General Ecology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: King,Aaron Alan; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, NS

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in EEB 381.

The course introduces the basic concepts and principles of ecology as applied to the study of individuals, populations, and communities of both plants and animals. Course topics include the roles of physical and biotic factors influencing the distribution and abundance of organisms; the dynamics of population growth; species interactions including competition, predation, mutualism; the structure of ecological communities; ecological succession; and applications of ecology to problems of environment and resource management. BIOLOGY 281 is a suitable prerequisite for intermediate and advanced courses in ecology.

There will be lectures and discussions. Three exams will constitute the main basis of evaluation.

Textbook: Elements of Ecology, Smith and Smith. 6th edition.

Advisory Prerequisite: BIOLOGY 162 or 163 or 171 & 172 & 173 or 195 & 173 AND a laboratory course in CHEM. BIOLOGY 172 and 173 are strongly recommended.

ENVIRON 300 — Special Problems and Research
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: INDEPENDENT

Independent study covering different resource issues.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

ENVIRON 312 — Environmental Politics and Policy
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Rabe,Barry George; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course is an advanced offering on environmental politics and the environmental policy-making process. The course considers both processes of policy formation and implementation, placing particular emphasis on the development of alternatives to conventional regulatory practices at federal, state, and local levels of government.

Advisory Prerequisite: ENVIRON 210 or POLSCI 111.

ENVIRON 317 — Conservation of Biological Diversity
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Foufopoulos,Johannes; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS

Overview of historic and present-day causes of species extinction, and of biological principles central to species conservation and sustainable management of ecosystems. Topics covered include: episodes of extinction and diversification over earth history; geographic distribution strategies; and sustainable use of ecosystems. Weekly discussions deal with material from lectures, assigned readings, and films; and performing computer and gaming simulations.

ENVIRON 320 — Environmental Journalism: Reporting About Science, Policy, and Public Health
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Askari,Emilia Shirin
Instructor: Halpert,Julie L

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

This course aims to give students an introduction to the world of mass media, with a strong emphasis on reporting about the environment and public health. Students learn from two prize-winning journalists who have more than 40 years combined experience covering the environment and public health for media outlets such as The New York Times, Newsweek, The Detroit Free Press and National Public Radio. Each week, the course focuses on a different topic in the news related to the environment and public health including urban sprawl, climate change, environmental justice, garbage, the Great Lakes, cancer and food-borne illnesses including Mad Cow Disease. Students hear from a range of speakers on the topic of the day, learning not only about the subject itself but also about the process of journalism. Guest speakers are chosen to represent many points of view. They range from corporate executives to environmental activists, scientists, government officials and journalists. During the fall 2004 semester, speakers included SNRE Dean Rosina Bierbaum; Donele Wilkins, Executive Director of Detroiters Working for Environmental Justice; State Senator Liz Brater; Mike Johnson of the Michigan Manufacturers' Association; Joann Muller, Detroit Bureau Chief for Forbes magazine; Lester Graham of National Public Radio's Great Lakes Radio Consortium; and 60 Minutes producer Alden Bourne, among many others. Along the way, instructors lecture and steer discussions about media ethics, interviewing skills, freedom-of- information laws, the Internet as a source of information, government databases and many other journalism-related topics. In-class exercises include writing the lead (first few paragraphs) of a story about one of the guest speakers and recording picking out the good quotes from recorded student-to-student interviews. In-class critiques of student writing also point out the most successful writing techniques. The course has two field trips that show first-hand how journalism is practiced. In recent years, they have been to the Environmental Protection Agency's Mobile Sources Lab in Ann Arbor and to the Carleton Farms landfill in Sumpter Township, (this is the controversial landfill that receives trash from Toronto). All class activities are designed to give students a broad understanding of how the mass media operates while also sharing tips on how students can participate in the mass media — either as full-time journalists or occasional dabblers in public discussions.

Course Requirements: 25 percent in-class participation; 20 percent 1000-word profile of person in environmental/public health field; 20 percent short assignments including list of story ideas, letter to the editor, 200-word story on local government issue; 35 percent final assignment, a 2000-word magazine article on environmental/public health issue. Multiple drafts are required for each writing assignment.

Intended Audience: Concentrators in any field of study are welcome, but students should be aware that all the stories written and read in this class focus on environment and/or public health and related policies. Class Format: Seminar format once per week for 3 hours

Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of First-Year Writing Requirement

ENVIRON 337 — Woody Plants I: Biology and Identification
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Dick,Christopher William

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS

Ecology, biology and identification of trees, shrubs, and vines are studied in weekly field trips. Woody plants are studied in their natural ecosystems — including upland (oak-hickory, beech-sugar maple, lake plain), wetland (swamp, bog), and floodplain forests. Non-native species are taught in the Nichols Arboretum, Saginaw Forest, and Main Campus. Lecture topics include vegetative and reproductive morphology, ecology, systematics, biogeography, genetic diversity, invasive species biology, and forest history.

Advisory Prerequisite: BIOLOGY 162 or 171

ENVIRON 360 — Behavior and Environment
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: De Young,Raymond K

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course deals with two central themes:

1. First, environmental problems are people problems. To promote environmental stewardship we must understand how we think, what we care about, what motivates us, and the conditions under which we behave more reasonably.

2. Second, our behavior closely interacts with the environments we find ourselves in. To understand why we act as we do, it is useful to understand the demands environments place upon, and the opportunities they afford, human cognition.

The course explores a model of human nature which includes:

• How people come to know and understand environments

• Which types of environments humans prefer

• How humans cope with non-preferred environments

• The role that mental fatigue and restoration have in everyday functioning

The course:

• Presents evidence of the strong connection between human health/well- being and the environment

• Discusses what human information processing has to say about:

o Design (e.g., architecture, landscapes, planning, urban settings,institutions)

o Effective communication (e.g., teaching in general, communicating about the environment)

o Program implementation (e.g., behavior change in general, promoting environmentally sustainable lifestyles)

• Explores strategies for better managing our time and choosing settings in which we function more effectively

Students taking the course often have no previous experience in the psychology of human-environment interaction. The course is useful to any field of study dealing with human behavior (e.g., environmental studies; education and communication; health education and behavior; conservation psychology; resource policy, planning, and management; organizational and institutional studies; landscape architecture and urban planning; green and sustainable business)

ENVIRON 367 — Global Enterprise and Sustainable Development
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Examines how businesses can influence, and are influenced by, issues related to sustainable development. The course identifies external forces and strategy based reasons that motivate corporations to contribute to environmental and social goals. Through guest lectures and case studies, students learn about current best practice and future possibilities.

Advisory Prerequisite: Senior Standing

ENVIRON 370 — Introduction to Urban and Environmental Planning
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 3

A comprehensive introductory course. Methods and processes in governmental planning and development of human activity systems requiring space, capital, and management components in the metropolitan environment. Major topics include: space and location planning, zoning and subdivision regulations, urban form and design, new town planning, housing urban renewal, transportation, metropolitan intergovernmental relations, comprehensive urban developmental planning, population and economic planning studies, planning techniques and methods. Emphasis is placed on recent developments and emerging problems.

ENVIRON 380 — Mineral Resources, Economics, and the Environment
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Kesler,Stephen E; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: ULWR, BS, NS, QR/2

GEOSCI 380 deals with mineral resource-related problems in a complex society. The course discusses the origin, distribution, and remaining supplies of oil, coal, uranium, copper, gold, diamonds, potash, sulfur, gravel, water, soil, and other important mineral resources in terms of the economic, engineering, political, and environmental factors that govern their recovery, processing, and use. Topics discussed in GEOSCI 380 include ore-forming processes, mineral exploration methods, mineral land access, strip mining, nuclear power, recycling, smelting methods, money and gold, mercury poisoning, and taxation vs. corporate profit. Three lectures and one discussion per week. Evaluation by means of quizzes, exercises, and a final exam.

Required text: A course pack is required, but no textbook.

No previous background in geology is necessary for this course.

Advisory Prerequisite: No previous courses in Geology or other sciences are required.

ENVIRON 382 — Introduction to Environmental Education for Sustainable Development
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Zint,Michaela T; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

As a result of this course, students become certified by the School of Education to teach leading environmental education programs. They learn how to educate a citizenry able and willing to work toward environmental and sustainable development goals, as well as how to develop, implement, and evaluate their own education efforts.

ENVIRON 401 — Modeling Coupled Human-Natural Systems
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Currie,William S; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Many of the environmental issues and problems that PitE graduates will confront in their careers will involve anthropogenic drivers of change in large-scale, interconnected systems in the environment. As the human population grows and increases its consumption of resources, many interconnected environmental systems are undergoing change. Examples of human-driven change include land cover change, extraction or re-direction of fresh water, decline of fisheries from overfishing and dam construction, and coastal eutrophication, to name a few. Environmental professionals will be needed who have the skills and tools to analyze how government policies, economic realities including the need for resource extraction and fertilizer use, and environmental management decisions will impact large-scale, interconnected environmental systems. Human activities, decisions, and resource demands will interact with ecosystem responses, vulnerabilities, and stabilities to shape the large-scale environmental dynamics of the future. Decision makers will need to understand concepts such as tipping points, lag times, and resilience in connected human-natural systems. Decision makers will also need to be able to analyze tradeoffs and potential synergies among social, economic, and ecological goals. Dynamic system models provide a framework to develop and communicate understanding of complex causes and effects in interconnected systems in the environment. In this course, students will learn to confront the complexity of large-scale and multifaceted environmental issues by building and using dynamic models. Students will learn to form concise statements of complex problems or concerns, and then learn to use models to gain intuitive understanding of dynamics such as lag times, overshoots, and the potential for multiple stable states and to apply models as decision support tools. The steps in conceiving, building, and applying an environmental model will be taught. These steps include identifying a problem statement, creating a conceptual model of system interconnections, building, testing, and exploring various model formulations, and simulating scenarios to inform management decisions or policy analysis.

Intended audience: Jr & Sr PitE majors & minors. This course is not geared toward students with strong mathematical or engineering interests, but designed primarily for those interested in policy, resource management, or impacts assessment.

Course Requirements: 2 closed-book exams (1 midterm 15% and 1 final 25%). Course will use individual case studies as the central methodology in teaching modeling concepts. With each case study, students will be required to draw on material in readings and lectures to: 1) briefly explain the environmental issue together with its social and ecological tradeoffs or synergies; 2) perform guided simulations of particular management or policy scenarios; 3) analyze the model results by comparing/contrasting scenarios; 4) provide original, critical insights into the strengths and limitations of the models in capturing the salient dynamics of the system; and 5) address the interconnected environmental issues.

Class Format: 3 hrs weekly in an instructional computer lab. 1 half-time GSI will help prepare in-class exercises, attend class and help during modeling exercises, do assigned readings, hold office hours to help w/ assignments, assist in grading case study writeups, preview and grade midterm & final exams.

Advisory Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing

ENVIRON 415 — Behavioral Ecology and Conservation Biology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Low,Bobbi S; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted for students who have taken or are enrolled in EEB 492.

This course focuses on the ways environments shape the behavior and life histories of animals. Because environments pose constraints, behaviors have "better" and "worse" impacts on an organism's survival and reproduction.

Advisory Prerequisite: BIOLOGY 162 or 171.

ENVIRON 422 — Biology of Fishes
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Wehrly,Kevin Eldon

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS

Lectures cover many aspects of the biology of lower vertebrates known as fishes, including evolution, physiology, functional morphology, phylogeny, bio geography, ecology, and reproduction. The systematic position of fish among vertebrates is discussed and exemplary assemblages examined. Special attention is given to the effect of the physical properties of water on form, function and mode of life of fishes. Discussions examine current papers in the primary literature.

Advisory Prerequisite: BIOLOGY 162 or 171, 172 and 173.

ENVIRON 423 — The Biology of Fishes Laboratory
Section 001, LAB

Instructor: Wehrly,Kevin Eldon

FA 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS

Optional laboratory course accompanying ENVIRON 422, providing an introduction to the field methods used in fish biology and fisheries, and examining the diversity of the Michigan ichthyofauna and major groups of world fishes.

Advisory Prerequisite: BIOLOGY 162 or 171, 172 and 173.

ENVIRON 499 — Senior Honors Thesis
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 6
Other: Honors, Indpnt Study

The primary goal of the course is to carry out the Honors thesis research, with guidence and support of a faculty sponsor. Class sessions in the Winter term provide the opportunity to discuss thesis progress and problems, issues related to writing the thesis, and preparation for the final presentation.

Advisory Prerequisite: ENVIRON 399 and permission of instructor.

 
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