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LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Fall 2007, Reqs = WLIT
 
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Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
AAPTIS 100 — Peoples of the Middle East
Section 001, LEC
Issues in Race & Ethnicity

Instructor: Babayan,Kathryn; homepage
Instructor: Brisch,Nicole M

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

This course will survey Middle Eastern political, social, and cultural history from Sumer (3000 BC) to Khomeini's Iran (1979-89). The lectures, the readings, the visuals (web, movies, slides) are all geared towards providing the student with a sense of the nature of authority, political and cultural styles, the fabric of society, attitudes and behaviors, heroes and villains, that are and were part of the heritage of those peoples who lived in the lands between the Nile and Oxus rivers, generally referred to as the Middle East. Throughout the academic term you will have four quizzes, a midterm, and an accumulative final exam. A one-page synopsis of your readings will be due weekly for your discussion section.

AAPTIS 200 — Introduction to World Religions: Near Eastern
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Williams,Ralph G; homepage
Instructor: Knysh,Alexander D

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

This course serves two main functions: the first of these is to provide an introductory sense of what is involved in the academic study of religion; the second, which will occupy almost the whole term, is to introduce the major religious traditions of the Near East, with emphasis on the development and major structures of Israelite Religion, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. The course will keep two foci in view: one will have to do with the historical development of these religious traditions, their sacred texts and major personalities; the second will involve a comparative view of these traditions by analyzing their sense of the sacred in space, time, and text, their views on holy people. This is an introductory course: it is not necessary for students to have any previous experience in the study of religion. The course consists of three weekly lectures and a discussion group. Writing for the course typically involves an essay, a midterm, and a final exam.

AAPTIS 261 — The Civilization of Medieval Islam
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Bonner,Michael David; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

This course describes the splendid culture and civilization of the Islamic world, from the beginning until the rise of the Ottoman Empire (ca. 600-1300). It introduces students to Islamic achievements in the arts and humanities, including poetry, artistic prose, historical writing, music, architecture, painting, ceramics and calligraphy; and also in the exact sciences, including mathematics, astronomy, geography and medicine. It emphasizes the fact that that these were collective achievements, made by people from many different ethnic and religious backgrounds.

The course does not provide a chronological presentation of the political and religious history of the Islamic world. Instead, it is organized around the following six locales:

  1. The desert. Mapping Arabia: how to survive and find your way. The poets and their themes of ruins, lost love, generosity and heroism. Disciplining the self: "the desert a city." Men and the veil.
  2. The court. Palaces and their floor-plans. Praising the monarch. The etiquette, theory and practice of falling in love. Music and its modes. The importance of having good handwriting. Tragic destinies of the bureaucrats (scribes).
  3. The salon. Sessions held for learning, listening, performing and drinking: their timing and layout. Participants in these sessions: female and male, slave and free. Hetero- and homosexuality. The "Renaissance of Islam." The sense of self, in biography and autobiography. Access to knowledge in an information age.
  4. The marketplace. Mapping the great cities. Ideals and realities of consumption and exchange, poverty and wealth. Books, textiles, carpets, ceramics and other commodities.
  5. The road. Mapping the routes that extend across the world. The environment, natural and human. The quest for knowledge. Ill-gotten gains: identity theft, beating the odds, abusing the kindness of strangers.
  6. The frontier. Different ways of visualizing the frontier. Islamic history viewed as a series of frontier societies. Soldiers and armies. Strangers and deviants. Inclusion and exclusion, both within and across the boundaries of the Islamic world.

No prerequisites. Readings will consist mainly of original sources in English translation. Students will be required to write a series of short papers on these readings. There will be a midterm examination and a final. Four credits, including one discussion hour.

Advisory Prerequisite: IN ENGLISH

AAPTIS 274 — Armenia: Culture and Ethnicity
Section 001, LEC
Issues in Race & Ethnicity

Instructor: Bardakjian,Kevork B; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: RE, HU
Other: WorldLit

This course explores various aspects of the Christian Armenian identity, from the earliest times to the 1990s, against a historical and political background, with a greater emphasis on the more modern times. It highlights the formation of the Armenian self-image; its principal features (political, religious, cultural); and its historical evolution in a multi-religious and multinational region that has undergone territorial and cultural transformation.

AAPTIS 332 — Introduction to Persian Culture and Language
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Windfuhr,Gernot L; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

This course is designed for undergraduate students, and aims at providing basic knowledge about a vital cultural area which has had a decisive impact on the world throughout history, but about which more misinformation, if any, than facts are commonly known. It introduces the geographic, social, historical, literary, and linguistic aspects of Persian culture, and their sources in the pre-Islamic Iranian world empires, and the Zoroastrian religion. The emphasis will be on the country of Iran. The format of the course is lecture and class discussion. The grade is based on participation, a midterm and a final exam.

AAPTIS 339 — Turkey: Language, Culture, Society Between East and West
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Hagen,Gottfried J

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: WorldLit

An introduction to the culture, language, and society of modern Turkey with a special emphasis on the Turkish position between Europe and the Middle East, and the Turkish project of modernity.

  • Where is this country, Turkey?
  • What kind of people are living there?
  • How do they live, work, think, express themselves?
  • What do they believe?
  • Where do they locate themselves on the map of the world?
  • Are they European or Middle Eastern? Traditional or modern?
  • What does it mean to be modern, anyways?
  • What other issues are there to complicate Turkish identity?

These are the question this course seeks to address in a series of lecture&discussion units on different aspects of modern Turkish social and cultural life, using literary criticism, sociological, and anthropological approaches. Movies, literature, and music will be used to illustrate relevant issues of gender, religion, urban and rural life, history and national myth. This cultural production will give students food for discussion of the overarching theme of modernity and identity in a culture between the Middle East and Europe.

Textbook: Reşat Kasaba and Sibel Bozdoğan, eds., Rethinking Identity and Modernity in Turkey. University of Washington Press, 1997, available at Shaman Drum, State St. Additional material will be made available through a course website. No knowledge of Turkish required!

Evaluation will be based on participation in classroom discussions (20%), a midterm in-class exam (30%), and a final paper (50%). It is expected that students have read the assigned readings before every class, and are able to make informed contributions to the discussion. The midterm will consist of a number of short essay questions. The final paper should be on a topic approved by the instructor, and should involve some independent research in the library or on the web (but with caution!).


AAPTIS 381 — Introduction to Arab Literature in Translation
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Legassick,Trevor; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

Materials in English translation will illustrate the progression of Arabic Literary culture from the earliest recorded sources to the present. Lectures and discussion, along with audio-visual materials, will introduce the essentials of the history of the Arabs and the cultural context expressed in their writings. Examination of pre-Islamic poetry will lead to discussion of the religious and historical texts of Islam. The literary legacy of the Caliphal period will be presented. The Arabian Nights will be seen to illustrate the popular culture of the times. Bell-lettrist works and those of the Arab explorers, scientists, and philosophers will be sampled. The contacts between the Arab world and the West in the modern era will be seen to have resulted in new departures in Arabic Literature, with the rise of the play, the short story, and the novel. Particular attention will be given to the works of Naguib Mahfouz, the Egyptian winner of the Nobel Prize for Literature. Students will write a series of short papers commenting upon aspects of the works assigned. Credit will also be given for attendance and for class discussion. A professor of Arabic literature, the instructor is a much-published translator and commentator on Arabic literature.

AAPTIS 475 — Rumi and the Great Persian Mystical Poets
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Windfuhr,Gernot L; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: WorldLit

This course is an introduction to the Classical Persian mystical poets through translations. We will focus on the 13th century Persian poet Jalaloddin Rumi, the leading figure in Persian mystical poetry, who fundamentally influenced Persian writing poets from the regions of the Ottoman Empire to the Indian subcontinent and Central Asia. We will also explore the works of other major classical Persian poets, including Attar, Sa'di and Hafez. Through close readings and explication of selected texts we will learn to appreciate their poetic art and imagery poets, and learn about major tenets of Sufism. The format of the course is lecture and class discussion. The grade is based on participation, a mid term and a final exam.

AAPTIS 486 — Topics in Modern Arabic Literature in Translation
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Shammas,Anton; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: WorldLit

The different histories of the Arab Nahdah (Renaissance) have been mainly a reflection of the different mappings of the problematically complex relationship between the Arab World and the West, in the wake of the French invasion of Egypt in 1798. This course will offer a cultural, literary and intellectual reading of the Nahdah from the standpoint of its forerunners, from Al-Jabarti to Jabra. It will explore some of the traditionally ignored events of the nineteenth century: the publication of the Bulaq edition of alf laylah wa-laylah in 1935; Shidyaq's 1855 al-saq 'ala al-saq; the 1865 Protestant translation of the Bible into Arabic; Bustani's Encyclopedia; the 1882 "Darwin Affair," etc. Besides focusing on the intellectual biographies of some of the "founders" and their contributions, a special emphasis will be put on the role of the Arabic language in the emergence of Arab nationalism. Students will be evaluated through class performance; one in-class presentation, based on the weekly readings; and a final term paper.

ACABS 100 — Peoples of the Middle East
Section 001, LEC
Issues in Race & Ethnicity

Instructor: Babayan,Kathryn; homepage
Instructor: Brisch,Nicole M

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

This course will survey Middle Eastern political, social, and cultural history from Sumer (3000 BC) to Khomeini's Iran (1979-89). The lectures, the readings, the visuals (web, movies, slides) are all geared towards providing the student with a sense of the nature of authority, political and cultural styles, the fabric of society, attitudes and behaviors, heroes and villains, that are and were part of the heritage of those peoples who lived in the lands between the Nile and Oxus rivers, generally referred to as the Middle East. Throughout the academic term you will have four quizzes, a midterm, and an accumulative final exam. A one-page synopsis of your readings will be due weekly for your discussion section.

ACABS 200 — Introduction to World Religions: Near Eastern
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Williams,Ralph G; homepage
Instructor: Knysh,Alexander D

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

This course serves two main functions: the first of these is to provide an introductory sense of what is involved in the academic study of religion; the second, which will occupy almost the whole term, is to introduce the major religious traditions of the Near East, with emphasis on the development and major structures of Israelite Religion, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. The course will keep two foci in view: one will have to do with the historical development of these religious traditions, their sacred texts and major personalities; the second will involve a comparative view of these traditions by analyzing their sense of the sacred in space, time, and text, their views on holy people. This is an introductory course: it is not necessary for students to have any previous experience in the study of religion. The course consists of three weekly lectures and a discussion group. Writing for the course typically involves an essay, a midterm, and a final exam.

ACABS 221 — Jesus and the Gospels
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Boccaccini,Gabriele; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

The course focuses on the founder of Christianity, Jesus son of Joseph (Joshua bar-Yosef), as an historical character. By examining all extant historical sources (Jewish, Christian, and Pagan), the course offers a critical reconstruction of the major stages of the life and deeds of the prophet from Nazareth, from his birth under Herod the Great to his death and crucifixion under Pontius Pilate, within the diverse world of Second Temple Judaism. The course also explores the way in which the figure of Jesus has been reinterpreted over the centuries within the Christian, Jewish, and Muslim traditions, as well as his numerous portraits in the arts, involving the students in a multimedia experience of theater, fine arts, and music (Gospel music, and operas like Amahl and the Night Vision by Menotti as well as musicals like Jesus Christ Superstar and Godspell). Particular emphasis is placed on a detailed analysis of the many movies on Jesus, from Zecca-Noguet (1905) to DeMille (1927), Ray (1961), Pasolini (1966), Scorsese (1988), and Gibson (2004). The format of the course consists of two lectures per week by the instructor and a weekly discussion session conducted by a GSI. The course grade will be based upon daily assignments and attendance; midterm(s) and final exam.

ACABS 382 — Introduction to Egyptian Archaeology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Richards,Janet E; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

This course focuses on the material culture and disposition of archaeological sites in ancient Egypt and Nubia from c. 3200 bce-285 ac. The logic and nature of both sacred and secular landscapes are explored, and specific sites, some well known (such as the extensive temple precinct at Karnak and the Meroitic pyramids).

ACABS 413 — Ancient Mesopotamia: History and Culture
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Yoffee,Norman; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Other: WorldLit

(Graduate students: Please note description for the graduate section of this course ACABS 513 below.)

Sumerian, Babylonian, and Assyrian civilization from the first cuneiform documents (ca. 3100 BC) to the fall of the Neo-Babylonian empire (539 BC); special attention to

  1. the rise and nature of early Mesopotamian city-states;
  2. Mesopotamian economics;
  3. Mesopotamian law;
  4. ethnic relations in Mesopotamia;
  5. Mesopotamia and its neighbors — Egypt, Iran, Israel;
  6. the collapse of Mesopotamian civilization.
Original documents are examined to show methods of interpreting the history and culture of Ancient Mesopotamia.

ACABS 513 meets with ACABS 413 but is intended for graduate students. It will survey Sumerian, Babylonian, and Assyrian civilization from the first written documents (ca. 3100 BC) to the fall of the Neo-Babylonian empire (539 BC). Students will meet with the instructor bi-weekly to discuss readings and topics.

Advisory Prerequisite: Junior standing.

ANTHRARC 381 — Introduction to Egyptian Archaeology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Richards,Janet E; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

This course focuses on the material culture and disposition of archaeological sites in ancient Egypt and Nubia from c. 3200 bce-285 ac. The logic and nature of both sacred and secular landscapes are explored, and specific sites, some well known (such as the extensive temple precinct at Karnak and the Meroitic pyramids).

ANTHRARC 442 — Ancient Mesopotamia: History and Culture
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Yoffee,Norman; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Other: WorldLit

(Graduate students: Please note description for the graduate section of this course ACABS 513 below.)

Sumerian, Babylonian, and Assyrian civilization from the first cuneiform documents (ca. 3100 BC) to the fall of the Neo-Babylonian empire (539 BC); special attention to

  1. the rise and nature of early Mesopotamian city-states;
  2. Mesopotamian economics;
  3. Mesopotamian law;
  4. ethnic relations in Mesopotamia;
  5. Mesopotamia and its neighbors — Egypt, Iran, Israel;
  6. the collapse of Mesopotamian civilization.
Original documents are examined to show methods of interpreting the history and culture of Ancient Mesopotamia.

ACABS 513 meets with ACABS 413 but is intended for graduate students. It will survey Sumerian, Babylonian, and Assyrian civilization from the first written documents (ca. 3100 BC) to the fall of the Neo-Babylonian empire (539 BC). Students will meet with the instructor bi-weekly to discuss readings and topics.

Advisory Prerequisite: Junior standing.

ARMENIAN 274 — Armenia: Culture and Ethnicity
Section 001, LEC
Issues in Race & Ethnicity

Instructor: Bardakjian,Kevork B; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: RE, HU
Other: WorldLit

This course explores various aspects of the Christian Armenian identity, from the earliest times to the 1990s, against a historical and political background, with a greater emphasis on the more modern times. It highlights the formation of the Armenian self-image; its principal features (political, religious, cultural); and its historical evolution in a multi-religious and multinational region that has undergone territorial and cultural transformation.

ARMENIAN 287 — Armenian History from Prehistoric Times to the Present
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Libaridian,Gerard J

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: WorldLit

This course explores the role of dynastic families and the nobility as well as intellectual élites and the Church in the rise and fall of different forms of Armenian statehood, from ancient and medieval kingdoms to the republics in the twentieth century. The course will cover successive political and economic systems throughout Armenian history as well as recent debates on domestic and foreign policy choices and their relationship to political parties and the Armenian Diaspora.

ASIAN 204 — East Asia: Early Transformations
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: de Pee,Christian

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: Theme, WorldLit

Survey of the history of China, Korea, and Japan, from mythical times to 1600. The course emphasizes the historical interactions and transformations that have made East Asia a coherent cultural region: exchanges of objects and ideas, technology and writing, monks and merchants, artists and scholars.

ASIAN 206 — Indian Civilization
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Trautmann,Thomas R

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

This course is an introduction to one of the world's great civilizations, that of India, from its beginnings in the third millennium BC to the present day. The first half will deal with classical Indian civilization, its origins, its social structure, religions, arts and sciences. The second half will examine India's encounters with the civilizations of Islam and Europe. We will also study the modern nations— India, Pakistan, Nepal, Bhutan, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka — which have emerged in the twentieth century, and their problems and accomplishments.


ASIAN 207 — Southeast Asian Civilization
Section 001, LEC
Issues in Race & Ethnicity

Instructor: Lieberman,Victor B

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: RE, SS
Other: WorldLit

Southeast Asia is one of the world's most culturally diverse regions, home to Buddhist, Moslem, Confucian, and Christian civilizations. It boasts ancient monuments of surpassing grandeur and symbolic complexity. It was the scene of the bloodiest conflict since World War II, the so-called Second Indo-China War (c.1960-1975). Until very recently it boasted the world's fastest growing regional economy.

HISTORY 207 offers an introduction to Southeast Asian history — the earliest civilizations, through the colonial conquest, the struggle for independence, and the development of an interdependent region.

The following paperback books can be purchased at Shaman Drum, 313 South State:

  • David Steinberg et al., In Search of Southeast Asia
  • Milton Osborne, Southeast Asia: an Introductory History
  • George Orwell, Burmese Days
  • Clark Neher and Ross Marlay, Democracy and Development in Southeast Asia
  • Thierry Zephyr, Khmer: The Lost Empire of Cambodia

In addition, you will need a course pack which is also available at Shaman Drum Bookstore.

ASIAN 225 — Hinduism
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Deshpande,Madhav

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

Hinduism is a major world religion practiced by over a billion people, primarily in South Asia, but it also was the precursor of Buddhism, and along with Buddhism it had a major impact on the civilizations in East and Southeast Asia. This course will cover its origins and development, its literature, its belief and practices, its unique social structures and doctrines, its interactions with other religions, and finally its confrontation with and accommodation of 'modernity.' We will use reading materials, lectures, discussions, and audio and video resources.

ASIAN 230 — Introduction to Buddhism
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

In this course, you will form a basic acquaintance with some representative ideas and practices of the Buddhist Tradition in its development of some two thousand five hundred years. We will devote the bulk of the course to exploring the origins and development of Buddhism in India, the land of its birth. In the final few weeks we will make a survey of the transmission and vicissitudes of Buddhism elsewhere, lingering for stops in Tibet, China, Japan, and North America. Throughout this time, you will be asked to use these materials continuously to test your own criteria for defining "religion," and your ideas of how we can have fruitful encounters with the religious traditions of others (and this applies even if you are yourself a practicing Buddhist). Other key themes that you will encounter in the presentation of Buddhism include:

  1. Buddhism and the visual arts and literature;
  2. Buddhism and its troubled relationship with state authority and violence;
  3. the modulating effects of factors like gender, class, and ethnic identity on the experience of Buddhism; and
  4. Buddhism and its acculturation to new cultural spheres.
There will be considerable readings of selected Buddhist primary texts in English. Course requirements include regular attendance, biweekly short response papers and two exams (midterm and final).

ASIAN 235 — Introduction to the Study of Asian Cultures
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Merrill,Christi Ann; homepage
Instructor: Fukuoka,Maki

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

This course combines lectures, discussion, visits to University collections, and interactive social networking exercises (wikis, annotations, folksonomies, blogs) for building the basic, critical vocabulary necessary to study Asian cultures in all their diversity. Rather than an exhaustive survey, students will be asked to engage with a range of exemplary cultural products (performances, objects, literary texts, films) from East, South and Southeast Asia that have traveled within Asia and beyond in order to make conceptual links between them. We assume that any serious engagement with Asian cultures in this era of globalization requires us to articulate their complex interconnectedness. The goal will be to develop a responsive, constantly-evolving conceptual map of Asia students can reliably draw on in the future when working with any facet of these cultures.

Requirements: The majority of each student's grade will be determined on a point system, earned by active participation in discussion, regular attendance at lectures and collection visits, and ongoing, meaningful contributions to the networking site for the course. (While minimum involvement in each category is necessary, students will have latitude in pursuing the topics and exercises that interest them most.) Instead of a final examination, students will be expected to turn in a portfolio of their best work to be graded qualitatively. All readings will be in English and no prior knowledge of any Asian language or culture is necessary. Likewise, students can expect to acquire any computer skills necessary for passing this course through class resources.

ASIAN 252 — Undergraduate Seminar in Japanese Culture
Section 001, SEM
Haiku as Poetry and Philosophy

Instructor: Ramirez-Christensen,E

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem, WorldLit

The seminar will examine the world's briefest known poem, the haiku.

  • How does this 17-syllable, 3-line poem signify?
  • What assumptions about the nature of language and meaning lie behind its composition and interpretation?
  • What social milieu produced it?
  • What is its link to Zen practice and other Zen arts?

Readings will be from the poetry and critical commentaries of the master Bashô and his disciples, with later poets such as Buson and Issa, as well as haiga (haiku paintings), providing opportunities for comparative study. The Western understanding of haiku in the Imagist movement, Ezra Pound, the beat generation, and Barthe's Empire of Signs will also be examined. Secondary sources are available in English, but given the brevity of the poems, analysis of some Japanese texts and their various English renditions will often be possible.

Requirements: 4 short papers, a 36-verse haikai linked sequence by the class, and individual English haiku compositions through the academic term.

Advisory Prerequisite: No knowledge of Japanese language is required.

ASIAN 252 — Undergraduate Seminar in Japanese Culture
Section 002, SEM
Food, Identity and Community in Japan

Instructor: Ito,Ken K

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem, WorldLit

Students will explore the place of food in a community's understanding of itself and of others. Using modern Japanese fiction and film as our main texts, we will examine how the discourse of food defines regional and national identities, and how communities are represented through patterns of consumption or deprivation. We will probe the tension between the role of certain foods as markers of cultural authenticity and the reality of cuisine as a historically dynamic, hybrid enterprise. We will investigate the connections of gender and class to food and its preparation, and study how the sharing of food affects human alliances. In short, we will be asking what it means to eat sushi.

Advisory Prerequisite: No knowledge of Japanese language is required.

ASIAN 252 — Undergraduate Seminar in Japanese Culture
Section 003, SEM
Tokyo and the Crowd

Instructor: Fukuoka,Maki

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem, WorldLit

Everyday, four million people pass through Tokyo's Shinjuku station, the busiest train station in the world. This is 40 times more than the entire population of Ann Arbor. Responding to such staggering statistics, this course explores representations of the crowd in Tokyo in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. We will consider how the crowd is evoked in visual culture by looking at popular magazines, woodblock prints, and postcards. We will also consider a number of literary, cinematic, and artistic works with particular attention paid to themes of disaster, sacred pilgrimage, political activism and entertainment. Ultimately, students will gain from this seminar an introduction to the history of Tokyo itself, with its peculiar intersection of topography and ideology, as well as a greater appreciation of the extent of the city's urban planning and the breadth of its representation.

Advisory Prerequisite: No knowledge of Japanese language is required.

ASIAN 253 — Undergraduate Seminar in South and Southeast Asian Culture
Section 001, SEM
The Philippines: Culture and History

Instructor: de la Cruz,Deirdre Leong

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

This course surveys major themes in history of the Philippines, paying particular attention to their cultural dimensions. Starting with its inception as a colony of Spain, through the American colonial period, to the post-colonial present, we will draw from Philippine historiography, ethnography, literary works and popular culture to examine the cultural effects of processes such as: religious conversion and colonial encounter; revolution and nationalism; hybridity and language; regional, class, and identity formation; modernity, globalization, and migration.

The course will be conducted as a seminar. Students will be graded on their active participation in discussion, response papers, and final research project.

Advisory Prerequisite: No knowledge of any Asian language required.

ASIAN 253 — Undergraduate Seminar in South and Southeast Asian Culture
Section 002, SEM
Global Encounters

Instructor: Sloan,Anna J

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

The final years of the fifteenth century heralded a new era in the relationship between Asia and distant parts of the globe. The arrival of Vasco da Gama on the west coast of India in 1498 established direct contact between Europe and maritime Asia. It also initiated centuries of commercial, cultural, artistic and technological exchange. This course explores facets of that exchange, pursuing case studies in India, Southeast Asia, China and Japan. Readings, lectures, and student projects will address the varied nature of Asia's encounters with the Portuguese, Dutch, and British, and more recently with global modernity and post-modernity. Topics include cartography, exotica, gift exchange, diplomacy and protocol, trade, missionary activity, colonization, Orientalism, and the post-colonial condition.

Advisory Prerequisite: No knowledge of any Asian language required.

ASIAN 254 — Undergraduate Seminar in Korean Culture
Section 001, SEM
The Outcast in Korean Literature

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem, WorldLit

As the product of a crisis within a given community, the outcast materializes, by his or her very existence, the boundaries within which the community imagines itself to be whole or coherent. For this reason, the outcast is always a figure of danger but also of potentiality — this is precisely the ambiguity which has proven fruitful for thinking across disciplines, from moral philosophy and political theory to psychoanalysis. In this course, we will focus on literary manifestations of the outcast in twentieth century Korea, where attempts to secure and legitimize various communal formations were accompanied by spectacular displays of violence, and rely on this figure as our guide in re-examining the history of modern nation-building in Korea. The outcast will serve as a broad heading under which we can consider relations between such terms as exile, migrant, refugee and nomad; special attention will be paid to the place of the writer within these relations. The course will conclude with discussions of recent texts that address new forms of exclusions emerging within the globalizing economy and digitalized culture of South Korean society today.

Advisory Prerequisite: No knowledge of Korean language is required.

ASIAN 301 — Writing Japanese Women
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Ramirez-Christensen,E

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

This is a course on writing by and about women — women's self-representation and male major authors' representations of women — in Japanese culture. It begins by a feminist reading of one of the world's oldest (9th-11th c.) traditions of women's writing: the memoirs, poetry, and fiction of the Heian court ladies who produced the country's first canonical literature and permanently marked its cultural self-image. It moves on to examine the semiotics of the feminine in Japanese culture using the popular image of women (including the portrayal of Heian women authors and their works) in medieval didactic and gothic tales; in the narrative painting scrolls; in the Nô and Kabuki stage, where male actors performed the "quintessentially feminine" to admiring audiences; in wood-block prints of "beauties" (courtesans or geisha) and stories of "amorous women" in the thriving new merchant culture. The third section focuses on modern women's writing, in particular its resistance to the intervening representations of the feminine and its own productive rereading of the Heian "mothers" in the process of recuperating women's ancient place in the critical representation of Japanese society.

Along with primary sources in literature and the visual arts, secondary sources will include theoretical readings in the psychology of sex, love, and death by Freud, Kristeva, Lacan, and Bataille; in the field of cultural production by Bourdieu; in feminist theories of reading in the Anglo-American academy. Materials and focus will vary from year to year. To be offered in the fall semester alternately with ASIAN 300.

Advisory Prerequisite: Knowledge of Japanese is not required

ASIAN 303 — Warrior Saints: Introduction to Sikh Religion, Culture, and Ethnicity
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Mandair,Arvind-Pal Singh

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

Sikhism's relatively short but eventful history provides a fascinating insight into the working of seemingly contradictory themes in the study of religion, such as politics and religion, or violence and mysticism.

Not surprisingly contemporary Sikh religion's emphasis on the essential identity of the Warrior and the Saint has also generated a great deal of misunderstanding particularly in the West. This interdisciplinary course provides an introduction to the forms and central ideas of Sikh culture and religion. Students will gain an understanding of the development Sikh traditions and the construction and institutionalization of its major beliefs, practices and festivals.

In addition the course will aim to explore the central teachings and leading ideas that have arisen from the Sikh textual and interpretive traditions. Students will be expected to analyse the complex interactions that have given rise to the contemporary interpretive scene, and will be encouraged to link their understanding of the various traditions to the present day problems of textual transmission and reception in global diasporas.

ASIAN 325 — Zen: History, Culture, and Critique
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Robson,James

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: Theme, WorldLit

This course provides an introduction to the religious history, philosophy and practices of Zen Buddhism. Zen is the Japanese pronunciation of the Chinese word Chan, which is itself a transcription of the Sanskrit word dhyâna, meaning meditation. While meditation is no doubt the backbone of the Zen tradition, this course will highlight the fact that Zen has a number of different faces, including a radical antinomian side that challenged the role of meditation (and all forms of mediation). This course will examine the rich diversity of the Zen tradition as it developed in China, Korea, and Japan, with the first part providing an overview of the historical development of Zen and situating it within the Buddhist tradition that it emerged out of. The second part of the course will challenge and critically evaluate much of what is presented in the first half by exploring some less well known facets of Zen practice that on first glance appear to run counter to what the Zen tradition says about itself. We will explore the role of language in Zen from the enigmatic and abstruse use of koans to questions about why a tradition which took pride in "not being dependent on words" nonetheless produced a voluminous textual record. We will study both the crazy antics of inspired Zen monks and the structured life of Zen monastics and their rituals. Consideration will also be given to why a seemingly iconoclastic tradition like Zen also has a long tradition of venerating its masters, including some that were mummified. Why, we will ask, was Zen appealing to the Japanese warrior class and what has been its role in modern nationalistic movements in Japan? This course is designed to be as much an ongoing critical reflection on the history of the study of Zen as it is about Zen history.

ASIAN 362 — Writer and Society in Modern China
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Luo,Liang; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: Theme, WorldLit

The rise of China has impacted contemporary world politics and economy in significant ways. How did it all happen? What can we learn from it? This course introduces a special angle of interpretation suggested by Chinese writers and intellectuals themselves. We will examine the role and self-conception of the writer in relation to the changing historical context of modern China, through the study of influential works of narrative fiction, performing arts and film, criticism, and literary theory (all in English translation). We will be focusing on the relationship between arts and politics, the intellectual and the people, and the artistic, the sexual, and the political aspects of Modern Chinese intellectual life. Our goal is to develop critical reading skills and to gain a deep knowledge of modern Chinese identity formation so as to better understand our own position in the contemporary world.

Advisory Prerequisite: No knowledge of Chinese is required.

ASIAN 428 — China's Evolution Under Communism
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Gallagher,Mary E; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Other: Theme, WorldLit

An analysis of China's remarkable evolution to develop an understanding of the present system's capacity to deal with the major challenges that confront it in the political, economic, social, environmental, and security arenas.

Advisory Prerequisite: Upperclass standing

CLARCH 221 — Introduction to Greek Archaeology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Herbert,Sharon C

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

The Ancient Greeks are always with us, in high places and low, from the halls of our democratic institutions to the pages of the Sports Illustrated swimsuit edition. How can we explain their ubiquitous presence in our lives? Why won't they go away? This course explores the art and archaeology of ancient Greece, beginning in the Bronze Age (the famous Minoan and Mycenaean civilizations) through to Hellenistic times (the age of Alexander the Great). We will explore all aspects of Greek life as reflected in the materials they left behind, objects that range from mighty marble temples such as the Parthenon, to discarded drinking vessels from their parties, from cities to theaters, from houses to palaces. Such artistic and archaeological evidence allows us to consider how Greek society worked, and how they understood the relations of humans and gods, men and women, Greeks and barbarians. Having taken this course, you will understand far better just why they Greeks are so hard to forget.

CLARCH 440 — Cities and Sanctuaries of Classical Greece
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Nevett,Lisa C

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: WorldLit

In the ancient Greek world cities and religious sanctuaries formed two complementary and interdependent types of built environment, each with its own characteristic function, architecture and layout.

  • But how did these distinctive architectural complexes arise, and how did they change through time and space?
  • What were their characteristic roles?
  • How can we detect those roles in the buildings and layouts of individual sites?
  • And to what extent did major political and cultural changes, such as the introduction of democracy, shape the various structures and the sites on which they stood?

In this course we address these questions and evaluate some of the answers (both ancient and modern) which have previously been offered, by looking in detail at the evidence from a variety of sites, including sanctuaries such as Delphi, Olympia and Samos, and cities such as Athens, Megara Hyblaia and Priene. We cover a wide geographical area, stretching from the Greek communities of southern Italy in the west, through Greece itself, to the eastern Greek settlements on the west coast of modern Turkey. We also span a long period of time, from the ninth and eighth centuries BCE, down to the third century BCE. The aim of the course is to enable students with some prior experience of Greek art and archaeology (for example through CLARCH/HISTART 221 and/or CLARCH/HISTART 384) to explore in more depth some of the cultural, social and political factors influencing the architectural form and spatial organisation of sites and structures in the Greek world during this period.

Advisory Prerequisite: Upperclass standing, and a course in archaeology.

CLCIV 101 — Classical Civilization I: The Ancient Greek World (in English)
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Acosta-Hughes,Benjamin B

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR
Other: WorldLit

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GTBOOKS 191 or 201.

How did the Greeks come to invent the first democracy?
Why did the freedom-loving Greeks condone slavery?
Why was the god Dionysus so important to Greek culture

This course is an introduction to the history and culture of this fascinating but paradoxical civilization. We will laugh with the ancient comedians and think with the ancient philosophers. We will also confront the contradictions of this complex society. There will be approximately 75-100 pages of reading per week, two short projects (for example, a presentation and a short paper), a midterm and a final examination. No previous knowledge is required.

Advisory Prerequisite: FR./SO./PER.

CLCIV 120 — First-year Seminar in Classical Civilization (Humanities)
Section 001, SEM
Law and Society in Greek and Roman Egypt

Instructor: Verhoogt,Arthur Mfw

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem, WorldLit

Tens of thousands of papyri from Egypt provide an intimate view of daily life in Egypt during the Greek and Roman periods. Many of these documents are legal and detail transactions and agreements of actual people. In this class we are going to read legal documents in translation and discuss the contents and the legal practices (Egyptian, Hellenistic, Roman) we see at work in them, and the social realities lying behind them.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

CLCIV 120 — First-year Seminar in Classical Civilization (Humanities)
Section 003, SEM
Food and Society in the Ancient Roman City

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem, WorldLit

What did Romans think about when eating dormice rolled in honey and sesame seeds? What was the cultural place and significance of food in ancient Roman society? This course will examine ancient Roman texts on food and cooking such as Petronius' Satyricon, Apicius' cookbooks, the satires of Horace, Persius and Juvenal and Seneca's Apocolocyntosis as literature and as cultural artifacts. Contemporary readings on food and culture will provide a theoretical framework for our analyses. The seminar will also include a workshop session on cooking Roman recipes from Apicius.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

CLCIV 350 — Topics in Classical Civilization
Section 001, LEC
Love and Affection in the Ancient World

Instructor: Caston,Ruth Rothaus

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

This course will focus on the representation of love and affection in Greece and Rome, both between lovers and among the members of a household. We will look at literary sources, artistic depictions, and philosophical arguments (both for and against), as well as historical source material. Major themes include the vocabulary of love and its symptoms (especially pain and pleasure); love as madness; love within and outside of marriage; the object of desire; the importance of vision; and familial bonds of affection. Throughout the course we will pay close attention to differences in ancient traditions, periods and genres, not to mention the preconceptions and obsessions we ourselves bring to the discussion.

Three short papers; final exam

Readings will be drawn from:

  • Cupid and Psyche
  • Plato, Symposium and Phaedo
  • Euripides, Mede
  • Peter Bing and Rip Cohen, Games of Venus. An Anthology of Greek and Roman Erotic Verse from Sappho to Ovid
  • Apollonius of Rhodes, Argonautica
  • Plautus, Menaechmi
  • Terence, Adelphoe
  • Vergil, Aeneid
  • Jo-Ann Shelton, As the Romans Did
  • Longus, Daphnis and Chloe

Advisory Prerequisite: CLCIV 101 and 102

CLCIV 372 — Sports and Daily Life in Ancient Rome
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Potter,David S

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

The amphitheater full of gladiators, the circus full of chariots (with or without Charleton Heston) are among the most abiding images of Roman, and perhaps, any western culture. The Olympic Games were as much a Roman institution as they were Greek — indeed the Roman empire was the first great age of public entertainment. But what did it all mean? How is entertainment related to the interests of society as a whole? These are two of the questions that we will explore through a discussion of the place of Roman entertainment in Roman society. We will start by looking at the broad structures of Roman life, and then move through the diverse entertainments of the Romans from athletic events to the theater, from chariot racing to public execution, beast hunts, and gladiators. Readings include selections from ancient authors and from recent scholarship.

CLCIV 388 — History of Philosophy: Ancient
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Caston,Victor; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

Western philosophy from its historical beginning through the Hellenistic period and including the Pre-Socratics, Sophists, Plato, Aristotle, Epicurus, Stoicism, and Scepticism.

Advisory Prerequisite: One philosophy introduction. A knowledge of Greek or Latin is not required.

CLCIV 464 — The Ancient Epic
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Scodel,Ruth S

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR
Other: WorldLit

Epic was the most ambitious, grand, culturally prized form of literature in antiquity. This course will look at ancient epics individually and at epic as a genre. The central questions will be why epic was once so important, but is no longer possible-and why, when we can no longer imagine writing epics, we still read them and can be deeply moved by them. (The instructor uses the Iliad as a guide to life; she realizes that this is odd, but hopes students will come to see how this could happen). The focus will be on the most canonical classical epics: Iliad, Odyssey, Apolloniu's Argonautica, Vergil's Aeneid, and Lucan's Pharsalia. We will consider performance, characterization, narrative method, ideology, and relation to the tradition. Each student will also choose a selection from another ancient or modern epic to read for comparison. For one paper, students will read secondary literature, but otherwise the emphasis will be on the poems themselves. The writing component will try to develop the ability to write in various formats and with varying amounts of opportunity for revision, since so much real-world writing is done under pressure. So besides two relatively short formal papers that will be revised and resubmitted, there will be in-class writing and short assignments meant to be done quickly.

CLCIV 495 — Senior Honors Research
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 3
Other: Honors, Indpnt Study, WorldLit

Work on the senior Honors thesis in Classical Civilization, under the supervision of a faculty advisor. It provides students with an appropriately designated course in which to undertake research, consultation, and writing necessary for the successful completion of the Senior Honors theses.

Advisory Prerequisite: Upperclass standing

CLCIV 499 — Supervised Reading
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 3
Other: INDEPENDENT, WorldLit

Undergraduate supervised reading in Classical Civilization.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor.

COMPLIT 340 — Travels to Greece
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Leontis,Artemis S

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

What inspires people to travel? What is the allure of Greece, and what happens to expectations once people reach this popular destination? Why do people take to the road in the first place, abandoning the comforts of home and routine? This course explores travels to Greece: visits to islands, mountains, villages, ancient sites as they are described in travel narratives. It leads readers from the Ionian Islands to Sparta and Attica, on to Northern Greece and the Aegean, conjuring up the history and mythology, civilization and wildness, heat and beauty that have lured writers from Homer to Byron, Flaubert to Freud, Mark Twain to Henry Miller, Virginia Woolf to Patricia Storace. It raises questions about the relations of travelers to the worlds they encounter but also the interior world they sometimes set out to discover. Films, novels, short stories, diaries, essays, letters, poems, paintings, drawings, photographs, and the Internet are rich sources of exploration.

DUTCH 160 — First Year Seminar: Colonialism and its Aftermath
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Broos,Antonius J M

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem, WorldLit

The course introduces first-year students to cultural studies in general and Dutch Studies in particular, integrating social, political, and economic history with literary renderings, and artistic representations of colonialism. The Netherlands has been an active participant in shaping the world as we know it, through mercantile and political involvement around the globe. The Dutch were colonizers of Indonesia and its many islands, founders of New Amsterdam/New York, traders in West Africa, first settlers in Capetown in South Africa, and the first trading partners with the Japanese. The Netherlands held colonial power over Suriname until 1975; other West Indies islands, i.e., Aruba, Bonaire, Curaçao are still part of the Dutch Kingdom. We will trace the origin and development of the Dutch expansion in the world, how countries were conquered and political systems were established. Mercantile gains as shown in the spice trade and the many aspects of the slave trade will be emphasized. The role of the Dutch East India Company (VOC), once called the world's largest multinational in the 17th and 18th century, will be examined. We will read from the vast body of Dutch literary works related to the East and West Indies, started as early as the 17th century.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

ENGLISH 245 — Introduction to Drama and Theatre
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Westlake,Jane; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RCHUMS 281.

The course aims to introduce students to the power and variety of theatre, and to help them understand the processes which go toward making a production. Five to seven plays will be subjects of special study, chosen to cover a wide range of style and content, but interest will not be confined to these. Each student will attend two lectures weekly, plays a two-hour meeting in section each week; the latter will be used for questions, discussions, exploration of texts, and other exercises. Students will be required to attend two or more theatre performances, chosen from those available in Ann Arbor. Three papers are required plus a final examination.

Required Texts: available at the Shaman Drum and on reserve at the Shapiro:

  • The Essential Theatre, Oscar Brockett
  • Waiting for Godot, Samuel Beckett
  • The Piano Lesson, August Wilson
  • The Heidi Chronicles, Wendy Wasserstein
  • Dream on Monkey Mountain, Derek Walcott

Online:

  • Oedipus Rex, Sophocles
  • Romeo and Juliet, William Shakespeare
  • and other online readings as assigned

Course Objectives

  1. To determine what "theatre" and "drama" have meant at different times in history and what they mean now, and to do so by examining landmark plays in their theatrical and social contexts.
  2. To gain a fundamental understanding of how each of the theatre's constituent arts (acting, directing, design, playwriting, architecture) contributes to the making of a theatrical whole.
  3. To develop a sense of how theatre is a discipline without clear boundaries and how other practices intersect with and shape theatrical performance.

ENGLISH 443 — History of Theatre I
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Woods,Leigh A

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: WorldLit

This course, a survey of the development of theatre from the ancient Greeks to the 17th century, should be elected by all Theatre concentrators. The focus is on the production of theatre in its historical and social context, but we shall also study representative plays.

ENGLISH 443 — History of Theatre I
Section 002, LEC

Instructor: Nkanga,Mbala D

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: WorldLit

This course, a survey of the development of theatre from the ancient Greeks to the 17th century, should be elected by all Theatre concentrators. The focus is on the production of theatre in its historical and social context, but we shall also study representative plays.

GERMAN 310 — Studies in German Culture
Section 001, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 1
Other: WorldLit

Advisory Prerequisite: Residence in Max Kade German House; others by permission of instructor.

GERMAN 330 — German Cinema
Section 001, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: WorldLit

An introduction to German cinema and its cultural background from the beginnings to the present, with emphasis on the classical period (ca. 1918-1933) and the modern (post-1965) resurgence.

GERMAN 375 — Celtic and Nordic Mythology
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: WorldLit

A study of the Celtic and Nordic cycles of myths and sagas, including the Nibelungenlied, Tristan and Isolde cycles, the Irish Tain, the Welsh Mabinogi, the Scandinavian Edda and some of the literature based on these cycles.

GERMAN 401 — Nineteenth-Century German and European Intellectual History
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Weineck,Silke-Maria

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: WorldLit

Between the upheavals of the French Revolution and the First World War, the European nations witnessed an utter transformation of their world. The relations of the person to the nation, to the state, to history, and to the physical world were rethought from top to bottom. Our exploration of modern ideas take us from rationalism to racism, and from utopian ideologies to the birth of psychoanalysis.

Advisory Prerequisite: German students must have concurrent registration in German 403. See Course Guide.

GERMAN 449 — Special Topics in English Translation
Section 001, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: WorldLit

Various themes, e.g., Nietzsche and Modern Literature or Rilke translations, etc., are taught by various members of the staff according to student interest and faculty availability.

GERMAN 449 — Special Topics in English Translation
Section 002, REC

Instructor: Markovits,Andrei S; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: WorldLit

Various themes, e.g., Nietzsche and Modern Literature or Rilke translations, etc., are taught by various members of the staff according to student interest and faculty availability.

GTBOOKS 191 — Great Books
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Cameron,H Don

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU, FYWR
Other: WorldLit

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GTBOOKS 201 or CLCIV 101.

GTBOOKS 191 will survey the classical works of ancient Greece. Among the readings will be Homer's Iliad and Odyssey; a number of the plays of Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, and Aristophanes; Herodotus' Histories; Thucydides' History of the Peloponnesian War; and several of Plato's dialogues. The course format is two lectures and two discussion meetings a week. Six to eight short papers will be assigned; there will be midterm and final examinations. GTBOOKS 191 is open to first-year students in the Honors Program, and to other students with the permission of the Director of the Great Books Program.

Advisory Prerequisite: FR.H.PRG.

HISTART 221 — Introduction to Greek Archaeology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Herbert,Sharon C

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

The Ancient Greeks are always with us, in high places and low, from the halls of our democratic institutions to the pages of the Sports Illustrated swimsuit edition. How can we explain their ubiquitous presence in our lives? Why won't they go away? This course explores the art and archaeology of ancient Greece, beginning in the Bronze Age (the famous Minoan and Mycenaean civilizations) through to Hellenistic times (the age of Alexander the Great). We will explore all aspects of Greek life as reflected in the materials they left behind, objects that range from mighty marble temples such as the Parthenon, to discarded drinking vessels from their parties, from cities to theaters, from houses to palaces. Such artistic and archaeological evidence allows us to consider how Greek society worked, and how they understood the relations of humans and gods, men and women, Greeks and barbarians. Having taken this course, you will understand far better just why they Greeks are so hard to forget.

HISTART 382 — Introduction to Egyptian Archaeology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Richards,Janet E; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

This course focuses on the material culture and disposition of archaeological sites in ancient Egypt and Nubia from c. 3200 bce-285 ac. The logic and nature of both sacred and secular landscapes are explored, and specific sites, some well known (such as the extensive temple precinct at Karnak and the Meroitic pyramids).

HISTART 440 — Cities and Sanctuaries of Classical Greece
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Nevett,Lisa C

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: WorldLit

In the ancient Greek world cities and religious sanctuaries formed two complementary and interdependent types of built environment, each with its own characteristic function, architecture and layout.

  • But how did these distinctive architectural complexes arise, and how did they change through time and space?
  • What were their characteristic roles?
  • How can we detect those roles in the buildings and layouts of individual sites?
  • And to what extent did major political and cultural changes, such as the introduction of democracy, shape the various structures and the sites on which they stood?

In this course we address these questions and evaluate some of the answers (both ancient and modern) which have previously been offered, by looking in detail at the evidence from a variety of sites, including sanctuaries such as Delphi, Olympia and Samos, and cities such as Athens, Megara Hyblaia and Priene. We cover a wide geographical area, stretching from the Greek communities of southern Italy in the west, through Greece itself, to the eastern Greek settlements on the west coast of modern Turkey. We also span a long period of time, from the ninth and eighth centuries BCE, down to the third century BCE. The aim of the course is to enable students with some prior experience of Greek art and archaeology (for example through CLARCH/HISTART 221 and/or CLARCH/HISTART 384) to explore in more depth some of the cultural, social and political factors influencing the architectural form and spatial organisation of sites and structures in the Greek world during this period.

Advisory Prerequisite: Upperclass standing, and a course in archaeology.

HISTORY 132 — Peoples of the Middle East
Section 001, LEC
Issues in Race & Ethnicity

Instructor: Babayan,Kathryn; homepage
Instructor: Brisch,Nicole M

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

This course will survey Middle Eastern political, social, and cultural history from Sumer (3000 BC) to Khomeini's Iran (1979-89). The lectures, the readings, the visuals (web, movies, slides) are all geared towards providing the student with a sense of the nature of authority, political and cultural styles, the fabric of society, attitudes and behaviors, heroes and villains, that are and were part of the heritage of those peoples who lived in the lands between the Nile and Oxus rivers, generally referred to as the Middle East. Throughout the academic term you will have four quizzes, a midterm, and an accumulative final exam. A one-page synopsis of your readings will be due weekly for your discussion section.

HISTORY 204 — East Asia: Early Transformations
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: de Pee,Christian

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: Theme, WorldLit

Survey of the history of China, Korea, and Japan, from mythical times to 1600. The course emphasizes the historical interactions and transformations that have made East Asia a coherent cultural region: exchanges of objects and ideas, technology and writing, monks and merchants, artists and scholars.

HISTORY 206 — Indian Civilization
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Trautmann,Thomas R

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

This course is an introduction to one of the world's great civilizations, that of India, from its beginnings in the third millennium BC to the present day. The first half will deal with classical Indian civilization, its origins, its social structure, religions, arts and sciences. The second half will examine India's encounters with the civilizations of Islam and Europe. We will also study the modern nations— India, Pakistan, Nepal, Bhutan, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka — which have emerged in the twentieth century, and their problems and accomplishments.


HISTORY 207 — Southeast Asian Civilization
Section 001, LEC
Issues in Race & Ethnicity

Instructor: Lieberman,Victor B

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: RE, SS
Other: WorldLit

Southeast Asia is one of the world's most culturally diverse regions, home to Buddhist, Moslem, Confucian, and Christian civilizations. It boasts ancient monuments of surpassing grandeur and symbolic complexity. It was the scene of the bloodiest conflict since World War II, the so-called Second Indo-China War (c.1960-1975). Until very recently it boasted the world's fastest growing regional economy.

HISTORY 207 offers an introduction to Southeast Asian history — the earliest civilizations, through the colonial conquest, the struggle for independence, and the development of an interdependent region.

The following paperback books can be purchased at Shaman Drum, 313 South State:

  • David Steinberg et al., In Search of Southeast Asia
  • Milton Osborne, Southeast Asia: an Introductory History
  • George Orwell, Burmese Days
  • Clark Neher and Ross Marlay, Democracy and Development in Southeast Asia
  • Thierry Zephyr, Khmer: The Lost Empire of Cambodia

In addition, you will need a course pack which is also available at Shaman Drum Bookstore.

HISTORY 287 — Armenian History from Prehistoric Times to the Present
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Libaridian,Gerard J

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: WorldLit

This course explores the role of dynastic families and the nobility as well as intellectual élites and the Church in the rise and fall of different forms of Armenian statehood, from ancient and medieval kingdoms to the republics in the twentieth century. The course will cover successive political and economic systems throughout Armenian history as well as recent debates on domestic and foreign policy choices and their relationship to political parties and the Armenian Diaspora.

HISTORY 416 — Nineteenth-Century German and European Intellectual History
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Weineck,Silke-Maria

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: WorldLit

Between the upheavals of the French Revolution and the First World War, the European nations witnessed an utter transformation of their world. The relations of the person to the nation, to the state, to history, and to the physical world were rethought from top to bottom. Our exploration of modern ideas take us from rationalism to racism, and from utopian ideologies to the birth of psychoanalysis.

Advisory Prerequisite: German students must have concurrent registration in German 403. See Course Guide.

HISTORY 440 — Ancient Mesopotamia: History and Culture
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Yoffee,Norman; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Other: WorldLit

(Graduate students: Please note description for the graduate section of this course ACABS 513 below.)

Sumerian, Babylonian, and Assyrian civilization from the first cuneiform documents (ca. 3100 BC) to the fall of the Neo-Babylonian empire (539 BC); special attention to

  1. the rise and nature of early Mesopotamian city-states;
  2. Mesopotamian economics;
  3. Mesopotamian law;
  4. ethnic relations in Mesopotamia;
  5. Mesopotamia and its neighbors — Egypt, Iran, Israel;
  6. the collapse of Mesopotamian civilization.
Original documents are examined to show methods of interpreting the history and culture of Ancient Mesopotamia.

ACABS 513 meets with ACABS 413 but is intended for graduate students. It will survey Sumerian, Babylonian, and Assyrian civilization from the first written documents (ca. 3100 BC) to the fall of the Neo-Babylonian empire (539 BC). Students will meet with the instructor bi-weekly to discuss readings and topics.

Advisory Prerequisite: Junior standing.

HJCS 100 — Peoples of the Middle East
Section 001, LEC
Issues in Race & Ethnicity

Instructor: Babayan,Kathryn; homepage
Instructor: Brisch,Nicole M

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

This course will survey Middle Eastern political, social, and cultural history from Sumer (3000 BC) to Khomeini's Iran (1979-89). The lectures, the readings, the visuals (web, movies, slides) are all geared towards providing the student with a sense of the nature of authority, political and cultural styles, the fabric of society, attitudes and behaviors, heroes and villains, that are and were part of the heritage of those peoples who lived in the lands between the Nile and Oxus rivers, generally referred to as the Middle East. Throughout the academic term you will have four quizzes, a midterm, and an accumulative final exam. A one-page synopsis of your readings will be due weekly for your discussion section.

HJCS 200 — Introduction to World Religions: Near Eastern
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Williams,Ralph G; homepage
Instructor: Knysh,Alexander D

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

This course serves two main functions: the first of these is to provide an introductory sense of what is involved in the academic study of religion; the second, which will occupy almost the whole term, is to introduce the major religious traditions of the Near East, with emphasis on the development and major structures of Israelite Religion, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. The course will keep two foci in view: one will have to do with the historical development of these religious traditions, their sacred texts and major personalities; the second will involve a comparative view of these traditions by analyzing their sense of the sacred in space, time, and text, their views on holy people. This is an introductory course: it is not necessary for students to have any previous experience in the study of religion. The course consists of three weekly lectures and a discussion group. Writing for the course typically involves an essay, a midterm, and a final exam.

HJCS 381 — Introduction to Israeli Literature and Culture
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

Since 1948, Israeli literature has dealt with issues confronting a new nation-state created with a utopian vision, but also burdened with a legacy of war and rapid social change. This course explores the main writers and trends of Israeli literature and culture from the War Generation of the late 40's to the new postmodern voices of the 21st century, analyzing how they respond both to the dreams and the reality of modern Israel. A wide variety of novels, poetry and short stories from the best and most important Israeli writers are presented. Additionally, students view and discuss films and adaptations of literary works. All the texts are in English translation.

HJCS 478 — Jewish Mysticism
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Ginsburg,Elliot K; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: WorldLit

A critical study of the historical development of Jewish mysticism, its symbolic universe and its social ramifications. The focus is on the variegated medieval stream known as Kabbalah. The issues explored are: the nature of mystical experience; images of God and the Person; symbols of the male and female; the problems of evil; mysticism and language; kabbalistic myth and ritual innovation; and kabbalistic interpretations of history.

ITALIAN 311 — Making Difference in Italy
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Squatriti,Paolo

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

This course investigates some of the ways in which people in Italy have constructed distinctions among themselves based on perceived differences of culture, language, and appearance. It shows that the desire to reinforce identities by means of ethnic ideology has a long history in the Italian penisula, and that such identities have generally served specific political and social interests in the communities which generated them. From the ancient Etruscans to the modern Lombard League (now Lega Nord), the course shows Italy to have been a cockpit for the development of (mutable, negotiable) ideas of ethnicity in Europe.

JUDAIC 381 — Introduction to Israeli Literature and Culture
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

Since 1948, Israeli literature has dealt with issues confronting a new nation-state created with a utopian vision, but also burdened with a legacy of war and rapid social change. This course explores the main writers and trends of Israeli literature and culture from the War Generation of the late 40's to the new postmodern voices of the 21st century, analyzing how they respond both to the dreams and the reality of modern Israel. A wide variety of novels, poetry and short stories from the best and most important Israeli writers are presented. Additionally, students view and discuss films and adaptations of literary works. All the texts are in English translation.

JUDAIC 468 — Jewish Mysticism
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Ginsburg,Elliot K; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: WorldLit

A critical study of the historical development of Jewish mysticism, its symbolic universe and its social ramifications. The focus is on the variegated medieval stream known as Kabbalah. The issues explored are: the nature of mystical experience; images of God and the Person; symbols of the male and female; the problems of evil; mysticism and language; kabbalistic myth and ritual innovation; and kabbalistic interpretations of history.

MEMS 310 — Medieval Sources of Modern Culture
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Sowers,Cynthia A

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

"The Dark Ages" conjures up lurid images of barbarians wearing horned helmets roaming a cultural landscape of generalized savagery and superstition. This course will attempt to discover a more complex, less stereotyped perspective on a fascinating period of Western European history. We will begin with the encounter between pagans and Christians in the field not only of religious belief, but also of philosophy and the arts. We will ask questions about the status of the body and its representations, about the role of intellectual life in the midst of political intrigue, and most importantly about the way in which a new history of origins and endings was framed by means of new narratives of purpose, pattern, choice, and engagement. How did Christians use paganism as a grounding and source for a new philosophy? How did barbarians use Christianity in order to represent and perhaps even to invent their own history? The course is interdisciplinary in nature, and will include a study of selected examples of the visual arts to enrich and deepen our understanding of the period.

Works studied will include: Plato, Phaedo; The Sayings of the Desert Fathers; The Life of Mary the Egyptian; St. Augustine, Confessions; Gregory of Tours, History of the Franks; Beowulf.

Advisory Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

MEMS 375 — Celtic and Nordic Mythology
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: WorldLit

A study of the Celtic and Nordic cycles of myths and sagas, including the Nibelungenlied, Tristan and Isolde cycles, the Irish Tain, the Welsh Mabinogi, the Scandinavian Edda and some of the literature based on these cycles.

MODGREEK 214 — Introduction to Modern Greek Culture
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Leontis,Artemis S

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS
Other: WorldLit

Discover Greece, a country with a long history and vibrant present. Famed for its antiquity, Greece has been adapting rapidly to a changing world. Two hundred years ago it was a backwater of the Ottoman Empire and a favorite stop for European travelers in the Mediterranean. As time passed, venerated traditions submitted to modern ways, so that today Greece seems indistinguishable from any other modern country, on the surface at least. Yet Greeks have their own history and ways. This course acquaints students with breakthrough moments in that history and key features of Greek society and culture. Sources are stories, films, poems, dances, music, art, newspaper articles, and historical archives. Students are expected to attend lectures, participate in discussions, write commentaries on readings, and take a midterm and final exam.

MODGREEK 340 — Travels to Greece
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Leontis,Artemis S

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

What inspires people to travel? What is the allure of Greece, and what happens to expectations once people reach this popular destination? Why do people take to the road in the first place, abandoning the comforts of home and routine? This course explores travels to Greece: visits to islands, mountains, villages, ancient sites as they are described in travel narratives. It leads readers from the Ionian Islands to Sparta and Attica, on to Northern Greece and the Aegean, conjuring up the history and mythology, civilization and wildness, heat and beauty that have lured writers from Homer to Byron, Flaubert to Freud, Mark Twain to Henry Miller, Virginia Woolf to Patricia Storace. It raises questions about the relations of travelers to the worlds they encounter but also the interior world they sometimes set out to discover. Films, novels, short stories, diaries, essays, letters, poems, paintings, drawings, photographs, and the Internet are rich sources of exploration.

PHIL 230 — Introduction to Buddhism
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

In this course, you will form a basic acquaintance with some representative ideas and practices of the Buddhist Tradition in its development of some two thousand five hundred years. We will devote the bulk of the course to exploring the origins and development of Buddhism in India, the land of its birth. In the final few weeks we will make a survey of the transmission and vicissitudes of Buddhism elsewhere, lingering for stops in Tibet, China, Japan, and North America. Throughout this time, you will be asked to use these materials continuously to test your own criteria for defining "religion," and your ideas of how we can have fruitful encounters with the religious traditions of others (and this applies even if you are yourself a practicing Buddhist). Other key themes that you will encounter in the presentation of Buddhism include:

  1. Buddhism and the visual arts and literature;
  2. Buddhism and its troubled relationship with state authority and violence;
  3. the modulating effects of factors like gender, class, and ethnic identity on the experience of Buddhism; and
  4. Buddhism and its acculturation to new cultural spheres.
There will be considerable readings of selected Buddhist primary texts in English. Course requirements include regular attendance, biweekly short response papers and two exams (midterm and final).

PHIL 388 — History of Philosophy: Ancient
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Caston,Victor; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

Western philosophy from its historical beginning through the Hellenistic period and including the Pre-Socratics, Sophists, Plato, Aristotle, Epicurus, Stoicism, and Scepticism.

Advisory Prerequisite: One philosophy introduction. A knowledge of Greek or Latin is not required.

POLISH 325 — Polish Literature in English to 1890
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Carpenter,Bogdana; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

The course surveys the development of Polish literature in terms of individual authors and major literary movements from the beginning until 1890. Individual critical analysis of texts required. A knowledge of Polish is NOT required. All readings in English translation. CANNOT be taken as a tutorial.

POLSCI 339 — China's Evolution Under Communism
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Gallagher,Mary E; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Other: Theme, WorldLit

An analysis of China's remarkable evolution to develop an understanding of the present system's capacity to deal with the major challenges that confront it in the political, economic, social, environmental, and security arenas.

Advisory Prerequisite: Upperclass standing

RCHUMS 280 — Introduction to Drama and Theatre
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Westlake,Jane; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RCHUMS 281.

The course aims to introduce students to the power and variety of theatre, and to help them understand the processes which go toward making a production. Five to seven plays will be subjects of special study, chosen to cover a wide range of style and content, but interest will not be confined to these. Each student will attend two lectures weekly, plays a two-hour meeting in section each week; the latter will be used for questions, discussions, exploration of texts, and other exercises. Students will be required to attend two or more theatre performances, chosen from those available in Ann Arbor. Three papers are required plus a final examination.

Required Texts: available at the Shaman Drum and on reserve at the Shapiro:

  • The Essential Theatre, Oscar Brockett
  • Waiting for Godot, Samuel Beckett
  • The Piano Lesson, August Wilson
  • The Heidi Chronicles, Wendy Wasserstein
  • Dream on Monkey Mountain, Derek Walcott

Online:

  • Oedipus Rex, Sophocles
  • Romeo and Juliet, William Shakespeare
  • and other online readings as assigned

Course Objectives

  1. To determine what "theatre" and "drama" have meant at different times in history and what they mean now, and to do so by examining landmark plays in their theatrical and social contexts.
  2. To gain a fundamental understanding of how each of the theatre's constituent arts (acting, directing, design, playwriting, architecture) contributes to the making of a theatrical whole.
  3. To develop a sense of how theatre is a discipline without clear boundaries and how other practices intersect with and shape theatrical performance.

RCHUMS 310 — Medieval Sources of Modern Culture
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Sowers,Cynthia A

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

"The Dark Ages" conjures up lurid images of barbarians wearing horned helmets roaming a cultural landscape of generalized savagery and superstition. This course will attempt to discover a more complex, less stereotyped perspective on a fascinating period of Western European history. We will begin with the encounter between pagans and Christians in the field not only of religious belief, but also of philosophy and the arts. We will ask questions about the status of the body and its representations, about the role of intellectual life in the midst of political intrigue, and most importantly about the way in which a new history of origins and endings was framed by means of new narratives of purpose, pattern, choice, and engagement. How did Christians use paganism as a grounding and source for a new philosophy? How did barbarians use Christianity in order to represent and perhaps even to invent their own history? The course is interdisciplinary in nature, and will include a study of selected examples of the visual arts to enrich and deepen our understanding of the period.

Works studied will include: Plato, Phaedo; The Sayings of the Desert Fathers; The Life of Mary the Egyptian; St. Augustine, Confessions; Gregory of Tours, History of the Franks; Beowulf.

Advisory Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

RCHUMS 313 — Russian Cinema
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Eagle,Herbert J; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR, HU
Other: WorldLit

Russian cinema studied against the background of the artistic and political revolutions which helped shape it. The course spans the period 1917-present, from the Russian pioneers of film montage (Sergei Eisenstein, Vsevolod Pudovkin, Dziga Vertov, Alexander Dovzhenko) to the varied cinematic approaches of recent directors such as Andrei Tarkovsky, and Nikita Mikhalkov. Films by all of the above directors and others are viewed, analyzed, and discussed both with respect to their intrinsic aesthetic structure and with respect to the cultural trends and socio-political events of the period and country.

RCHUMS 347 — Survey of Russian Literature
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR, HU
Other: WorldLit

This course focuses on the masterpieces of Russian fiction written between 1820 and 1870, including such classics of world literature as Tolstoy's War and Peace and Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment. Evolving fast from Romanticism to High Realism, this period marks a blossoming of Russian culture, despite strained relations with political authorities. We will trace how writers treated the political, social, intellectual, and religious issues dividing their contemporaries, creating a unique kind of literature that claimed authority over society in settling these problems. Topics include romantic self-fashioning and posturing (including such risky aristocratic games as dueling and gambling), gender relations, the fate of the educated in society, violence and repentance, reform and stagnation, history and the private self, Russia and the West. No knowledge of Russian literature or history is presupposed. Participation in class discussion, two short papers, and a final exam.

REQUIRED TEXTS:

  • Aleksandr Pushkin, Eugene Onegin (Dana Point: Ardis, 1993)
  • Mikhail Lermontov, A Hero of Our Time (Dana Point: Ardis, 1988)
  • Ivan Turgenev, Fathers and Sons (New York: Norton, 1994)
  • Leo Tolstoy, War and Peace (Oxford: World's Classics Ser., Oxford UP, 1991)
  • Fyodor Dostoevsky, Crime and Punishment (New York: Norton, 1989)
  • Course pack from Accu-Copy.

Advisory Prerequisite: A knowledge of Russian is not required. No knowledge of Russian literature or history is presupposed.

RCHUMS 362 — Writer and Society in Modern China
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Luo,Liang; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: Theme, WorldLit

The rise of China has impacted contemporary world politics and economy in significant ways. How did it all happen? What can we learn from it? This course introduces a special angle of interpretation suggested by Chinese writers and intellectuals themselves. We will examine the role and self-conception of the writer in relation to the changing historical context of modern China, through the study of influential works of narrative fiction, performing arts and film, criticism, and literary theory (all in English translation). We will be focusing on the relationship between arts and politics, the intellectual and the people, and the artistic, the sexual, and the political aspects of Modern Chinese intellectual life. Our goal is to develop critical reading skills and to gain a deep knowledge of modern Chinese identity formation so as to better understand our own position in the contemporary world.

Advisory Prerequisite: No knowledge of Chinese is required.

RCHUMS 390 — Special Period and Place Drama
Section 001, SEM
Modern Irish Drama and Film

Instructor: Walsh,Martin W

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Other: WorldLit

A survey of 20th century Irish Drama beginning with the pioneering works of the "Irish Dramatic Movement" (Yeats, Synge and Lady Gregory) in the first years of the century, through the works of O'Casey in the 20s and beyond to the second flourishing of Irish drama in the 60s onward with such figures as Brendan Behan, Brian Friel, and Tom Murphy to Martin McDonagh and a host of other new playwrights of the 1990s. Some recent important Irish films will also be included. This course will be equally divided between lecture/discussion (with attention paid to Irish mythology, folklore, history, politics) and practical work on scenes (with workshops in verse-speaking, grotesque comedy, Irish accents, etc.). Midterm exam, individual research into playwright not covered in syllabus, an End-of-Term show presenting very recent work(s) from such exciting new playwrights as Marina Carr, Conor McPherson, or Mark O'Rowe.

Texts:

  • Irish Drama, 1900-1980 — ed.s Coilin D. Owens & Joan N. Radner (CUA Press).
  • The Complete Plays — J. M. Synge (Vintage)
  • A Reader's Guide to Modern Irish Drama — Sanford Sternlicht (Syracuse).

    Advisory Prerequisite: RCHUMS 280 and permission of instructor.

RCHUMS 485 — Special Drama Topics
Section 001, SEM
Commedia dell'arte Performance Project

Instructor: Walsh,Martin W

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 2
Other: WorldLit

This minicourse will be devoted to producing a COMMEDIA DELL'ARTE-style theatre piece for the RC's 40th Anniversary in October. We will be adapting Antonfrancesco Grazzini's "Story of Doctor Manente" in D.H. Lawrence's translation. The longest novella in Grazzini's LA CENE (c. 1538), "The Story of Doctor Manente" chronicles an elaborate Beffa or practical joke, performed by Lorenzo de'Medici upon one of his more annoying parasites. By means of a convenient plague victim, Lorenzo engineers the "death" of Doctor Manente who is spirited out of Florence by mysterious masked figures and kept in a well-provisioned "solitary confinement." Months later when he returns to town, Manente finds his friends amazed, his wife remarried, and his affairs in such chaos that even the Signoria has to intervene. A hilarious trial complete with bogus relics and a crazed prophet from the hills (could this be Lorenzo in disguise?) completes the Magnifico's comical revenge.
The minicourse will "meet with" HUMS 387 for the first half of the semester. Actors, designers, mask-makers, researchers welcome.

Advisory Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and permission of instructor.

RELIGION 201 — Introduction to World Religions: Near Eastern
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Williams,Ralph G; homepage
Instructor: Knysh,Alexander D

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

This course serves two main functions: the first of these is to provide an introductory sense of what is involved in the academic study of religion; the second, which will occupy almost the whole term, is to introduce the major religious traditions of the Near East, with emphasis on the development and major structures of Israelite Religion, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. The course will keep two foci in view: one will have to do with the historical development of these religious traditions, their sacred texts and major personalities; the second will involve a comparative view of these traditions by analyzing their sense of the sacred in space, time, and text, their views on holy people. This is an introductory course: it is not necessary for students to have any previous experience in the study of religion. The course consists of three weekly lectures and a discussion group. Writing for the course typically involves an essay, a midterm, and a final exam.

RELIGION 225 — Hinduism
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Deshpande,Madhav

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

Hinduism is a major world religion practiced by over a billion people, primarily in South Asia, but it also was the precursor of Buddhism, and along with Buddhism it had a major impact on the civilizations in East and Southeast Asia. This course will cover its origins and development, its literature, its belief and practices, its unique social structures and doctrines, its interactions with other religions, and finally its confrontation with and accommodation of 'modernity.' We will use reading materials, lectures, discussions, and audio and video resources.

RELIGION 230 — Introduction to Buddhism
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

In this course, you will form a basic acquaintance with some representative ideas and practices of the Buddhist Tradition in its development of some two thousand five hundred years. We will devote the bulk of the course to exploring the origins and development of Buddhism in India, the land of its birth. In the final few weeks we will make a survey of the transmission and vicissitudes of Buddhism elsewhere, lingering for stops in Tibet, China, Japan, and North America. Throughout this time, you will be asked to use these materials continuously to test your own criteria for defining "religion," and your ideas of how we can have fruitful encounters with the religious traditions of others (and this applies even if you are yourself a practicing Buddhist). Other key themes that you will encounter in the presentation of Buddhism include:

  1. Buddhism and the visual arts and literature;
  2. Buddhism and its troubled relationship with state authority and violence;
  3. the modulating effects of factors like gender, class, and ethnic identity on the experience of Buddhism; and
  4. Buddhism and its acculturation to new cultural spheres.
There will be considerable readings of selected Buddhist primary texts in English. Course requirements include regular attendance, biweekly short response papers and two exams (midterm and final).

RELIGION 280 — Jesus and the Gospels
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Boccaccini,Gabriele; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

The course focuses on the founder of Christianity, Jesus son of Joseph (Joshua bar-Yosef), as an historical character. By examining all extant historical sources (Jewish, Christian, and Pagan), the course offers a critical reconstruction of the major stages of the life and deeds of the prophet from Nazareth, from his birth under Herod the Great to his death and crucifixion under Pontius Pilate, within the diverse world of Second Temple Judaism. The course also explores the way in which the figure of Jesus has been reinterpreted over the centuries within the Christian, Jewish, and Muslim traditions, as well as his numerous portraits in the arts, involving the students in a multimedia experience of theater, fine arts, and music (Gospel music, and operas like Amahl and the Night Vision by Menotti as well as musicals like Jesus Christ Superstar and Godspell). Particular emphasis is placed on a detailed analysis of the many movies on Jesus, from Zecca-Noguet (1905) to DeMille (1927), Ray (1961), Pasolini (1966), Scorsese (1988), and Gibson (2004). The format of the course consists of two lectures per week by the instructor and a weekly discussion session conducted by a GSI. The course grade will be based upon daily assignments and attendance; midterm(s) and final exam.

RELIGION 303 — Warrior Saints: Introduction to Sikh Religion, Culture, and Ethnicity
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Mandair,Arvind-Pal Singh

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

Sikhism's relatively short but eventful history provides a fascinating insight into the working of seemingly contradictory themes in the study of religion, such as politics and religion, or violence and mysticism.

Not surprisingly contemporary Sikh religion's emphasis on the essential identity of the Warrior and the Saint has also generated a great deal of misunderstanding particularly in the West. This interdisciplinary course provides an introduction to the forms and central ideas of Sikh culture and religion. Students will gain an understanding of the development Sikh traditions and the construction and institutionalization of its major beliefs, practices and festivals.

In addition the course will aim to explore the central teachings and leading ideas that have arisen from the Sikh textual and interpretive traditions. Students will be expected to analyse the complex interactions that have given rise to the contemporary interpretive scene, and will be encouraged to link their understanding of the various traditions to the present day problems of textual transmission and reception in global diasporas.

RELIGION 323 — Zen: History, Culture, and Critique
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Robson,James

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: Theme, WorldLit

This course provides an introduction to the religious history, philosophy and practices of Zen Buddhism. Zen is the Japanese pronunciation of the Chinese word Chan, which is itself a transcription of the Sanskrit word dhyâna, meaning meditation. While meditation is no doubt the backbone of the Zen tradition, this course will highlight the fact that Zen has a number of different faces, including a radical antinomian side that challenged the role of meditation (and all forms of mediation). This course will examine the rich diversity of the Zen tradition as it developed in China, Korea, and Japan, with the first part providing an overview of the historical development of Zen and situating it within the Buddhist tradition that it emerged out of. The second part of the course will challenge and critically evaluate much of what is presented in the first half by exploring some less well known facets of Zen practice that on first glance appear to run counter to what the Zen tradition says about itself. We will explore the role of language in Zen from the enigmatic and abstruse use of koans to questions about why a tradition which took pride in "not being dependent on words" nonetheless produced a voluminous textual record. We will study both the crazy antics of inspired Zen monks and the structured life of Zen monastics and their rituals. Consideration will also be given to why a seemingly iconoclastic tradition like Zen also has a long tradition of venerating its masters, including some that were mummified. Why, we will ask, was Zen appealing to the Japanese warrior class and what has been its role in modern nationalistic movements in Japan? This course is designed to be as much an ongoing critical reflection on the history of the study of Zen as it is about Zen history.

RELIGION 469 — Jewish Mysticism
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Ginsburg,Elliot K; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: WorldLit

A critical study of the historical development of Jewish mysticism, its symbolic universe and its social ramifications. The focus is on the variegated medieval stream known as Kabbalah. The issues explored are: the nature of mystical experience; images of God and the Person; symbols of the male and female; the problems of evil; mysticism and language; kabbalistic myth and ritual innovation; and kabbalistic interpretations of history.

RUSSIAN 231 — Russian Culture and Society: An Introduction
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Maiorova,Olga E; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

Interdisciplinary course spanning many periods and areas of Russian culture, from medieval times to the present day, covering art, music, literature, architecture, popular culture, and cinema.

RUSSIAN 347 — Survey of Russian Literature
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR, HU
Other: WorldLit

This course focuses on the masterpieces of Russian fiction written between 1820 and 1870, including such classics of world literature as Tolstoy's War and Peace and Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment. Evolving fast from Romanticism to High Realism, this period marks a blossoming of Russian culture, despite strained relations with political authorities. We will trace how writers treated the political, social, intellectual, and religious issues dividing their contemporaries, creating a unique kind of literature that claimed authority over society in settling these problems. Topics include romantic self-fashioning and posturing (including such risky aristocratic games as dueling and gambling), gender relations, the fate of the educated in society, violence and repentance, reform and stagnation, history and the private self, Russia and the West. No knowledge of Russian literature or history is presupposed. Participation in class discussion, two short papers, and a final exam.

REQUIRED TEXTS:

  • Aleksandr Pushkin, Eugene Onegin (Dana Point: Ardis, 1993)
  • Mikhail Lermontov, A Hero of Our Time (Dana Point: Ardis, 1988)
  • Ivan Turgenev, Fathers and Sons (New York: Norton, 1994)
  • Leo Tolstoy, War and Peace (Oxford: World's Classics Ser., Oxford UP, 1991)
  • Fyodor Dostoevsky, Crime and Punishment (New York: Norton, 1989)
  • Course pack from Accu-Copy.

Advisory Prerequisite: A knowledge of Russian is not required. No knowledge of Russian literature or history is presupposed.

RUSSIAN 449 — Twentieth-Century Russian Literature
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Ronen,Omry; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: WorldLit

This historical survey of Russian literature from 1890 to 1921 covers the final achievements of realism in the later works of Tolstoy and Chekhov, the art of symbolism, the post-symbolist currents in poetry and prose, and the major literary events of the first post-revolutionary years both in the USSR and in exile. The required reading includes English translations of representative poems by Soloviev, Briusov, Balmont, Merezhkovsky, Hippius, Sologub, Blok, Belyi, Viacheslav Ivanov, Annensky, Kuzmin, Khodasevich, Gumilev, Akhmatova, Mandelstam, Khlebnikov, Maiakovsky, Pasternak, Tsvetaeva, Esenin, and Kliuev.

RUSSIAN 463 — Chekhov
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Makin,Michael; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: WorldLit

A detailed examination of the literary career of Anton Chekhov: his prose and drama are analyzed and assessed in the context of the literary, social, and political currents of his time, and as masterpieces of Russian literature. An informal lecture course, with contributions and discussion from students encouraged. This course should appeal to anyone interested in short story or in modern drama. It is taught in English, and all readings may be done in English. Two papers, three one-hour, in-class examinations.

Advisory Prerequisite: PER. INSTR.

RUSSIAN 464 — Tolstoy
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Maiorova,Olga E; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: WorldLit

This course will cover some of the major works written by Leo Tolstoy throughout his long and extremely productive artistic life — from the 1850s through the beginning of the twentieth century. We will examine his masterpieces in connection with the religious, political, and social phenomena that shaped Russian intellectual life of that period. At the same time we will learn how Tolstoy's writing changed the Russian intellectual landscape. This course will emphasize the main existential problems Tolstoy was deeply interested in, as well as his extraordinary views on literature and fine arts. We also will focus on Tolstoy's artistic devices and narrative means. The course will alternate lectures with discussions of assigned readings. All readings are in English translation. It is designed both for those with general interest in Russian literature, and for those with a specific, scholarly or literary interest in Tolstoy. No prior knowledge of Russian literature and culture is necessary. Evaluation of students' work will be based on essay, final test, and class participation.

SCAND 331 — Introduction to Scandinavian Civilization
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Eriksson,Johanna Ulrika

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

A survey of the artistic, intellectual, political, social, and literary traditions of Scandinavia from the Viking Age to the present.

SCAND 375 — Celtic and Nordic Mythology
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: WorldLit

A study of the Celtic and Nordic cycles of myths and sagas, including the Nibelungenlied, Tristan and Isolde cycles, the Irish Tain, the Welsh Mabinogi, the Scandinavian Edda and some of the literature based on these cycles.

SLAVIC 225 — Arts and Cultures of Central Europe
Section 001, LEC
Issues in Race & Ethnicity

Instructor: Eagle,Herbert J; homepage
Instructor: Toman,Jindrich; homepage
Instructor: Carpenter,Bogdana; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: RE, HU
Other: WorldLit

The course is an introduction to the rich cultures of the peoples of Central Europe (Croats, Czechs, Hungarians, Jews, Poles, Serbs, and Slovaks) seen against the background of two world wars, communism and its recent disintegration. Culturally vibrant, Central Europe reveals the tragic destiny of twentieth-century civilization which gave rise to two totalitarian systems: fascism and communism. The course will outline the ethnic complexities of the region, with special attention to Jewish culture and its tragic destruction during the Holocaust. The traumatic effects of the war and of ideological coercion on the civilian population will be documented by contemporary films. The course will examine the fate of culture under totalitarianism and study subterfuges used by novelists, dramatists, and artists to circumvent political control and censorship. Students will read works by Kafka, Milosz, Kundera, and Havel; see movies by Kadar, Wajda, and Kieslowski; become acquainted with Czech and Polish avant-garde art and music and the unique cultural atmosphere of Central European cities: Vienna, Prague, Budapest, and Warsaw.

SLAVIC 313 — Russian Cinema
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Eagle,Herbert J; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR, HU
Other: WorldLit

Russian cinema studied against the background of the artistic and political revolutions which helped shape it. The course spans the period 1917-present, from the Russian pioneers of film montage (Sergei Eisenstein, Vsevolod Pudovkin, Dziga Vertov, Alexander Dovzhenko) to the varied cinematic approaches of recent directors such as Andrei Tarkovsky, and Nikita Mikhalkov. Films by all of the above directors and others are viewed, analyzed, and discussed both with respect to their intrinsic aesthetic structure and with respect to the cultural trends and socio-political events of the period and country.

SOC 426 — China's Evolution Under Communism
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Gallagher,Mary E; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Other: Theme, WorldLit

An analysis of China's remarkable evolution to develop an understanding of the present system's capacity to deal with the major challenges that confront it in the political, economic, social, environmental, and security arenas.

Advisory Prerequisite: Upperclass standing

THTREMUS 211 — Introduction to Drama and Theatre
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Westlake,Jane; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RCHUMS 281.

The course aims to introduce students to the power and variety of theatre, and to help them understand the processes which go toward making a production. Five to seven plays will be subjects of special study, chosen to cover a wide range of style and content, but interest will not be confined to these. Each student will attend two lectures weekly, plays a two-hour meeting in section each week; the latter will be used for questions, discussions, exploration of texts, and other exercises. Students will be required to attend two or more theatre performances, chosen from those available in Ann Arbor. Three papers are required plus a final examination.

Required Texts: available at the Shaman Drum and on reserve at the Shapiro:

  • The Essential Theatre, Oscar Brockett
  • Waiting for Godot, Samuel Beckett
  • The Piano Lesson, August Wilson
  • The Heidi Chronicles, Wendy Wasserstein
  • Dream on Monkey Mountain, Derek Walcott

Online:

  • Oedipus Rex, Sophocles
  • Romeo and Juliet, William Shakespeare
  • and other online readings as assigned

Course Objectives

  1. To determine what "theatre" and "drama" have meant at different times in history and what they mean now, and to do so by examining landmark plays in their theatrical and social contexts.
  2. To gain a fundamental understanding of how each of the theatre's constituent arts (acting, directing, design, playwriting, architecture) contributes to the making of a theatrical whole.
  3. To develop a sense of how theatre is a discipline without clear boundaries and how other practices intersect with and shape theatrical performance.

THTREMUS 321 — History of Theatre I
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Woods,Leigh A

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: WorldLit

This course, a survey of the development of theatre from the ancient Greeks to the 17th century, should be elected by all Theatre concentrators. The focus is on the production of theatre in its historical and social context, but we shall also study representative plays.

THTREMUS 321 — History of Theatre I
Section 002, LEC

Instructor: Nkanga,Mbala D

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: WorldLit

This course, a survey of the development of theatre from the ancient Greeks to the 17th century, should be elected by all Theatre concentrators. The focus is on the production of theatre in its historical and social context, but we shall also study representative plays.

WOMENSTD 301 — Writing Japanese Women
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Ramirez-Christensen,E

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

This is a course on writing by and about women — women's self-representation and male major authors' representations of women — in Japanese culture. It begins by a feminist reading of one of the world's oldest (9th-11th c.) traditions of women's writing: the memoirs, poetry, and fiction of the Heian court ladies who produced the country's first canonical literature and permanently marked its cultural self-image. It moves on to examine the semiotics of the feminine in Japanese culture using the popular image of women (including the portrayal of Heian women authors and their works) in medieval didactic and gothic tales; in the narrative painting scrolls; in the Nô and Kabuki stage, where male actors performed the "quintessentially feminine" to admiring audiences; in wood-block prints of "beauties" (courtesans or geisha) and stories of "amorous women" in the thriving new merchant culture. The third section focuses on modern women's writing, in particular its resistance to the intervening representations of the feminine and its own productive rereading of the Heian "mothers" in the process of recuperating women's ancient place in the critical representation of Japanese society.

Along with primary sources in literature and the visual arts, secondary sources will include theoretical readings in the psychology of sex, love, and death by Freud, Kristeva, Lacan, and Bataille; in the field of cultural production by Bourdieu; in feminist theories of reading in the Anglo-American academy. Materials and focus will vary from year to year. To be offered in the fall semester alternately with ASIAN 300.

Advisory Prerequisite: Knowledge of Japanese is not required

 
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