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LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Fall 2007, Reqs = FIRST_YEAR_SEM
 
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Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
AMCULT 102 — First Year Seminar in American Studies
Section 001, SEM
Sports Culture

Instructor: Diaz,Vicente M; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS
Other: FYSem

This seminar examines the role of sports culture in the social and political construction of individual and collective American identities. Special attention will be given to issues of power, and race, gender, sexuality, class, and nationalism. Readings and films will cover contemporary and historical issues in baseball, basketball, football, boxing, and cheerleading.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

AMCULT 103 — First Year Seminar in American Studies
Section 001, SEM
Race and Mixed-Race

Instructor: Alsultany,Evelyn Azeeza

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem

This course examines how laws and popular culture have historically shaped conceptions of race and mixed race in the U.S. In addition to examining historical contexts, we will also explore autobiographical and theoretical writings on mixed race identities and representations of mixed race identities in popular culture. The themes that will be covered in this course include questions of appearance, "authenticity," community membership and belonging, and performativity. Requirements for the course include: in-class attendance, frequent short response papers, a midterm essay, and a creative final project.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

AMCULT 103 — First Year Seminar in American Studies
Section 002, SEM
Interracial America

Instructor: Briones,Matthew M

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: RE, HU
Other: FYSem

This course will examine the interaction between different racial groups in the U.S. from the 19th century to our present moment. Conventionally, such studies focus solely on the relationship between African Americans and whites, relying on the hackneyed Black-white paradigm of U.S. race relations. This seminar explodes that dichotomy, searching for a broader historical model, which includes yellow, brown, red, and ethnic white.

  • In other words, how did African Americans respond to the internment of Japanese Americans?
  • What made desegregation cases like Mendez v. Westminster important precedents in the run-up to Brown v. Board of Education?
  • What is a "model minority," and why did Asians inherit the mantle from Jews?
  • What is a "protest minority," and why were Blacks and Jews labeled as such during the Civil Rights Movement?
  • What is the relationship among Black Power, Yellow Power, the American Indian Movement, and Chicano Power, if any?

We will critically interrogate the history of contact that exists between and among these diverse "groups," and whether conflict or confluence dominates their interaction. If conflict, what factors have prevented meaningful alliances? If confluence, what roles have these groups played in collectively striving for a multiracial democracy?"

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

AMCULT 103 — First Year Seminar in American Studies
Section 003, SEM
American Humor

Instructor: Daligga,Catherine Elizabeth

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem

This seminar will consider the role that comedy and comedians play in contemporary American culture and politics and their influence, both direct and covert, on the ever-changing conception of American identity. We will explore the connections in style and message between current stars — Dave Chappelle, Margaret Cho, Stephen Colbert, and Chris Rock — and some of their classic predecessors (such as Buster Keaton, Bert Willams, the Marx Brothers and Will Rogers). We will also examine the work and impact of innovative, iconoclastic performers whose direct influence is still strong, such as Lenny Bruce, Richard Pryor, George Carlin and Whoopi Goldberg, and discuss key critical commentary on humor, comedy, and comedians.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

ANTHRCUL 158 — First Year Seminar in Cultural Anthropology
Section 001, SEM
The Races of Sexuality and the Sexualities of Race

Instructor: Partridge,Damani James

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS
Other: FYSem

From the lynching advocated in D.W. Griffith's Birth of a Nation to the feminization of East Asian bodies in David Henry Hwang's M. Butterfly, to ethnographies of mail order brides and sex tourism, this course will examine the intimate links between race and sexuality. Through ethnography, film, literature and diverse histories, we will investigate how race gets sexualized and how sexualities get racialized through processes of globalization and in particular local and national settings.

This course will include midterm and final papers, as well as short weekly reading responses. Grades will be based on the quality of written work, on class participation, and on attendance.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

ANTHRCUL 158 — First Year Seminar in Cultural Anthropology
Section 002, SEM
Cities and Communities in Films and Their Scores

Instructor: Hart,Janet Carol

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS
Other: FYSem

This course combines several approaches, drawing materials from urban and more broadly, cultural anthropology by focusing on cities and communities; media and visual anthropology, taking into account popular cultural forms and life ways as portrayed on the big screen; and musicology and film studies, asking how — and why — film scores are matched and used to evoke particular cinematic narratives. We will watch, read about, listen to and discuss a selection of films and consider the many ways in which, in them, music and images are arranged to convey meanings, symbols, places, cultural practices and political relations. Evaluations will be based on class participation, a short, autobiography about your personal history and relationship to film, a take-home midterm essay, and ongoing group projects organized around distinct film genres, culminating in a final collective paper and presentation.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

ANTHRCUL 158 — First Year Seminar in Cultural Anthropology
Section 003, SEM
Venezuela and the U.S. in Historical Perspective

Instructor: Skurski,Julie A

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS
Other: FYSem

This course examines key moments in Venezuelan history from Simón Bolívar, independence hero, to Hugo Chávez, the current president and critic of the U.S. It examines how interactions with the U.S. have shaped Venezuelan nationalism and images of national culture. In particular, it focuses on issues of race, gender, political violence, the petroleum state, and religiosity, with an emphasis on the contemporary period. We will use film, novels, and the press, and students will present brief research projects.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

ASIAN 252 — Undergraduate Seminar in Japanese Culture
Section 001, SEM
Haiku as Poetry and Philosophy

Instructor: Ramirez-Christensen,E

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem, WorldLit

The seminar will examine the world's briefest known poem, the haiku.

  • How does this 17-syllable, 3-line poem signify?
  • What assumptions about the nature of language and meaning lie behind its composition and interpretation?
  • What social milieu produced it?
  • What is its link to Zen practice and other Zen arts?

Readings will be from the poetry and critical commentaries of the master Bashô and his disciples, with later poets such as Buson and Issa, as well as haiga (haiku paintings), providing opportunities for comparative study. The Western understanding of haiku in the Imagist movement, Ezra Pound, the beat generation, and Barthe's Empire of Signs will also be examined. Secondary sources are available in English, but given the brevity of the poems, analysis of some Japanese texts and their various English renditions will often be possible.

Requirements: 4 short papers, a 36-verse haikai linked sequence by the class, and individual English haiku compositions through the academic term.

Advisory Prerequisite: No knowledge of Japanese language is required.

ASIAN 252 — Undergraduate Seminar in Japanese Culture
Section 002, SEM
Food, Identity and Community in Japan

Instructor: Ito,Ken K

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem, WorldLit

Students will explore the place of food in a community's understanding of itself and of others. Using modern Japanese fiction and film as our main texts, we will examine how the discourse of food defines regional and national identities, and how communities are represented through patterns of consumption or deprivation. We will probe the tension between the role of certain foods as markers of cultural authenticity and the reality of cuisine as a historically dynamic, hybrid enterprise. We will investigate the connections of gender and class to food and its preparation, and study how the sharing of food affects human alliances. In short, we will be asking what it means to eat sushi.

Advisory Prerequisite: No knowledge of Japanese language is required.

ASIAN 252 — Undergraduate Seminar in Japanese Culture
Section 003, SEM
Tokyo and the Crowd

Instructor: Fukuoka,Maki

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem, WorldLit

Everyday, four million people pass through Tokyo's Shinjuku station, the busiest train station in the world. This is 40 times more than the entire population of Ann Arbor. Responding to such staggering statistics, this course explores representations of the crowd in Tokyo in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. We will consider how the crowd is evoked in visual culture by looking at popular magazines, woodblock prints, and postcards. We will also consider a number of literary, cinematic, and artistic works with particular attention paid to themes of disaster, sacred pilgrimage, political activism and entertainment. Ultimately, students will gain from this seminar an introduction to the history of Tokyo itself, with its peculiar intersection of topography and ideology, as well as a greater appreciation of the extent of the city's urban planning and the breadth of its representation.

Advisory Prerequisite: No knowledge of Japanese language is required.

ASIAN 254 — Undergraduate Seminar in Korean Culture
Section 001, SEM
The Outcast in Korean Literature

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem, WorldLit

As the product of a crisis within a given community, the outcast materializes, by his or her very existence, the boundaries within which the community imagines itself to be whole or coherent. For this reason, the outcast is always a figure of danger but also of potentiality — this is precisely the ambiguity which has proven fruitful for thinking across disciplines, from moral philosophy and political theory to psychoanalysis. In this course, we will focus on literary manifestations of the outcast in twentieth century Korea, where attempts to secure and legitimize various communal formations were accompanied by spectacular displays of violence, and rely on this figure as our guide in re-examining the history of modern nation-building in Korea. The outcast will serve as a broad heading under which we can consider relations between such terms as exile, migrant, refugee and nomad; special attention will be paid to the place of the writer within these relations. The course will conclude with discussions of recent texts that address new forms of exclusions emerging within the globalizing economy and digitalized culture of South Korean society today.

Advisory Prerequisite: No knowledge of Korean language is required.

ASTRO 120 — Frontiers of Astronomy
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Volonteri,Marta

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, NS
Other: FYSem

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in ASTRO 102, 112, 125 or 160

Topics emphasized stem from modern extragalactic astronomy, with a stress on areas that are still emerging, such as dark matter, expansion of the universe, and formation of structures in the universe.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

BIOLOGY 120 — First Year Seminar in Biology
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Oakley,Bruce

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, NS
Other: FYSem

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for a combined total of 17 credits elected in introductory biology.

A User's Guide to the Brain

Two years of high school biology required.

Brain function depends upon intricate connections among nerve cells strategically positioned to process information. This means you will learn about the physiology of individual nerve cells and the operation of synaptic communications among nerve cells. Because sensory systems are reasonably well understood, they provide an opportunity to understand how the brain works. As we sort through various functions of the brain, we will eventually consider whether it is possible for someone to read or modify your thoughts and feelings.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

BIOLOGY 120 — First Year Seminar in Biology
Section 002, SEM

Instructor: Oakley,Bruce

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, NS
Other: FYSem

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for a combined total of 17 credits elected in introductory biology.

All human cultures have seasoned their foods. Although hunger makes us eat, it is flavor that controls what we choose to eat. Some typical questions:

  • How do the chemical senses detect savory flavors and what do we know about the neurophysiology of their pleasures?
  • Do plants taste attractive or repellent to animals?
  • How do natural or artificial seasonings affect your health?
  • Can dieters successfully replace calories with seasonings?

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

CAAS 103 — First Year Social Science Seminar
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Partridge,Damani James

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS
Other: FYSem

From the lynching advocated in D.W. Griffith's Birth of a Nation to the feminization of East Asian bodies in David Henry Hwang's M. Butterfly, to ethnographies of mail order brides and sex tourism, this course will examine the intimate links between race and sexuality. Through ethnography, film, literature and diverse histories, we will investigate how race gets sexualized and how sexualities get racialized through processes of globalization and in particular local and national settings.

This course will include midterm and final papers, as well as short weekly reading responses. Grades will be based on the quality of written work, on class participation, and on attendance.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

CAAS 103 — First Year Social Science Seminar
Section 002, SEM

Instructor: Young Jr,Alford A; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS
Other: FYSem

For most of the last half the twentieth century, scholars, journalists, and policy advocates have considered African American men to be in a state of crisis. This course provides a critical examination of works that aim to document and interpret that crisis. We will explore a range of arguments produced in the past thirty years that aim to define the state of Black masculinity and the social condition of African American men. These works will stimulate our effort to pose and answer questions about what, if anything, constitutes a condition of crisis for African American men and what needs to happen to and for them in order to improve their prospects in American society.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

CAAS 103 — First Year Social Science Seminar
Section 005, SEM
I, Too, Sing America: A Psychology of Race & Racism

Instructor: Behling,Charles F

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: RE, SS
Other: FYSem

Taking its title from the Langston Hughes poem, this seminar will explore psychological aspects of race, ethnicity, and other cultural differences in the United States. What are some of the opportunities and obstacles to our joining with Hughes in affirming, "They'll see how beautiful I am . . . I, too, sing America?" Topics include stereotyping, communication, cooperation, conflict, justice, and discrimination. What psychological theories address how individuals and groups might benefit most from life in pluralistic societies? What are some psychological dynamics of stereotyping? What are possible connections between various forms of discrimination, e.g. racism, sexism, homophobia, and anti-Semitism? (meets with CAAS 103.005)

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

CAAS 103 — First Year Social Science Seminar
Section 006, SEM
Justice For All? Difference & Oppression in U.S. Society

Instructor: Gurin,Patricia Y

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: RE, SS
Other: FYSem

How do issues of race, intergroup relations, and social group identity impact possibilities for building community in a democratic society? Students will explore issues of civic engagement and community building in a democratic society, taking into account issues of power and celebration, conflict and coalition, differences and common ground. This course is part of a larger program called FIGS (First-year Interest GroupS).

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

CAAS 104 — First Year Humanities Seminar
Section 001, SEM
Interracial America

Instructor: Briones,Matthew M

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: RE, HU
Other: FYSem

This course will examine the interaction between different racial groups in the U.S. from the 19th century to our present moment. Conventionally, such studies focus solely on the relationship between African Americans and whites, relying on the hackneyed Black-white paradigm of U.S. race relations. This seminar explodes that dichotomy, searching for a broader historical model, which includes yellow, brown, red, and ethnic white.

  • In other words, how did African Americans respond to the internment of Japanese Americans?
  • What made desegregation cases like Mendez v. Westminster important precedents in the run-up to Brown v. Board of Education?
  • What is a "model minority," and why did Asians inherit the mantle from Jews?
  • What is a "protest minority," and why were Blacks and Jews labeled as such during the Civil Rights Movement?
  • What is the relationship among Black Power, Yellow Power, the American Indian Movement, and Chicano Power, if any?

We will critically interrogate the history of contact that exists between and among these diverse "groups," and whether conflict or confluence dominates their interaction. If conflict, what factors have prevented meaningful alliances? If confluence, what roles have these groups played in collectively striving for a multiracial democracy?"

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

CLCIV 120 — First-year Seminar in Classical Civilization (Humanities)
Section 001, SEM
Law and Society in Greek and Roman Egypt

Instructor: Verhoogt,Arthur Mfw

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem, WorldLit

Tens of thousands of papyri from Egypt provide an intimate view of daily life in Egypt during the Greek and Roman periods. Many of these documents are legal and detail transactions and agreements of actual people. In this class we are going to read legal documents in translation and discuss the contents and the legal practices (Egyptian, Hellenistic, Roman) we see at work in them, and the social realities lying behind them.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

CLCIV 120 — First-year Seminar in Classical Civilization (Humanities)
Section 003, SEM
Food and Society in the Ancient Roman City

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem, WorldLit

What did Romans think about when eating dormice rolled in honey and sesame seeds? What was the cultural place and significance of food in ancient Roman society? This course will examine ancient Roman texts on food and cooking such as Petronius' Satyricon, Apicius' cookbooks, the satires of Horace, Persius and Juvenal and Seneca's Apocolocyntosis as literature and as cultural artifacts. Contemporary readings on food and culture will provide a theoretical framework for our analyses. The seminar will also include a workshop session on cooking Roman recipes from Apicius.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

COMPLIT 140 — First-Year Literary Seminar
Section 001, SEM
Women Writers and Classical Myth

Instructor: Prins,Johanna H; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem

Over the last century, why have women writers returned to Greek and Roman mythology as a source of inspiration? How do they rewrite the gendered plots of particular myths in order to engender new meanings? This seminar will consider revisions of Classical myth in various literary genres (including fiction, poetry, and drama) written by various women (including Mary Renault, H.D., Christa Wolf, Marguerite Yourcenar, Rita Dove, and Anne Carson).

Students will develop skills in critical analysis of literature, by writing a series of short essays and also creating their own version of a Classical myth.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

DUTCH 160 — First Year Seminar: Colonialism and its Aftermath
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Broos,Antonius J M

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem, WorldLit

The course introduces first-year students to cultural studies in general and Dutch Studies in particular, integrating social, political, and economic history with literary renderings, and artistic representations of colonialism. The Netherlands has been an active participant in shaping the world as we know it, through mercantile and political involvement around the globe. The Dutch were colonizers of Indonesia and its many islands, founders of New Amsterdam/New York, traders in West Africa, first settlers in Capetown in South Africa, and the first trading partners with the Japanese. The Netherlands held colonial power over Suriname until 1975; other West Indies islands, i.e., Aruba, Bonaire, Curaçao are still part of the Dutch Kingdom. We will trace the origin and development of the Dutch expansion in the world, how countries were conquered and political systems were established. Mercantile gains as shown in the spice trade and the many aspects of the slave trade will be emphasized. The role of the Dutch East India Company (VOC), once called the world's largest multinational in the 17th and 18th century, will be examined. We will read from the vast body of Dutch literary works related to the East and West Indies, started as early as the 17th century.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 010, REC

Instructor: Scheidt,Donna Lynn

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR
Other: FYSem

A study of rhetoric, both as a body of principles, and as a practical art, emphasizing the writing of expository and argumentative essays.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 012, REC

Instructor: Cornelius,Tyler Adam

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR
Other: FYSem

A study of rhetoric, both as a body of principles, and as a practical art, emphasizing the writing of expository and argumentative essays.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 018, REC

Instructor: Sampson,Christopher Michael

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR
Other: FYSem

A study of rhetoric, both as a body of principles, and as a practical art, emphasizing the writing of expository and argumentative essays.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 032, REC

Instructor: Carbonell,Vanessa

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR
Other: FYSem

A study of rhetoric, both as a body of principles, and as a practical art, emphasizing the writing of expository and argumentative essays.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 039, REC

Instructor: Ides,Matthew Allan

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR
Other: FYSem

A study of rhetoric, both as a body of principles, and as a practical art, emphasizing the writing of expository and argumentative essays.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 049, REC

Instructor: Button,Seth Lowell

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR
Other: FYSem

A study of rhetoric, both as a body of principles, and as a practical art, emphasizing the writing of expository and argumentative essays.

ENGLISH 140 — First-Year Literary Seminar
Section 001, SEM
The Sincerest Form

Instructor: Delbanco,Nicholas F

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem

A course in the nature and technique of contemporary short fiction, from the reader-writer's point-of-view. Close analysis of twelve examples of recent American prose, with an eye on authorial technique. Written work will consist of exercises in imitation, an effort to enter the style and specific rhetoric of the examples at hand. We will read short stories from Andrea Barrett, John Barth, Charles Baxter, Raymond Carver, Ernest Hemingway, Richard Ford, Jamaica Kincaid, Bernard Malamud, Lorrie Moore, Bharati Mukherjee, Tim O'Brien, and Flannery O'Connor. The article of faith on which this course is based is that imitation is not merely the sincerest form of flattery, but also a good way to grow.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

ENGLISH 140 — First-Year Literary Seminar
Section 003, SEM
Contemporary American Poetry and "the Personal"

Instructor: White,Gillian Cahill

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem

In his introduction to Contemporary American Poetry, critic Alfred Poulin asserts that one of the most notable differences between modern and contemporary American poetry is that "the latter is more personal and intimate." He almost immediately withdraws the claim, arguing that poems can't ever really be personal, because they call attention to themselves as fabrications. In this seminar, we explore and test the limits of both Poulin's claims: What is it about (some) contemporary poems that justifies calling them "personal?" What does that word imply — private, truthful, shocking, sincere, bodily, emotional, beyond interpretation, testimonial? What ideas about writing, reading and experience does the question of a poem's personality assume? In order to answer these questions, we begin by considering a range of short writings from the disciplines of psychology, philosophy, and literary criticism that help us to sharpen our understanding of what is meant by "personal." We then move on to a range of contemporary poems to test the "personal" as a critical rubric. Likely readings include work by T.S. Eliot, Robert Lowell, Sylvia Plath, Frank Bidart, Rita Dove, Sigmund Freud, Michel Foucault, and Roland Barthes. Students write weekly two page response papers, which will form the basis of two longer essays for the course. Short presentations may also be assigned.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

ENVIRON 139 — First-Year Seminar in the Environment
Section 001, SEM
Footprints Across Time

Instructor: Low,Bobbi S; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ID
Other: FYSem

Today, we humans are more numerous than ever before — and we consume more per person than ever before. How did we get here, and what (if we wish) can we do about it? In this course, we will examine how humans have left their imprint — ‘footprints' — on the earth. We begin by calculating our individual ecological footprints: how many planets would it take for the human population if everyone lived as you, or I, do? Then we find a very general definition for "resources," one that does not depend on culture or modernity. Next, we will trace our pre-human and human ecological footprints across time. First, why do we care more about ourselves, our families and friends, and the here-and-now, than about distant strangers or the far future? What differences did it make that we tamed fire? That we invented agriculture, and that it spread around the globe? That we harnessed mechanical energy, and solved some major public health problems? We will find that each of these inventions or transitions allowed us to survive better, to raise families more successfully, and to consume ever more of the earth's resources. Today, we are one of millions of species, but we consume the vast majority of the earth's productivity, and have a huge impact on those other species. And even within our species, there are huge differences in wealth and resources. After our trek across time, we will ask: what can we do to be effective in reducing our human impact?

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

ENVIRON 139 — First-Year Seminar in the Environment
Section 002, SEM
Environmental Conflict: Science, Political, Social

Instructor: Wondolleck,Julia Marie; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ID
Other: FYSem

Environmental problems are a tangled web of scientific, political, historical, social, economic, legal and psychological factors. This seminar will unravel the complexity of the challenging world of environmental problems by examining several conflicts through these different disciplinary lenses. The conflict over reintroduction of wolves to the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, the global climate change debate, and the conflict between fishermen and scientists over New England's declining cod fishery will be examined in detail. Other current conflicts will be discussed including oil exploration in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, preservation of endangered grizzly bears and bowhead whales, and rock climbing disputes at Native American sacred sites.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

ENVIRON 139 — First-Year Seminar in the Environment
Section 020, SEM
Environment, Religions, Spirituality and Sustainability

Instructor: Crowfoot,James E

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ID
Other: FYSem

Inquiry into the fundamental changes occurring in the natural environment (including humans) and in human social systems and culture, to explore the question "To what extent, in what ways and why are current trends in human impacts on the environment and social relations unsustainable/sustainable? The seminar will introduce the major contrasting responses being made to this question along with their differing scenarios of the future in terms of their visions, strategies, and examples of practices to be pursued.

Learning resources will be selected from four types of information: (1) scientific, (2) religious/spiritual, (3) documentation of innovative environmental, social (including economic and political) and technological practices and (4) personal experiences and commitments. Religions to be considered include those of Native Americans and other indigenous peoples as well as world religions, e.g., Buddhism, Islam, Judaism, and Christianity. The consideration of spirituality is based on individuals' experiences and recognition of "sacred" or "ultimate" realities that are variously understood and characterized.

Students will be asked to engage in interdisciplinary, seminar based inquiry through reading and thinking critically, reflecting on and analyzing their own values, beliefs and practices, sharing the results of their own inquiries through discussions, writing, and presentations and by comparing and contrasting their own beliefs and ideas with others who have different backgrounds and current values, beliefs and goals.

It is expected that students enrolling in this seminar will have differing backgrounds of knowledge and experience in relation to the environment, science, religion/spirituality, and unsustainability/sustainability. Both students with religious commitments are welcome as well as students who are agnostics, atheists or who would describe themselves as secular humanists, skeptics, and "undecided" or by some other name for their highest values and related belief systems and practices. This opportunity for participatory inquiry will require enrolled students to engage in respectful dialogue along with acceptance of people with backgrounds and present commitments and beliefs that are different from their own.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

GEOSCI 145 — Evolution of the Earth
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Mukasa,Samuel B; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, NS
Other: FYSem

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GEOSCI 135. Those with credit for GEOSCI 115 may only elect GEOSCI 145 for 2 credits.

This seminar course is intended for first-year students with no previous knowledge of, or experience in, the earth sciences. The material introduces students to the history of the Earth from its formation in the solar nebula, through the development of the continents, oceans, atmosphere, and life to its present state as an active planet. The course explains how various features of the Earth 'work,' including continental drift, volcanoes, and the formation of most rocks; how theories are developed in geology; and how the magnitude of time has been determined. The course is divided into two halves. In the first half, the basic concepts are explained. In the second half, each student makes a presentation covering a relevant subject followed by discussion. Assessment is by two one-hour examinations and the oral presentation, which forms the basis for a term paper. Regular assigned readings from the course text book are essential. Enrollment is limited to first-year students only. Upperclassmen will not be allowed to register for the course.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students (including first-year students with sophomore standing) may pre-register for this course. All others need permission of instructor.

GEOSCI 146 — Plate Tectonics
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Ritsema,Jeroen; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, NS
Other: FYSem

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed three of GEOSCI 105, 107, and 205. Those with credit for one of GEOSCI 105 and 107 may only elect GEOSCI 146 for two credits. Those with credit for GEOSCI 205, or both GEOSCI 105 and 107, may only elect GEOSCI 146 for one credit.

Two hundred million years ago the Earth's continents were joined together to form one gigantic super-continent, called Pangea. Plate tectonic forces broke Pangea apart and caused the continents to drift. We study the evidence for plate tectonics and the large-scale dynamics of the Earth's interior that is responsible for mountain building, earthquakes faulting, volcanic eruptions, changes in Earth's magnetic field and much more.

The course involves three hours of weekly meeting time and selected reading material. No background in Earth science is necessary. Evaluation is based on class participation, three exams, a series of student presentations on selected topics and written essays on the same subject.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students (including first-year students with sophomore standing) may pre-register for this course. All others need permission of instructor.

GEOSCI 147 — Natural Hazards
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Kesler,Stephen E; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, NS
Other: FYSem

Credit Exclusions: Those with credit for GEOSCI 107 or 205 may only elect GEOSCI 147 for 2 credits. Those who have credit for both GEOSCI 107 and 205 may only elect 147 for 1 credit.

This first-year seminar examines the geologic origin, as well as economic and societal impact of natural hazards such as earthquakes, volcanoes, landslides, floods, tsunamis, climate change, and meteorite impacts through lectures, discussion, student presentations, and research projects.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students (including first-year students with sophomore standing) may pre-register for this course. All others need permission of instructor.

GEOSCI 148 — Seminar: Environmental Geology
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Ruff,Larry John; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, NS
Other: FYSem

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GEOSCI 284. Those with credit for GEOSCI 109 may only elect GEOSCI 148 for 2 credits.

This seminar will focus on a wide spectrum of possible interactions between people and their physical environment. Fundamental principles important to the study of environmental geology will be presented followed by readings of case histories and discussions of selected environmental problems, in particular those of anthropogenic origin. Examples of topics discussed include issues related to global warming, energy (fossil fuels, nuclear energy), water resources (impacts of excessive groundwater withdrawal, allocation of surface water rights), radioactive waste disposal, and geological aspects of environmental health.

Advisory Prerequisite: High school math and science. Only first-year students (including first-year students with sophomore standing) may pre-register for this course. All others need permission of instructor.

HISTART 194 — First Year Seminar
Section 001, SEM
Global Encounters: Asia and the World

Instructor: Sloan,Anna J

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem

The final years of the fifteenth century heralded a new era in the relationship between Asia and distant parts of the globe. The arrival of Vasco da Gama on the west coast of India in 1498 established direct contact between Europe and maritime Asia. It also initiated centuries of commercial, cultural, artistic and technological exchange. This course explores facets of that exchange, pursuing case studies in India, Southeast Asia, China and Japan. Readings, lectures, and student projects will address the varied nature of Asia's encounters with the Portuguese, Dutch, and British, and more recently with global modernity and post-modernity. Topics include cartography, exotica, gift exchange, diplomacy and protocol, trade, missionary activity, colonization, Orientalism, and the post-colonial condition. I.III.IV. 3,4

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

HISTORY 196 — First-Year Seminar
Section 001, SEM
Venezuela and the US in Historical Perspective

Instructor: Skurski,Julie A

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS
Other: FYSem

This course examines key moments in Venezuelan history from Simón Bolívar, independence hero, to Hugo Chávez, the current president and critic of the U.S. It examines how interactions with the U.S. have shaped Venezuelan nationalism and images of national culture. In particular, it focuses on issues of race, gender, political violence, the petroleum state, and religiosity, with an emphasis on the contemporary period. We will use film, novels, and the press, and students will present brief research projects.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

HISTORY 197 — First-Year Seminar
Section 001, SEM
Witchcraft in Russia

Instructor: Kivelson,Valerie Ann

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem

Many of the assumptions that we make about witches and witchcraft do not hold true in the Russian case. Unlike the western European cases, where witches were overwhelming imagined as female, in Russia, the vast majority of the accused were male. In the west, Satan and a satanic pact defined the essential nature of witchcraft, but in Russia the devil made little appearance in witchcraft cases. How can we explain these differences? What do the differences and similarities tell us about Russia and about witchcraft? We will analyze fairy tales, folk practices, miracle tales, contemporary descriptions and trials, and we will read several recent studies that offer thought-provoking analytical frameworks.

A new component of the course will be a unit on the understandings, justifications, and results of judicial torture in witch trials in Russia and the west, a subject with startling relevance in the world of today.

The course is conceived as a collective effort to puzzle out some of the fundamental problems and methods of comparative history. Students will have a chance to do original research and analysis.

The course requires no background in Russian history and is open to all interested first-year students.

Course Requirements:
The course will be a small discussion class, meeting twice a week. Requirements will include very short weekly response papers (2 pages), plus a longer (10 page) source-based paper due at the end of the semester. Students will be required to submit their longer papers in draft form and then to rewrite them incorporating editorial suggestions. Students will be expected to attend every class, to participate regularly, and to present results of their individual research to the class.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

HISTORY 197 — First-Year Seminar
Section 002, SEM
Writing Violence

Instructor: Mir,Farina

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: Honors, FYSem

In a world in which violence seems endemic — from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan (2003- and 2001-, respectively), "militia" violence in the Darfur region of Somalia (2003-), pogroms in Gujarat, India (2002), ethnic cleansing in Kosovo (1999), to genocide in Rwanda (1994) … — this course examines the ability of history, as a discipline, to represent violence. This course is concerned, in particular, with the limits of the existing historiography of violence, and gauges whether other disciplines or genres (specifically anthropology, literature, and film) have been more successful in capturing the multifaceted — and often elusive — causes of violence, and its impact on society.

While this course addresses a broad theme, it will focus, principally, on a single historical event: the partition of India in 1947. Due to this historical event, which accompanied India's independence from British colonial rule, some 12 million people migrated, 1 million people were killed, and perhaps as many as 75,000 women were victims of sexual violence. The study of the partition has produced a rich and diverse body of scholarship that helps address the broader theoretical questions about violence and history that this course engages.

This course has no prerequisites.

Evaluation in this course will be based on participation, two 3-4 page essays, and a final exam.

Required texts:
Gyanendra Pandey, Remembering Partition (Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 2002)

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

HISTORY 197 — First-Year Seminar
Section 004, SEM
Civil Rights and Black Power Era

Instructor: Gaines,Kevin K; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem

This course will investigate the gender contestation that lay just beneath the emphasis on Black unity and antiracist struggle in the movement activism and cultural production of the 1950s and 1960s. It is common knowledge that the fault lines of gender and sexuality were far more pronounced and prominent in Black public culture during the post-civil rights era than during the high tide of the Black freedom movement. In historicizing gender as a crucial aspect of discourses of Black identity and authenticity in the art, literature and politics of the Black freedom movement, we will re-examine that assumption. Our readings will help provide a contextualization and analysis of the uses of gender and sexuality in contemporary constructions of African American religion, popular culture and politics. Drawing on a range of printed sources and works of cultural production, including government documents, legal discourses, fiction, drama, periodicals, popular music, visual art, and dance, I hope to explore the centrality of gender and sexuality as a marker for racial authenticity, and as a predictable site for common sense "diagnoses" of antiBlack oppression and prescriptions for Black liberation.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

LING 102 — First Year Seminar (Humanities)
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Baxter, William H

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem

Much of our current knowledge of early civilizations is due to the deciphering of ancient scripts and languages, which requires an understanding of how scripts and languages work as well as a bit of luck. This course examines successful decipherments of the past (e.g., of Egyptian and of languages written in cuneiform scripts), recent breakthroughs (e.g., in deciphering Mesoamerican languages), and cases that remain unsolved. Hands-on exercises are based on real examples.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

LING 102 — First Year Seminar (Humanities)
Section 002, SEM

Instructor: Lawler,John M; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem

Designed to introduce entering students to the intellectual life of the university in a small course taught by an experienced member of the faculty. Topics vary according to the interests of the instructors. Whatever their subject matter, first-year seminars emphasize critical thinking through class discussion and regular practice in writing. Linguistics 102-104 differ only in their area distribution designation.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

MATH 128 — Explorations in Number Theory
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1
Other: FYSem

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed a 200- (or higher) level mathematics course (except for MATH 385 and 485)

Designed for non-science concentrators and students with no intended concentration who want to learn how to think mathematically without having to take calculus first. Students are introduced to the ideas of Number Theory through lectures and experimentation by using software to investigate numerical phenomena, and to make conjectures that they try to prove.

Advisory Prerequisite: High school mathematics through at least Analytic Geometry. Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

MATH 174 — Plane Geometry: An Introduction to Proofs
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1
Other: FYSem, Honors

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed a 200-level or higher Mathematics course.

This course introduces students to rigorous mathematical thinking, and writing proofs using plane geometry.

Background and Goals: The course will be very interactive, eliciting suggestions towards proof from the students so that all the problems are eventually solved by a joint effort between the students and the instructor. The format has worked well in the past for honors courses. To enhance the visualization, we plan to develop software for two-dimensional geometric constructions. This software will be able to produce multi-color pictures if geometric configurations. In the long run, such software will save us time in creating problem sets, handouts and perhaps slides. Additional topics may be added depending on the interest and abilities of the students.

Content: A good text for the course is already available: the classic "Geometry Revisited" by Coxter and Greitzer, which contains a wonderful exposition of the material and has suitable exercises. As a precursor to the mathematics, the course will use familiar games such as the old game Mastermind where player A has a code which player B has to use. Students will pair off and play the game, with the important additional feature that the guesser must write down what(s) he knows and can deduce after each guess, and therefore motivate his/her next guess. This should help set the mood and instill the idea of analyzing the facts at hand and making logical deductions. After this the course will develop some basic theorems of Euclidean geometry. An example of such a theorem is that the angle bisectors (or medians, or altitudes, or perpendicular bisectors) of a triangle are concurrent. These results are fairly straightforward but exemplify the spirit of the course by providing a good introduction to rigorous proofs, Then we move to some more difficult but beautiful theorems from geometry such as Ceva's theorem, the Euler line, the nine-point circle theorem, Ptolemy's theorem and Morley's theorem.

Alternatives: none

Subsequent Courses: none

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of Honors Advisor

MATH 175 — An Introduction to Cryptology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Petersen,Thomas Kyle

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1
Other: FYSem, Honors

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed a 200-level or higher Mathematics course.

Introduces students to the science of constructing and attacking secret codes. An important goal is to present the mathematical tools — from combinatorics, number theory, and probability — that underlie cryptologic methods.

Background and Goals: This course is an alternative to MATH 185 as an entry to the Honors sequence. Students are expected to have previous experience with the basic concepts and techniques of first-semester calculus. The course stresses discovery as a vehicle for learning. Students will be required to experiment throughout the course on a range of problems and will participate each semester in a group project. Grades will be based on homework and projects with a strong emphasis on homework. Personal computers will be a valuable experimental tool in this course and students will be asked to learn to program in either BASIC, PASCAL or FORTRAN.

Content: This course gives a historical introduction to Cryptology and introduces a number of mathematical ideas and results involved in the development and analysis of secret codes. The course begins with the study of permutation-based codes: substitutional ciphers, transpositional codes, and more complex polyalphabetic substitutions. The mathematical subjects treated in this section include enumeration, modular arithmetic and some elementary statistics. The subject then moves to bit stream encryption methods. These include block cipher schemes such as the Data Encryption Standard. The mathematical concepts introduced here are recurrence relations and some more advanced statistical results. The final part of the course is devoted to public key encryption, including Diffie-Hellman key exchange, RSA and Knapsack codes. The mathematical tools come from elementary number theory.

Alternatives: MATH 115 (Calculus I), MATH 185 (Honors Calculus I), or MATH 295 (Honors Mathematics I).

Subsequent Courses: MATH 176 (Dynamical Systems and Calculus), MATH 186 (Honors Calculus II), or MATH 116 (Calculus II).

Advisory Prerequisite: PER.DEPT.

PHIL 196 — First Year Seminar
Section 001, SEM

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem

This course is designed to provide first-year students with an intensive introduction to philosophy in a seminar format. The content varies, depending on the instructor.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

PHIL 196 — First Year Seminar
Section 002, SEM

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem

This course is designed to provide first-year students with an intensive introduction to philosophy in a seminar format. The content varies, depending on the instructor.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

PHIL 196 — First Year Seminar
Section 003, SEM

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem

This course is designed to provide first-year students with an intensive introduction to philosophy in a seminar format. The content varies, depending on the instructor.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

PHIL 196 — First Year Seminar
Section 004, SEM

Instructor: Lormand,Eric P; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem

Our discussions will center on the relationship between reason and emotion, their respective roles in determining our choices, actions, and the overall shape of our lives. Other classic philosophical questions having to do with the metaphysical relationship between mind and body, the nature and extent of scientific knowledge will be introduced in relation to this central question. Readings will be drawn from the works of Plato, Descartes, and contemporary philosophers.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

PHIL 196 — First Year Seminar
Section 005, SEM

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem

Humans are free. We are capable of free choice and action. When we act freely, nothing makes us do what we do, so we could have acted differently. Thus, if circumstances (like fear, pain, or oppression) compel or determine an act — so that one could not have acted differently — then it was not done freely.

The universe, on the other hand, follows the laws of nature. Causes produce their effects in strict accord with those laws. So every event is determined by its causes to occur precisely as it does, and it could not have occurred differently.

But humans are parts of the universe! So, every human choice and action is an event determined by its causes in accord with the laws of nature. Since it must therefore occur exactly as it does, in no case could one have chosen or acted other than as one did. So humans are not free.

Just a little thinking and we've put ourselves into a terrible bind. That's philosophy. The aim of the class is to get out of the bind, if we can, by re-examining these concepts and assumptions as carefully and rationally as possible. That too is philosophy. We'll read and discuss some of the most important modern work on these subjects by professional philosophers. There will also be reading quizzes, a midterm exam, two short papers, and a final.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

PHIL 196 — First Year Seminar
Section 006, SEM

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem

This course is designed to provide first-year students with an intensive introduction to philosophy in a seminar format. The content varies, depending on the instructor.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

PHYSICS 112 — Cosmology: The Science of the Universe
Section 001, SEM

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, NS
Other: FYSem

The course examines the conceptual foundations underlying our current scientific understanding of the origin and evolution of the universe. The subject is viewed through four astrophysical windows: the universe as a whole; galaxies; stars; and planets. We explore how these various settings provide the essential ingredients for the genesis of life. Finally we examine the evolution of scientific thought that enabled humans to develop an understanding of the universe around them.

Advisory Prerequisite: Although no science prerequisites are required, exposure to physics at high school level would be helpful. Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instruc

PSYCH 120 — First-Year Seminar in Psychology as a Social Science
Section 002, SEM
Twins and What They Teach Us About Identity, Genes, and Environment

Instructor: Perlmutter,Marion

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS
Other: FYSem

Throughout time and across cultures twins have been a source of special fascination, and recently as the rate of twining has increased, practical issues regarding twin's development demands greater attention. This seminar will examine the experience and lessons of twinship. We will review research on how being a twin, and how raising twins, affects twin's identity. We will also consider what these data, and the metaphor of twinship found in literature and film, teach us about identity, relationships, good vs. evil, life options, symmetry, and soul mates. The behavior genetics research involving twins to disentangle effects of heredity and environment will also be reviewed in order to gain an understanding of effects of nature and nurture in general.

The seminar will begin with an overview of the context of twining across time and culture. In particular in the variety of rates of twining and in beliefs about twins will be considered. We will then investigate how being conceived and experiencing each developmental milestone with another effects one's sense of self and identity. Finally, we will examine how scientists have utilized the natural variance in genes and environment between identical and fraternal twins, siblings, and nonrelated individuals who have been either raised together or apart to disentangle effects of nature and nurture on development and aging. By the end of the course students should have a better appreciation of the uniqueness of growing up as a twin, how this experience affects one's identity, and how twin development and aging illuminates development and aging in general. In addition, the ways in which both our genes and environment affect our biology, behavior, and thought will be elucidated.

The course involves a heavy workload and relies extensively on a course web site. All assignments are described on the web site and are to be submitted through it. The web site also contains topic outlines, links to relevant readings and research materials, and places for student discussion. It is essential that all students do reading and writing assignments before the class in which they are covered. Students also are expected to participate actively in class and web discussions. Class sessions will mostly involve student discussion, but will also include instructor lecture, group work, student presentations, and videos. Grades will be based on the number of points accumulated by completing assignments and exams and participating in class and web discussions.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

PSYCH 120 — First-Year Seminar in Psychology as a Social Science
Section 003, SEM
Law and Psychology

Instructor: Pachella,Robert G

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS
Other: Honors, FYSem

This seminar will study the relationship between law and psychology within a general framework. We will examine a number of real cases that have been covered by the popular press (e.g., the trial of Lorena Bobbitt) as well as some fictional accounts (e.g., Grisham's A Time to Kill) with regard to how the law defines the limits of personal responsibility. We will also discuss the psychological import of legal issues such as the insanity defense, and battered wife syndrome. Each student will write a weekly commentary as well as a "closing argument" that will be presented to the class for one of the cases under consideration.

(NOTE: Three hour session scheduled on Friday is designed to accommodate occasional showing of movies. Class session is usually less than two hours.)

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

PSYCH 120 — First-Year Seminar in Psychology as a Social Science
Section 004, SEM
Justice For All? Difference & Oppression in U.S. Society

Instructor: Gurin,Patricia Y

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: RE, SS
Other: FYSem

How do issues of race, intergroup relations, and social group identity impact possibilities for building community in a democratic society? Students will explore issues of civic engagement and community building in a democratic society, taking into account issues of power and celebration, conflict and coalition, differences and common ground. This course is part of a larger program called FIGS (First-year Interest GroupS).

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

PSYCH 120 — First-Year Seminar in Psychology as a Social Science
Section 005, SEM
Freedom, Identity and Alienation

Instructor: Pachella,Robert G

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS
Other: Honors, FYSem

The purpose of this seminar will be to explore the concepts of identity, alienation, and freedom as psychological and philosophical concepts. However, the orientation will be specific and applied to the normal situations and predicaments that college students experience. Questions to be considered: Surviving as an individual in a large and often impersonal university; living up to and/or dealing with the expectations of parents and teachers; questioning authority in the context of the classroom; trading-off career pressures and personal goals in setting educational priorities. Of special importance will be the examination of the sometimes frightening loss of a sense of identity that often accompanies significant alterations in life style, such as that experienced by students in the transition from high school to college, or later, in the transition from college to the "real world."

(NOTE: Three hour session scheduled on Thursday is designed to accommodate occasional showing of movies. Class session is usually less than two hours.)

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

PSYCH 120 — First-Year Seminar in Psychology as a Social Science
Section 006, SEM
Gender, Emotion, and the Self

Instructor: Grayson,Carla Elena

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS
Other: FYSem

This course will explore how gender influences construction of the self and how we understand our own and others' emotions. Taught from a social justice perspective, this class will explore psychologically, socially and morally complex issues surrounding gender identity, transsexualism, sexual orientation , and relationships. Students will examine their own beliefs and experiences as well as become familiar with basic controversies in this area.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

PSYCH 120 — First-Year Seminar in Psychology as a Social Science
Section 007, SEM
Understanding Leadership

Instructor: Wierba,Elizabeth E

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS
Other: FYSem

What does it mean to be an effective leader? What are the individual characteristics, behavior or circumstances that determine a leader's ability to mobilize others successfully? In this seminar we will explore these questions and others by studying several approaches to understanding leadership in organizational contexts. We will use real and fictional cases to examine leadership, and evaluate our own leadership skills and behaviors in class exercises and discussions

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

PSYCH 120 — First-Year Seminar in Psychology as a Social Science
Section 008, SEM
I, Too, Sing America: A Psychology of Race & Racism

Instructor: Behling,Charles F

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: RE, SS
Other: FYSem

Taking its title from the Langston Hughes poem, this seminar will explore psychological aspects of race, ethnicity, and other cultural differences in the United States. What are some of the opportunities and obstacles to our joining with Hughes in affirming, "They'll see how beautiful I am . . . I, too, sing America?" Topics include stereotyping, communication, cooperation, conflict, justice, and discrimination. What psychological theories address how individuals and groups might benefit most from life in pluralistic societies? What are some psychological dynamics of stereotyping? What are possible connections between various forms of discrimination, e.g. racism, sexism, homophobia, and anti-Semitism? (meets with CAAS 103.005)

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

PSYCH 121 — First-Year Seminar in Psychology as a Natural Science
Section 001, SEM
Doing Unto Others: The Origins of Good and Evil in the Human Mind and Brain

Instructor: Gehring,William J

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, NS
Other: FYSem

Why do people hurt each other? When do they choose good over evil? In this course, we will examine how violent, hurtful behavior and caring, empathic behavior both arise from the cognitive and emotional processes of the human brain. We will consider how these biological and psychological factors interact with an individual's social context and environment. Our discussions will include psychological, psychiatric, neurological, genetic, and evolutionary perspectives. Topics will include a wide range of evil and good, from individual acts of aggression and helping behavior to large-scale phenomena such as genocide.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

PSYCH 121 — First-Year Seminar in Psychology as a Natural Science
Section 002, SEM
Learning and Memory

Instructor: Baron,Scott P

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, NS
Other: FYSem

Students will be introduced to the fundamental concepts of learning and memory particularly as they relate to research in non-human animals.Classic texts and original papers will be read and reviewed. In-class exercises will also be employed to aid in students' understanding.Topics will include the history of the laboratory study of learning/memory, Pavlovian, and Skinnerian theories. In addition to class-room lectures and discussion, this class will also emphasize the development of scientific writing skills using both in-class and out-of-class assignments.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

PSYCH 121 — First-Year Seminar in Psychology as a Natural Science
Section 003, SEM
Relationships Between Humans and Other Animals

Instructor: Smuts,Barbara Boardman

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, NS
Other: FYSem

This seminar examines interactions and relationships between humans and other animals, especially mammals and birds. We begin by learning how animals such as chimpanzees, baboons, and wolves use sounds, body language, and facial expressions to communicate with each other and how, through such knowledge we, like Dr. Doolittle, can begin to "talk" to the animals. We'll explore real life examples of how scientists engage in mutual communication with wild animals (e.g. Jane Goodall's research on chimps and the instructor's work with baboons). We will also study specific relationships with captive animals, such as those between grizzly bears and their trainers, horses and their riders, and our own experiences with dogs, cats, etc. Through a series of short essays, in-class exercises, and a final paper on a topic of their choice, students will explore their personal relationships with animals as well as their attitudes about societal practices such as factory farming, circuses, zoos, and the use of animals in research experiments. We will also consider the imminent extinction of other species, such as chimpanzees and gorillas, as a result of human activities. Through case studies of successful conservation projects, we will learn how extinctions may be averted. Readings from a variety of sources will be available online; there is no textbook. Videos will be used extensively. We will meet a few animals in class and take a field trip to a local animal sanctuary.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

SLAVIC 151 — First Year Seminar
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Toman,Jindrich; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR
Other: FYSem

Designed to introduce entering students to aspects of culture in Eastern Europe, Russia and Eurasia by analyzing the complex processes which define "culture" and "ethnicity" in the areas where "West meets East." Topics vary according to the interests of the instructors. Whatever their subject matter, first-year seminars emphasize critical thinking through class discussions and thorough practice in introductory composition.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

SLAVIC 151 — First Year Seminar
Section 002, SEM

Instructor: Krutikov,Mikhail

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR
Other: FYSem

Designed to introduce entering students to aspects of culture in Eastern Europe, Russia and Eurasia by analyzing the complex processes which define "culture" and "ethnicity" in the areas where "West meets East." Topics vary according to the interests of the instructors. Whatever their subject matter, first-year seminars emphasize critical thinking through class discussions and thorough practice in introductory composition.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

SLAVIC 151 — First Year Seminar
Section 003, SEM

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR
Other: FYSem

Designed to introduce entering students to aspects of culture in Eastern Europe, Russia and Eurasia by analyzing the complex processes which define "culture" and "ethnicity" in the areas where "West meets East." Topics vary according to the interests of the instructors. Whatever their subject matter, first-year seminars emphasize critical thinking through class discussions and thorough practice in introductory composition.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

SOC 105 — First Year Seminar in Sociology
Section 001, SEM
Transforming America: Immigrants Then and Now

Instructor: Pedraza,Silvia

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: RE, SS
Other: FYSem

That America is a nation of immigrants is one of the most common yet truest statements. In this course we will survey a vast range of the American immigrant experience: that of the Irish, Germans, Jews, Italians, Blacks, Puerto Ricans, Mexicans, Cubans, Koreans, and Japanese. Immigration to America can be broadly understood as consisting of four major waves: the first one, that which consisted of Northwest Europeans who immigrated up to the mid-19th century; the second one, that which consisted of Southern and Eastern Europeans at the end of the 19th century and beginning of the 20th; the third one, the movement from the South to the North of Black Americans and Mexicans precipitated by two World Wars; and the fourth one, from 1965 on, is still ongoing in the present, of immigrants mostly from Latin America and Asia. At all times, our effort will be to understand the immigrant past of these ethnic groups, both for what it tells us about the past as well as their present and possible future.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

SOC 105 — First Year Seminar in Sociology
Section 002, SEM
Diversity,Democracy,Community

Instructor: Schoem,David

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: RE, SS
Other: FYSem

How do we develop the practice of civic engagement along with the skills of boundary-crossing in order to build a strong democracy comprised of people with perspectives and viewpoints that differ from our own? This seminar explores a wide range of issues on social identity and intergroup relations, notions of community, and everyday politics and democracy. It examines the possibilities for building community across race, gender, and class as students explore their own racial and social group identities.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

SOC 105 — First Year Seminar in Sociology
Section 003, SEM
"Class", "Race," "Gender," and Modernity

Instructor: Paige,Jeffery M

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS
Other: FYSem

An introduction to the sociological study of inequality through an analysis of three of its fundamental dimensions — class, race and gender. The course will explore how each of the three dimensions of inequality is related to the development of modern capitalist society as described by Marx and Weber. The course will provide an introduction to basic concepts in class analysis, to contemporary issues in feminist theories of gender, and to recent work on the social construction of race. It will also trace both the similarities and differences among the three dimensions, their relationship to one another and to the underlying dynamics of capitalist modernity.

Texts include Barbara Ehrenreich, Nickel and Dimed: On (Not) Getting Buy in America; Richard Feldman and Michale Beltzold, End of the Line: Autoworkers and the American Dream; Susan Kessler and Wendy McKenna, Gender: An Ethnomethodological Approach; Oyeronke, Oyewumi, The Invention of Women; Joe Feagin and Melvin Sikes, Living with Racism: The Black Middle Class Experience; Ron Takaki, Iron Cages: Race and Culture in Nineteenth Century America, as well as selected readings from Marx and Weber.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

UC 150 — First-Year Humanities Seminar
Section 001, SEM
Music in Our Lives

Instructor: Nagel,Louis B

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem

This seminar will focus on how people listen to music and music's impact on communities of people who listen to it. In the first weeks of the course, students will learn how to listen to music and explore the interaction of different elements of music, such as rhythm, melody, and harmony. As we begin to listen to a wider range of music, we will explore the impact of music in cases such as the Paris riot of 1913 following the performance of Stravinsky's "Rite of Spring" or the reaction of King George to the "Hallelujah Chorus" at the conclusion of Handel's "Messiah." We will consider the impact of popular music, religious music, and the band as examples of how music has reached out into all types of communities. Students will attend three musical events and write reviews of each based on concepts explored in class. The professor will present and perform numerous examples of music on the piano, there will be invited soloists and chamber ensembles, and students who wish may share their musical talents in class.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

UC 151 — First-Year Social Science Seminar
Section 002, SEM
Human Sexuality, Gender Issues

Instructor: Mayes,Frances L

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS
Other: FYSem

Issues of human sexuality and gender are explored from many perspectives including historical, cross-cultural, religious, and physiological. All people are sexual throughout their lives, although the expression of our sex and gender is one of the most diverse and controversial areas in personal and public arenas. The diversities of biological sex, gender identity, gender roles, sexual orientation, sexual identity, and sexual behavior and the interplay among them are presented and reinforced through readings, exercises, videos, guest speakers, and weekly written assignments. We will discuss sexual difficulties such as infertility, STDs, sexual dysfunction, and sexual victimization along with prevention and treatment strategies. We will examine social and political issues such as civil rights for sexual minorities, sex and the law, date rape, pornography, the impact of AIDS, public and private morality.

Issues especially relevant for students are explored, including:

  • choice of sexual partners and behaviors
  • the influence of drugs, alcohol, and smoking on sexual function and sexual decision-making
  • sexual values and religious attitudes toward sex, and
  • the wide range of possible lifestyles from celibacy to polyamory to paraphilias.

The course requires access to the Internet and uses a variety of Web-based resources and communication modes, as well as a textbook and readings from various journals. Weekly short papers and a semester project are required. Opportunities for help with developing presentation skills are available.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

UC 151 — First-Year Social Science Seminar
Section 003, SEM
Medicine&the Media

Instructor: Hobbs,Raymond

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS
Other: FYSem

We study the development of medicine as a science and how the perception of it has been changed through the media. Students explore their own beliefs about medicine through literature such as The House of God, The Intern Blues, The Double Helix and movies and television series such as the Story of Louis Pasteur, The Hospital, Medic, Ben Casey, Marcus Welby, M.D., ER, and Saint Elsewhere, as well as more recent offerings such as John Q, House, and Grey's Anatomy. Much of the course focuses on the discussion of ethical issues and the crystallization of students' own beliefs about medicine in the 20th century.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

UC 151 — First-Year Social Science Seminar
Section 004, SEM
Schools, Community, Power

Instructor: Galura,Joseph A

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS
Other: FYSem

This is a service-learning course that integrates traditional coursework with personal reflection and community involvement. The goal of the course is to explore the dynamics of formal and informal education in urban settings. This course will help university students to understand the effects of social history and culture on the social identity of young children and how community members, especially elders, help to create and support positive roles for young children within this community. Students work closely with members of the community and program staff to document cultural beliefs and practices that help to shape social identity and social expectations within the community.

As a requirement for the course, students complete five hours of service each week in the Detroit public school system to develop practical service-learning models. Assisting educators in implementing these developed programs will give students the opportunity to put into practice the theory of service-learning.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

UC 151 — First-Year Social Science Seminar
Section 005, SEM
Science and Practice of Dentistry

Instructor: Taichman,Russell S

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS
Other: FYSem

Students will examine the development of dentistry from its origins to its present status as a scientifically-driven health care discipline. Students will evaluate critically how science has influenced the development of dentistry as a discipline for the past century and explore how emerging scientific disciplines are likely to change the practice of dentistry in the next millennium.

Please attend every session if possible. If you are unable to attend a class, please email me beforehand. This is not a lecture course with a final written exam. Students will be expected to participate in class discussions, ask questions, and offer opinions.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

UC 151 — First-Year Social Science Seminar
Section 008, SEM
Becoming a Doctor: More Than Science

Instructor: Rosenthal,Marilynn M

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS
Other: FYSem

There will be two texts, group projects in the form of "Journal Clubs," and an individual book review in both written and oral form. Journal Clubs are an important part of the continuing education of medical professionals. Journal clubs meet regularly to discuss current studies on subjects of mutual interest. The class will divide into JCs to explore various aspects of medical school. This project would accomplish several goals: help you build your group participation skills, develop web skills and increase your practical, current knowledge of medical schools. In addition, this project will introduce you to a wide range of information sources. The Clubs can decide specific topics, such as: how medical schools differ; the admissions process; trends in medical education; what undergraduate majors are possible; patterns in specialty choice; getting a residency; and staying balanced in medical school. Each Journal Club will make a group presentation to the seminar. Each student will choose an individual book that is an autobiography of a medical student or a physician. (Other kinds of book are possible.) The student will make a presentation to the seminar, discussing the themes of the book and what insights it provides, as well as submit a review of the book covering these topics.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

UC 154 — First-Year Interdisciplinary Seminar
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Burdi,Alphonse R

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ID
Other: FYSem

Indeed this is the age of scientific discovery! With each passing day, knowledge in the life sciences is increasing exponentially in many areas, including stem cell biology, patterns of birth defects, and the phenomena of aging, dying and death. This new information, while important to human health, surfaces the complex and intertwining issues of ethics and values that will be of special consideration in this seminar. Each of the daily learning modules and projects in this seminar is designed to expand our current thinking about the intersect between world of scientific discovery and its impact on human health and society.

Biological Perspectives. The plan of the human body can serve as a keystone as we probe the interplay of genes, cells, morphogenesis, and the environment in which we live. A myriad of biological advances could be considered, but three exciting topics especially jump out:

  1. Birth defects and population patterns
  2. Phenomena of aging, dying, and death
  3. Immensely provocative "stem cells"

This last topic alone opens up a world of biological concepts and principles that can influence our understanding of how the human body — your human body — is shaped prior to birth and throughout life. Thus, "life inside the box."

Ethical and Societal Perspectives. However stimulating "life inside the box" may be, that is not the whole story! In the excitement of so many dramatic scientific advances over the last ten years, efforts to understand the ethical implications have not kept pace. It is vital that researchers and clinicians be aware of and sensitive to the legal, cultural, and societal issues spawned by their work. What principles and policies should be in place to guide further research and application of such discoveries? Answering this question focuses our attention on those environmental events occurring outside biology laboratories and outside our own human bodies, i.e., "life outside the box."

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

WOMENSTD 150 — Humanities Seminars on Women and Gender
Section 001, SEM
Who can be Human? Rethinking Human Rights, Humanitarianism and Social Justice

Instructor: Ticktin,Miriam I

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem

  • What does it mean to be human?
  • Does it mean one has a right to dignity? To equality? To housing, education, and a job? To be free from racial discrimination, or sexual harassment?

This class will explore how being human grounds struggles for social justice, including human rights and humanitarianism. While the French and American revolutions changed the way societies were understood and organized, instituting systems based on freedom and equality for all, we will ask how this plays out today: how recognizing "humanity" both allows for equality between people, and for new forms of discrimination.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

WOMENSTD 151 — Social Science Seminars on Women and Gender
Section 001, SEM
Gender, Population and Development

Instructor: Fadlalla,Amal Hassan

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS
Other: FYSem

This course examines the discourses and practices of development and population control targeting non-western countries. The course situates these discourses and practices in histories of colonial encounters, international politics, and global relations of power and inequalities. We will survey a diverse range of debates among the critics of population and development policies and projects in order to see how such debates have succeeded or failed in altering hegemonic approaches to development with new approaches that attend to peoples' histories, social locations, and health and human rights. The course will analyze these discourses and practices with reference to local politics and realities of uneven development that produce gender, class, and ethnic disparities. Although the course material focuses on non-western countries, Africa in particular, we will also look at some examples of how these discourses are projected on poor communities elsewhere including the U.S. The course also aims at introducing students to the methodologies of doing research in the social sciences, for instance students will do group projects on either the case of Katrina-New Orleans or the Darfur conflict, Western Sudan as research topics for their final papers.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

 
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