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LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Fall 2007, Reqs = IC
 
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Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
CLCIV 101 — Classical Civilization I: The Ancient Greek World (in English)
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Acosta-Hughes,Benjamin B

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR
Other: WorldLit

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GTBOOKS 191 or 201.

How did the Greeks come to invent the first democracy?
Why did the freedom-loving Greeks condone slavery?
Why was the god Dionysus so important to Greek culture

This course is an introduction to the history and culture of this fascinating but paradoxical civilization. We will laugh with the ancient comedians and think with the ancient philosophers. We will also confront the contradictions of this complex society. There will be approximately 75-100 pages of reading per week, two short projects (for example, a presentation and a short paper), a midterm and a final examination. No previous knowledge is required.

Advisory Prerequisite: FR./SO./PER.

COMPLIT 122 — Writing World Literatures
Section 001, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

An intensive writing course focusing on multiple translations of works, asking students to consider how these translation reflect different cultural times and milieu as well as choices in language. Students work intensely with issues of composition, argument, and source material related to the creative texts.

COMPLIT 122 — Writing World Literatures
Section 002, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

An intensive writing course focusing on multiple translations of works, asking students to consider how these translation reflect different cultural times and milieu as well as choices in language. Students work intensely with issues of composition, argument, and source material related to the creative texts.

COMPLIT 122 — Writing World Literatures
Section 003, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

An intensive writing course focusing on multiple translations of works, asking students to consider how these translation reflect different cultural times and milieu as well as choices in language. Students work intensely with issues of composition, argument, and source material related to the creative texts.

COMPLIT 122 — Writing World Literatures
Section 004, REC

Instructor: Merrill,Christi Ann; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

An intensive writing course focusing on multiple translations of works, asking students to consider how these translation reflect different cultural times and milieu as well as choices in language. Students work intensely with issues of composition, argument, and source material related to the creative texts.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 001, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This course studies the intersection between critical thinking and persuasive writing, and, using literary texts as the point of reference, takes as its goal the development of the student's skill at writing cogent expository and argumentative prose.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 002, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This section of English 124 will focus on the construction of childhood and adolescence in literature. To this end, we will explore works "for" young adults –Harry Potter, Anne of Green Gables — as well as literary works "for" adults that depict key moments in adolescent development. Examples of the latter may include works by J.D. Salinger, Carson McCullers, Toni Morrison, and others.

In addition to its thematic and personal importance, our attention to the construction of adolescence in fiction is designed to heighten our awareness of language and audience. Is youth portrayed differently in works *for* youth, as opposed to works merely *about* youth? How might the depictions change if we investigate works by young authors? What is the relationship between the writing style of these works and the topics they portray?

While these literary concerns will be at stake throughout the course, English 124 is designed fundamentally as a writing course. Emphasis will be placed on the thesis-centered persuasive paper that uses literary analysis. Other assignments may include descriptive papers, peer evaluations, exploratory essays, personal response papers, creative response papers, argumentative essays, and research/citation/bibliographic papers.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 003, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This course studies the intersection between critical thinking and persuasive writing, and, using literary texts as the point of reference, takes as its goal the development of the student's skill at writing cogent expository and argumentative prose.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 004, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

In this course we will examine a range of texts — poetry, short stories, philosophy, and psychology — written between the years 1887-1945 to investigate the literary period that has come to be known as "modernism." We will focus on the tension inherent in the modernist impulse to use materials from the past in order, as Ezra Pound puts it, to "make it new." How do these allusive yet iconoclastic texts dismantle the distinction between writer and reader? How do the modernists represent authorial identity and individual identity? What happens to character and the lyric "I" in modernist fiction and poetry? What theory of the "self" does modernist psychology construct? What problems do modernist texts — which not only appropriate prior material, but also often involve extensive collaboration between a writer and an editor — pose to our understanding of authorship and identity?

Assigned readings will include selections from Nietzsche, Freud, Virginia Woolf's polemical treatment of the relationship between gender and authority in *A Room of One's Own*, the manuscript and published versions of T.S. Eliot's poem *The Waste Land* (to which the poet Ezra Pound made extensive revisions), essays by Eliot and Pound, short stories by James Joyce and Gertrude Stein, and poems and essays by Marianne Moore, H.D., Mina Loy, W.H. Auden, and others.

As we explore how the modernists borrowed from and challenged their literary predecessors, you, too, will learn to engage literature through your own writing. This intensive introduction to composition will help you develop the tools to understand books by writing about them. You will write short responses to your reading in preparation for each class, and I will assign in-class writing assignments from time to time. You will submit four formal essays over the course of the semester (4-6 pp.). Self-assessment and peer critique will comprise a substantial part of the course: you will revise and expand one of your essays (6-8 pp.) through class workshops.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 005, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This course studies the intersection between critical thinking and persuasive writing, and, using literary texts as the point of reference, takes as its goal the development of the student's skill at writing cogent expository and argumentative prose.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 006, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This course studies the intersection between critical thinking and persuasive writing, and, using literary texts as the point of reference, takes as its goal the development of the student's skill at writing cogent expository and argumentative prose.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 007, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This course studies the intersection between critical thinking and persuasive writing, and, using literary texts as the point of reference, takes as its goal the development of the student's skill at writing cogent expository and argumentative prose.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 008, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This is an introduction to college composition using as its focus for discussion and writing 20th (and 21st) century American literature of war. If war heightens our own human dramas, highlighting our capacity for good and evil, heroism and humiliation, what can we learn about ourselves from reading remarkable works of war literature? What are the clichés of war (such as those used in the preceding sentence) and how do clichés about "the other" or about war or masculinity or patriotism function? Is it possible to formulate ideas of good and evil, heroism and humiliation that go beyond their movie-worn versions? For example, since war entails killing, how must we think about other people before we — you and I (let's be personal here) — can kill them? What makes a person into an enemy? What makes us into people capable of killing? Is war gendered? Why is war so often associated with masculinity and what are the nature and implications of the association?

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 009, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This course studies the intersection between critical thinking and persuasive writing, and, using literary texts as the point of reference, takes as its goal the development of the student's skill at writing cogent expository and argumentative prose.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 010, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This course studies the intersection between critical thinking and persuasive writing, and, using literary texts as the point of reference, takes as its goal the development of the student's skill at writing cogent expository and argumentative prose.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 011, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This course will look at how writers of the last sixty years have interpreted and re-imagined history through the lens of fiction. More specifically, we will look at "magic realism," a genre of literature that incorporates elements of folklore, surrealism, fantasy, and the grotesque, while also being wedded to the realities and problems of history. How might works of magic realist fiction engage, subvert or reinscribe official "textbook" histories, which have silenced certain marginalized voices? How might a narrative that suspends reality from its historical moorings, actually allow us to understand better the past and our present? Readings may include works by Alejo Carpentier, Toni Morrison, Emile Habiby, Mahasweta Devi, Bertolt Brecht, Gü nter Grass, Walter Benjamin, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, and Salman Rushdie. This course will require a substantial amount of reading, including both fictional and historical material, as well as writing: four 3-5 page essays, including the revision and expansion of one of these into a 6-7 page paper.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 012, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This course studies the intersection between critical thinking and persuasive writing, and, using literary texts as the point of reference, takes as its goal the development of the student's skill at writing cogent expository and argumentative prose.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 013, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This course studies the intersection between critical thinking and persuasive writing, and, using literary texts as the point of reference, takes as its goal the development of the student's skill at writing cogent expository and argumentative prose.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 014, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This writing course focuses on the creation of complex, analytical, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. Students work closely with their peers and the instructor to develop their written prose. Readings cover a variety of different genres, with a primary focus on literary texts.

This section will focus on place: how we observe and inhabit it, what meaning setting can convey in fiction, how poets bring us to other places in their pointillistic ways. Come prepared to explore ideas about buildings, language, Ann Arbor, and wild and urbanized landscapes of all kinds.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 015, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

The notion of travel is a rich and varied subject used by many writers in all genres of literature. In this class, we will be using the overarching theme of travel as an opportunity for each of you to develop your individual voices as writers while developing essay-writing skills in a variety of styles to help meet your college writing needs. To accomplish these skills, we will engage with an assortment of travel essays, fictional accounts of characters who travel, and poems about journeys, which we will then discuss in terms of style and content. Reading and writing themselves can also be acts of traveling and we will pay attention to these metaphorical notions of journeying as well.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 016, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This course studies the intersection between critical thinking and persuasive writing, and, using literary texts as the point of reference, takes as its goal the development of the student's skill at writing cogent expository and argumentative prose.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 017, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

The notion of travel is a rich and varied subject used by many writers in all genres of literature. In this class, we will be using the overarching theme of travel as an opportunity for each of you to develop your individual voices as writers while developing essay-writing skills in a variety of styles to help meet your college writing needs. To accomplish these skills, we will engage with an assortment of travel essays, fictional accounts of characters who travel, and poems about journeys, which we will then discuss in terms of style and content. Reading and writing themselves can also be acts of traveling and we will pay attention to these metaphorical notions of journeying as well.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 018, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

In this course, we will be reading literature written by women that provocatively addresses issues of women's lives. Throughout the term, we will be discussing and analyzing such topics as sexuality, body image, family, the politics of gender, and how ethnic, religious and other identities affect women's lives. We will be developing academic writing skills through the framework of these texts, and you will be producing four essays ranging from autobiographical writing to critical analyses of particular literary texts. Texts will include a short novel, short stories, non-fiction essays, and poetry.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 019, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This writing course, "Diversity and American Literature" focuses on the creation of complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. Students work closely with their peers and the professor to develop their written prose. Readings cover a variety of different genres, with a primary focus on literary texts. This course, "Diversity and American Literature," is designed to hone your critical thinking and writing skills and to accustom you to thinking about writing as a multi-step process.

Together we will explore poems, short stories, plays, and films that offer diverse perspectives on what it means to be "American." In class discussion and written assignments, we will contemplate how gender, race, class, and sexuality shape understandings of Americanness at different historical moments.

You will complete rough and final drafts of several essays that you workshop with a peer group, as well as a number of shorter writings to be assigned throughout the term. Your essays will yield a total of 20-30 pages of polished prose by the end of the semester; in addition, you will submit some form of writing each week. Put simply, to become a better writer, you must do quite a lot of writing.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 020, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This course studies the intersection between critical thinking and persuasive writing, and, using literary texts as the point of reference, takes as its goal the development of the student's skill at writing cogent expository and argumentative prose.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 021, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This course studies the intersection between critical thinking and persuasive writing, and, using literary texts as the point of reference, takes as its goal the development of the student's skill at writing cogent expository and argumentative prose.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 022, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This section of English 124 will focus on the construction of childhood and adolescence in literature. To this end, we will explore works "for" young adults –Harry Potter, Anne of Green Gables — as well as literary works "for" adults that depict key moments in adolescent development. Examples of the latter may include works by J.D. Salinger, Carson McCullers, Toni Morrison, and others.

In addition to its thematic and personal importance, our attention to the construction of adolescence in fiction is designed to heighten our awareness of language and audience. Is youth portrayed differently in works *for* youth, as opposed to works merely *about* youth? How might the depictions change if we investigate works by young authors? What is the relationship between the writing style of these works and the topics they portray?

While these literary concerns will be at stake throughout the course, English 124 is designed fundamentally as a writing course. Emphasis will be placed on the thesis-centered persuasive paper that uses literary analysis. Other assignments may include descriptive papers, peer evaluations, exploratory essays, personal response papers, creative response papers, argumentative essays, and research/citation/bibliographic papers.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 023, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This course studies the intersection between critical thinking and persuasive writing, and, using literary texts as the point of reference, takes as its goal the development of the student's skill at writing cogent expository and argumentative prose.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 024, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

New York, San Francisco, Los Angeles, Minneapolis, Detroit, Santa Fe, Seattle, Miami, Atlanta, Houston, Tulsa, Denver — these simple words call up complex associations and emotions. In this course, we'll be exploring that provoking modern space — the American city. Our reading will examine cities across the United States and sample from a number of genres and historical eras. The breadth of this material will allow you to consider the many ways a writer may choose to tackle a similar subject. Our syllabus may include such works as Allen Ginsberg's "Howl," Edgar Allen Poe's "Man of the Crowd," N.W.A.'s "Straight Outta Compton," Edwidge Danticat's "New York Day Woman," op-ed articles from newspapers, Chester Himes' If He Hollers, Let Him Go, and Eudora Welty's "Curtain of Green," among others.

The focus of this course is your own writing. You will craft short weekly response papers, and we will take time in class to write. You will submit two formal essays (3-5 pages), one of which you will develop into a final paper (6-7 pages) through peer review and workshops. The primary goal of this course is to help you develop a set of strategies for approaching and understanding the critical writing required at the university level.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 025, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This writing course focuses on examining contemporary culture through reading, discussing, and analyzing various texts (both literature and film). We will read and discuss a half dozen or so short stories, at least two novels (Chuck Palahniuk's FIGHT CLUB and Don DeLillo's WHITE NOISE) and at least three films. This is a writing-intensive course and in addition to short written responses to EACH of the readings, you will be expected to write and revise three analytical papers on topics of your choice.

The primary goal of this course is to help you learn to write clear, compelling, and sophisticated prose. We will develop these skills through a range of methods: readings, discussions, writing exercises, peer critiques, and responses to other forms of expression such as media, visual art, music, and film. Because writing is an organized way of thinking, our engagement with the subject matter will be focused primarily on issues of style, craft, and execution.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 026, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This course studies the intersection between critical thinking and persuasive writing, and, using literary texts as the point of reference, takes as its goal the development of the student's skill at writing cogent expository and argumentative prose.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 027, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This course studies the intersection between critical thinking and persuasive writing, and, using literary texts as the point of reference, takes as its goal the development of the student's skill at writing cogent expository and argumentative prose.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 028, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This course studies the intersection between critical thinking and persuasive writing, and, using literary texts as the point of reference, takes as its goal the development of the student's skill at writing cogent expository and argumentative prose.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 029, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

In this course we sharpen our writing skills as we discuss and think about representations of the American Road Trip in literature, art, film, music and journalism. Who goes on Road Trips and why? How do Road Trips open our eyes to diverse people and experiences within our own country? What types of writing and representation result from road trips? Is there an "American Road Trip Aesthetic?" Are there specific politics and social responsibilities attached to the American Road Trip? Have you gone on a good Road Trip? We consider all of these questions about the genre of the American Road Trip in conjunction with some disciplined work on writing skills.

Students can expect to come away equipped to write at a college level especially in the Humanities and related fields. We focus on developing a strong writer's voice, mastering written grammar, organizing clear, insightful essays and revising drafts thoroughly and productively. Much of the course will be devoted to collaboration with classmates in peer workshopping sessions. By the end of the term each student will produce no less than 20 pages of polished prose.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 030, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

From celebrity tell-alls, autobiography fads, Sunday confessions to psychotherapy, there seems to be, in us, a desire to tell our own stories, as a form of self-understanding — a form of self-disclosure and self-discovery. Literature has always been a hotbed of this practice, and in this course, we will read a selection of "confessional" literature across genres and time periods, such as "confessional" poetry of the 20th century (Plath, Sexton), classic fictional autobiographies (Dostoevsky's Notes from the Underground), and contemporary American personal essays (Grealy, Ehrlich); we will examine the urges behind confession in these works and explore the ideas and life experiences that form and inform the interiority of an individual and of humanity. Some of the questions we'll ponder over the course of the semester include: where does our desire for self-disclosure come from? How does self-disclosure lead to self-discovery — how are the two related to one another? And what does it mean to "discover" oneself?

The writing assignments for this course will entail the standard English 124 requirement (roughly four papers of about 5-7 pages), along with short informal writings and journal assignments in response to the assigned readings, in which you may, if you wish, do a bit of your own "confession." We will guide ourselves through the process of writing as an act of discovery in itself — exploring meaning in the making, analyzing our thoughts in action — and learn to become independent writers through extensive workshops and revisions.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 031, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

In Western culture, we often think of the "self" as a separate, distinct thing of its own. But in this class, we'll try to think about the fact that each "self" is bound up with lots of other "selves" — mothers, fathers, brothers, sisters, lovers, friends, enemies. This semester, we will be trying to answer the question: To what extent does our identity depend on our relationships with all the people that matter in our lives, for good or ill (or, more likely, both)? We'll read short stories by James Joyce, Tillie Olsen, William Faulkner, and Charlotte Gilman, poetry by Walt Whitman, Robert Haydn, William Blake, e.e. cummings, and William Wordsworth, and a novel, _Mama Day_, by Gloria Naylor as we analyze and explore the ways identities are built from relationships of all kinds. And, most importantly, we will be writing; this is a serious writing class, with four carefully revised papers and multiple shorter writing assignments. You will have the opportunity to think closely about your own writing process, while learning to write complex, analytic, persuasive arguments about literature.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 032, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This is an introduction to college composition using as its focus for discussion and writing 20th (and 21st) century American literature of war. If war heightens our own human dramas, highlighting our capacity for good and evil, heroism and humiliation, what can we learn about ourselves from reading remarkable works of war literature? What are the clichés of war (such as those used in the preceding sentence) and how do clichés about "the other" or about war or masculinity or patriotism function? Is it possible to formulate ideas of good and evil, heroism and humiliation that go beyond their movie-worn versions? For example, since war entails killing, how must we think about other people before we — you and I (let's be personal here) — can kill them? What makes a person into an enemy? What makes us into people capable of killing? Is war gendered? Why is war so often associated with masculinity and what are the nature and implications of the association?

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 033, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This course studies the intersection between critical thinking and persuasive writing, and, using literary texts as the point of reference, takes as its goal the development of the student's skill at writing cogent expository and argumentative prose.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 034, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

Each day we come across a wide variety of images — advertisements in magazines, comics in the newspaper, paintings in the art museum, snapshots of our friends and families — images that make us buy things, feel a certain way, or remember certain events. In this section of ENGLISH 124 we will be reading and writing about works of literature that deal with looking at visual images. How does a poet write about the Mona Lisa? What does a Marxist have to say on advertising? Why do two of the writers we will read in this class represent a painting as killing the subject it depicts? We will be reading poems by William Wordsworth, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Edith Wharton, Charles Baudelaire, and W.H Auden, as well as a story by Edgar Allan Poe and Oscar Wilde's The Picture of Dorian Gray.. We will talk about what images communicate to these writers, and how they write what they see. To guide our readings of these works, we will also be looking at two non-fiction pieces: John Berger's Ways of Seeing and Mark Doty's Still Life with Oysters and Lemon.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 035, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This course studies the intersection between critical thinking and persuasive writing, and, using literary texts as the point of reference, takes as its goal the development of the student's skill at writing cogent expository and argumentative prose.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 036, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

In this course we will examine how writers have represented the human mind in all its complexity. We will think about how words are capable (or incapable) of capturing thought, and consider how literary language is uniquely suited to psychological exploration. We will also ask how literature not only represents the mind, but shapes it, as well; that is, how literature affects our personal patterns of thinking.

In order to answer these questions, we will read psychologically-complex works by authors that are likely to include Freud, Hemingway, and Flannery O'Connor. We will also study two longer works: Shakespeare's Othello and Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment.

This course will also focus on helping you represent your own complex thoughts in writing. Our primary goal will be to help you develop the analytical and stylistic skills that are fundamentally important to the college-level writer. We will be thinking together about how to approach each step of the writing process, from initial questions and observations of a text to the revision of your work. With devotion and effort, you will leave the course equipped to compose insightful and well-constructed essays.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 037, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This course studies the intersection between critical thinking and persuasive writing, and, using literary texts as the point of reference, takes as its goal the development of the student's skill at writing cogent expository and argumentative prose.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 038, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

The primary purpose of this course is to develop and refine each student's analytic and writing skills in preparation for the challenges of academic life at the University. In addition to general readings on the writing process, this section of English 124 will utilize the literature of immigration from various periods of American history to explore form, voice, structure, and to analyze the elements of compelling writing. Immigration is central to the American experience and the current debate over the topic spans across political, cultural, social, economic, and philosophical concerns. Readings will include stories, narratives and essays on immigration from the early settlers of "The New World" to the present day national discussion of immigration. This is not a course on current affairs although the timeliness of the subject matter should help inspire our thoughts, discussions, and writing.

Students will work with the instructor, small groups, and in open class discussion to produce 4 polished essays by the end of the semester. Students will be asked to write regularly both in and out of class to produce: reading summaries/responses, discussion questions, peer critiques, and in-class timed writing.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 039, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This course studies the intersection between critical thinking and persuasive writing, and, using literary texts as the point of reference, takes as its goal the development of the student's skill at writing cogent expository and argumentative prose.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 040, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

Tenements, factories, the stock market, crime, telephones, railroads, electricity, museums, newspapers, photography, department stores, and automobiles: how did American writers experience and describe these now-familiar elements of our society for the first time? The period of 1880-1920 in America was one of incredible technological, economic and social change, and writers like Stephen Crane, Edith Wharton, Frank Norris and Theodore Dreiser depicted these changes with a vivid urgency. Some of these writers sought to expose the social problems of modern urban life; some praised the new opportunities it offered, and some did both. Yet despite their varying attitudes toward modernity, all of these writers shared an interest in portraying its ordinary, nitty-gritty details in an accurate and life-like manner. What can investigating these literary efforts to provide accurate portrayals of the modernization of American life during the early part of the 20th century teach us about reading critically and writing persuasively?

Despite any appearances or claims of accuracy and objectivity, each of the works we will be studying is a human creation, crafted and constructed not only by observation, but also by the imagination and logic of a writer. In this course, you will be called upon to interrogate these constructions of reality with your own writing. Throughout the course, we will focus on helping you find and develop your voice as an academic writer. In order to do this, you will be engaged in various kinds of writing throughout the term. You will keep a reading journal, tracking your notes, observations and ideas about the texts we read and our class discussions; you will also be writing three short essays (4-6 pages). For each of these essays, you will receive feedback from me and from your classmates at various stages of the writing process. We will focus on "macro" concepts like developing strong overall arguments and using textual evidence effectively, but we will also spend considerable time on "micro" issues of sentence structure, punctuation, grammar and vocabulary.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 041, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This writing course focuses on the creation of complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. Students work closely with their peers and the instructor to develop their written prose. Readings cover a variety of different genres, with a primary focus on literary texts.

This section of English 124 shall focus on "literatures of witness" — those narratives predicated on the authenticity of having "been there." We will read fiction, poetry, and memoir, interrogating the ways in which literary works make truth claims regarding characters, events, and settings we might presume, despite the definitive artifice of the literary, to be "real."

Some of our readings and all of our written assignments for this course will be posted to the Ctools site, as PDF documents, no later than a week before they are due. Students are responsible for printing these documents and bringing them to class on days when they will be discussed, in addition, of course, to reading them at least once (but preferably twice). Although we will discuss writing assignments in class, they will be posted in their definitive, written forms on our Ctools site. Readings appear in the "Resources" section of the site, while writing assignments appear in the "Assignments" section. Other than a repository for assigned readings and descriptions of writing assignments, the site will be practically inactive. Changes to course schedule or other matters pertaining to the syllabus will be announced in class or, in a pinch, via email.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 042, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This course studies the intersection between critical thinking and persuasive writing, and, using literary texts as the point of reference, takes as its goal the development of the student's skill at writing cogent expository and argumentative prose.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 043, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This course studies the intersection between critical thinking and persuasive writing, and, using literary texts as the point of reference, takes as its goal the development of the student's skill at writing cogent expository and argumentative prose.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 044, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This course studies the intersection between critical thinking and persuasive writing, and, using literary texts as the point of reference, takes as its goal the development of the student's skill at writing cogent expository and argumentative prose.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 045, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This course studies the intersection between critical thinking and persuasive writing, and, using literary texts as the point of reference, takes as its goal the development of the student's skill at writing cogent expository and argumentative prose.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 001, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

In this course, we will work on improving your confidence and competence in writing collegiate essays. We will focus on developing the critical thinking, reading, writing, and argumentation skills necessary to produce effective, competent college writing.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 002, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

All sections of ENGLISH 125 focus on creating complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. Students work closely with their peers and instructor to develop their writing, and readings cover a variety of different genres and academic disciplines.

This section, in particular, focuses on the power of language and literacy. Learning to use literacy as a tool will help you in your classes and in your personal and professional endeavors. This course is designed to guide you as you develop your literacy skills through a rich exploration of language. You will have the opportunity to practice critical reading and writing on a regular basis and in a collaborative learning environment. Class meetings will often be devoted to group work and will focus on the interplay of author, text, reader, and context or community.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 003, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This writing course focuses on the creation of complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. You will work closely with your peers and with me to develop your written prose. The readings will cover a variety of genres.

In this class, you will learn and practice working with the essential building blocks of writing. You will apply these skills to a variety of written assignments, aided by discussions, workshops, and individual conferences with me. We will emphasize constructing the thesis, developing and organizing content, planning an essay, drafting, and revising.

This class is for motivated students who truly want a solid foundation of writing skills, but also want to build upon that foundation with imagination and originality.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 004, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

All sections of ENGLISH 125 focus on creating complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. Students work closely with their peers and instructor to develop their writing, and readings cover a variety of different genres and academic disciplines.

In this section of 125 we will consider the role of memory in writing. In what ways does memory effect writing? Does writing effect our memories? Is it possible to accurately remember or narrate an experience? Is there a cultural experience of memory or is remembering necessarily an individual act? To answer these questions and others, we will examine our own personal histories, cultural memories, and other narrative representations in order to consider the ways that writers (re)collect memories and translate them into text.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 005, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

Texts: The Bedford Reader, X. J. Kennedy, available at Shaman Drum on State Street; course pack available at Accu-Copy, two blocks down from State Street on William.

ENGLISH 125 is designed to bridge the difficult transition between high school and college level writing, writing for different subjects. An essay that might have earned an A in high school might earn a D in college. The reason for this involves the new set of criteria expected at the college level. You will need to engage original ideas in your writing with a clear thesis statement that includes tension and supports your main argument. This also includes challenging your own first, second, and third idea about a subject or situation. College writing requires more original argument, clear thesis and developed support and analysis. It also involves writing for different audiences and in different formats. For example, your assessment of a stand of redwoods would necessarily be different if you were writing an article for a nature magazine, a letter to advocates of oil drilling, an annual report to a board of directors, a grant for panel review, or a scientific analysis for a biology journal. The required format of each of the above is also different. Also, you will need to imagine "the other side" and not only answer but convince your audience with counter argument.

Course Goals:The above means that assignments are designed to elicit original thinking, careful consideration, analysis and interpretation from the writer NOT to give obvious, illogical or, frankly, clichéd or boring writing. Also, be wary of trying to guess what I would like to hear. Your job is to challenge your own ideas as well as others. What do you really think and why? Why is the MOST important aspect. What evidence, examples, considerations, analysis supports your point of view? We will use different lenses to place over our writing and others in this process of examination and revision. By the end of the course, you should be able to critique your own writing and others using the frame of introduction (subject and tension), body (support, examples, evidence), conclusion (interpretation, final point of view). Also, you should be able to adequately put the lenses of logic, clarity/cohesion, syntax, texture, and grammar over various types of writing. As well, you should be able to consider various writing and how different appeals the writer uses aids their credibility: emotional, value, logic and facts, character and humor. You will be asked to comment on others' writing as well as revise your own. This will aid in the writing process. You will also be asked to read and digest the structure and methods of published writers.

The Work: You will be asked to write six papers total. Two will be three-page papers that will be workshopped either in small group workshops or in the large group workshop. The other two papers will be longer, five- to six-page papers that may develop further your earlier shorter papers. However, if the ideas of either shorter paper don't seem worthwhile to be revised into a longer paper, you have the option of using one of two one-page papers as either longer paper. The one-page papers will be assigned later in the semester. This way you have a choice in subjects. Writers tend to write well about subjects in which they are interested. That is the case here. Within a framework, you will be able to choose your own subjects to write about. Each student will have the opportunity to have one paper workshopped in small group workshop with their peers and one paper workshopped in the large group workshop with myself and their peers. Essay options will include personal, comparison/contrast, definition, persuasive, and exploratory. You will also be asked to complete written peer critiques of other students' work and to contribute to workshop discussion. Peer critiques are due on email to me and the student author. Inclass writings respond to the assigned readings and are graded.

Workshop Your name already appears on the schedule for workshop. For the large group workshop ONLY, and ONLY ONCE, you are asked to bring 19 copies of your paper to class. Workshop is an in depth process and you'll be asked to comment on many levels of the writing including the different lenses mentioned above. Because it is always difficult to see your OWN writing, it is imperative that you attend workshop, especially when your own writing is NOT discussed, to receive an adequate grade. It is usually easier to see others' writing more clearly than your own. That is why this is part of the process of applying standards to your own work. You need to attend to the complex issues of other writing to then be able to internalize that process for your own writing. That is one of the real pleasures of workshop: collaborative learning, being able to assimilate techniques from others. Missing more than one workshop can result in your being graded down one third of your overaall class grade.

How will I be evaluated?

A rough outline of standards for what each grade means is online on CTools under Grade Outline. Generally, the quality and originality of the thinking is evaluated, along with other aspects of writing. How insightful, interesting, cohesive are the ideas? What types of appeal do you successfully use to convince your audience? What support is well developed? How in depth is your counter argument? What cements the bridge between your argument and your support? What is the level of analysis? Do you address obvious counter arguments or not? The breakdown is below.

Two two-page papers 15 percent each Written peer critiques 10 percent Two Five- to six-page papers 20 percent each Inclass writings 10 percent Two One-page papers 5 percent each Class Participation and Attendance I no longer give a direct grade for class participation. However, if, at the end of the semester, you are between two grades and your class participation has been extremely high, consistently commenting on others' work in workshop, contributing to class discussion, and you have not missed more than one class session, I will award you the higher grade. Otherwise, you will receive the lower grade. Your grade may also be decreased by up to one half-grade for failing to attend to other students' contributions during workshop and/or class discussion. Attendance at all class sessions is considered mandatory. Your grade may also be decreased by up to one-half grade down for missing more than three class sessions. Be sure to contact me about any missed classes.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 006, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This writing course focuses on the creation of complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. Students work closely with their peers and the instructor to develop their written prose. Readings cover a variety of different genres and academic disciplines.

In this section, we will read, think and write analytically about various topics like space, citizenship and diversity. Students will learn to generate ideas and express them in clear and well-supported argumentative writing.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 007, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This writing course focuses on the creation of complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. Students work closely with their peers to develop their written prose. Readings cover a variety of different genres.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 008, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

A study of rhetoric, both as a body of principles, and as a practical art, emphasizing the writing of expository and argumentative essays.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 009, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

A study of rhetoric, both as a body of principles, and as a practical art, emphasizing the writing of expository and argumentative essays.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 010, REC

Instructor: Scheidt,Donna Lynn

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR
Other: FYSem

A study of rhetoric, both as a body of principles, and as a practical art, emphasizing the writing of expository and argumentative essays.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 011, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

Texts: The Bedford Reader, X. J. Kennedy, available at Shaman Drum on State Street; course pack available at Accu-Copy, two blocks down from State Street on William.

ENGLISH 125 is designed to bridge the difficult transition between high school and college level writing, writing for different subjects. An essay that might have earned an A in high school might earn a D in college. The reason for this involves the new set of criteria expected at the college level. You will need to engage original ideas in your writing with a clear thesis statement that includes tension and supports your main argument. This also includes challenging your own first, second, and third idea about a subject or situation. College writing requires more original argument, clear thesis and developed support and analysis. It also involves writing for different audiences and in different formats. For example, your assessment of a stand of redwoods would necessarily be different if you were writing an article for a nature magazine, a letter to advocates of oil drilling, an annual report to a board of directors, a grant for panel review, or a scientific analysis for a biology journal. The required format of each of the above is also different. Also, you will need to imagine "the other side" and not only answer but convince your audience with counter argument.

Course Goals:The above means that assignments are designed to elicit original thinking, careful consideration, analysis and interpretation from the writer NOT to give obvious, illogical or, frankly, clichéd or boring writing. Also, be wary of trying to guess what I would like to hear. Your job is to challenge your own ideas as well as others. What do you really think and why? Why is the MOST important aspect. What evidence, examples, considerations, analysis supports your point of view? We will use different lenses to place over our writing and others in this process of examination and revision. By the end of the course, you should be able to critique your own writing and others using the frame of introduction (subject and tension), body (support, examples, evidence), conclusion (interpretation, final point of view). Also, you should be able to adequately put the lenses of logic, clarity/cohesion, syntax, texture, and grammar over various types of writing. As well, you should be able to consider various writing and how different appeals the writer uses aids their credibility: emotional, value, logic and facts, character and humor. You will be asked to comment on others' writing as well as revise your own. This will aid in the writing process. You will also be asked to read and digest the structure and methods of published writers.

The Work: You will be asked to write six papers total. Two will be three-page papers that will be workshopped either in small group workshops or in the large group workshop. The other two papers will be longer, five- to six-page papers that may develop further your earlier shorter papers. However, if the ideas of either shorter paper don't seem worthwhile to be revised into a longer paper, you have the option of using one of two one-page papers as either longer paper. The one-page papers will be assigned later in the semester. This way you have a choice in subjects. Writers tend to write well about subjects in which they are interested. That is the case here. Within a framework, you will be able to choose your own subjects to write about. Each student will have the opportunity to have one paper workshopped in small group workshop with their peers and one paper workshopped in the large group workshop with myself and their peers. Essay options will include personal, comparison/contrast, definition, persuasive, and exploratory. You will also be asked to complete written peer critiques of other students' work and to contribute to workshop discussion. Peer critiques are due on email to me and the student author. Inclass writings respond to the assigned readings and are graded.

Workshop Your name already appears on the schedule for workshop. For the large group workshop ONLY, and ONLY ONCE, you are asked to bring 19 copies of your paper to class. Workshop is an in depth process and you'll be asked to comment on many levels of the writing including the different lenses mentioned above. Because it is always difficult to see your OWN writing, it is imperative that you attend workshop, especially when your own writing is NOT discussed, to receive an adequate grade. It is usually easier to see others' writing more clearly than your own. That is why this is part of the process of applying standards to your own work. You need to attend to the complex issues of other writing to then be able to internalize that process for your own writing. That is one of the real pleasures of workshop: collaborative learning, being able to assimilate techniques from others. Missing more than one workshop can result in your being graded down one third of your overall class grade.

How will I be evaluated?

A rough outline of standards for what each grade means is online on CTools under Grade Outline. Generally, the quality and originality of the thinking is evaluated, along with other aspects of writing. How insightful, interesting, cohesive are the ideas? What types of appeal do you successfully use to convince your audience? What support is well developed? How in depth is your counter argument? What cements the bridge between your argument and your support? What is the level of analysis? Do you address obvious counter arguments or not? The breakdown is below.

Two two-page papers 15 percent each Written peer critiques 10 percent Two Five- to six-page papers 20 percent each Inclass writings 10 percent Two One-page papers 5 percent each Class Participation and Attendance I no longer give a direct grade for class participation. However, if, at the end of the semester, you are between two grades and your class participation has been extremely high, consistently commenting on others' work in workshop, contributing to class discussion, and you have not missed more than one class session, I will award you the higher grade. Otherwise, you will receive the lower grade. Your grade may also be decreased by up to one half-grade for failing to attend to other students' contributions during workshop and/or class discussion. Attendance at all class sessions is considered mandatory. Your grade may also be decreased by up to one-half grade down for missing more than three class sessions. Be sure to contact me about any missed classes.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 012, REC

Instructor: Cornelius,Tyler Adam

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR
Other: FYSem

A study of rhetoric, both as a body of principles, and as a practical art, emphasizing the writing of expository and argumentative essays.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 013, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

Texts: The Bedford Reader, X. J. Kennedy, available at Shaman Drum on State Street; course pack available at Accu-Copy, two blocks down from State Street on William.

Course Description: ENGLISH 125 is designed to bridge the difficult transition between high school and college level writing, writing for different subjects. An essay that might have earned an A in high school might earn a D in college. The reason for this involves the new set of criteria expected at the college level. You will need to engage original ideas in your writing with a clear thesis statement that includes tension and supports your main argument. This also includes challenging your own first, second, and third idea about a subject or situation. College writing requires more original argument, clear thesis and developed support and analysis. It also involves writing for different audiences and in different formats. For example, your assessment of a stand of redwoods would necessarily be different if you were writing an article for a nature magazine, a letter to advocates of oil drilling, an annual report to a board of directors, a grant for panel review, or a scientific analysis for a biology journal. The required format of each of the above is also different. Also, you will need to imagine "the other side" and not only answer but convince your audience with counter argument.

Course Goals:The above means that assignments are designed to elicit original thinking, careful consideration, analysis and interpretation from the writer NOT to give obvious, illogical or, frankly, clichéd or boring writing. Also, be wary of trying to guess what I would like to hear. Your job is to challenge your own ideas as well as others. What do you really think and why? Why is the MOST important aspect. What evidence, examples, considerations, analysis supports your point of view? We will use different lenses to place over our writing and others in this process of examination and revision. By the end of the course, you should be able to critique your own writing and others using the frame of introduction (subject and tension), body (support, examples, evidence), conclusion (interpretation, final point of view). Also, you should be able to adequately put the lenses of logic, clarity/cohesion, syntax, texture, and grammar over various types of writing. As well, you should be able to consider various writing and how different appeals the writer uses aids their credibility: emotional, value, logic and facts, character and humor. You will be asked to comment on others' writing as well as revise your own. This will aid in the writing process. You will also be asked to read and digest the structure and methods of published writers.

The Work: You will be asked to write six papers total. Two will be three-page papers that will be workshopped either in small group workshops or in the large group workshop. The other two papers will be longer, five- to six-page papers that may develop further your earlier shorter papers. However, if the ideas of either shorter paper don't seem worthwhile to be revised into a longer paper, you have the option of using one of two one-page papers as either longer paper. The one-page papers will be assigned later in the semester. This way you have a choice in subjects. Writers tend to write well about subjects in which they are interested. That is the case here. Within a framework, you will be able to choose your own subjects to write about. Each student will have the opportunity to have one paper workshopped in small group workshop with their peers and one paper workshopped in the large group workshop with myself and their peers. Essay options will include personal, comparison/contrast, definition, persuasive, and exploratory. You will also be asked to complete written peer critiques of other students' work and to contribute to workshop discussion. Peer critiques are due on email to me and the student author. Inclass writings respond to the assigned readings and are graded.

Workshop Your name already appears on the schedule for workshop. For the large group workshop ONLY, and ONLY ONCE, you are asked to bring 19 copies of your paper to class. Workshop is an in depth process and you'll be asked to comment on many levels of the writing including the different lenses mentioned above. Because it is always difficult to see your OWN writing, it is imperative that you attend workshop, especially when your own writing is NOT discussed, to receive an adequate grade. It is usually easier to see others' writing more clearly than your own. That is why this is part of the process of applying standards to your own work. You need to attend to the complex issues of other writing to then be able to internalize that process for your own writing. That is one of the real pleasures of workshop: collaborative learning, being able to assimilate techniques from others. Missing more than one workshop can result in your being graded down one third of your overall class grade.

How will I be evaluated?

A rough outline of standards for what each grade means is online on CTools under Grade Outline. Generally, the quality and originality of the thinking is evaluated, along with other aspects of writing. How insightful, interesting, cohesive are the ideas? What types of appeal do you successfully use to convince your audience? What support is well developed? How in depth is your counter argument? What cements the bridge between your argument and your support? What is the level of analysis? Do you address obvious counter arguments or not? The breakdown is below.

Two two-page papers 15 percent each Written peer critiques 10 percent Two Five- to six-page papers 20 percent each Inclass writings 10 percent Two One-page papers 5 percent each Class Participation and Attendance I no longer give a direct grade for class participation. However, if, at the end of the semester, you are between two grades and your class participation has been extremely high, consistently commenting on others' work in workshop, contributing to class discussion, and you have not missed more than one class session, I will award you the higher grade. Otherwise, you will receive the lower grade. Your grade may also be decreased by up to one half-grade for failing to attend to other students' contributions during workshop and/or class discussion. Attendance at all class sessions is considered mandatory. Your grade may also be decreased by up to one-half grade down for missing more than three class sessions. Be sure to contact me about any missed classes.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 014, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

A study of rhetoric, both as a body of principles, and as a practical art, emphasizing the writing of expository and argumentative essays.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 015, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

A study of rhetoric, both as a body of principles, and as a practical art, emphasizing the writing of expository and argumentative essays.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 016, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This writing course focuses on the creation of complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. Students work closely with their peers and instructor to develop their written prose. Readings cover a variety of different genres and academic disciplines.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 017, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

How important are our assumptions about language, culture, and environment to the process of thinking and writing? In this course we will take a rigorous analytical look at the subjects of our reading and writing in the hope of challenging some of our safe and easy assumptions about them. By clearing away these assumptions, not only will our writing become sharper and stronger, but the enhanced capacity for critical thinking should lead us to develop more detailed, more interesting, and more original expository and argumentative essays.

We will look at a wide range of professional essays, but will also spend a good bit of time examining writing from within our class. By engaging in peer editing, reading both classic essays and the discourse of contemporary culture, and writing and rewriting pages of carefully considered prose, students will gain knowledge and skills for further academic writing. Each formal paper will have a prescribed approach and a specific aim, but students will have free reign to invent their own paper topics.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 018, REC

Instructor: Sampson,Christopher Michael

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR
Other: FYSem

A study of rhetoric, both as a body of principles, and as a practical art, emphasizing the writing of expository and argumentative essays.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 019, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

Introduction to English Composition focuses on the rhetorical strategies and research skills students need to succeed in their academic endeavors. This course is also a themed course examining the ramifications of "literacy" throughout academic, professional, and pupular cultures. Students will have an opportunity to explore their personal interests by engaging in dialogue between common and academic disciplines.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 020, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This writing course focuses on the creation of complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. Students work closely with their peers and instructor to develop their written prose. Readings cover a variety of different genres and academic disciplines.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 021, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This course is designed to help you develop skills necessary for effective college-level writing. Over the course of the semester you will learn how to write personal narratives, persuasive essays, and summaries in a fashion suitable for academic discourse. We will spend a good deal of time on the process of revision; learning to work in steps towards prose that is marked by coherence, clarity, and intellectual force. You will also learn how to synthesize academic arguments efficiently and effectively.

What you read is the result of a process of writing. Reading a well-written piece is therefore helpful in acquiring good writing skills. In order to be able to practice various writing skills, you will need to have sufficient knowledge about issues and topics on which you will write. You will therefore read about various themes and issues that already exist, and respond to them in your writing. This will provide an opportunity for reflection and critical analysis of the topics discussed in the reading, which in turn will serve as a background for your writing assignments. The clarity of your writing will, to an extent, depend on how closely you have done the readings.

The college of LS&A states that at the end of ENGLISH 125, students should be able to: 1. Revise argumentative/expository writing in order to improve correctness, appropriateness of expression, and development of ideas. 2. Organize essays of varied lengths. 3. Use outside sources correctly and effectively in developing ideas. 4. Set appropriate individual goals for improving writing and devise effective plans for achieving those goals. 5. Collaborate with peers to define revision strategies for particular pieces of writing and to set goals for improving writing.

My goals for this course are to help you to develop meaningful, persuasive prose; to emphasize that thinking and writing are often an intertwined process; and finally, to give you a greater appreciation for the complexity and richness of language (both written and spoken) that is so often taken for granted.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 022, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

We will aim for lively and efficient communication in this class — our goal is writing that "bites," that is sharp, focused, concise, and elegant. Class will be informed by a textbook, and by a coursepack of useful essays and other compositions. Student work will be critiqued in the workshop environment.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 023, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

Composing the Society of Our Dreams: The Social Role of Language in College Writing This course will provide an introduction to the study of composition and rhetoric, both as a body of principles, and as a practical art, emphasizing the writing of expository and argumentative essays. You will begin this course by writing a personal essay about yourself and your life experiences, but we will by no means remain at that level of composing. By the end of the course, you should be comfortable writing in the academic register across genres, which will prepare you for the specialized demands of writing at the University of Michigan.

To that end, the authors whose work we will read hail from a broad variety of disciplines and historical periods. They include great contemporary writers and thinkers who have contributed to our understanding of society such as Azar Nafisi, Audre Lorde, Stephen King, Jonathan Kozol, and Mari Matsuda. Later, as you prepare to write your position paper, we will consider ideal societies (also known as utopias) as conceived by some of the greatest thinkers of all time: Sir Thomas More, Niccolo Machiavelli, Jonathan Swift, Thomas Jefferson, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Ursula K. LeGuin, and others. However, this work will only serve as a backdrop for our main focus: your development as an academic writer.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 024, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

A study of rhetoric, both as a body of principles, and as a practical art, emphasizing the writing of expository and argumentative essays.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 025, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

The year is 1955. Americans are watching their first color television, going to Disneyland, and eating McDonald's hamburgers for the first time. The Civil Rights movement gains prominent attention when Rosa Parks refuses to ride in a segregated bus. The term AI (articificial intelligence) is coined by Dartmouth mathematician John McCarthy. Bill Gates is born. Albert Einstein dies.

How do these pieces of information inform one another? How do you connect them? How does your intended major or personal experience affect what is most important? This is a writing based course where you have the opportunity to practice engaged academic work through the course title theme. Emphasis will be on the formation of analysis, how to be relevant and engage ongoing dialogues, and how to sustain/complicate your ideas. The theme of this course gives you the opportunity to practice these skills in a common environment with other students. Texts may include Allen Ginsberg's book of poetry _Howl_, Flannery O'Connor's short story collection _A Good Man is Hard to Find_, speeches, newspaper articles, a viewing of the film noir classic _Kiss Me Deadly_ and Disney's _Lady and the Tramp_.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 026, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

The films, political manifestos, essays on cultural history and other documents we will examine in this course all work in one way or another to present and defend a particular point of view. As we progress through the term we will concentrate not only on what a given text appears to be arguing but also on how that text works to achieve its ends.

This course has been designed with cumulative learning in mind. As we progress through each week's focus of study, you will see how the readings build into and out of one another. Students will be required to write three substantial essays, and each essay will grow out of a series of pre-draft assignments.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 027, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

College-level writing calls for clear, concise prose and focused critical analysis, but it also calls for originality, creative thinking, and a strong individual "voice." The best academic essays are sophisticated and thought-provoking, but they balance analytical work with a human voice, an attention to the details of prose in English, and a fluid, conversational logic that draws the argument forward. In this course, we will work toward that perfect balance of poetic language and academic analysis.

The college states that ENGLISH 125 should teach Michigan students to:

• Produce complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. • Read, summarize, analyze, and synthesize complex texts purposefully in order to generate and support writing. • Demonstrate an awareness of the strategies that writers use in different rhetorical situations. • Develop flexible strategies for organizing, revising, editing, and proofreading writing of varying lengths to improve development of ideas and appropriateness of expression. • Collaborate with peers and the instructor to define revision strategies for particular pieces of writing, set goals for improving writing, and devise effective plans for achieving those goals.

We will approach these goals from several angles, beginning with personal narrative, moving into description and argument, and finishing with a longer, individual research project. In the first part of this course, you will have many opportunities to practice and perfect your own style of interesting, grammatical prose. You will be responsible for one 4-5 page expository essay and one 3-4 page descriptive essay, in addition to various shorter writing assignments.

In the second part of the course, we will expand our writing horizons to the kind of thesis-driven, argumentative essay that appears on nearly every university syllabus. Keep in mind that this is not your basic five-paragraph essay! We will start by considering the argumentative structure of newspaper editorials, then we will apply the basics of persuasion to cultural critique and academic research projects. During this time, you will be responsible for one 2 page editorial essay, one 5-6 page cultural critique, and a final 6-8 page research paper in the style of your anticipated major.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 028, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

My goal in this course is simple: to help each of you become a better writer. Articulating your ideas well on paper and in conversation can be one of your greatest assets in college and professional life. In this course you will learn to identify and analyze the components of good persuasive and expository prose, and you'll develop the essential skills for writing critical and persuasive essays at the college level. You will learn to express and support your own opinions in a way that is appropriate to the genre and clear and interesting to the reader. We will closely study the work of established writers as well as the writing of our peers, and workshops and peer critiques will play a central role in this course. Assignments will include four formal, revised essays, peer critiques, weekly exercises, and readings.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 029, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

First-year composition course devoted to the writing and revising of several different kinds of essays.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 030, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This course is a college writing course exploring argument through fiction and non-fiction to teach students to write more effectively.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 031, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

Think of the best party or gathering you can imagine. Is it a room filled with clones, moving in unison to repetitive music, talking about the same topics with unvarying perspectives? Or is it an occasion of diversity, one where a variety of faces and shapes dance to unique internal beats, bringing multiple experiences and opinions, each movement and thought fresh and intriguing? Well, if you prefer the latter type of gathering, then this section of ENGLISH 125 is right for you. In it, you will explore, discuss and critique issues of diversity and identification intelligently and respectfully with your peers.

Also, you will improve your critical reading, writing, listening and thinking skills. We will read and view a variety of texts and explore a number of issues and writing styles that will enhance your university experience and prepare you for communication outside of the university. Your writing assignments will help you to identify and explore a central position, and present it in a coherent, well-developed response. Additionally, you will develop your research skills and will learn to use and document sources.

Group discussion, drafting, peer editing, workshopping, conferencing and hard work are essential to successful completion of this course. Come and join the party!

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 032, REC

Instructor: Carbonell,Vanessa

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR
Other: FYSem

A study of rhetoric, both as a body of principles, and as a practical art, emphasizing the writing of expository and argumentative essays.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 033, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

The year is 1955. Americans are watching their first color television, going to Disneyland, and eating McDonald's hamburgers for the first time. The Civil Rights movement gains prominent attention when Rosa Parks refuses to ride in a segregated bus. The term AI (articificial intelligence) is coined by Dartmouth mathematician John McCarthy. Bill Gates is born. Albert Einstein dies.

How do these pieces of information inform one another? How do you connect them? How does your intended major or personal experience affect what is most important? This is a writing based course where you have the opportunity to practice engaged academic work through the course title theme. Emphasis will be on the formation of analysis, how to be relevant and engage ongoing dialogues, and how to sustain/complicate your ideas. The theme of this course gives you the opportunity to practice these skills in a common environment with other students. Texts may include Allen Ginsberg's book of poetry _Howl_, Flannery O'Connor's short story collection _A Good Man is Hard to Find_, speeches, newspaper articles, a viewing of the film noir classic _Kiss Me Deadly_ and Disney's _Lady and the Tramp_.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 034, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This writing course focuses on the creation of complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. Students work closely with their peers and their instructor to develop their written prose. Readings cover a variety of genres and academic disciplines.

The primary goal of this course is to help you learn to write clear, compelling, and sophisticated prose. We will develop these skills through a range of methods: readings, discussions, writing exercises, peer critiques, and responses to other forms of expression such as media, visual art, music, and film. Because writing is an organized way of thinking, our engagement with the subject matter will be focused primarily on issues of style, craft, and execution.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 035, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This writing course focuses on the creation of complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. You will work closely with your peers and with me to develop your written prose. The readings will cover a variety of genres.

In this class, you will learn and practice working with the essential building blocks of writing. You will apply these skills to a variety of written assignments, aided by discussions, workshops, and individual conferences with me. We will emphasize constructing the thesis, developing and organizing content, planning an essay, drafting, and revising.

This class is for motivated students who truly want a solid foundation of writing skills, but also want to build upon that foundation with imagination and originality.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 036, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

The primary goal of this course is to develop the ability to tackle effectively the essay form as a medium of writing. We will learn how to use textual and non-textual evidence in the construction of a complex but lucid argument. Hopefully throughout the course students will also see that the ability to write a substantial essay is connected to the ability to read critically. In addition to rigorous writing exercises, a considerable portion of time and effort will therefore be devoted to a close and careful discussion of the assigned readings drawn from different fictional and non-fictional sources such as articles. short stories, poems, etc.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 037, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

First-year composition course devoted to the writing and revising of several different kinds of essays.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 038, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

Twenty-first century health professionals face a challenging, multidisciplinary professional environment. The public of the twenty-first century needs health professionals dedicated to the practice of medicine as a public discipline of responsible citizenship. The creative practitioner must possess strong analytic thinking and writing skills to distill the maelstrom of maelstrom of medical information into understandable prose that speaks to the publics he or she is called to serve. This course will prepare the student ready to learn to write clearly and to interest and speak to the intended audience.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 039, REC

Instructor: Ides,Matthew Allan

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR
Other: FYSem

A study of rhetoric, both as a body of principles, and as a practical art, emphasizing the writing of expository and argumentative essays.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 040, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

The primary objective of this course is to prepare you to write effectively. Together, we will study what it means to create the complex, analytic, and well-supported arguments so important in a university setting. Extensive practice and careful examination of the writing and revision processes will contribute to your academic success at the University of Michigan as well as your successful communication outside the classroom — interpersonally, as community members, and professionally. You will be required to write across the disciplines and to hone your skills as an intellectual and a critic, thinking in a variety of modes across the arts and humanities.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 041, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This writing course focuses on the creation of complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. Students work closely with their peers and the instructor to develop their written prose. Readings cover a variety of different genres and academic disciplines.

Whether you're interested in business school, law school, or rock school, the ability to communicate in a clear and compelling manner is key to success in college, and in life. Balancing our time between personal, argumentative, and analytical writing, we will aim to produce essays that are equally deft in vision and execution, displaying purpose, clarity, and elegance. To provide inspiration and lend guidance, we will read a broad selection of writers from varied ages, backgrounds and perspectives, and discuss how they manipulate and exercise their craft.

We will also spend a bit of time in the freshman English trenches, reviewing grammatical fundamentals and rules for research and citation. Perhaps most crucial to our class, however, will be the class time we spend "workshopping" each other's work — providing sensitive constructive criticism toward thoughtful revision and improvements.

You'll find that writing well is a skill that takes effort, discipline, and time, but the rewards — both pragmatic and figurative — are very real.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 042, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This course concentrates on acquiring the skills for the kind of writing that is required at the college level. In order to cultivate your ability to think and write critically and analytically, we will read various texts (including essays, advertisements, literary texts, and possibly graphic novels) that deal with diverse topics in regard to our contemporary culture (both in domestic and international contexts). We will treat those reading materials as a sort of sample writings that enable us to think about the ways in which a good analytic writing can be crafted. Major assignments include writing four essays, peer critiques, a short response paper, a discussion question, as well as leading one discussion on a given text.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 043, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This course develops student writing using a range of materials that explore the role of the visual in literature and culture.

Literacy today has become "literacies." We live in a world were learning to read visual texts has become as important as learning to read verbal ones. For this course, we will examine closely the rhetorical strategies used when producing both visual images and written works. Objects for our study will include art, essays, advertising, film, photographs, and cartoons. Seeing and writing have much more in common than you might think, and as you sharpen your tools of perception, you will also develop the ability to write with deeper insight and greater persuasiveness. Along with exploring the connections between the visual and verbal, we will spend a great deal of time developing the skills necessary for writing in college — a mastery of grammar and syntax, the ability to write with clarity, and an understanding of what it means to engage in academic discourse.

We are here to develop our craft as writers, and our classroom will function primarily as a workshop environment. As we work toward perfecting our craft, all of us will become comfortable with sharing our work in the classroom and quickly familiar with each other's words and writing. For the purposes of learning, we will become a community of writers. As a community, we will read texts, critically and write about what we see.

Our primary text will be Donald and Christine McQuade's Seeing and Writing 3 (Bedford/St. Martin, 2006).

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 044, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This writing course focuses on the creation of complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. Students work closely with their peers and the instructor to develop their written prose. Readings cover a variety of different genres and academic disciplines.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 045, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

The films, political manifestos, essays on cultural history and other documents we will examine in this course all work in one way or another to present and defend a particular point of view. As we progress through the term we will concentrate not only on what a given text appears to be arguing but also on how that text works to achieve its ends.

This course has been designed with cumulative learning in mind. As we progress through each week's focus of study, you will see how the readings build into and out of one another. Students will be required to write three substantial essays, and each essay will grow out of a series of pre-draft assignments.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 046, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

College-level writing calls for clear, concise prose and focused critical analysis, but it also calls for originality, creative thinking, and a strong individual "voice." The best academic essays are sophisticated and thought-provoking, but they balance analytical work with a human voice, an attention to the details of prose in English, and a fluid, conversational logic that draws the argument forward. In this course, we will work toward that perfect balance of poetic language and academic analysis.

The college states that ENGLISH 125 should teach Michigan students to:

• Produce complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. • Read, summarize, analyze, and synthesize complex texts purposefully in order to generate and support writing. • Demonstrate an awareness of the strategies that writers use in different rhetorical situations. • Develop flexible strategies for organizing, revising, editing, and proofreading writing of varying lengths to improve development of ideas and appropriateness of expression. • Collaborate with peers and the instructor to define revision strategies for particular pieces of writing, set goals for improving writing, and devise effective plans for achieving those goals.

We will approach these goals from several angles, beginning with personal narrative, moving into description and argument, and finishing with a longer, individual research project. In the first part of this course, you will have many opportunities to practice and perfect your own style of interesting, grammatical prose. You will be responsible for one 4-5 page expository essay and one 3-4 page descriptive essay, in addition to various shorter writing assignments.

In the second part of the course, we will expand our writing horizons to the kind of thesis-driven, argumentative essay that appears on nearly every university syllabus. Keep in mind that this is not your basic five-paragraph essay! We will start by considering the argumentative structure of newspaper editorials, then we will apply the basics of persuasion to cultural critique and academic research projects. During this time, you will be responsible for one 2 page editorial essay, one 5-6 page cultural critique, and a final 6-8 page research paper in the style of your anticipated major.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 047, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This course focuses on the creation of complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. The goal of this course is to teach students the discipline and skills needed for college writing. By the end of this course, students will possess an awareness for strategies that successful writers use in different rhetorical situations. They will develop their own strategies for organzing, revising, editing and proofreading essays of varying lengths to prepare students for future academic writing. This is a collaborative effort among peers and the instructor to help define these strategies for each writer. Readings cover a variety of different genres and academic disciplines.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 048, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

Have you ever wondered what constitutes "good writing"? Ever found a writer's description of something so vivid that you felt as though you had experienced it yourself? Have you ever wanted to persuade others about a topic you believed strongly in? Or simply paused over a familiar word like "intelligence" to consider what it really meant? Have you ever wondered how writing pertains to fields other than English? If so, this course is for you.

This course is designed to introduce you to the challenges and rewards of joining a community of college writers. As undergraduates at the University of Michigan, you will all be expected to contribute at some point to the discourse of whatever major you decide to specialize in. These contributions can take many forms, including speaking in oral discussions, collaborating with faculty or fellow students on research, and writing in a wide variety of genres for an equally wide variety of audiences. We will focus primarily on the last of these skills — preparing you to write for college discourse communities — while also addressing the close connections writing has with oral discussion and research. You will write four major essays that ask you to practice an assortment of rhetorical methods (including, but not limited to, description, definition, comparison and contrast, and argument), and we will attend to how such methods can be effectively combined. You will workshop drafts of all four essays in class, and you will have a number of shorter writing assignments designed to help you with the longer ones. In addition, you will keep a journal of informal writing in response to class readings. These readings will cover a variety of topics, and the writing assignments will encourage you to explore academic or personal interests beyond this class. If, by the end of the term, you have a better sense of what constitutes "good writing" across different disciplines, greater confidence in your ability to write effectively at the college level, and sharpened critical thinking skills, this course will have been a success.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 049, REC

Instructor: Button,Seth Lowell

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR
Other: FYSem

A study of rhetoric, both as a body of principles, and as a practical art, emphasizing the writing of expository and argumentative essays.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 050, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

Communicating ideas clearly and persuasively on the page is an essential part of being an educated person. In the classroom and beyond, your ability to organize, develop and express thoughts will serve the authority of your opinions. Along with writing skills, the critical reading skills gained in this class will enable you to become a more-informed critic of the social and political issues that affect your daily life.

In this course, you will learn how to define a thesis, or an organizing idea, and then support and develop that idea in a focused, thorough and stylistically sophisticated essay. The three papers you will draft and revise for this course are not simply exercises in writing, but rather they are opportunities for you to hone your critical reading and thinking skills while exploring topics of interest. We will be reading a number of published essays as models for your own work and also to generate class discussion about relevant social issues. These essays may spur ideas for your own writing as you examine various perspectives on issues such as race and class in America, mass media, consumer culture and more. Furthermore, as you express your ideas on the page, you will learn how to write for a specific audience, how to consider both sides of an issue by utilizing counter-arguments, how to organize an argument, as well as how to write with precision and flourish.

By the end of the semester, you will be able to develop a clear, focused and well-supported position within an essay of substantial length. Your essays will be workshopped in class with at least one of your peers; while this process is aimed at improving your critical reading and writing skills, you will also benefit by seeing how others in class are handling the assignment. Through workshopping and revising, you will obtain a better grasp on how significantly your writing can improve with each draft. Simply stated: Writing is revising. And, like a muscle, writing only gets stronger with use.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 051, REC

Instructor: Ben-Ishai,Elizabeth

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

What does it mean to "Argue with Images"? To present an argument using images as evidence or to challenge the images themselves? Both. In this intensive writing course, we will question how images make meaning and also learn to use those images to write persuasive academic arguments. In this course, you will write papers on advertisements, on photographs, on films, and on literary texts published in a field of visual images. We will read and discuss many different kinds of images as well as critical works on visual culture including pieces by Roland Barthes, John Berger, and Susan Sontag. How is a photograph different from a painting? What do techniques like "airbrushing" say about the status of the "real" in a visual image? How can we think about texts differently when they are read in the context of images? How can we think about images differently when they are read through critical texts? Why would a director choose to shoot a film scene in a specific way? In addition to questioning the meanings of images, we will work to simultaneously enhance our understanding of the images and texts we read and the ways in which we write by continually questioning assumptions that we may have about thinking, reading, and writing. We will challenge our comfortable categories of value and discuss why certain images affect us more than others — and we will analyze how they accomplish these effects.

Most importantly this class will focus on improving your writing. We will approach writing as a process: you will learn that you don't have to have all the answers when you sit down to write — in fact, you shouldn't. We will be working collaboratively on a daily basis to develop your writing techniques within the supportive community of the class — your classmates will be instrumental sites of learning in this course. There will be four revised papers due for this course as well as several shorter assignments to improve your writing processes. The best way to improve your writing is through practice and thoughtful feedback and thus every paper will have drafts and "workshopping" will be a central activity in the class. Each student will have feedback from smaller peer groups on every paper. Also, every student will have one opportunity over the course of the semester to receive feedback from the full-class workshop (i.e. the whole class will read your paper and give advice, encouragement, and constructive criticism). In this course, you will learn to argue with images and to adapt and to refine your writing processes to succeed in college writing.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 052, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This course will introduce ways to construct strong, sophisticated essays and persuasive arguments. Our focus will be to transcend the notion of evaluating written work on the basis of personal aesthetics or preferences: rather, we will investigate the strategies authors employ to develop compelling arguments and document personal experiences. Students will submit short writing assignments every week, as well as two longer (5-7) page essays and a final paper. Collaboration is highly encouraged, and therefore students will be expected to submit critiques of their peers' work and present their own pieces during in-class workshops.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 053, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

A study of rhetoric, both as a body of principles, and as a practical art, emphasizing the writing of expository and argumentative essays.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 054, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

Writing is a skill you will use for the rest of your life and throughout your college career. In this class we will practice writing several different types of argumentative and analytical essays while focusing on the themes of both place and politics. How does our environment shape our attitudes and our political views? How do the place we're from and our memories and feelings about that place fit into our ideas about our place in the world, both politically and in terms of our individual identity? These are questions we will attempt to answer by looking at the ways other authors deal with these issues in novels, poetry, and non-fiction essays. This course focuses on developing a broad range of writing skills for use both in college and afterward.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 055, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This writing course focuses on the creation of complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. You will work closely with your peers and with me to develop your written prose. The readings will cover a variety of genres.

In this class, you will learn and practice working with the essential building blocks of writing. You will apply these skills to a variety of written assignments, aided by discussions, workshops, and individual conferences with me. We will emphasize constructing the thesis, developing and organizing content, planning an essay, drafting, and revising.

This class is for motivated students who truly want a solid foundation of writing skills, but also want to build upon that foundation with imagination and originality.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 056, REC

Instructor: Cooper,George H

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

Taught in conjunction with the Michigan Community Scholars Program, this course challenges students to reflect on and articulate social tensions that constitute what we live in as a community. We have two community partners to help us in this work: COURSE, Community Organization for Urban Revitalization and Sustainable Environment; and HERO, Homeless Empowerment Relationship Organization. Guided by these community, non-profit organizations, we will direct our attention to issues of homelessness, low income living, suburban sprawl, food consumption and production, especially as they become themes for investigation and writing. Some of this writing will be designed to assist our community partners in their work, and in that way students have an opportunity to effect change in the community and to write for an audience beyond each other and the teacher. Students will write frequent short reaction papers to their reading and experiences in the community. Students will also write three longer essays that cover a range of styles, from personal narrative, to exposition, to academic argument. The combination of these two, non-profit organizations with the principles and goals of a writing course is challenging, and we will need to remember the role writing plays in knowledge transmission and possession. The combination of our different parts — the demands of language with the demands of curriculum — will need constant attention, patience, and creativity, recognizing that a successful integration might very well defy understanding and explanation. And yet, that is what we will attempt — to understand and explain. We will read. We will talk. We will explain. We will argue. We will listen. We will pursue success, success in writing, in reading, in understanding a culture that might seem intent on destroying itself, but that also retains the possibility of reconstruction and its own re-visioning and articulation.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 057, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

The office of First and Second Year Studies says that ENGLISH 125 "focuses on the creation of complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. Students work closely with their peers and the instructor to develop their written prose. Readings cover a variety of different genres and academic disciplines." (FSYS, A Guide to English 124 and 125, pg 20).

I submit to you the following: the ability to express yourself effectively in writing is the single most important skill that you will acquire in college. No, I take it back. In life. People who can communicate clearly write the best grant proposals, job applications, academic essays, emails, love letters, etc. Though not all essays begin as explicitly persuasive (when you sit down to begin writing, you might not even know your own aims), writing is at bottom an attempt to get what you want. You may want people to laugh, to understand your perspective, to interrogate their own assumptions, to rethink their stance on an issue, and/or to trust you; but whatever your goal, you are trying to manipulate people with your words.

In this course, we will focus on crafting essays (personal and analytic) with a clear sense of purpose, an awareness of audience, a complex understanding of all sides of an issue, and the kind of technical elegance that makes a reader want to trust a writer. We will do at least the following: read a lot of published essays, engage in the occasional in-class writing assignment, dedicate an enormous amount of class-time to (constructively) critiquing one another's work, and revise our own essays beyond recognition. Expect to be writing more or less constantly, but also, except to like some of it. By the end of the semester, you will each be the proud owner of at least 25-30 pages of really polished prose.

(Disclaimer: I am what some people consider a Grammar Fascist. I believe that a mastery of the technical aspects of formal writing endows the author with credibility necessary to gain/maintain a reader's trust. I *will* waste as much class time as I have to on this stuff. You've been warned.)

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 058, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This writing course focuses on the creation of complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. Students work closely with their peers to develop their written prose. Readings cover a variety of different genres.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 059, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

Writing helps us envision, influence, and contextualize our global community. Through the processes of reading, writing, and editing, this course will explore what it means to live a global community. Writing will serve as a way to generate, revise, and articulate thoughts as we explore a variety of questions: How do we define ourselves and others within the context of community? Since language is often a location of power, how do silence and naming contribute to global conflicts? How do we communicate to affect change within these larger communities?

While exploring these questions, we will focus on the creation of complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. Students will work closely with their peers to develop their written prose, as they engage in all aspects of the writing process. Readings will cover a variety of different genres and academic disciplines, while focusing on issues of globalization.

In this section, writing will be considered as both a student activity and as an object of study. Communicating knowledge in a variety of academic contexts is crucial to academic success. Therefore, exploring issues of grammar, usage, mechanics, and style will also be central to this course. Students will be expected to engage actively in a workshop style class, which requires openness to giving and receiving feedback.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 060, REC

Instructor: Tessier,Randall L

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

Using a course text, Everything's an Argument, we will seek to improve our writing by focusing on the connection between reading, writing and thinking.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 061, REC

Instructor: Tessier,Randall L

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

Using a course text, Everything's an Argument, we will seek to improve our writing by focusing on the connection between reading, writing and thinking.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 062, REC

Instructor: Zimmerman,Enid J

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

A study of rhetoric, both as a body of principles, and as a practical art, emphasizing the writing of expository and argumentative essays.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 063, REC

Instructor: Zimmerman,Enid J

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

A study of rhetoric, both as a body of principles, and as a practical art, emphasizing the writing of expository and argumentative essays.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 064, REC

Instructor: Bankowski,Geoffrey Martin

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

It is often heard that writing well is a natural phenomenon, that some people have what it takes and others do not, and that this is somehow determined at birth. One of the goals of this course is to prove this wrong. While it may be true that some writers produce smooth, powerful prose in a way that makes their work seem effortless, there is a very good chance that they have worked hard somewhere along the way. Writing well, like anything really valuable, is difficult. Though it is directly related to thinking and speaking, it is a process quite different. We will attempt to distinguish how this is so, determining as we do the difficulties particular to writing, and will proceed gradually to develop your ability to write clearly and with authority.

The first few weeks of the course will be spent taking a closer look at the actual process, the experience of getting words down. It is usually at this early stage, before we barely begin, that anxiety or confusion takes us from the path. My hope is that a continued exploration of this difficult first stage of writing, and the sharing of experiences with it, will develop a level of familiarity and comfort that will allow each of you to take the risks necessary to understand and communicate your complex ideas, emotions and insights more successfully.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 065, REC

Instructor: Bankowski,Geoffrey Martin

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

It is often heard that writing well is a natural phenomenon, that some people have what it takes and others do not, and that this is somehow determined at birth. One of the goals of this course is to prove this wrong. While it may be true that some writers produce smooth, powerful prose in a way that makes their work seem effortless, there is a very good chance that they have worked hard somewhere along the way. Writing well, like anything really valuable, is difficult. Though it is directly related to thinking and speaking, it is a process quite different. We will attempt to distinguish how this is so, determining as we do the difficulties particular to writing, and will proceed gradually to develop your ability to write clearly and with authority.

The first few weeks of the course will be spent taking a closer look at the actual process, the experience of getting words down. It is usually at this early stage, before we barely begin, that anxiety or confusion takes us from the path. My hope is that a continued exploration of this difficult first stage of writing, and the sharing of experiences with it, will develop a level of familiarity and comfort that will allow each of you to take the risks necessary to understand and communicate your complex ideas, emotions and insights more successfully.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 066, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This writing course focuses on the creation of complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. Students work closely with their peers and the instructor to develop their written prose. Readings will cover a variety of different genres and academic disciplines. Special emphasis will be placed on the effects of the way we present ourselves in writing, how it both shapes and reflects our identities or allows us to create personas, including an academic one. This course also aims to help students cultivate a sense of pride and investment in their work as discussants, readers (of class assignments and their peers' papers), and writers.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 067, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This writing course focuses on the creation of complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. Students work closely with their peers and the instructor to develop their written prose. Readings cover a variety of different genres and academic disciplines.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 068, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This course focuses on the creation of complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. Students work closely with their peers and the instructor to develop their written prose. Readings cover a variety of different genres and academic disciplines. This section of ENGLISH 125 will be divided into two parts. The first half of the class will invite students to examine the process of writing, both in terms of their experience with writing and in terms of their budding careers as academic writers. The second part of the course will examine the intersection of science and politics, meaning how scientific ideas that have political significance are treated in both academic and non-academic discourses.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 069, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

"The essay form as a whole has long been associated with an experimental method," Philip Lopate writes, "To essay is to attempt, to test, to make a run at something without knowing whether you are going to succeed." In teaching the essay, I want you to carry away not only improved writing skills, but, beyond that, the capacity to try on new ideas, to take risks, and to question. Since most of you, though you will, of course, need to write in the future, will not decide to be writers, this capacity is the most useful skill a writing course can teach, a skill you will need in whatever profession you choose. Most university classes require this capacity for questioning, but a writing course is uniquely suited to teach it; the human ability to reason has developed alongside our ability for language, and articulating an idea will often force you to see its flaws, to question and address them.

The focus of this class, therefore, is not what one should do, but rather why. Instead of giving you "rules" for writing, I will ask you to question why such rules exist, how you can use them to your advantage, and when they can be broken: we'll read published essays which frequently resist conventions — they delay the thesis, use first and second person, use sentence fragments or run-ons — and we'll assess why and when such conventions can be ignored.

A good essay is half good writing and half good ideas, though this kind of division is false. Clear writing leads to clear ideas, and vice versa. I want you to think brilliantly in this class, and the writing will follow; I want to write brilliantly, and the thoughts will follow.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 070, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

"The essay form as a whole has long been associated with an experimental method," Philip Lopate writes, "To essay is to attempt, to test, to make a run at something without knowing whether you are going to succeed." In teaching the essay, I want you to carry away not only improved writing skills, but, beyond that, the capacity to try on new ideas, to take risks, and to question. Since most of you, though you will, of course, need to write in the future, will not decide to be writers, this capacity is the most useful skill a writing course can teach, a skill you will need in whatever profession you choose. Most university classes require this capacity for questioning, but a writing course is uniquely suited to teach it; the human ability to reason has developed alongside our ability for language, and articulating an idea will often force you to see its flaws, to question and address them.

The focus of this class, therefore, is not what one should do, but rather why. Instead of giving you "rules" for writing, I will ask you to question why such rules exist, how you can use them to your advantage, and when they can be broken: we'll read published essays which frequently resist conventions — they delay the thesis, use first and second person, use sentence fragments or run-ons — and we'll assess why and when such conventions can be ignored.

A good essay is half good writing and half good ideas, though this kind of division is false. Clear writing leads to clear ideas, and vice versa. I want you to think brilliantly in this class, and the writing will follow; I want to write brilliantly, and the thoughts will follow.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 071, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

In this section of ENGLISH 125, I hope we can defeat the myth that academic writing is such a burdensome process. Hopefully, through studying literature, studying each other's essays, and studying our own, as a group, we will discover a working definition of academic writing and how it works to our own advantage. As students responding to and interacting with what we're learning in our classes, it benefits us just as much as the professor who requires the finished, polished paper.

Through open class discussion, and workshopping your essays in small groups and as a class, I hope this semester amounts to a collaborative, open and fun experience that helps us all understand a little better the way the writing process adds depth and diversity to our relationship with our college courses.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 072, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

A study of rhetoric, both as a body of principles, and as a practical art, emphasizing the writing of expository and argumentative essays.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 073, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This writing course focuses on the creation of complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. Students work closely with their peers and the instructor to develop their written prose. Readings cover a variety of different genres and academic disciplines.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 074, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

College-level writing calls for clear, concise prose and focused critical analysis, but it also calls for originality, creative thinking, and a strong individual "voice." The best academic essays are sophisticated and thought-provoking, but they balance analytical work with a human voice, an attention to the details of prose in English, and a fluid, conversational logic that draws the argument forward. In this course, we will work toward that perfect balance of poetic language and academic analysis.

The college states that ENGLISH 125 should teach Michigan students to:

• Produce complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. • Read, summarize, analyze, and synthesize complex texts purposefully in order to generate and support writing. • Demonstrate an awareness of the strategies that writers use in different rhetorical situations. • Develop flexible strategies for organizing, revising, editing, and proofreading writing of varying lengths to improve development of ideas and appropriateness of expression. • Collaborate with peers and the instructor to define revision strategies for particular pieces of writing, set goals for improving writing, and devise effective plans for achieving those goals.

We will approach these goals from several angles, beginning with personal narrative, moving into description and argument, and finishing with a longer, individual research project. In the first part of this course, you will have many opportunities to practice and perfect your own style of interesting, grammatical prose. You will be responsible for one 4-5 page expository essay and one 3-4 page descriptive essay, in addition to various shorter writing assignments.

In the second part of the course, we will expand our writing horizons to the kind of thesis-driven, argumentative essay that appears on nearly every university syllabus. Keep in mind that this is not your basic five-paragraph essay! We will start by considering the argumentative structure of newspaper editorials, then we will apply the basics of persuasion to cultural critique and academic research projects. During this time, you will be responsible for one 2 page editorial essay, one 5-6 page cultural critique, and a final 6-8 page research paper in the style of your anticipated major.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 075, REC

Instructor: Feigenbaum,Paul T

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

How is history written? How is memory written? Who writes either, and who decides who will read what? What is the distinction between these two genres? Are the differences about style? About facts? About truth? About point of view and voice? And what is the relationship between them? Are there ways that history and memory are similar? What are the consequences — both broadly and personally — of making that claim? This class is designed to help you become better writers of argumentative, analytical papers. The readings I have chosen are designed to give you a jumping off point for your own thinking, both in what they argue and how they argue. This means that sometimes they may be challenging on the first reading, but never fear! That's what the class discussions are for. Through the discussions and your own in-class and out-of-class writings, you will learn to demystify both the arcane land of college writing and college reading. To help you achieve this proficiency, you will be writing and rewriting several essays of increasing length, focusing on developing well-thought out and carefully analyzed arguments. This class is not supposed to terrify you, but to help you make the transition into a more rigorous model of academic writing and to familiarize you with its conventions so that you can use them to your own advantage. The essays and articles we read are the stepping off place and inspiration for our writing, but the most important texts in this class will be your own writing. We will focus our energy on writing and rewriting papers you have produced for class, using the initial texts as grounding. Let me emphasize: this class is intended to help you develop better skills as a reader and writer.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 076, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

The primary goal of this course of ENGLISH 125 for the Health Sciences Scholars Program is to help you learn to write clear, compelling, and sophisticated prose. In short, this course is designed to help you to learn to write well at the college level, regardless of your field of study. After all, as we will talk about from day one, good writing is good writing. We will work to develop writing skills through a wide range of methods: readings, discussions, writing exercises, peer critiques, and responses to other forms of expression. Writing is an organized way of thinking, and our engagement with the subject matter will be focused primarily on issues of style, craft, and execution. By learning to identify and evaluate the craft elements and prose strategies used by other writers (both published authors and your own classmates), my hope is that you will begin to employ them more effectively in your own pieces of writing. Of course, the most important part of a piece of good writing is its significance. No matter how well crafted a line, how beautiful a transition, good writing has to say something, show us a new way of seeing something, and we will also examine different ways authors imbue their work with relevance and meaning. Each of you bring something unique to the classroom; each of you has a unique voice. Voice gives life to writing, whether creative or scholarly, by imbuing it with individuality and texture and by allowing you to interpret culture through your own identity. Writing, after all, is a process of filtering. But voice is not only a way to explore identity and significance. Awareness of an appropriate voice can lead you to consider the concept of audience and to realize that you may have many different voices; a personal narrative calls for a different voice, say, than does an analysis of a foreign film or a scientific challenge. Over the course of this semester we will explore the ways in which individuals — including ourselves — negotiate and examine the different aspects of our contemporary culture, and how these investigations might lead to an authentic voice.

ESSAYS, IN-CLASS EXERCISES, SHORT ASSIGNMENTS, AND READINGS If I had a dollar for every person who told me, "I have a great idea for a novel/screenplay/essay, if I only could write it," I would be a rich, rich woman. There is a strange assumption that having the great idea is all that writing takes, and once you have it, writing is a piece of cake, just a matter of getting those brilliant ideas down on paper in whatever order they come. In a sense, perhaps, the idea is part of it, but I wish writing were this easy. Writing is a craft, an art, and a skill. Writing is not a piece of cake. It takes work, thought, and lots and lots of revision. Writing is a process. Sometimes, we don't know how we feel about a topic until we begin to write about it. Writing helps us work out different issues in our heads, to reflect, to analyze, to answer questions. First and foremost, there's no way around it: the best way to improve your writing skills is through practice, and lots of it. You should expect to work very hard in this class. You should expect in-class writing exercises that respond to and reflect on our readings. Several short essays will be assigned to help develop your skills of observation and reflective thought. The major essay projects that you will complete as the class progresses will be based on the various forms of writing we will explore this semester. When trying to communicate your ideas, technical skills count, too. The most compelling, provocative ideas are only well served if they are articulated well, and proper grammar and punctuation can make all the difference. Secondly, we become better writers through reading. A writer who claims he or she doesn't read is probably, well, a very limited writer. I hope this class will expose you to a wide range of styles. I hope that our discussions of the published work will be as helpful to your writing as our in-class workshops and my comments on your work. In many classes you might have been in, you may have used the readings as prompts for essays: analyzing a character or theme or comparing or contrasting a certain element in two different works. Here, while we will surely be paying attention to theme and character, among many other things, the readings we will examine will serve more as models for the essays I will ask you to write. Finally, we will also be reading some craft essays: different writers' thoughts and ideas about the actual process, art, and craft of writing. A myth exists, perhaps, that good college writing involves using million-dollar words or always writing in a high diction, that is, writing in a way that "sounds smart." Rather, I think good college writing is not about sounding smart, per se, but about sounding authentic. I'd like you, as writers and students, to be able to think through complex ideas, to challenge comfortable assumptions, and to write like you mean it. If you don't believe in what you're writing, or if you're using meaningless, convoluted phrases or giant words just to sound impressive, you most likely will come up with a very boring, stilted, or unimpressive essay. Write what you believe. Believe what you write. Say it clearly. Write like you mean it.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 077, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

The films, political manifestos, essays on cultural history and other documents we will examine in this course all work in one way or another to present and defend a particular point of view. As we progress through the term we will concentrate not only on what a given text appears to be arguing but also on how that text works to achieve its ends.

This course has been designed with cumulative learning in mind. As we progress through each week's focus of study, you will see how the readings build into and out of one another. Students will be required to write three substantial essays, and each essay will grow out of a series of pre-draft assignments.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 078, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This is a normal college writing course, in which you will practice thinking/reasoning clearly and writing out your thoughts in easily understood language. Throughout this particular section of the course, however, we will be focussing on the question: "what makes sense?"; that is, what can we say about a topic or object so that we can make an argument about it such that other people understand and can respond to? This obviously involves some understanding of the audience we write for, but it also involves a constant awareness of the form of writing itself, the way we construct an argument in the same way we construct buildings or bikes or whatever else, that is, out of units or pieces that we put together or carefully pile on top of each other. I hope that the class will enable you to see that the art of "reasoning" as this construction of units is both binding and liberating: it disallows claims that don't have either evidence or some sense of causality behind them, but it also doesn't follow one absolute, pre-given set of rules. There are many ways of making sense of a given topic, each of them with both their blind-spots and points of insight; much of our work in the class will revolve around identifying these methods in other writers and, of course, practicing our own methods of reasoning and exercising our abilities to reason in our writing. In order to keep ourselves focussed on reasoning and writing, we won't be doing extensive reading; rather we will look at small pieces of writing — sometimes only paragraphs at a time — in order to see how they are reasoning or making sense of an issue. These readings will vary and will include philosophical texts, standard academic essays, sports/fashion writing, fiction, historical writings, and whatever happens to be in the paper that day. Assignments will consist of frequent short essays — sometimes only a few sentences and (probably) never more than a page — which will lead up to either one or two longer papers. In these essays and paper(s), students will practice talking both about themselves and their opinions and about more objective things, such as a historical event, a theory, a biological phenomenon, etc. Students should expect to do an unusual amount of thinking and talking while in class, and those students with a critical or analytical bent are encouraged to enroll.

Enjoy the rest of summer, and see you in September.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 079, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

A study of rhetoric, both as a body of principles, and as a practical art, emphasizing the writing of expository and argumentative essays.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 080, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

A study of rhetoric, both as a body of principles, and as a practical art, emphasizing the writing of expository and argumentative essays.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 081, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

COURSE DESCRIPTION: The pulse of this writing workshop is your voice. In order to explore the art of writing you must begin with what you value, what moves you, how you communicate, how you listen, and how you observe. What you have that no other writer has is your own way of phrasing, your own way of seeing, your own history that shapes your lens. This class is designed to give you the structure and tools you need to realize your own intentions and to reach your audience. Revising is the most important thing we do as writers, and we will spend the majority of our time doing so. Essays are a place for you to think, and by doing so on the page — allowing your ideas to dictate your essay's form — you can interest even those who disagree with your point of view.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 082, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

You are in college. You must write. In this course, you will learn skills of the writing craft to take into whatever discipline you choose. We will create essays that emphasize discovery, analysis, and clarity. We will read a broad variety of essays, deconstructing them in class discussion and using them as models for our own work. You will produce new writing, workshop (both peer group and whole class), and revise. This class will give you a foundation for solid writing and will encourage brilliant thought.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 083, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

A study of rhetoric, both as a body of principles, and as a practical art, emphasizing the writing of expository and argumentative essays.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 084, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This section of ENGLISH125 will focus on the peculiar construction of counter- and sub-cultures, those groups whose identities are generated negatively within a larger, dominant culture. The course consists of three units: 1) defining culture; 2) a brief history of American counterculture; 3) comparative documentarian histories of British "punk" [the Sex Pistols story]. Students should be advised that a few of the assigned texts contain frank language.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 085, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

Fifteen percent of the population nationally and worldwide are categorized as people with disabilities, making them a large physical minority. Despite their numbers, they have been historically disenfranchised and marginalized in society at large. Only within the last twenty years has disability gained visibility within the discourses of knowledge.

In this section of ENGLISH 125, we will look at representative texts from the field of disability studies, texts which present important writings about disability. We will examine texts written by experts in cultural studies, literary criticism, sociology, biology, the visual arts, pedagogy, and postcolonial studies, in order to gain a comprehensive overview to the issue of disability and to practise writing abilities.

Good writing is a process combining engaged, complex thinking, close reading of sources and last, but not least, technical competence. Thus, we will thoroughly practise each one of these skills within the field of disability studies, which is ideal for our purpose. By examining the notion of the normal body, revealing assumptions in the politics and poetics of social and physical space, sexuality, language, textuality, access to resources, and public policy decisions concerning the body, you will further your abilities through a wide range of methods: readings, discussions, writing exercises, peer critiques, and responses to other forms of expression, including visual art and film. Apart from learning how to organize essays of varied lengths or how to use and quote outside sources correctly by completing a variety of writing exercises and projects in and out of class, this section should also help you develop an authentic and mindful voice as an individual. Basic course requirements are, among others, a portfolio with at least 25-30 pages of revised prose and other writing assignments.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 086, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

A study of rhetoric, both as a body of principles, and as a practical art, emphasizing the writing of expository and argumentative essays.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 087, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This section of ENGLISH 125 will focus on the peculiar construction of counter- and sub-cultures, those groups whose identities are generated negatively within a larger, dominant culture. The course consists of three units: 1) defining culture; 2) a brief history of American counterculture; 3) comparative documentarian histories of British "punk" [the Sex Pistols story]. Students should be advised that a few of the assigned texts contain frank language.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 088, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

Welcome to ENGLISH 125.088. This is an intensive writing course that will focus on the creation of complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. You will work closely with your peers and your instructor to develop your written prose. Readings will cover a variety of genres and academic disciplines.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 089, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

Fifteen percent of the population nationally and worldwide are categorized as people with disabilities, making them a large physical minority. Despite their numbers, they have been historically disenfranchised and marginalized in society at large. Only within the last twenty years has disability gained visibility within the discourses of knowledge.

In this section of ENGLISH 125, we will look at representative texts from the field of disability studies, texts which present important writings about disability. We will examine texts written by experts in cultural studies, literary criticism, sociology, biology, the visual arts, pedagogy, and postcolonial studies, in order to gain a comprehensive overview to the issue of disability and to practise writing abilities.

Good writing is a process combining engaged, complex thinking, close reading of sources and last, but not least, technical competence. Thus, we will thoroughly practise each one of these skills within the field of disability studies, which is ideal for our purpose. By examining the notion of the normal body, revealing assumptions in the politics and poetics of social and physical space, sexuality, language, textuality, access to resources, and public policy decisions concerning the body, you will further your abilities through a wide range of methods: readings, discussions, writing exercises, peer critiques, and responses to other forms of expression, including visual art and film. Apart from learning how to organize essays of varied lengths or how to use and quote outside sources correctly by completing a variety of writing exercises and projects in and out of class, this section should also help you develop an authentic and mindful voice as an individual. Basic course requirements are, among others, a portfolio with at least 25-30 pages of revised prose and other writing assignments.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 090, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

Communicating ideas clearly and persuasively on the page is an essential part of being an educated person. In the classroom and beyond, your ability to organize, develop and express thoughts will serve the authority of your opinions. Along with writing skills, the critical reading skills gained in this class will enable you to become a more-informed critic of the social and political issues that affect your daily life.

In this course, you will learn how to define a thesis, or an organizing idea, and then support and develop that idea in a focused, thorough and stylistically sophisticated essay. The three papers you will draft and revise for this course are not simply exercises in writing, but rather they are opportunities for you to hone your critical reading and thinking skills while exploring topics of interest. We will be reading a number of published essays as models for your own work and also to generate class discussion about relevant social issues. These essays may spur ideas for your own writing as you examine various perspectives on issues such as race and class in America, mass media, consumer culture and more. Furthermore, as you express your ideas on the page, you will learn how to write for a specific audience, how to consider both sides of an issue by utilizing counter-arguments, how to organize an argument, as well as how to write with precision and flourish.

By the end of the semester, you will be able to develop a clear, focused and well-supported position within an essay of substantial length. Your essays will be workshopped in class with at least one of your peers; while this process is aimed at improving your critical reading and writing skills, you will also benefit by seeing how others in class are handling the assignment. Through workshopping and revising, you will obtain a better grasp on how significantly your writing can improve with each draft. Simply stated: Writing is revising. And, like a muscle, writing only gets stronger with use.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 091, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

Writing, like most forms of performance, demands creative application of polished skills. In order to acquire and practice these skills, we will look back to the contexts in which they were first formalized and studied under the concept of rhetoric: the Greek city states and Roman republic of classical antiquity. As we gain familiarity with the forms, processes, and strategies of argument practiced by the ancients, we will begin to apply them to analyses of readings drawn from a range of historical periods and fields and employ them in a variety of writing assignments.

Although classical antiquity does not represent the last word on theories of rhetoric and composition, it affords contemporary writers a particularly strong foundation, in part because its social context bears many parallels with the challenges we face. These include complexities of cultural diversity and economic inequality, questions of elitism versus populism, and conflicting views regarding the power of tradition and the possibilities of the future.

Students in this course will learn how to "invent" or discover arguments, recognize fallacies, and make calculated decisions regarding kinds of appeal (logical, ethical, or emotional). Where is your composition strengthened by deduction and where by induction? How can awareness of your subject matter and target audience help you choose the most effective tone and style? Such considerations will contribute to your development as a writer on the level of the sentence, paragraph structure, and the organization of an essay. Ultimately, the goal is to increase your facility with language in order to sharpen your analytical faculties and to exercise your own voice with increased effectiveness.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 092, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This writing course focuses on the creation of complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. Students work closely with their peers and their instructor to develop their written prose. Readings cover a variety of genres and academic disciplines.

The primary goal of this course is to help you learn to write clear, compelling, and sophisticated prose. We will develop these skills through a range of methods: readings, discussions, writing exercises, peer critiques, and responses to other forms of expression such as media, visual art, music, and film. Because writing is an organized way of thinking, our engagement with the subject matter will be focused primarily on issues of style, craft, and execution.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 093, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This writing course focuses on the creation of complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. Students work closely with their peers and their instructor to develop their written prose. Readings cover a variety of genres and academic disciplines.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 094, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This writing course focuses on the creation of complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. Students work closely with their peers and the instructor to develop their written prose. Readings cover a variety of different genres and academic disciplines.

The aim of this course is to make students more comfortable with academic writing. Since college writing demands lengthy and complex papers, the process of writing will be emphasized. The course writing requirements will consist of essays (one 2-3 pages in length, one 4-5 pages in length, and one 7-8 pages in length) and summaries (one 1-2 pages in length and one 3-4 pages in length). Students will have the opportunity to workshop their work in progress and revise drafts.

The reading and discussion of a variety of texts (printed, oral, and visual; theoretical, professional, and creative) will aid students in the process of constructing viable arguments and in developing personal style. Students will be asked to critically assess their own goals and progress and encouraged to find their own balance between the personal and the public in their writing. The class will also address theoretical questions connected with the ethics and politics of writing.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 095, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This writing course focuses on the creation of complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. Students work closely with their peers to develop their written prose. Readings cover a variety of different genres.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 096, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

How important are our assumptions about language, culture, and environment to the process of thinking and writing? In this course we will take a rigorous analytical look at the subjects of our reading and writing in the hope of challenging some of our safe and easy assumptions about them. By clearing away these assumptions, not only will our writing become sharper and stronger, but the enhanced capacity for critical thinking should lead us to develop more detailed, more interesting, and more original expository and argumentative essays.

We will look at a wide range of professional essays, but will also spend a good bit of time examining writing from within our class. By engaging in peer editing, reading both classic essays and the discourse of contemporary culture, and writing and rewriting pages of carefully considered prose, students will gain knowledge and skills for further academic writing. Each formal paper will have a prescribed approach and a specific aim, but students will have free reign to invent their own paper topics.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 097, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

A study of rhetoric, both as a body of principles, and as a practical art, emphasizing the writing of expository and argumentative essays.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 098, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This writing course focuses on the creation of complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. Students work closely with their peers and the instructor to develop their written prose. Readings cover a variety of different genres and academic disciplines.

This section takes its title from the opening pages of The Practical Guide to Writing, which maintains that writing is, in part, a physical act, a skill that can be learned and improved by reading, writing, and revising as much as possible and by receiving critical feedback from others. Good writing is also interconnected with good reading, so we will discuss assigned readings together with an eye toward what choices go into writing an essay and how they affect the final product. An essential component of this course is the workshop, where we will read and critique each other's papers. The goal of the workshop is to provide a variety of viewpoints and suggestions from which the author may draw when revising his or her paper. This requires participation from everyone.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 099, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

My goal in this course is simple: to help each of you become a better writer. Articulating your ideas well on paper and in conversation can be one of your greatest assets in college and professional life. In this course you will learn to identify and analyze the components of good persuasive and expository prose, and you'll develop the essential skills for writing critical and persuasive essays at the college level. You will learn to express and support your own opinions in a way that is appropriate to the genre and clear and interesting to the reader. We will closely study the work of established writers as well as the writing of our peers, and workshops and peer critiques will play a central role in this course. Assignments will include four formal, revised essays, peer critiques, weekly exercises, and readings.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 100, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

Students will draw on their own memories and impressions of place to discover techniques for travel writing, personal narrative, and critical essay. Relevant reading material will inform discussion and provide writing models.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 101, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

So much of life is about dealing with change. The world is a flux of new technologies and old problems. Our sense of security has been altered by tragic events. The environment is shifting before our eyes. As college students, many of you live in a constant state of transition as you deal with new classes, new friends, new places to call home. In this class, while we engage with the topics of college academic writing, such as pre-writing, rhetoric, audience, persuasion, editing for correctness, and citing sources, we will also consider what it means to be in transition, whether the shift is global, local, or personal. This theme will also lend itself to our discussions about writing. As writing is best approached from a position of inquiry, the process of drafting requires us to remain in a transitory state as we pursue questions from different angles. The more we view writing as a process, not a final product, and the more comfortable we are with writing through the unknown, the more surprising and effortless our writing will become.

Over the course of the term, you will write three to four essays of increasing length, each of which will be workshopped, revised, and turned in for a final grade. The final essay will be accompanied by an annotated bibliography. Shorter assignments will help you transition into the longer essays by engaging with individual components of the overall tradition of college writing. We will discuss grammar as standards that reflect a static image of a living language, and you will work in groups to create your own grammar lesson. To help with your engagement with discussions and skills acquisition, you will also keep a writing journal, which will contain reading questions, free-writes, vocabulary notes, and pre- and post-class transitional exercises. The goal of this class is for you to challenge yourself by exploring complex ideas in your writing, without being overwhelmed by the new skills, attitudes, and ideas these explorations will inevitably require and ultimately produce.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 102, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

So much of life is about dealing with change. The world is a flux of new technologies and old problems. Our sense of security has been altered by tragic events. The environment is shifting before our eyes. As college students, many of you live in a constant state of transition as you deal with new classes, new friends, new places to call home. In this class, while we engage with the topics of college academic writing, such as pre-writing, rhetoric, audience, persuasion, editing for correctness, and citing sources, we will also consider what it means to be in transition, whether the shift is global, local, or personal. This theme will also lend itself to our discussions about writing. As writing is best approached from a position of inquiry, the process of drafting requires us to remain in a transitory state as we pursue questions from different angles. The more we view writing as a process, not a final product, and the more comfortable we are with writing through the unknown, the more surprising and effortless our writing will become.

Over the course of the term, you will write three to four essays of increasing length, each of which will be workshopped, revised, and turned in for a final grade. The final essay will be accompanied by an annotated bibliography. Shorter assignments will help you transition into the longer essays by engaging with individual components of the overall tradition of college writing. We will discuss grammar as standards that reflect a static image of a living language, and you will work in groups to create your own grammar lesson. To help with your engagement with discussions and skills acquisition, you will also keep a writing journal, which will contain reading questions, free-writes, vocabulary notes, and pre- and post-class transitional exercises. The goal of this class is for you to challenge yourself by exploring complex ideas in your writing, without being overwhelmed by the new skills, attitudes, and ideas these explorations will inevitably require and ultimately produce.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 103, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

Through reading and intensive writing, we'll explore how place, memory, and the workings of the mind build our sense of who we are and how we exist in the world — all the while working toward a mastery of college writing skills.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 104, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This introductory writing course will encourage students to explore their ideas, experience, and critical skills using the navigational tools of language. Balancing our time between personal, argumentative, and analytical writing, we will stake our own unique claims on written communication. To provide inspiration and lend guidance, we will read a broad selection of writers from varied ages, backgrounds and perspectives, and discuss how they manipulate and exercise their craft.

We will also spend a bit of time in the freshman English trenches, reviewing grammatical fundamentals and rules for research and citation. Perhaps most crucial to our class, however, will be the class time we spend "workshopping" each other's work — providing sensitive constructive criticism toward thoughtful revision and improvements.

SPECIAL NOTE FOR FALL, 2006: In commemoration of the fifth anniversary of the 9/11 attacks, this semester's course will feature a unit of readings/writings on the event and its cultural and emotional aftermath. While this focus will in NO way seek to exploit, morbidly, the events and emotions of 9/11, students who elect this section should be prepared to revisit some of the difficult images and realities of that tragic day.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 105, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This introductory writing course will encourage students to explore their ideas, experience, and critical skills using the navigational tools of language. Balancing our time between personal, argumentative, and analytical writing, we will stake our own unique claims on written communication. To provide inspiration and lend guidance, we will read a broad selection of writers from varied ages, backgrounds and perspectives, and discuss how they manipulate and exercise their craft.

We will also spend a bit of time in the freshman English trenches, reviewing grammatical fundamentals and rules for research and citation. Perhaps most crucial to our class, however, will be the class time we spend "workshopping" each other's work — providing sensitive constructive criticism toward thoughtful revision and improvements.

SPECIAL NOTE FOR FALL, 2006: In commemoration of the fifth anniversary of the 9/11 attacks, this semester's course will feature a unit of readings/writings on the event and its cultural and emotional aftermath. While this focus will in NO way seek to exploit, morbidly, the events and emotions of 9/11, students who elect this section should be prepared to revisit some of the difficult images and realities of that tragic day.

GTBOOKS 191 — Great Books
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Cameron,H Don

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU, FYWR
Other: WorldLit

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GTBOOKS 201 or CLCIV 101.

GTBOOKS 191 will survey the classical works of ancient Greece. Among the readings will be Homer's Iliad and Odyssey; a number of the plays of Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, and Aristophanes; Herodotus' Histories; Thucydides' History of the Peloponnesian War; and several of Plato's dialogues. The course format is two lectures and two discussion meetings a week. Six to eight short papers will be assigned; there will be midterm and final examinations. GTBOOKS 191 is open to first-year students in the Honors Program, and to other students with the permission of the Director of the Great Books Program.

Advisory Prerequisite: FR.H.PRG.

HISTORY 195 — The Writing of History
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Kerenji,Emil

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

Each section of this course studies a different era and topic in the past. Students read the work of modern historians, documents, and other source materials from the past. The goal is to learn how to construct effective arguments, and how to write college-level papers.

HISTORY 195 — The Writing of History
Section 002, REC

Instructor: Soppelsa,Peter Shannon

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

Each section of this course studies a different era and topic in the past. Students read the work of modern historians, documents, and other source materials from the past. The goal is to learn how to construct effective arguments, and how to write college-level papers.

HISTORY 195 — The Writing of History
Section 003, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

Each section of this course studies a different era and topic in the past. Students read the work of modern historians, documents, and other source materials from the past. The goal is to learn how to construct effective arguments, and how to write college-level papers.

HISTORY 195 — The Writing of History
Section 004, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

Each section of this course studies a different era and topic in the past. Students read the work of modern historians, documents, and other source materials from the past. The goal is to learn how to construct effective arguments, and how to write college-level papers.

LHSP 125 — College Writing
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Metsker,Jennifer A

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

Credit Exclusions: A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Every day we encounter a whirlwind of advertisements, products, media, and fads based on ideals presumed readymade for the populace, ideals that are often supported by assumptions about what you, the consumer, need or desire. By combining a close examination of popular culture with the challenging task of creating successful college essays, this class sets out to achieve two goals at once. In addition to offering you the tools to write well in a variety of academic contexts, this class will encourage you to form a healthy habit of questioning your relationship with popular culture. And as good writing often begins with a good question, this attitude of inquiry will be the basis of our approach to writing. While we form inquiries about such topics as television addiction, rap music, and comic books, we will also critically examine our writing habits and our ideas of how to create viable theses and effective arguments.

Over the course of the term, you will write four main essays, all of which will be workshopped and revised before being turned in for a final grade. We will discuss grammar as a set of standards that reflect a static image of a living language, and you will work in groups to create your own grammar lessons.

To help with your engagement with discussions and skills acquisition, you will keep a writing journal, which will contain reading questions, free-writes, vocabulary notes, and in-class exercises. We will also analyze visual media, including photography, advertisements, television, and film, and you will be assigned an art project that will help you explore argumentation in a creative medium.

LHSP 125 — College Writing
Section 002, REC

Instructor: Cicciarelli,Louis A

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

Credit Exclusions: A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

This section of LHSP 125 will pivot on two main, simultaneous concerns: the development of your writing voice and the essential practice of revision. While our texts will explore the sometimes dark, sometimes destructive, and always mysterious pull of family, this course is ultimately designed to guide your development as critical readers, thinkers, and writers able to communicate in an academic community. We will use a workshop format to discuss our work-in-progress, with both peer critiques and full class workshops. Workshops will help us develop the critical skills necessary to read, discuss and analyze a piece of writing, and to learn how to apply these critical skills to our own work, especially in the process of revision. This class will stress drafting and revision as a necessary component of the writing process. Active class participation will also be a vital component of our class; discussions will develop critical processes that I believe help us clarify our thoughts and write good essays. In the end this course will improve upon your own writing processes and working methods as strategies you can return to as you continue to develop your writing.
Students will be expected to complete four revised essays, two short essays and two longer papers, and several one-page response papers. Our readings will include several essays that discuss notions of family in history and within the United States, as well as several short stories, a play, two novels, and two films steeped in family secrets, lore, struggle, dysfunction, and joy.

Texts may include Goodbye, Columbus, Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf, Affliction, Into the Great Wide Open, Housekeeping, The Virgin Suicides, Magnolia, The Squid and the Whale, and East is East.

LHSP 125 — College Writing
Section 003, REC

Instructor: Anderson,Marjorie Caldwell

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

Credit Exclusions: A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

What happens when questions of why and how intersect with the question where? This class will explore location and dislocation, home and travel, in text and experience. We'll read fiction writers who focus their attention on places like the plains of north Mexico and Ann Arbor, Michigan; we'll read nonfiction writers who explain their ways of understanding place and suggest new meanings for it; and we'll examine the actual places around us as a way of practicing creating arguments out of what we notice.

Good writing is based on careful observation and fresh insight, and the places around us provide one of our best resources for looking carefully and generating ideas about what we see.
Come with an enthusiasm for discussion and for writing as a process. Come prepared to work hard. Perhaps most of all, come with an interest in investigating where you are and where you come from.

LHSP 125 — College Writing
Section 004, REC

Instructor: McDaniel,Raymond Clark

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

Credit Exclusions: A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Every section of LHSP 125 addresses questions of narrative, argument and analysis. This section is no different in terms of WHAT you will learn, but it differs a bit in terms of HOW. We'll focus on writing about art, but not just "High Art" — we'll pay equal attention to high, middle and low, and determine whether those distinctions make any sense. So you'll be reading academic theory as well as the Television Without Pity website, savoring classics of horror literature as well as cheap B-movies. We'll consider epics and comic books, opera and bubblegum pop. Along the way, you'll learn how to recognize and manipulate the standards of college-level writing and thought, both in terms of flexible and professional prose and sophisticated argument.

LHSP 125 — College Writing
Section 005, REC

Instructor: Chamberlin,Jeremiah Michael

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

Credit Exclusions: A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

I have named this class "The Individual Voice in Community and Culture" because writing is not only a process of learning and expression, but also an important way to develop a conscious voice as an individual. We are each members — citizens, if you will — of diverse and myriad communities. Be it our regional or national background, educational or economic circumstances, ethnic or racial history, sexual or political preference, or religious or family upbringing, we understand the world and define ourselves in relation to the institutions and groups to which we belong (whether by choice or not). Yet ultimately, and perhaps most importantly, we are our own persons. Over the course of this semester we will explore the ways in which individuals — including ourselves — negotiate the different and sometimes difficult responsibilities of culture. By seeking to understand what "belonging" means, we will not only learn to see the world in a more complex way, but also begin the life-long process of developing our own voices as artists, writers, thinkers, and citizens.

RCCORE 100 — First Year Seminar
Section 011, SEM

Instructor: Sloat,Barbara M

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

An introductory course taken by all Residential College and Inteflex first-year students. Theme, readings, and methodology vary, but the common purpose of all Seminars is to introduce students to the intellectual life of the University and encourage them to become active and responsible in the learning process. Oral and written skills are stressed; students write frequent essays based on class readings and group discussions.

Advisory Prerequisite: SWC Writing Assessment. Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

RCCORE 100 — First Year Seminar
Section 016, SEM

Instructor: Hernandez,Lolita

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

An introductory course taken by all Residential College and Inteflex first-year students. Theme, readings, and methodology vary, but the common purpose of all Seminars is to introduce students to the intellectual life of the University and encourage them to become active and responsible in the learning process. Oral and written skills are stressed; students write frequent essays based on class readings and group discussions.

Advisory Prerequisite: SWC Writing Assessment. Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

SLAVIC 151 — First Year Seminar
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Toman,Jindrich; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR
Other: FYSem

Designed to introduce entering students to aspects of culture in Eastern Europe, Russia and Eurasia by analyzing the complex processes which define "culture" and "ethnicity" in the areas where "West meets East." Topics vary according to the interests of the instructors. Whatever their subject matter, first-year seminars emphasize critical thinking through class discussions and thorough practice in introductory composition.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

SLAVIC 151 — First Year Seminar
Section 002, SEM

Instructor: Krutikov,Mikhail

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR
Other: FYSem

Designed to introduce entering students to aspects of culture in Eastern Europe, Russia and Eurasia by analyzing the complex processes which define "culture" and "ethnicity" in the areas where "West meets East." Topics vary according to the interests of the instructors. Whatever their subject matter, first-year seminars emphasize critical thinking through class discussions and thorough practice in introductory composition.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

SLAVIC 151 — First Year Seminar
Section 003, SEM

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR
Other: FYSem

Designed to introduce entering students to aspects of culture in Eastern Europe, Russia and Eurasia by analyzing the complex processes which define "culture" and "ethnicity" in the areas where "West meets East." Topics vary according to the interests of the instructors. Whatever their subject matter, first-year seminars emphasize critical thinking through class discussions and thorough practice in introductory composition.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

 
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