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LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Fall 2007, Dept = GEOSCI
 
Page 1 of 1, Results 1 — 56 of 56
Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
GEOSCI 100 — Coral Reefs
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Hendy,Ingrid L

FA 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS
Other: Minicourse

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GEOSCI 156.

Coral Reefs is an in-depth tour of the biological and physical processes active in modern reef systems to provide a detailed understanding of the ecology of the individual organisms and the complex nature of their interactions within the reef community. Evolution of the reef community is examined, ranging from the crude framework structures formed over one billion years ago by primitive algae to luxuriant and diversified reefs of the modern-day oceans. The implications of man's intervention in the Earth's hydrosphere and atmosphere on the character of future reef communities are also considered.

GEOSCI 102 — Energy from the Earth
Section 002, LEC

Instructor: Kesler,Stephen E; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS
Other: Minicourse

The nature, mode of occurrence, and the technology of exploration and exploitation of energy resources, and their relevance to the present and future world energy needs. Special attention is given to oil, gas, oil shale, tar sands, coal, uranium, and geothermal resources.

GEOSCI 103 — Dinosaurs and Other Failures
Section 002, LEC

Instructor: Wilson,Jeffrey A; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS
Other: Minicourse

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GEOSCI 149.

Some of the outstanding "failures" in evolutionary history also involve the most interesting success stories. This course looks at the fossil record and the ecological causes of diversification and extinction of the ruling reptiles.

GEOSCI 104 — Ice Ages, Past and Future
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Moore Jr,Theodore C; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS
Other: Minicourse

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GEOSCI 151.

This course examines the effects of past glaciations on the landscape and on life, and on man in particular. Speculation on the causes of the ice ages that have dominated the Earth for the past million years and predictions of future ice ages, based on current geological research, are examined.

GEOSCI 107 — Volcanoes and Earthquakes
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Zhang,Youxue; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS
Other: Minicourse

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GEOSCI 205, 146, or 147.

The earth in action; geography of earthquakes and volcanoes and catastrophic events in historic times; size and frequency of occurrence of earthquakes and volcanic eruptions; the products of volcanism, volcanic rocks, and volcanic and geologic activity through geologic time; volcanic exhalations and the evolution of the earth's atmosphere and oceans; the relationship of earthquakes and volcanoes to plate tectonics and the internal dynamics of the earth; and volcanism and geothermal energy, man-made earthquakes, and earthquake prediction and control.

GEOSCI 107 — Volcanoes and Earthquakes
Section 002, LEC

Instructor: Zhang,Youxue; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS
Other: Minicourse

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GEOSCI 205, 146, or 147.

The earth in action; geography of earthquakes and volcanoes and catastrophic events in historic times; size and frequency of occurrence of earthquakes and volcanic eruptions; the products of volcanism, volcanic rocks, and volcanic and geologic activity through geologic time; volcanic exhalations and the evolution of the earth's atmosphere and oceans; the relationship of earthquakes and volcanoes to plate tectonics and the internal dynamics of the earth; and volcanism and geothermal energy, man-made earthquakes, and earthquake prediction and control.

GEOSCI 109 — Water and Society
Section 002, LEC

Instructor: Cruz Da Silva Castro,Maria C; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS
Other: Minicourse

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GEOSCI 206.

Presents an overview of problems encountered through the unwise use of water resources and the resultant impact on society through the analysis of case studies. An introduction to the hydrological cycle and principles of surface and groundwater hydrology is provided.

GEOSCI 111 — Climate and Mankind
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Moore Jr,Theodore C; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS
Other: Minicourse

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GEOSCI 151.

A short, half-term lecture course covering topics including weather, climate factors, climate. The course will explore how climate affects humans and how humans affect climate.


GEOSCI 115 — Earth and Life Through Time
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Mukasa,Samuel B; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS
Other: Minicourse

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GEOSCI 135 or 145.

General survey of geologic time, its measurement, dimensions and implications for rates of geological change. A review of the geological history of the Earth and the solar system to provide a framework for discussions of the evolution of life and development of the continents through time.

GEOSCI 115 — Earth and Life Through Time
Section 002, LEC

Instructor: Essene,Eric J; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS
Other: Minicourse

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GEOSCI 135 or 145.

General survey of geologic time, its measurement, dimensions and implications for rates of geological change. A review of the geological history of the Earth and the solar system to provide a framework for discussions of the evolution of life and development of the continents through time.

GEOSCI 118 — Introductory Geology Laboratory
Section 001, LAB

Instructor: Lohmann,Kyger C

FA 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS

Credit Exclusions: No credit if completed an introductory course in geology (GEOSCI/ENVIRON 116, 117, or 218).

A one-term laboratory course covering the laboratory portion of Introduction to Geology. The laboratory provides hands-on experience with minerals, rocks, and maps. Participants will learn to identify common minerals and rocks, use topographic and geologic maps, and draw and interpret geologic cross sections. Examples will be drawn from areas of recent glaciation, volcanism, and earthquakes to show how these features are depicted in maps.

Students who register for GEOSCI 118 must also be enrolled in GEOSCI 119 or they must have taken 119 in an earlier academic term.

Advisory Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent enrollment in GEOSCI 119, or 205 and 206, or 135.

GEOSCI 118 — Introductory Geology Laboratory
Section 002, LAB

Instructor: Lohmann,Kyger C

FA 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS

Credit Exclusions: No credit if completed an introductory course in geology (GEOSCI/ENVIRON 116, 117, or 218).

A one-term laboratory course covering the laboratory portion of Introduction to Geology. The laboratory provides hands-on experience with minerals, rocks, and maps. Participants will learn to identify common minerals and rocks, use topographic and geologic maps, and draw and interpret geologic cross sections. Examples will be drawn from areas of recent glaciation, volcanism, and earthquakes to show how these features are depicted in maps.

Students who register for GEOSCI 118 must also be enrolled in GEOSCI 119 or they must have taken 119 in an earlier academic term.

Advisory Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent enrollment in GEOSCI 119, or 205 and 206, or 135.

GEOSCI 118 — Introductory Geology Laboratory
Section 003, LAB

Instructor: Lohmann,Kyger C

FA 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS

Credit Exclusions: No credit if completed an introductory course in geology (GEOSCI/ENVIRON 116, 117, or 218).

A one-term laboratory course covering the laboratory portion of Introduction to Geology. The laboratory provides hands-on experience with minerals, rocks, and maps. Participants will learn to identify common minerals and rocks, use topographic and geologic maps, and draw and interpret geologic cross sections. Examples will be drawn from areas of recent glaciation, volcanism, and earthquakes to show how these features are depicted in maps.

Students who register for GEOSCI 118 must also be enrolled in GEOSCI 119 or they must have taken 119 in an earlier academic term.

Advisory Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent enrollment in GEOSCI 119, or 205 and 206, or 135.

GEOSCI 118 — Introductory Geology Laboratory
Section 004, LAB

Instructor: Lohmann,Kyger C

FA 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS

Credit Exclusions: No credit if completed an introductory course in geology (GEOSCI/ENVIRON 116, 117, or 218).

A one-term laboratory course covering the laboratory portion of Introduction to Geology. The laboratory provides hands-on experience with minerals, rocks, and maps. Participants will learn to identify common minerals and rocks, use topographic and geologic maps, and draw and interpret geologic cross sections. Examples will be drawn from areas of recent glaciation, volcanism, and earthquakes to show how these features are depicted in maps.

Students who register for GEOSCI 118 must also be enrolled in GEOSCI 119 or they must have taken 119 in an earlier academic term.

Advisory Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent enrollment in GEOSCI 119, or 205 and 206, or 135.

GEOSCI 118 — Introductory Geology Laboratory
Section 005, LAB

Instructor: Lohmann,Kyger C

FA 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS

Credit Exclusions: No credit if completed an introductory course in geology (GEOSCI/ENVIRON 116, 117, or 218).

A one-term laboratory course covering the laboratory portion of Introduction to Geology. The laboratory provides hands-on experience with minerals, rocks, and maps. Participants will learn to identify common minerals and rocks, use topographic and geologic maps, and draw and interpret geologic cross sections. Examples will be drawn from areas of recent glaciation, volcanism, and earthquakes to show how these features are depicted in maps.

Students who register for GEOSCI 118 must also be enrolled in GEOSCI 119 or they must have taken 119 in an earlier academic term.

Advisory Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent enrollment in GEOSCI 119, or 205 and 206, or 135.

GEOSCI 118 — Introductory Geology Laboratory
Section 006, LAB

Instructor: Lohmann,Kyger C

FA 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS

Credit Exclusions: No credit if completed an introductory course in geology (GEOSCI/ENVIRON 116, 117, or 218).

A one-term laboratory course covering the laboratory portion of Introduction to Geology. The laboratory provides hands-on experience with minerals, rocks, and maps. Participants will learn to identify common minerals and rocks, use topographic and geologic maps, and draw and interpret geologic cross sections. Examples will be drawn from areas of recent glaciation, volcanism, and earthquakes to show how these features are depicted in maps.

Students who register for GEOSCI 118 must also be enrolled in GEOSCI 119 or they must have taken 119 in an earlier academic term.

Advisory Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent enrollment in GEOSCI 119, or 205 and 206, or 135.

GEOSCI 119 — Introductory Geology Lectures
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Lohmann,Kyger C

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, NS

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted if completed or enrolled in GEOSCI/ENVIRON 116, 117, 120. No credit granted if completed both GEOSCI 205 AND GEOSCI/ENVIRON 206. Only 3 credits with GEOSCI 205 or GEOSCI/ENVIRON 206.

GEOSCI 119 is a basic single-term course in introductory geology concentrating on the evolution of the Earth in physical and chemical terms. Reference to the interaction of the external biosphere — atmosphere — hydrosphere with the earth's interior is an essential component of the course.

Topics covered include:

  • plate tectonics: continental collision and fragmentation
  • tsunamis, earthquakes and volcanoes
  • evolution and extinction: dinosaurs and the fossil record
  • glaciers, global warming and climate change
  • geologic time

Lectures three hours per week. A separate discussion section for one hour each week is scheduled for review and discussion of topics covered in class.

To also enroll in the Intro Geology Lab, register for any section of GEOSCI 118. The GEOSCI 118 laboratory provides a practical study of minerals, rocks, fossils and geologic maps. Students are strongly encouraged to enroll in both GEOSCI 119 and 118, since the lab sessions complement the lectures and discussions.

NOTE: GEOSCI 119 plus 118 replaces GEOSCI 117.

REQUIRED TEXTBOOK: Earth: Portrait of a Planet, by Marshak, second edition, W.W. Norton & Company, New York. ISBN: 0-393-92502-1

Advisory Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in ENVIRON or GEOSCI 118 for the lab

GEOSCI 120 — Geology of National Parks and Monuments
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Lange,Rebecca Ann; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, NS

Credit Exclusions: No credit if completed GEOSCI/ENVIRON 116, 117, or 119, or both GEOSCI 205 AND GEOSCI/ENVIRON 206. Only 3 credits with GEOSCI 205 or GEOSCI/ENVIRON 206.

This course approaches Earth history by examining the geology of places rather than by taking a process approach. It is designed for all interested undergraduates at the University of Michigan. The course format consists of three lectures each week and one two-hour demonstration-laboratory period, for four credits. Lecture material deals with the geologic history of selected national parks and monuments, which are chosen and scheduled so that those in which the oldest rocks are exposed (thus relating to the earliest portions of Earth history) are covered first. In so doing, we cover Earth history in a temporal progression, but do so by discussing different geographic areas. The demonstration-laboratory portion of the course will give you first-hand experience with rocks, minerals, and fossils; and an opportunity to discuss these in small groups.

Text: Parks and Plates: The Geology of Our National Parks, Monuments, and Seashores by Robert J. Lillie ISBN: 0393924076 W. W. Norton & Company

GEOSCI 122 — Extreme Weather
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Ridley,Aaron James

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: NS

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in AOSS 202.

This course provides an introduction to the physics of extreme weather events. The course uses weather disasters and threats to illustrate the physical laws governing the atmosphere.

We examine solar eruptions, ice ages, climate change, monsoons, El Niño, hurricanes, floods, droughts, heat waves, thunderstorms, lightning, hail, tornados, and other extreme atmospheric events to illustrate the basic physical laws that produce these events. Participants are expected to apply these principles to a series of homework assignments including hands-on weather forecasting and analysis of storm events.

Required resources for this course include:

  1. An on-line subscription to XamPREP: Essentials of Meteorology by C. Donald Ahrens with
  2. (Optionally) A hard-copy version of Essentials of Meteorology by C. Donald Ahrens (it's redundant but some really prefer to also have the traditional paper copy), and
  3. A copy of Extreme Weather by Chris Burt.

GEOSCI 145 — Evolution of the Earth
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Mukasa,Samuel B; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, NS
Other: FYSem

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GEOSCI 135. Those with credit for GEOSCI 115 may only elect GEOSCI 145 for 2 credits.

This seminar course is intended for first-year students with no previous knowledge of, or experience in, the earth sciences. The material introduces students to the history of the Earth from its formation in the solar nebula, through the development of the continents, oceans, atmosphere, and life to its present state as an active planet. The course explains how various features of the Earth 'work,' including continental drift, volcanoes, and the formation of most rocks; how theories are developed in geology; and how the magnitude of time has been determined. The course is divided into two halves. In the first half, the basic concepts are explained. In the second half, each student makes a presentation covering a relevant subject followed by discussion. Assessment is by two one-hour examinations and the oral presentation, which forms the basis for a term paper. Regular assigned readings from the course text book are essential. Enrollment is limited to first-year students only. Upperclassmen will not be allowed to register for the course.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students (including first-year students with sophomore standing) may pre-register for this course. All others need permission of instructor.

GEOSCI 146 — Plate Tectonics
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Ritsema,Jeroen; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, NS
Other: FYSem

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed three of GEOSCI 105, 107, and 205. Those with credit for one of GEOSCI 105 and 107 may only elect GEOSCI 146 for two credits. Those with credit for GEOSCI 205, or both GEOSCI 105 and 107, may only elect GEOSCI 146 for one credit.

Two hundred million years ago the Earth's continents were joined together to form one gigantic super-continent, called Pangea. Plate tectonic forces broke Pangea apart and caused the continents to drift. We study the evidence for plate tectonics and the large-scale dynamics of the Earth's interior that is responsible for mountain building, earthquakes faulting, volcanic eruptions, changes in Earth's magnetic field and much more.

The course involves three hours of weekly meeting time and selected reading material. No background in Earth science is necessary. Evaluation is based on class participation, three exams, a series of student presentations on selected topics and written essays on the same subject.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students (including first-year students with sophomore standing) may pre-register for this course. All others need permission of instructor.

GEOSCI 147 — Natural Hazards
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Kesler,Stephen E; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, NS
Other: FYSem

Credit Exclusions: Those with credit for GEOSCI 107 or 205 may only elect GEOSCI 147 for 2 credits. Those who have credit for both GEOSCI 107 and 205 may only elect 147 for 1 credit.

This first-year seminar examines the geologic origin, as well as economic and societal impact of natural hazards such as earthquakes, volcanoes, landslides, floods, tsunamis, climate change, and meteorite impacts through lectures, discussion, student presentations, and research projects.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students (including first-year students with sophomore standing) may pre-register for this course. All others need permission of instructor.

GEOSCI 148 — Seminar: Environmental Geology
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Ruff,Larry John; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, NS
Other: FYSem

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GEOSCI 284. Those with credit for GEOSCI 109 may only elect GEOSCI 148 for 2 credits.

This seminar will focus on a wide spectrum of possible interactions between people and their physical environment. Fundamental principles important to the study of environmental geology will be presented followed by readings of case histories and discussions of selected environmental problems, in particular those of anthropogenic origin. Examples of topics discussed include issues related to global warming, energy (fossil fuels, nuclear energy), water resources (impacts of excessive groundwater withdrawal, allocation of surface water rights), radioactive waste disposal, and geological aspects of environmental health.

Advisory Prerequisite: High school math and science. Only first-year students (including first-year students with sophomore standing) may pre-register for this course. All others need permission of instructor.

GEOSCI 171 — Introduction of Global Change: Physical Processes
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: van der Pluijm,Ben A; homepage
Instructor: Allan,J David; homepage
Instructor: Kling II,George W; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: NS

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for a combined total of 12 credits elected in introductory biology.

Instructor(s):

Every day, millions of human and natural activities are altering the planet on which we live. Over the past century, through our ever-increasing population and mastery of technology, we have been changing the global environment at a pace unknown to natural history.

The University of Michigan Global Change Program offers an interdisciplinary, introductory course sequence which investigates the causes and potential impacts of these changes using a combination of traditional lecture-based and modern web-based teaching methodologies. The Fall Academic Term course deals with issues relating to the physical, chemical, and biological cycles contributing to Global Change. Students apply learned knowledge by using spreadsheet and systems modeling software to investigate the dynamics of natural systems.

The Web-based course curriculum provides unparalleled opportunities to conduct on-line Internet research. In fact, you will create your own web-based poster on a topic of your choosing. The interactive laboratory exercises provide you the opportunity to use computers to examine how natural systems function as well as develop projections of the future consequences of changes in the environment. And, perhaps most important of all, you will have ample time for discussion of the critical issues in human development and how they relate to the international business community, global economics, society as a whole and the individual. All topics are developed in a manner that students will find both accessible and enjoyable. The course grade is based on two midterm exams, a final exam, completion of laboratory modules, and a course project based on some aspect of global change. There are no prerequisites for the course and no science background is assumed. The course is appropriate for all undergraduate students, irrespective of intended concentration, and is the first of a series of courses that can be taken as part of the Global Change Minor.

You will discuss...

  • Current and Projected Global Change

  • The Role of the Individual as a Citizen of the Planet

  • Case Studies of Regional and Global Change Issues

You will create...

  • Models of Interacting Systems that Give Insight into the Collision Between Natural and Societal Processes

  • A Web-based Poster on a Related Topic of Your Choice

Topics that are covered ......

The Universe:

  • Big Bang Theory

  • Birth and Death of Stars

  • Radiation Laws

  • Origin of the Elements

  • Planetary Energy Budget

Our Planet:

  • The Age of the Earth

  • Primitive Atmospheres

  • Natural Hazards

  • Plate Tectonics

  • Chemical & Biological Evolution

  • The Building Blocks for Life

Earth's Atmospheric & Oceanic Evolution:

  • Life Processes and Earth Systems

  • The Great Ice Ages

  • Atmospheric Circulation and Weather

  • Climate and Paleoclimate

  • Greenhouse Gases and Global Warming

  • Sea Level Change

  • El Niño

The Tree of Life:

  • Emergence of Complex Life

  • Extinction and Radiation

  • The Five Kingdoms

  • Natural Selection

  • Respiration and Photosynthesis

  • Ecosystems

Projected Ecological Consequences:

  • Elevated Carbon Dioxide Levels

  • Environmental Pollutants

  • Ozone Depletion

  • Likelihood of Global Climatic Change

GEOSCI 201 — Introduction to Physical Geography: The Earth System
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Blum,Joel D; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, NS

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GEOSCI 144.

This introduction to physical geography emphasizes the nature and dynamics of the earth system including the atmosphere, hydrosphere, and solid earth, and their interactions. Topics include seasons, heat balance, global warming, ozone destruction and circulation, moisture, precipitation, clouds, groundwater, ocean circulation, waves and tides, plate tectonics, landform evolution and soil development, the biosphere, climate evolution, and global change.

GEOSCI 205 — How the Earth Works: The Dynamic Planet
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Clark,Marin Kristen; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 2
Reqs: BS, NS

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GEOSCI 116, 117, 119, 120, or 146. No credit granted to those who have completed both GEOSCI 105 and 107. Those with credit for one of GEOSCI 105 and 107 may only elect GEOSCI 205 for 1 credit.

An integrated look at the dynamic Earth, with an emphasis on processes involved in its formation 4.56 billion years ago, the early development of its atmosphere, oceans and crust, and the subsequent evolution of its continents and ocean basins.

GEOSCI 208 — Hot Topics in the Earth Sciences
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Walter,Lynn M; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 1

The modern Earth Sciences are in the middle of some of the hottest debates in science on topics such as climate, global change, natural hazards, water and resources, evolution and origin of life, and the future of our planet. The Geological Sciences Department hosts an endowed Smith Lecture Series in which earth scientists from many research areas around the world share their latest work on these topics. Seminar participants will attend the lectures, read the posted topical articles, and post a weblog entry each week discussing new earth science insights gained from hearing the lecture and the effectiveness of the speaker in communicating these points.

Intended audience: Undergraduates interested in earth sciences and the environment.

Course Requirements: Attendance at both the weekly Smith Lecture and preceding seminar is mandatory. Grade is based on weekly attendance, participation in discussion sessions, and weblog entries.

Class Format: Meets for one hour before lecture, then for the Smith Lecture.

GEOSCI 222 — Introductory Oceanography
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/2

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in AOSS 203.

This course expores the oceans of Earth, their circulation, biology, chemistry, geology of the sea floor, and marine resources. Emphasis is on understanding the oceans as a single ecosystem.

While GEOSCI 222.001 students are encouraged to take the lab, GEOSCI 223, it is not required.

GEOSCI 222 — Introductory Oceanography
Section 002, LEC

Instructor: Owen,Robert M; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/2
Other: GateSci

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in AOSS 203.

This course introduces students to the scientific study of the oceans. Contents include: a brief history of ocean exploration; origins of the Earth, the oceans and life; the theory of plate tectonics; how ocean sediments serve as the Earth's history book; the composition of seawater and its influence on life and climate; waves, tides and currents; the life of the oceans and how it depends upon the marine environment; and the resources of the ocean. The course format consists of lectures and readings from an assigned textbook. The course grade will be based on three one-hour exams and a two-hour final exam.

Section 002 is a Gateway Science Course, designed especially for students considering an academic major or minor in one of the sciences. All students signing up for GEOSCI 222.002 must also take GEOSCI 223 Lab (any section).

NOTE: GEOSCI 222.001 is not a Gateway science course and does not require the GEOSCI 223 lab.

GEOSCI 223 — Introductory Oceanography, Laboratory
Section 001, LAB

FA 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/2

Laboratory course to be elected concurrently with GEOSCI 222. One two-hour lab each week.

Advisory Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in GEOSCI 222/ENVIRON 232

GEOSCI 223 — Introductory Oceanography, Laboratory
Section 002, LAB

FA 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/2

Laboratory course to be elected concurrently with GEOSCI 222. One two-hour lab each week.

Advisory Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in GEOSCI 222/ENVIRON 232

GEOSCI 223 — Introductory Oceanography, Laboratory
Section 003, LAB

FA 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/2

Laboratory course to be elected concurrently with GEOSCI 222. One two-hour lab each week.

Advisory Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in GEOSCI 222/ENVIRON 232

GEOSCI 223 — Introductory Oceanography, Laboratory
Section 004, LAB

FA 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/2

Laboratory course to be elected concurrently with GEOSCI 222. One two-hour lab each week.

Advisory Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in GEOSCI 222/ENVIRON 232

GEOSCI 231 — Elements of Mineralogy
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Ewing,Rodney C; homepage
Instructor: Becker,Udo

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GEOSCI 431. Those with credit for GEOSCI 232 may elect GEOSCI 231 for only 2 credits.

This course offers a comprehensive introduction to the nature, properties, structures, and modes of occurrence of minerals. The general features of the common rock-forming minerals are covered in lectures (3 hours per week). Topics that will be covered include an introduction to crystal chemistry, phase equilibria and crystallography, as well as the use of the SEM and XRD in characterizing solids. The principal rock-forming minerals such as sulfides, oxides, carbonates, garnets, olivines, pyroxenes, amphiboles, micas, and feldspars are individually reviewed with respect to properties, structures, genesis, and their natural associations. The laboratory (three hours per week) includes systematic study of the properties and associations of the common rock-forming minerals and the routine use of the polarizing microscope for mineral identifications. In early October, there is a required four-day field trip to Bancroft, Ontario. Students will each collect a rock-forming mineral and prepare a term paper on a study using different experimental (e.g., optics, XRD and SEM) and theoretical methods. This provides an independent research experience. The grade is based on two midterms and a final exam, laboratory exercises, the term project, and class participation.

Required text: Introduction to Mineralogy (Hardcover) by William D. Nesse, Oxford University Press.

GEOSCI 231 is a prerequisite to the Geological Sciences concentration program in the Department of Geological Sciences.

Advisory Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent enrollment in CHEM 125/126/130 or 210/211.

GEOSCI 305 — Sedimentary Geology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Lohmann,Kyger C

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, NS

Properties of sediments and their origin, transportation, deposition, lithification, and diagenesis followed by ecology and environmental analysis, paleoecology, facies analysis, and an introduction to stratigraphic methods and principles. Lectures, laboratory, and field trip.

Advisory Prerequisite: An introductory geological sciences laboratory course.

GEOSCI 320 — Earth Systems Evolution
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Steiner,Allison L
Instructor: Ruff,Larry John; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS

This is a core course in the new Earth System Science Program that is being developed jointly by AOSS and Geological Sciences. The program is designed to provide an education in earth system science that is both broad an deep, so that students in this program will be well prepared for graduate school.

Course Description: Introduction to the physics and chemistry of Earth. Gravitational energy, radiative energy, Earth's energy budget, and Earth tectonics are discussed along with chemical evolution and biogeochemical cycles. The connections among the carbon cycle, silicate weathering, and the natural greenhouse effect are discussed. Required for AOSS/GEOSCI 321, which introduces Earth system dynamics.

Prerequisites: CHEM 126 (General and Inorganic Chemistry) and MATH 216 (Introduction to Differential Equations). Generally, students should be conversant with basic chemistry concepts, simple chemical calculations, and elementary differential and integral calculus.

Required text: Lee R. Kump. James F. Kasting, and Robert G. Crane, The Earth System, 2nd Ed. (Pearson/Prentice Hall 2004). ISBN 0-13-142059-3.

Required Software: Vensim PLE (free ) systems simulation software can be down-loaded from the Ventana Inc. site: http://www.vensim.com/software.html.

Advisory Prerequisite: MATH 116

GEOSCI 380 — Mineral Resources, Economics, and the Environment
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Kesler,Stephen E; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: ULWR, BS, NS, QR/2

GEOSCI 380 deals with mineral resource-related problems in a complex society. The course discusses the origin, distribution, and remaining supplies of oil, coal, uranium, copper, gold, diamonds, potash, sulfur, gravel, water, soil, and other important mineral resources in terms of the economic, engineering, political, and environmental factors that govern their recovery, processing, and use. Topics discussed in GEOSCI 380 include ore-forming processes, mineral exploration methods, mineral land access, strip mining, nuclear power, recycling, smelting methods, money and gold, mercury poisoning, and taxation vs. corporate profit. Three lectures and one discussion per week. Evaluation by means of quizzes, exercises, and a final exam.

Required text: A course pack is required, but no textbook.

No previous background in geology is necessary for this course.

Advisory Prerequisite: No previous courses in Geology or other sciences are required.

GEOSCI 409 — Earth System Modeling
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Poulsen,Christopher James
Instructor: Penner,Joyce E; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS

Introduction to Earth System Modeling; discussion of energy balance models, carbon cycle models, and atmospheric chemistry models with multiple time scales; methods for numerical solution and practice building and analyzing results from models.

Advisory Prerequisite: GEOSCI 320 and 321; or AOSS 320 and 321

GEOSCI 420 — Introductory Earth Physics
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Clark,Marin Kristen; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS

This course treats the application of physical methods to the study of the solid Earth. Main themes include the kinematic and dynamic aspects of plate tectonics, physical transport mechanisms, and Earth structure. The main focus is on global geophysics, but we will also encounter applications from exploration or environmental geophysics. The grade is based on weekly problem sets that focus on quantitative problems (50%) and two exams (20% for the first, 30% for the second).

Text: Lowry, Fundamentals of Geophysics, Cambridge University Press, 1997 (approx. $45).

Course topics

  • Gravity:
    Galileo, Kepler, Newton: planetary orbits.
    Earth structure: gravity, moment of inertia, Earth models.
    Use of gravity in exploration/environmental geophysics.
    Geoid and Isostasy
  • Heat:
    Surface heatflow, heat conduction, geotherms.
    Heat sources: radiogenic heating, secular cooling.
  • Waves:
    Seismology, elastic waves, strain, stress.
    Travel time curves, seismograms, Earth structure.
  • Magnetism:
    Earth's magnetic field, magnetic minerals.
    Paleomagnetism: continental drift, dating.
  • Dynamics (if time permits)
    Earth as a heat engine.
    Thermal evolution of the Earth.

Enforced Prerequisites: MATH 116, 156, 176, 186, or 295

GEOSCI 428 — Mineral Surface Chemistry
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Becker,Udo

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS

Introduces the surface sensitive techniques to determine the composition, atomic and electronic structure of material surfaces. Examples are studied on fundamental processes such as surface stability and reactivity in environmental mineralogy or in catalytic processes in the atmosphere, in soils, in sediments, and in technical applications.

Advisory Prerequisite: One course in mineralogy, petrology, solid state chemistry, solid state physics, or materials science.

GEOSCI 437 — Evolution of Vertebrates
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Wilson,Jeffrey A; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS

Lectures and laboratory exercises on the anatomy, ecology, and phylogeny of vertebrates with emphasis on adaptation and evolution.

Advisory Prerequisite: GEOSCI 125 or BIOLOGY 162 or 171 or 172.

GEOSCI 442 — Earth Surface Processes and Soils
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Ehlers,Todd A

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS

Prerequisites include: Math 115 or equivalent (calculus I), CHEM 130 or equivalent (introductory chemistry), and GEOSCI 231 or 232 (mineralogy), or permission of instructor. 4 Credits, including lab.

GEOSCI 442 is a course that focuses on an understanding of processes that shape the Earth's surface and the physical and chemical underpinnings of each process. This course concentrates on physical and chemical processes in the context of topographic evolution, erosion, the global hydrologic cycle, environmental change, and fluid and sediment transport dynamics. Geomorphologic, geochemical, and computational methods for quantifying erosional and depositional processes are investigated. The course is divided into the following parts:

  1. Physical and mathematical representations of hillslope, fluvial, glacial, coastal, and aeolian processes
  2. Erosional and depositional landforms
  3. Chemical weathering and soil formation
  4. Chemical erosion and transport by rivers
Students will learn basic physical and chemical principles, read and discuss scientific journal articles, complete problem sets, learn how to make observations of physical and chemical weathering processes, and quantify these processes with 'hands on' laboratory exercises. Laboratory exercises include air photo interpretation, introduction to GIS and remote sensing software analysis of landforms, rudimentary computer programming with Matlab, measurement and interpretation of soil chemistry and mineral weathering rates, and field investigations.

Required text: Process Geomorphology (Paperback) — 4th Edition. by Dale F Ritter, R. Craig Kochel, Jerry R Miller. Paperback: 576 pages Publisher: McGraw-Hill Science/Engineering/Math; 4 edition (November 19, 2001) ISBN: 0697344118

Grade: Course grade will be based on homework, laboratory and computer exercises, class discussions, and two exams.

Advisory Prerequisite: MATH 115, CHEM 130 , and GEOSCI 231 or 232.

GEOSCI 452 — Cenozoic Stratigraphy and Global Change
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Hendy,Ingrid L

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS

Focuses on global Earth system changes over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. Major climatic events occurring over the last 60 million years and their interaction with biota, ocean, and atmospheric chemistry and sediments are examined.

Advisory Prerequisite: GEOSCI 117/119, GEOSCI 222

GEOSCI 489 — Geological Sciences Honors
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 6
Reqs: BS
Other: Honors, Indpnt Study

Readings, discussions, and special work in geological sciences for undergraduate Honors students. May be taken as a one-term or two-term sequence with GEOSCI 490.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

GEOSCI 490 — Geological Sciences Honors
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 6
Reqs: BS
Other: Honors, Indpnt Study

Readings, discussions, and special work in geological sciences for undergraduate Honors students. May be taken as a one-term or two-term sequence with GEOSCI 489.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

GEOSCI 497 — William T. Smith Lecture Seminar
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Walter,Lynn M; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 1

The modern Earth Sciences are in the middle of some of the hottest debates in science on topics such as climate, global change, natural hazards, water and resources, evolution and origin of life, and the future of our planet. The Geological Sciences Department hosts an endowed Smith Lecture Series in which earth scientists from many research areas around the world share their latest work on these topics. Seminar participants attend the lectures, read the posted topical articles, and post a weblog entry each week discussing new earth science insights gained from hearing the lecture and the effectiveness of the speaker in communicating these points.

Meets for one hour before the lecture and then for the Smith Lecture each Friday afternoon of the term. Attendance at both the Smith Lecture and the preceding seminar is mandatory. Grade is based on weekly attendance, participation in discussion sessions, and weblog entries.

Advisory Prerequisite: Two required Geological Sciences concentration core courses.

GEOSCI 498 — Research or Special Work
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 6
Other: INDEPENDENT

Research or special work in geological sciences for undergraduate or graduate students. May be taken as a one-term or two-term sequence with GEOSCI 499.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

GEOSCI 499 — Research or Special Work
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 6
Other: INDEPENDENT

Research or special work in geological sciences for undergraduate or graduate students. May be taken as a one-term or two-term sequence with GEOSCI 498.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

GEOSCI 531 — Seminar in Geologic Problems
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Kesler,Stephen E; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS

This seminar includes presentations on current research by all active research faculty in the Department. It is required for all incoming graduate students.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

GEOSCI 534 — Seminar in Geophysics, Tectonics, or Structure
Section 023, SEM
Rock Magnetism

Instructor: Van Der Voo,Rob; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 2
Reqs: BS

Topical or current research presentations by graduate students.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

GEOSCI 536 — Seminar in Stratigraphy, Paleontology, or Sedimentology
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Wilson,Jeffrey A; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS

Topics in Stratigraphy, Paleontology, or Sedimentology for graduate students.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

GEOSCI 553 — Thermodynamics and Phase Equilibria
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Essene,Eric J; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS

This course emphasizes the connection between thermodynamics and phase equilibria. The student is introduced to the concepts of thermodynamics necessary for generation of phase equilibria. Emphasis will be placed on the roles of pressure, temperature mole fractions and fugacities of various gas species, activity composition relations in selected solids and fluids. An introduction to the common experimental techniques of determining phase equilibria.

Advisory Prerequisite: GEOSCI 231 and 310; CHEM 468 recommended. Graduate standing.

GEOSCI 709 — Thesis Research-A.M., M.S.
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 6

The Master of Science degree in Geology or the Master of Science degree in Mineralogy. A thesis, a report on a research project, or a publishable scientific paper must be presented to and judged acceptable by two faculty members who form the Candidate's M.Sc. Committee. The chair of the Committee will be the faculty member under whose direction the work is done. The subject of the research project, scientific paper, or thesis, whichever the Candidate elects, must be chosen no later than the first week of the second term in residence. Four copies of the hardbound thesis (or the report or manuscript in lieu of thesis) must be presented to the Department Chair no later than the last day of classes of the term in which the degree is expected. Copies will be put on permanent reserve at the Science Library and in the Department. If the Candidate elects to submit a scientific paper, it will be read and judged acceptable for submission as a publication by his/her faculty committee.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

GEOSCI 929 — Investigations in Geology and Mineralogy
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 6

Laboratory research, readings, and investigations in geology and mineralogy (other than thesis research).

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

GEOSCI 990 — Dissertation/Precandidate
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 8

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Advisory Prerequisite: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. Permission of instructor.

GEOSCI 995 — Dissertation/Candidate
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 8

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

 
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