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LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Fall 2007, Dept = GERMAN
 
Page 1 of 1, Results 1 — 69 of 69
Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
GERMAN 101 — Elementary Course
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Rastalsky,Hartmut Maria; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 100 or 103.

German 101 is an introductory course for students who have not previously studied German. Learning a new language for the first time is exciting and fun, and we hope students will approach the course in this spirit! The course focuses systematically on the development of all four basic language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing), and aims to do this by taking advantage of the cognitive advantages adult language learners have over children. This means focusing on material that will engage learners' interest, creativity, and sense of humor, as well as on the development of effective language learning strategies. By the end of the semester, students will have a firm foundation in some of the fundamental elements of German grammar and will be able to understand and respond appropriately to a variety of texts and basic conversational situations.

Required Texts:

  • Lovik, Guy & Chavez: Vorsprung Text, up-dated edition, Houghton Mifflin,
  • Lovik, Guy & Chavez: Vorsprung Workbook, up-dated edition, Houghton Mifflin
  • Course pack (Available at Excel; 1117 South University; 996-1500)
  • Audiotape Program Accompanying Vorsprung (Available online and at the LRC)
  • Flippo: When in Germany, Do as the Germans Do.

Recommended:

  • Webster's New World German Dictionary, Concise Edition, Macmillan
  • Zorach/Melin: English Grammar for Students of German, 4th edition, Olivia & Hill
  • Brown: A Practical Guide to Language Learning McGraw-Hill
  • Lovik, Guy & Chavez: Vorsprung Computer Study Modules (IBM or Mac) Houghton Mifflin
  • Vocabulary tapes for Vorsprung (Available at the LRC).
  • Harper Collins Beginner's German Dictionary
  • PONS Basisworterbuch, Deutsch als Fremdsprache

Advisory Prerequisite: All students with prior coursework in German must take the placement test.

GERMAN 101 — Elementary Course
Section 002, REC

Instructor: Rastalsky,Hartmut Maria; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 100 or 103.

German 101 is an introductory course for students who have not previously studied German. Learning a new language for the first time is exciting and fun, and we hope students will approach the course in this spirit! The course focuses systematically on the development of all four basic language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing), and aims to do this by taking advantage of the cognitive advantages adult language learners have over children. This means focusing on material that will engage learners' interest, creativity, and sense of humor, as well as on the development of effective language learning strategies. By the end of the semester, students will have a firm foundation in some of the fundamental elements of German grammar and will be able to understand and respond appropriately to a variety of texts and basic conversational situations.

Required Texts:

  • Lovik, Guy & Chavez: Vorsprung Text, up-dated edition, Houghton Mifflin,
  • Lovik, Guy & Chavez: Vorsprung Workbook, up-dated edition, Houghton Mifflin
  • Course pack (Available at Excel; 1117 South University; 996-1500)
  • Audiotape Program Accompanying Vorsprung (Available online and at the LRC)
  • Flippo: When in Germany, Do as the Germans Do.

Recommended:

  • Webster's New World German Dictionary, Concise Edition, Macmillan
  • Zorach/Melin: English Grammar for Students of German, 4th edition, Olivia & Hill
  • Brown: A Practical Guide to Language Learning McGraw-Hill
  • Lovik, Guy & Chavez: Vorsprung Computer Study Modules (IBM or Mac) Houghton Mifflin
  • Vocabulary tapes for Vorsprung (Available at the LRC).
  • Harper Collins Beginner's German Dictionary
  • PONS Basisworterbuch, Deutsch als Fremdsprache

Advisory Prerequisite: All students with prior coursework in German must take the placement test.

GERMAN 101 — Elementary Course
Section 003, REC

Instructor: Rastalsky,Hartmut Maria; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 100 or 103.

German 101 is an introductory course for students who have not previously studied German. Learning a new language for the first time is exciting and fun, and we hope students will approach the course in this spirit! The course focuses systematically on the development of all four basic language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing), and aims to do this by taking advantage of the cognitive advantages adult language learners have over children. This means focusing on material that will engage learners' interest, creativity, and sense of humor, as well as on the development of effective language learning strategies. By the end of the semester, students will have a firm foundation in some of the fundamental elements of German grammar and will be able to understand and respond appropriately to a variety of texts and basic conversational situations.

Required Texts:

  • Lovik, Guy & Chavez: Vorsprung Text, up-dated edition, Houghton Mifflin,
  • Lovik, Guy & Chavez: Vorsprung Workbook, up-dated edition, Houghton Mifflin
  • Course pack (Available at Excel; 1117 South University; 996-1500)
  • Audiotape Program Accompanying Vorsprung (Available online and at the LRC)
  • Flippo: When in Germany, Do as the Germans Do.

Recommended:

  • Webster's New World German Dictionary, Concise Edition, Macmillan
  • Zorach/Melin: English Grammar for Students of German, 4th edition, Olivia & Hill
  • Brown: A Practical Guide to Language Learning McGraw-Hill
  • Lovik, Guy & Chavez: Vorsprung Computer Study Modules (IBM or Mac) Houghton Mifflin
  • Vocabulary tapes for Vorsprung (Available at the LRC).
  • Harper Collins Beginner's German Dictionary
  • PONS Basisworterbuch, Deutsch als Fremdsprache

Advisory Prerequisite: All students with prior coursework in German must take the placement test.

GERMAN 101 — Elementary Course
Section 004, REC

Instructor: Rastalsky,Hartmut Maria; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 100 or 103.

German 101 is an introductory course for students who have not previously studied German. Learning a new language for the first time is exciting and fun, and we hope students will approach the course in this spirit! The course focuses systematically on the development of all four basic language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing), and aims to do this by taking advantage of the cognitive advantages adult language learners have over children. This means focusing on material that will engage learners' interest, creativity, and sense of humor, as well as on the development of effective language learning strategies. By the end of the semester, students will have a firm foundation in some of the fundamental elements of German grammar and will be able to understand and respond appropriately to a variety of texts and basic conversational situations.

Required Texts:

  • Lovik, Guy & Chavez: Vorsprung Text, up-dated edition, Houghton Mifflin,
  • Lovik, Guy & Chavez: Vorsprung Workbook, up-dated edition, Houghton Mifflin
  • Course pack (Available at Excel; 1117 South University; 996-1500)
  • Audiotape Program Accompanying Vorsprung (Available online and at the LRC)
  • Flippo: When in Germany, Do as the Germans Do.

Recommended:

  • Webster's New World German Dictionary, Concise Edition, Macmillan
  • Zorach/Melin: English Grammar for Students of German, 4th edition, Olivia & Hill
  • Brown: A Practical Guide to Language Learning McGraw-Hill
  • Lovik, Guy & Chavez: Vorsprung Computer Study Modules (IBM or Mac) Houghton Mifflin
  • Vocabulary tapes for Vorsprung (Available at the LRC).
  • Harper Collins Beginner's German Dictionary
  • PONS Basisworterbuch, Deutsch als Fremdsprache

Advisory Prerequisite: All students with prior coursework in German must take the placement test.

GERMAN 101 — Elementary Course
Section 005, REC

Instructor: Rastalsky,Hartmut Maria; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 100 or 103.

German 101 is an introductory course for students who have not previously studied German. Learning a new language for the first time is exciting and fun, and we hope students will approach the course in this spirit! The course focuses systematically on the development of all four basic language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing), and aims to do this by taking advantage of the cognitive advantages adult language learners have over children. This means focusing on material that will engage learners' interest, creativity, and sense of humor, as well as on the development of effective language learning strategies. By the end of the semester, students will have a firm foundation in some of the fundamental elements of German grammar and will be able to understand and respond appropriately to a variety of texts and basic conversational situations.

Required Texts:

  • Lovik, Guy & Chavez: Vorsprung Text, up-dated edition, Houghton Mifflin,
  • Lovik, Guy & Chavez: Vorsprung Workbook, up-dated edition, Houghton Mifflin
  • Course pack (Available at Excel; 1117 South University; 996-1500)
  • Audiotape Program Accompanying Vorsprung (Available online and at the LRC)
  • Flippo: When in Germany, Do as the Germans Do.

Recommended:

  • Webster's New World German Dictionary, Concise Edition, Macmillan
  • Zorach/Melin: English Grammar for Students of German, 4th edition, Olivia & Hill
  • Brown: A Practical Guide to Language Learning McGraw-Hill
  • Lovik, Guy & Chavez: Vorsprung Computer Study Modules (IBM or Mac) Houghton Mifflin
  • Vocabulary tapes for Vorsprung (Available at the LRC).
  • Harper Collins Beginner's German Dictionary
  • PONS Basisworterbuch, Deutsch als Fremdsprache

Advisory Prerequisite: All students with prior coursework in German must take the placement test.

GERMAN 101 — Elementary Course
Section 006, REC

Instructor: Rastalsky,Hartmut Maria; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 100 or 103.

German 101 is an introductory course for students who have not previously studied German. Learning a new language for the first time is exciting and fun, and we hope students will approach the course in this spirit! The course focuses systematically on the development of all four basic language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing), and aims to do this by taking advantage of the cognitive advantages adult language learners have over children. This means focusing on material that will engage learners' interest, creativity, and sense of humor, as well as on the development of effective language learning strategies. By the end of the semester, students will have a firm foundation in some of the fundamental elements of German grammar and will be able to understand and respond appropriately to a variety of texts and basic conversational situations.

Required Texts:

  • Lovik, Guy & Chavez: Vorsprung Text, up-dated edition, Houghton Mifflin,
  • Lovik, Guy & Chavez: Vorsprung Workbook, up-dated edition, Houghton Mifflin
  • Course pack (Available at Excel; 1117 South University; 996-1500)
  • Audiotape Program Accompanying Vorsprung (Available online and at the LRC)
  • Flippo: When in Germany, Do as the Germans Do.

Recommended:

  • Webster's New World German Dictionary, Concise Edition, Macmillan
  • Zorach/Melin: English Grammar for Students of German, 4th edition, Olivia & Hill
  • Brown: A Practical Guide to Language Learning McGraw-Hill
  • Lovik, Guy & Chavez: Vorsprung Computer Study Modules (IBM or Mac) Houghton Mifflin
  • Vocabulary tapes for Vorsprung (Available at the LRC).
  • Harper Collins Beginner's German Dictionary
  • PONS Basisworterbuch, Deutsch als Fremdsprache

Advisory Prerequisite: All students with prior coursework in German must take the placement test.

GERMAN 101 — Elementary Course
Section 007, REC

Instructor: Rastalsky,Hartmut Maria; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 100 or 103.

German 101 is an introductory course for students who have not previously studied German. Learning a new language for the first time is exciting and fun, and we hope students will approach the course in this spirit! The course focuses systematically on the development of all four basic language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing), and aims to do this by taking advantage of the cognitive advantages adult language learners have over children. This means focusing on material that will engage learners' interest, creativity, and sense of humor, as well as on the development of effective language learning strategies. By the end of the semester, students will have a firm foundation in some of the fundamental elements of German grammar and will be able to understand and respond appropriately to a variety of texts and basic conversational situations.

Required Texts:

  • Lovik, Guy & Chavez: Vorsprung Text, up-dated edition, Houghton Mifflin,
  • Lovik, Guy & Chavez: Vorsprung Workbook, up-dated edition, Houghton Mifflin
  • Course pack (Available at Excel; 1117 South University; 996-1500)
  • Audiotape Program Accompanying Vorsprung (Available online and at the LRC)
  • Flippo: When in Germany, Do as the Germans Do.

Recommended:

  • Webster's New World German Dictionary, Concise Edition, Macmillan
  • Zorach/Melin: English Grammar for Students of German, 4th edition, Olivia & Hill
  • Brown: A Practical Guide to Language Learning McGraw-Hill
  • Lovik, Guy & Chavez: Vorsprung Computer Study Modules (IBM or Mac) Houghton Mifflin
  • Vocabulary tapes for Vorsprung (Available at the LRC).
  • Harper Collins Beginner's German Dictionary
  • PONS Basisworterbuch, Deutsch als Fremdsprache

Advisory Prerequisite: All students with prior coursework in German must take the placement test.

GERMAN 102 — Elementary Course
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Rastalsky,Hartmut Maria; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 100 or 103.

GERMAN 102 is the continuation of GERMAN 101; please see the description for German 101 for a description of the general philosophy underlying this course. By the end of the term, students will have been exposed to all the essentials of German grammar, which will then be reviewed and extended in the third and fourth semesters. Students will be able to cope with a variety of conversational situations and written texts. In particular, they will have the necessary 'survival skills' for a visit to a German-speaking country, as well as a foundation for doing intellectual work in German.

Required Texts:

  • Lovik, Guy & Chavez: Vorsprung , Textbook, updated edition
  • Lovik, Guy & Chavez Vorsprung Workbook, updated edition
  • Course pack (Available at Excel; 1117 South University; 996-1500)
  • Audiotape Program Accompanying Vorsprung (Available at the LRC)
  • Janosch: Oh, wie schön ist Panama [Paperback edition; ISBN: 3407780028]

Recommended Texts:

  • Webster's New World German Dictionary, Concise Edition
  • Zorach: English Grammar for Students of German, 4th Edition
  • Brown: A Practical Guide to Language Learning
  • Vocabulary tapes for Vorsprung (Available at the LRC)
  • Lovik/Guy/Chavez Vorsprung Computer Study Modules (available for IBM or Mac)

Recommended Texts for 'Free Reading' [see description of 'Language Learning Journal' online or in the first few pages of the course pack!]

  • Crossgrove & Crossgrove: Graded German Reader
  • Bü rger: Mü nchhausens Abenteuer
  • Martin: Kein Schnaps fü r Tamara
  • Sempé/Goscinny: Asterix, Volume 1.
  • Harper Collins Beginner's German Dictionary
  • PONS Basisworterbuch, Deutsch als Fremdsprache

Advisory Prerequisite: GERMAN 101.

GERMAN 102 — Elementary Course
Section 002, REC

Instructor: Rastalsky,Hartmut Maria; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 100 or 103.

GERMAN 102 is the continuation of GERMAN 101; please see the description for German 101 for a description of the general philosophy underlying this course. By the end of the term, students will have been exposed to all the essentials of German grammar, which will then be reviewed and extended in the third and fourth semesters. Students will be able to cope with a variety of conversational situations and written texts. In particular, they will have the necessary 'survival skills' for a visit to a German-speaking country, as well as a foundation for doing intellectual work in German.

Required Texts:

  • Lovik, Guy & Chavez: Vorsprung , Textbook, updated edition
  • Lovik, Guy & Chavez Vorsprung Workbook, updated edition
  • Course pack (Available at Excel; 1117 South University; 996-1500)
  • Audiotape Program Accompanying Vorsprung (Available at the LRC)
  • Janosch: Oh, wie schön ist Panama [Paperback edition; ISBN: 3407780028]

Recommended Texts:

  • Webster's New World German Dictionary, Concise Edition
  • Zorach: English Grammar for Students of German, 4th Edition
  • Brown: A Practical Guide to Language Learning
  • Vocabulary tapes for Vorsprung (Available at the LRC)
  • Lovik/Guy/Chavez Vorsprung Computer Study Modules (available for IBM or Mac)

Recommended Texts for 'Free Reading' [see description of 'Language Learning Journal' online or in the first few pages of the course pack!]

  • Crossgrove & Crossgrove: Graded German Reader
  • Bü rger: Mü nchhausens Abenteuer
  • Martin: Kein Schnaps fü r Tamara
  • Sempé/Goscinny: Asterix, Volume 1.
  • Harper Collins Beginner's German Dictionary
  • PONS Basisworterbuch, Deutsch als Fremdsprache

Advisory Prerequisite: GERMAN 101.

GERMAN 103 — Review of Elementary German
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Rastalsky,Hartmut Maria; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 100, 101, or 102.

GERMAN 103 provides a review of the fundamental components of the German language for students who have had German language instruction before entering the University of Michigan. The course focuses systematically on all four basic language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing), and aims to take advantage of the cognitive advantages adult language learners have over children. This means focussing on material that will engage learners' interest, creativity, and sense of humor, as well as on the development of effective language learning strategies. By the end of the academic term, students will have been exposed to all the essentials of German grammar, which will then be reviewed and extended in the third and fourth semesters. Students will be able to cope with a variety of conversational situations and written texts. In particular, they will have the necessary "survival skills" for a visit to a German-speaking country, as well as a foundation for doing intellectual work in German.

Required Texts:

  • Widmaier/Widmaier, Treffpunkt Deutsch 4th Ed., Textbook, Houghton Mifflin
  • Widmaier/Widmaier, Treffpunkt Deutsch 4th Ed., Workbook, Houghton Mifflin
  • Course pack. Available at Excel, 1117 South University, phone 996-1500
  • Janosch: Oh, wie schon ist Panama [Paperback edition; ISBN: 3407780028](P)

Recommended Texts:

  • Webster's New World German Dictionary, Concise Edition, Macmillan
  • Zorach, Melin, English Grammar for Students of German, 4th Ed. Olivia & Hill
  • Brown A Practical Guide to Language Learning, McGraw-Hill
  • Widmaier/Widmaier Treffpunkt Deutsch 4th. Ed., CD-ROM, Prentice-Hall
  • Widmaier/Widmaier Treffpunkt Deutsch 4th. Ed., Tutorial Software — Mac or IBM, Prentice Hall.
  • Harper Collins Beginner's German Dictionary
  • PONS Basisworterbuch, Deutsch als Fremdsprache

Advisory Prerequisite: Assignment by placement test or permission of department.

GERMAN 103 — Review of Elementary German
Section 002, REC

Instructor: Rastalsky,Hartmut Maria; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 100, 101, or 102.

GERMAN 103 provides a review of the fundamental components of the German language for students who have had German language instruction before entering the University of Michigan. The course focuses systematically on all four basic language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing), and aims to take advantage of the cognitive advantages adult language learners have over children. This means focussing on material that will engage learners' interest, creativity, and sense of humor, as well as on the development of effective language learning strategies. By the end of the academic term, students will have been exposed to all the essentials of German grammar, which will then be reviewed and extended in the third and fourth semesters. Students will be able to cope with a variety of conversational situations and written texts. In particular, they will have the necessary "survival skills" for a visit to a German-speaking country, as well as a foundation for doing intellectual work in German.

Required Texts:

  • Widmaier/Widmaier, Treffpunkt Deutsch 4th Ed., Textbook, Houghton Mifflin
  • Widmaier/Widmaier, Treffpunkt Deutsch 4th Ed., Workbook, Houghton Mifflin
  • Course pack. Available at Excel, 1117 South University, phone 996-1500
  • Janosch: Oh, wie schon ist Panama [Paperback edition; ISBN: 3407780028](P)

Recommended Texts:

  • Webster's New World German Dictionary, Concise Edition, Macmillan
  • Zorach, Melin, English Grammar for Students of German, 4th Ed. Olivia & Hill
  • Brown A Practical Guide to Language Learning, McGraw-Hill
  • Widmaier/Widmaier Treffpunkt Deutsch 4th. Ed., CD-ROM, Prentice-Hall
  • Widmaier/Widmaier Treffpunkt Deutsch 4th. Ed., Tutorial Software — Mac or IBM, Prentice Hall.
  • Harper Collins Beginner's German Dictionary
  • PONS Basisworterbuch, Deutsch als Fremdsprache

Advisory Prerequisite: Assignment by placement test or permission of department.

GERMAN 111 — First Special Reading Course
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Rastalsky,Hartmut Maria; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4

The objective of this course is to teach students to read simple German expository prose. Students are introduced to the essentials of German grammar, syntax, and vocabulary, both in class lectures and in texts. The course is taught in English, and students are required to read but not write and speak German. This is a fast-paced course with a substantial workload, intended for students with some experience in language learning, and is therefore recommended only to graduate students who wish to meet a German foreign language requirement and to advanced undergraduates who have already met the LS&A foreign language requirement. Course requirements include daily assignments, quizzes, a midterm on grammar and vocabulary, and a final examination requiring the translation of sight passages without the aid of a dictionary. The course does not satisfy the LS&A foreign language requirement.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of the department.

GERMAN 205 — Conversation Practice
Section 001, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 1

Credit Exclusions: Students previously enrolled in a 300- or 400-level GERMAN conversation course may not register for GERMAN 205 or 206.

The unwritten German class! In this course, you will dramatize everyday situations that ask for spontaneously expressing an opinion or formulating an argument. The topics that nourish our discussions are both inclusive and inconclusive: current cultural events, German etiquette, popular magazines. By cross-analyzing various resources, you will hone your conversation skills while you learn simultaneously about German cultural institutions. Although far from being exclusive, this course may address in particular those of you who are currently enrolled in GERMAN 221, 231, or 232 and those who intend to participate in the junior-year-abroad program. Graduates of previous GERMAN 205 classes are regretfully barred from this course.

Advisory Prerequisite: GERMAN 102 or 103.

GERMAN 205 — Conversation Practice
Section 002, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 1

Credit Exclusions: Students previously enrolled in a 300- or 400-level GERMAN conversation course may not register for GERMAN 205 or 206.

The unwritten German class! In this course, you will dramatize everyday situations that ask for spontaneously expressing an opinion or formulating an argument. The topics that nourish our discussions are both inclusive and inconclusive: current cultural events, German etiquette, popular magazines. By cross-analyzing various resources, you will hone your conversation skills while you learn simultaneously about German cultural institutions. Although far from being exclusive, this course may address in particular those of you who are currently enrolled in GERMAN 221, 231, or 232 and those who intend to participate in the junior-year-abroad program. Graduates of previous GERMAN 205 classes are regretfully barred from this course.

Advisory Prerequisite: GERMAN 102 or 103.

GERMAN 221 — Accelerated Third Semester German
Section 002, REC

Instructor: Rastalsky,Hartmut Maria; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 5

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed GERMAN 230 or 231. Four credits granted to those who have completed GERMAN 102 or 103.

This course combines an intensive review of basic grammar with more advanced practice in the four basic language skills (reading, writing, listening, and speaking). It covers the same content as GERMAN 231, but with an extra day of class each week for additional review and speaking practice, so that by the end of the academic term, students in GERMAN 221 and 231 will be at the same level.

By this point in your career as a German student, you're ready to do some really interesting, fun and challenging things. In this course, you will watch six feature films (including Good Bye Lenin!) and one set of video interviews online, and see numerous other DVD/video clips in class. You will read some short texts and two short novels edited for language learners. The first is based on a popular movie about growing up and falling in love in former East Germany shortly before the fall of the Berlin Wall. The second is Kafka's Die Verwandlung (The Metamorphosis), in which Gregor Samsa awakes one morning from uneasy dreams to find himself transformed in his bed into an enormous bug, and wonders how he's going to get to work on time. The course pack will provide you with extensive explanatory notes and vocabulary glosses in order to help you to enjoy these two books, and to read them at a reasonable speed. Several class sessions will take place in the computer lab, where you will have an opportunity to listen to some German popular music, look at some art by German-speaking artists, learn about the geography of the German-speaking countries, take (part of) a test that has been proposed as a requirement for immigrants seeking German citizenship, and to inform yourself about the Holocaust.

You will review and extend the grammatical knowledge with which you entered the course by means of an online grammar consisting of summaries, explanations, lots of examples, practice exercises and "diagnostic exercises"; we've done our best to make learning grammar fun and interesting for you by our choice of exercises and examples.

You will have six opportunities in the first month of the course to pass a "Gateway Vocabulary Test" on a list of slightly less than 600 of the most common German words and phrases, most of which you will already have encountered. This will provide you with a solid vocabulary base which will make everything else you do with German easier for you. You need a score of 70% to pass this multiple choice test; once you pass it, you need not take it again. If you do not manage to pass this test by the last scheduled time, your final course grade will be reduced by one grade notch, i.e., an A would become an A-, an A- would become a B+, etc. Six additional, much shorter vocabulary lists later in the course will help you to further extend your vocabulary. We are working on projects that would allow you to listen to this vocabulary against a fun musical background, and to practice the vocabulary online using simulated flashcards; we hope you will enjoy these when they are ready! To help you study for the test, an identical version of the test will be available for you to take online as often as you wish. The test consists of a large item bank, of which you will see 40 items each time the test loads.

The feature films, DVD and video clips, readings and other course materials will cover a variety of fields and themes ranging from popular culture, contemporary social issues and history to classical music, art, and literature. By the end of the course, you should be able to survive without using English in a German-speaking country, and have enough conversational skills to meet people and enjoy yourself. You should be comfortable surfing the web in German, able to read and write independently about short texts covering a wide range of topics, and you should be quite familiar with all the basics of German grammar, so that you will be able to pursue your own specific interests in GERMAN 232 and beyond.

Course requirements include daily homework assignments (reading, writing, learning vocabulary, practicing grammar, watching movies, etc.), regular attendance and participation, tests (including two informal oral tests), quizzes, and the Gateway Vocabulary Test. Instead of a final examination, students will work in groups to produce short videos, which will be screened on the last day of classes. A $200 prize is awarded each semester for the best final video in GERMAN 221/231.

Required Texts:

  • Thomas Brussig: Am kü rzeren Ende der Sonnenallee — Easy Reader Series, ISBN: 3126756891 Note: You will need this specific edited version
  • Franz Kafka [edited by Achim Seiffarth]: Die Verwandlung [Book & CD], ISBN: 88-7754-808-8 Note: You will need this specific edited version
  • Coursepack (CP) (Available at Excel; 1117 South University; 996-1500)

Recommended Grammar Text

All the grammar you are required to know is in the coursepack and on the web, but this book is an excellent reference:

  • Rankin/Wells. Handbuch zur deutschen Grammatik (grammar text), 4th Edition (G)

Recommended Texts for "Language Learning Journals"

Please wait for information in class on the "Language Learning Journal" before you decide if you want to buy one of these.

  • Hans Peter Richter: Damals war es Friedrich ISBN: 3423078006
  • Adalbert von Chamisso: Peter Schlemihls wundersame Geschichte [Lesen leicht gemacht Series] ISBN: 3125592208
  • J.K. Rowling: Harry Potter und der Stein der Weisen
  • C.R. Goedsche: Cultural Graded Reader: Heine ISBN: 0442220383 Unfortunately, this text has been out of print for some time ==> we cannot order copies for the bookstores. If you are interested in it, you should be able to find a used copy online, e.g., via amazon.com!

Other Recommended Texts

  • Webster's New World German Dictionary, Concise Edition ($14, orange; conventional dictionary with >100,000 entries)
  • Harper Collins Beginner's German Dictionary, 2nd ed. 10,000 (??) entries, lots of helpful usage examples, especially easy to read and use.
  • PONS Basiswörterbuch Deutsch als Fremdsprache (Green German-German dictionary. 8,000 entries + 1,500 idioms and much more usage information than a regular dictionary)
  • Zorach & Melin: English Grammar for Students of German, 4th ed.
  • Brown: A Practical Guide to Language Learning
  • Jones & Tschirner: A Frequency Dictionary of German ( ISBN: 0-415-31632-4) Expensive, and not suited for use as a regular dictionary, but an excellent resource if you want to build your vocabulary systematically.

Advisory Prerequisite: GERMAN 102 and assignment by placement test

GERMAN 221 — Accelerated Third Semester German
Section 003, REC

Instructor: Rastalsky,Hartmut Maria; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 5

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed GERMAN 230 or 231. Four credits granted to those who have completed GERMAN 102 or 103.

This course combines an intensive review of basic grammar with more advanced practice in the four basic language skills (reading, writing, listening, and speaking). It covers the same content as GERMAN 231, but with an extra day of class each week for additional review and speaking practice, so that by the end of the academic term, students in GERMAN 221 and 231 will be at the same level.

By this point in your career as a German student, you're ready to do some really interesting, fun and challenging things. In this course, you will watch six feature films (including Good Bye Lenin!) and one set of video interviews online, and see numerous other DVD/video clips in class. You will read some short texts and two short novels edited for language learners. The first is based on a popular movie about growing up and falling in love in former East Germany shortly before the fall of the Berlin Wall. The second is Kafka's Die Verwandlung (The Metamorphosis), in which Gregor Samsa awakes one morning from uneasy dreams to find himself transformed in his bed into an enormous bug, and wonders how he's going to get to work on time. The course pack will provide you with extensive explanatory notes and vocabulary glosses in order to help you to enjoy these two books, and to read them at a reasonable speed. Several class sessions will take place in the computer lab, where you will have an opportunity to listen to some German popular music, look at some art by German-speaking artists, learn about the geography of the German-speaking countries, take (part of) a test that has been proposed as a requirement for immigrants seeking German citizenship, and to inform yourself about the Holocaust.

You will review and extend the grammatical knowledge with which you entered the course by means of an online grammar consisting of summaries, explanations, lots of examples, practice exercises and "diagnostic exercises"; we've done our best to make learning grammar fun and interesting for you by our choice of exercises and examples.

You will have six opportunities in the first month of the course to pass a "Gateway Vocabulary Test" on a list of slightly less than 600 of the most common German words and phrases, most of which you will already have encountered. This will provide you with a solid vocabulary base which will make everything else you do with German easier for you. You need a score of 70% to pass this multiple choice test; once you pass it, you need not take it again. If you do not manage to pass this test by the last scheduled time, your final course grade will be reduced by one grade notch, i.e., an A would become an A-, an A- would become a B+, etc. Six additional, much shorter vocabulary lists later in the course will help you to further extend your vocabulary. We are working on projects that would allow you to listen to this vocabulary against a fun musical background, and to practice the vocabulary online using simulated flashcards; we hope you will enjoy these when they are ready! To help you study for the test, an identical version of the test will be available for you to take online as often as you wish. The test consists of a large item bank, of which you will see 40 items each time the test loads.

The feature films, DVD and video clips, readings and other course materials will cover a variety of fields and themes ranging from popular culture, contemporary social issues and history to classical music, art, and literature. By the end of the course, you should be able to survive without using English in a German-speaking country, and have enough conversational skills to meet people and enjoy yourself. You should be comfortable surfing the web in German, able to read and write independently about short texts covering a wide range of topics, and you should be quite familiar with all the basics of German grammar, so that you will be able to pursue your own specific interests in GERMAN 232 and beyond.

Course requirements include daily homework assignments (reading, writing, learning vocabulary, practicing grammar, watching movies, etc.), regular attendance and participation, tests (including two informal oral tests), quizzes, and the Gateway Vocabulary Test. Instead of a final examination, students will work in groups to produce short videos, which will be screened on the last day of classes. A $200 prize is awarded each semester for the best final video in GERMAN 221/231.

Required Texts:

  • Thomas Brussig: Am kü rzeren Ende der Sonnenallee — Easy Reader Series, ISBN: 3126756891 Note: You will need this specific edited version
  • Franz Kafka [edited by Achim Seiffarth]: Die Verwandlung [Book & CD], ISBN: 88-7754-808-8 Note: You will need this specific edited version
  • Coursepack (CP) (Available at Excel; 1117 South University; 996-1500)

Recommended Grammar Text

All the grammar you are required to know is in the coursepack and on the web, but this book is an excellent reference:

  • Rankin/Wells. Handbuch zur deutschen Grammatik (grammar text), 4th Edition (G)

Recommended Texts for "Language Learning Journals"

Please wait for information in class on the "Language Learning Journal" before you decide if you want to buy one of these.

  • Hans Peter Richter: Damals war es Friedrich ISBN: 3423078006
  • Adalbert von Chamisso: Peter Schlemihls wundersame Geschichte [Lesen leicht gemacht Series] ISBN: 3125592208
  • J.K. Rowling: Harry Potter und der Stein der Weisen
  • C.R. Goedsche: Cultural Graded Reader: Heine ISBN: 0442220383 Unfortunately, this text has been out of print for some time ==> we cannot order copies for the bookstores. If you are interested in it, you should be able to find a used copy online, e.g., via amazon.com!

Other Recommended Texts

  • Webster's New World German Dictionary, Concise Edition ($14, orange; conventional dictionary with >100,000 entries)
  • Harper Collins Beginner's German Dictionary, 2nd ed. 10,000 (??) entries, lots of helpful usage examples, especially easy to read and use.
  • PONS Basiswörterbuch Deutsch als Fremdsprache (Green German-German dictionary. 8,000 entries + 1,500 idioms and much more usage information than a regular dictionary)
  • Zorach & Melin: English Grammar for Students of German, 4th ed.
  • Brown: A Practical Guide to Language Learning
  • Jones & Tschirner: A Frequency Dictionary of German ( ISBN: 0-415-31632-4) Expensive, and not suited for use as a regular dictionary, but an excellent resource if you want to build your vocabulary systematically.

Advisory Prerequisite: GERMAN 102 and assignment by placement test

GERMAN 231 — Second-Year Course
Section 002, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 230 or 221.

By this point in your career as a German student, you're ready to do some really interesting, fun and challenging things. In this course, you will watch 6 feature films (including Good Bye Lenin!) and one set of video interviews online, and see numerous other DVD/video clips in class. You will read some short texts and two short novels edited for language learners. The first is based on a popular movie about growing up and falling in love in former East Germany shortly before the fall of the Berlin Wall. The second is Kafka's Die Verwandlung (The Metamorphosis), in which Gregor Samsa awakes one morning from uneasy dreams to find himself transformed in his bed into an enormous bug, and wonders how he's going to get to work on time. The course pack will provide you with extensive explanatory notes and vocabulary glosses in order to help you to enjoy these two books, and to read them at a reasonable speed. Several class sessions will take place in the computer lab, where you will have an opportunity to listen to some German popular music, look at some art by German-speaking artists, learn about the geography of the German-speaking countries, take (part of) a test that has been proposed as a requirement for immigrants seeking German citizenship, and to inform yourself about the Holocaust.

You will review and extend the grammatical knowledge with which you entered the course by means of an online grammar consisting of summaries, explanations, lots of examples, practice exercises and "diagnostic exercises"; we've done our best to make learning grammar fun and interesting for you by our choice of exercises and examples.

You will have six opportunities in the first month of the course to pass a "Gateway Vocabulary Test" on a list of slightly less than 600 of the most common German words and phrases, most of which you will already have encountered. This will provide you with a solid vocabulary base which will make everything else you do with German easier for you. You need a score of 70% to pass this multiple choice test; once you pass it, you need not take it again. If you do not manage to pass this test by the last scheduled time, your final course grade will be reduced by one grade notch, i.e., an A would become an A-, an A- would become a B+ etc. Six additional, much shorter vocabulary lists later in the course will help you to further extend your vocabulary. We are working on projects that would allow you to listen to this vocabulary against a fun musical background, and to practice the vocabulary online using simulated flashcards; we hope you will enjoy these when they are ready! To help you study for the test, an identical version of the test will be available for you to take online as often as you wish. The test consists of a large item bank, of which you will see 40 items each time the test loads.

The feature films, DVD and video clips, readings and other course materials will cover a variety of fields and themes ranging from popular culture, contemporary social issues and history to classical music, art, and literature. By the end of the course, you should be able to survive without using English in a German-speaking country, and have enough conversational skills to meet people and enjoy yourself. You should be comfortable surfing the web in German, able to read and write independently about short texts covering a wide range of topics, and you should be quite familiar with all the basics of German grammar, so that you will be able to pursue your own specific interests in GERMAN 232 and beyond.

Course requirements include daily homework assignments (reading, writing, learning vocabulary, practicing grammar, watching movies, etc.), regular attendance and participation, tests (including two informal oral tests), quizzes, and the Gateway Vocabulary Test. Instead of a final examination, students will work in groups to produce short videos, which will be screened on the last day of classes. A $200 prize is awarded each semester for the best final video in GERMAN 221/231.

Required Texts:

  • Thomas Brussig: Am kü rzeren Ende der Sonnenallee — Easy Reader Series, ISBN: 3126756891 Note: You will need this specific edited version
  • Franz Kafka [edited by Achim Seiffarth]: Die Verwandlung, [Book & CD], ISBN: 88-7754-808-8 Note: You will need this specific edited version
  • Coursepack (CP) (Available at Excel; 1117 South University; 996-1500)

Recommended Grammar Text

All the grammar you are required to know is in the coursepack and on the web, but this book is an excellent reference:

  • Rankin/Wells. Handbuch zur deutschen Grammatik (grammar text), 4th Edition (G)

Recommended Texts for "Language Learning Journals"

Please wait for information in class on the "Language Learning Journal" before you decide if you want to buy one of these.

  • Hans Peter Richter: Damals war es Friedrich ISBN: 3423078006
  • Adalbert von Chamisso: Peter Schlemihls wundersame Geschichte [Lesen leicht gemacht Series] ISBN: 3125592208
  • J.K. Rowling: Harry Potter und der Stein der Weisen
  • C.R. Goedsche: Cultural Graded Reader: Heine ISBN: 0442220383 Unfortunately, this text has been out of print for some time ==> we cannot order copies for the bookstores. If you are interested in it, you should be able to find a used copy online, e.g. via amazon.com!

Other Recommended Texts

  • Webster's New World German Dictionary, Concise Edition ($14, orange; conventional dictionary with >100,000 entries)
  • Harper Collins Beginner's German Dictionary, 2nd ed. 10,000 (??) entries, lots of helpful usage examples, especially easy to read and use.
  • PONS Basiswörterbuch Deutsch als Fremdsprache (Green German-German dictionary. 8,000 entries + 1,500 idioms and much more usage information than a regular dictionary)
  • Zorach & Melin: English Grammar for Students of German, 4th ed.
  • Brown: A Practical Guide to Language Learning

Advisory Prerequisite: GERMAN 102 or 103 and assignment by placement test

GERMAN 231 — Second-Year Course
Section 003, REC

Instructor: Rastalsky,Hartmut Maria; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 230 or 221.

In this course, the four basic language skills (reading, writing, listening, and speaking) developed in the first year will be reviewed and extended. The course includes a selection of recent feature films such as Lola rennt, as well as a variety of shorter video clips and movie excerpts. Readings will be taken from print and online sources and will cover a variety of fields and themes ranging from popular culture, contemporary social issues and history to classical music, art, poetry, and a short text by Nietzsche. By the end of the course, students will be quite familiar with all the basics of German grammar, and be able to survive and hold conversations in a German-speaking country. They will be comfortable surfing the web in German, and able to read and write independently about short texts covering a wide range of topics, so that they will be able to pursue their own specific interests in GERMAN 232 and beyond. Course requirements include daily homework assignments (reading, writing, learning vocabulary, etc.), regular attendance, video assignments, tests, and quizzes. Instead of a final examination, students will work in groups to produce short videos, which will be screened on the last day of classes. A $250 prize is awarded each academic term for the best final video in GERMAN 221/231.

Required text:

  • Course pack (Available at Excel; 1117 South University; 996-1500)

Recommended Grammar Text [All the grammar you are required to know is in the course pack and on the web, but this book is an excellent reference that would also be helpful to you in the future, and would provide information on many topics for which we do not have enough time in the course.]:

  • Wells, Larry D. Handbuch zur deutschen Grammatik (grammar text), 2nd Edition

Recommended Texts for 'Language Learning Journals' [see description of 'Language Learning Journal' online or in the first few pages of the course pack; more info on these books is on the main GERMAN 221/231 course page]:

  • Widmer, Uris, Liebesbrief fuer Mary, Diogenes, Zuerich
  • Brothers Grimm, Grimms Maerchen
  • Frisch, Max, Andorra, Suhrkamp
  • Rowling, J.K., Harry Potter und der Stein der Weisen
  • Brussig, Thomas, Am kuerzeren Ende der Sonnenalle
  • Carroll, Lewis, Alice in Wonderland/Alice im Wunderland, dtv bilingual edition (dtv 9244)

Other Recommended Texts:

  • Webster's New World German Dictionary, Concise Edition, Macmillan
  • Zorach/Melin: English Grammar for Students of German 4th Edition, Olivia & Hill
  • Wells, Larry D. Arbeitsbuch (workbook with additional exercises to accompany Handbuch zur deutschen Grammatik).

Advisory Prerequisite: GERMAN 102 or 103 and assignment by placement test

GERMAN 231 — Second-Year Course
Section 004, REC

Instructor: Rastalsky,Hartmut Maria; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 230 or 221.

By this point in your career as a German student, you're ready to do some really interesting, fun and challenging things. In this course, you will watch 6 feature films (including Good Bye Lenin!) and one set of video interviews online, and see numerous other DVD/video clips in class. You will read some short texts and two short novels edited for language learners. The first is based on a popular movie about growing up and falling in love in former East Germany shortly before the fall of the Berlin Wall. The second is Kafka's Die Verwandlung (The Metamorphosis), in which Gregor Samsa awakes one morning from uneasy dreams to find himself transformed in his bed into an enormous bug, and wonders how he's going to get to work on time. The course pack will provide you with extensive explanatory notes and vocabulary glosses in order to help you to enjoy these two books, and to read them at a reasonable speed. Several class sessions will take place in the computer lab, where you will have an opportunity to listen to some German popular music, look at some art by German-speaking artists, learn about the geography of the German-speaking countries, take (part of) a test that has been proposed as a requirement for immigrants seeking German citizenship, and to inform yourself about the Holocaust.

You will review and extend the grammatical knowledge with which you entered the course by means of an online grammar consisting of summaries, explanations, lots of examples, practice exercises and "diagnostic exercises"; we've done our best to make learning grammar fun and interesting for you by our choice of exercises and examples.

You will have six opportunities in the first month of the course to pass a "Gateway Vocabulary Test" on a list of slightly less than 600 of the most common German words and phrases, most of which you will already have encountered. This will provide you with a solid vocabulary base which will make everything else you do with German easier for you. You need a score of 70% to pass this multiple choice test; once you pass it, you need not take it again. If you do not manage to pass this test by the last scheduled time, your final course grade will be reduced by one grade notch, i.e., an A would become an A-, an A- would become a B+ etc. Six additional, much shorter vocabulary lists later in the course will help you to further extend your vocabulary. We are working on projects that would allow you to listen to this vocabulary against a fun musical background, and to practice the vocabulary online using simulated flashcards; we hope you will enjoy these when they are ready! To help you study for the test, an identical version of the test will be available for you to take online as often as you wish. The test consists of a large item bank, of which you will see 40 items each time the test loads.

The feature films, DVD and video clips, readings and other course materials will cover a variety of fields and themes ranging from popular culture, contemporary social issues and history to classical music, art, and literature. By the end of the course, you should be able to survive without using English in a German-speaking country, and have enough conversational skills to meet people and enjoy yourself. You should be comfortable surfing the web in German, able to read and write independently about short texts covering a wide range of topics, and you should be quite familiar with all the basics of German grammar, so that you will be able to pursue your own specific interests in GERMAN 232 and beyond.

Course requirements include daily homework assignments (reading, writing, learning vocabulary, practicing grammar, watching movies, etc.), regular attendance and participation, tests (including two informal oral tests), quizzes, and the Gateway Vocabulary Test. Instead of a final examination, students will work in groups to produce short videos, which will be screened on the last day of classes. A $200 prize is awarded each semester for the best final video in GERMAN 221/231.

Required Texts:

  • Thomas Brussig: Am kü rzeren Ende der Sonnenallee — Easy Reader Series, ISBN: 3126756891 Note: You will need this specific edited version
  • Franz Kafka [edited by Achim Seiffarth]: Die Verwandlung, [Book & CD], ISBN: 88-7754-808-8 Note: You will need this specific edited version
  • Coursepack (CP) (Available at Excel; 1117 South University; 996-1500)

Recommended Grammar Text

All the grammar you are required to know is in the coursepack and on the web, but this book is an excellent reference:

  • Rankin/Wells. Handbuch zur deutschen Grammatik (grammar text), 4th Edition (G)

Recommended Texts for "Language Learning Journals"

Please wait for information in class on the "Language Learning Journal" before you decide if you want to buy one of these.

  • Hans Peter Richter: Damals war es Friedrich ISBN: 3423078006
  • Adalbert von Chamisso: Peter Schlemihls wundersame Geschichte [Lesen leicht gemacht Series] ISBN: 3125592208
  • J.K. Rowling: Harry Potter und der Stein der Weisen
  • C.R. Goedsche: Cultural Graded Reader: Heine ISBN: 0442220383 Unfortunately, this text has been out of print for some time ==> we cannot order copies for the bookstores. If you are interested in it, you should be able to find a used copy online, e.g. via amazon.com!

Other Recommended Texts

  • Webster's New World German Dictionary, Concise Edition ($14, orange; conventional dictionary with >100,000 entries)
  • Harper Collins Beginner's German Dictionary, 2nd ed. 10,000 (??) entries, lots of helpful usage examples, especially easy to read and use.
  • PONS Basiswörterbuch Deutsch als Fremdsprache (Green German-German dictionary. 8,000 entries + 1,500 idioms and much more usage information than a regular dictionary)
  • Zorach & Melin: English Grammar for Students of German, 4th ed.
  • Brown: A Practical Guide to Language Learning

Advisory Prerequisite: GERMAN 102 or 103 and assignment by placement test

GERMAN 231 — Second-Year Course
Section 005, REC

Instructor: Rastalsky,Hartmut Maria; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 230 or 221.

In this course, the four basic language skills (reading, writing, listening, and speaking) developed in the first year will be reviewed and extended. The course includes a selection of recent feature films such as Lola rennt, as well as a variety of shorter video clips and movie excerpts. Readings will be taken from print and online sources and will cover a variety of fields and themes ranging from popular culture, contemporary social issues and history to classical music, art, poetry, and a short text by Nietzsche. By the end of the course, students will be quite familiar with all the basics of German grammar, and be able to survive and hold conversations in a German-speaking country. They will be comfortable surfing the web in German, and able to read and write independently about short texts covering a wide range of topics, so that they will be able to pursue their own specific interests in GERMAN 232 and beyond. Course requirements include daily homework assignments (reading, writing, learning vocabulary, etc.), regular attendance, video assignments, tests, and quizzes. Instead of a final examination, students will work in groups to produce short videos, which will be screened on the last day of classes. A $250 prize is awarded each academic term for the best final video in GERMAN 221/231.

Required text:

  • Course pack (Available at Excel; 1117 South University; 996-1500)

Recommended Grammar Text [All the grammar you are required to know is in the course pack and on the web, but this book is an excellent reference that would also be helpful to you in the future, and would provide information on many topics for which we do not have enough time in the course.]:

  • Wells, Larry D. Handbuch zur deutschen Grammatik (grammar text), 2nd Edition

Recommended Texts for 'Language Learning Journals' [see description of 'Language Learning Journal' online or in the first few pages of the course pack; more info on these books is on the main GERMAN 221/231 course page]:

  • Widmer, Uris, Liebesbrief fuer Mary, Diogenes, Zuerich
  • Brothers Grimm, Grimms Maerchen
  • Frisch, Max, Andorra, Suhrkamp
  • Rowling, J.K., Harry Potter und der Stein der Weisen
  • Brussig, Thomas, Am kuerzeren Ende der Sonnenalle
  • Carroll, Lewis, Alice in Wonderland/Alice im Wunderland, dtv bilingual edition (dtv 9244)

Other Recommended Texts:

  • Webster's New World German Dictionary, Concise Edition, Macmillan
  • Zorach/Melin: English Grammar for Students of German 4th Edition, Olivia & Hill
  • Wells, Larry D. Arbeitsbuch (workbook with additional exercises to accompany Handbuch zur deutschen Grammatik).

Advisory Prerequisite: GERMAN 102 or 103 and assignment by placement test

GERMAN 231 — Second-Year Course
Section 007, REC

Instructor: Rastalsky,Hartmut Maria; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 230 or 221.

By this point in your career as a German student, you're ready to do some really interesting, fun and challenging things. In this course, you will watch 6 feature films (including Good Bye Lenin!) and one set of video interviews online, and see numerous other DVD/video clips in class. You will read some short texts and two short novels edited for language learners. The first is based on a popular movie about growing up and falling in love in former East Germany shortly before the fall of the Berlin Wall. The second is Kafka's Die Verwandlung (The Metamorphosis), in which Gregor Samsa awakes one morning from uneasy dreams to find himself transformed in his bed into an enormous bug, and wonders how he's going to get to work on time. The course pack will provide you with extensive explanatory notes and vocabulary glosses in order to help you to enjoy these two books, and to read them at a reasonable speed. Several class sessions will take place in the computer lab, where you will have an opportunity to listen to some German popular music, look at some art by German-speaking artists, learn about the geography of the German-speaking countries, take (part of) a test that has been proposed as a requirement for immigrants seeking German citizenship, and to inform yourself about the Holocaust.

You will review and extend the grammatical knowledge with which you entered the course by means of an online grammar consisting of summaries, explanations, lots of examples, practice exercises and "diagnostic exercises"; we've done our best to make learning grammar fun and interesting for you by our choice of exercises and examples.

You will have six opportunities in the first month of the course to pass a "Gateway Vocabulary Test" on a list of slightly less than 600 of the most common German words and phrases, most of which you will already have encountered. This will provide you with a solid vocabulary base which will make everything else you do with German easier for you. You need a score of 70% to pass this multiple choice test; once you pass it, you need not take it again. If you do not manage to pass this test by the last scheduled time, your final course grade will be reduced by one grade notch, i.e., an A would become an A-, an A- would become a B+ etc. Six additional, much shorter vocabulary lists later in the course will help you to further extend your vocabulary. We are working on projects that would allow you to listen to this vocabulary against a fun musical background, and to practice the vocabulary online using simulated flashcards; we hope you will enjoy these when they are ready! To help you study for the test, an identical version of the test will be available for you to take online as often as you wish. The test consists of a large item bank, of which you will see 40 items each time the test loads.

The feature films, DVD and video clips, readings and other course materials will cover a variety of fields and themes ranging from popular culture, contemporary social issues and history to classical music, art, and literature. By the end of the course, you should be able to survive without using English in a German-speaking country, and have enough conversational skills to meet people and enjoy yourself. You should be comfortable surfing the web in German, able to read and write independently about short texts covering a wide range of topics, and you should be quite familiar with all the basics of German grammar, so that you will be able to pursue your own specific interests in GERMAN 232 and beyond.

Course requirements include daily homework assignments (reading, writing, learning vocabulary, practicing grammar, watching movies, etc.), regular attendance and participation, tests (including two informal oral tests), quizzes, and the Gateway Vocabulary Test. Instead of a final examination, students will work in groups to produce short videos, which will be screened on the last day of classes. A $200 prize is awarded each semester for the best final video in GERMAN 221/231.

Required Texts:

  • Thomas Brussig: Am kü rzeren Ende der Sonnenallee — Easy Reader Series, ISBN: 3126756891 Note: You will need this specific edited version
  • Franz Kafka [edited by Achim Seiffarth]: Die Verwandlung, [Book & CD], ISBN: 88-7754-808-8 Note: You will need this specific edited version
  • Coursepack (CP) (Available at Excel; 1117 South University; 996-1500)

Recommended Grammar Text

All the grammar you are required to know is in the coursepack and on the web, but this book is an excellent reference:

  • Rankin/Wells. Handbuch zur deutschen Grammatik (grammar text), 4th Edition (G)

Recommended Texts for "Language Learning Journals"

Please wait for information in class on the "Language Learning Journal" before you decide if you want to buy one of these.

  • Hans Peter Richter: Damals war es Friedrich ISBN: 3423078006
  • Adalbert von Chamisso: Peter Schlemihls wundersame Geschichte [Lesen leicht gemacht Series] ISBN: 3125592208
  • J.K. Rowling: Harry Potter und der Stein der Weisen
  • C.R. Goedsche: Cultural Graded Reader: Heine ISBN: 0442220383 Unfortunately, this text has been out of print for some time ==> we cannot order copies for the bookstores. If you are interested in it, you should be able to find a used copy online, e.g. via amazon.com!

Other Recommended Texts

  • Webster's New World German Dictionary, Concise Edition ($14, orange; conventional dictionary with >100,000 entries)
  • Harper Collins Beginner's German Dictionary, 2nd ed. 10,000 (??) entries, lots of helpful usage examples, especially easy to read and use.
  • PONS Basiswörterbuch Deutsch als Fremdsprache (Green German-German dictionary. 8,000 entries + 1,500 idioms and much more usage information than a regular dictionary)
  • Zorach & Melin: English Grammar for Students of German, 4th ed.
  • Brown: A Practical Guide to Language Learning

Advisory Prerequisite: GERMAN 102 or 103 and assignment by placement test

GERMAN 232 — Second-Year Course
Section 001, REC
Contemporary German Society and Business Culture

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Other: Lang Req

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 230.

While building a topic-oriented vocabulary and reviewing essential grammar appropriate to this level, students will be reading and discussing a variety of authentic texts dealing with Germany's geography, economic situation, the situation of foreigners, the reunification of "the two" Germanys and repercussions thereof in contemporary German society. Furthermore, students will get an insight into the evolution, the decision-making process, and current issues of the European Union.

Advisory Prerequisite: GERMAN 221 or 231 and assignment by placement test

GERMAN 232 — Second-Year Course
Section 003, REC
Mathematical Scientific German

Instructor: Rastalsky,Hartmut Maria; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Other: Lang Req

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 230.

This course serves as an introduction to the tools that are vital for pursuing further science-based work in German — practical or academic. Recently, one of the reasons why students have taken this course has been to prepare themselves for summer internships available with German companies or for study abroad in technical and scientific fields.

In addition to reading various scientific articles, we will go on excursions to the Hands on Museum , and the Exhibit Museum of Natural History, students will have the opportunity to present some fun experiments in groups; there will be an elementary math lesson (or more if the class is interested) as well as presentations by other guest speakers, etc.

In addition, we will pause along the way to consider the nature of science and the cultural values that can underlie it, as well as the ethical implications that a rapidly increasing amount of technology and knowledge has on our society today. The necessary vocabulary and grammar will be provided along the way. No background in math or science is assumed. Grades will be based on participation, homework, quizzes, presentations/projects, and exams.

By the end of the course, students will be ready to pursue an internship or study abroad in Germany, and are strongly encouraged to take advantage of the assistance offered by the German department and by the Office of International Programs in this regard.

Required text:

  • Course pack (Available at Excel; 1117 South University; 996-1500)
Recommended Texts:
  • Webster's New World German Dictionary, Concise Edition;
  • Zorach: English Grammar for Students of German

Advisory Prerequisite: GERMAN 221 or 231 and assignment by placement test

GERMAN 232 — Second-Year Course
Section 004, REC
Introduction to Minority Literature in Germany

Instructor: Rastalsky,Hartmut Maria; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Other: Lang Req

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 230.

"Mein Vaterland ist Ghana, meine Muttersprache ist Deutsch, die Heimat trage ich in den Schuhen." In just one sentence, May Ayim, the well-known Afro-German poet and activist, addresses themes central to minority writers in the German context and to this course: belonging, the quest for home(land), in-betweeness, and mother-tongue(s). The question of how to place minority literature in the German context extends back to its early stages as Gastarbeiterliteratur [guest worker literature] in the 1960s. Proceeding chronologically, this course attempts to provide an overview of the various minority voices and their engagement with questions of identity and belonging as they relate to the notion of "Germanness" from the 1960s to the present. The sources for this course will be drawn from primary texts — poems, short stories, autobiographical pieces, and novel excerpts by prominent writers from various backgrounds such as Franco Biondi, Yü ksel Pazarkaya, Emine Sevgi Özdamar, May Ayim, Rafik Schami, to name a few. Furthermore, music and film will be accompanying our readings as we move into to the present. In addition to familiarizing the students with non-canonical writers, the hope is that students will develop and elaborate their reading, interpretive, and analytical skills. The necessary vocabulary and grammar will be provided along the way. Course requirements will include active class participation, essays and other homework, quizzes, an oral presentation, and a final project.

Advisory Prerequisite: GERMAN 221 or 231 and assignment by placement test

GERMAN 232 — Second-Year Course
Section 005, REC
Introduction to German Film

Instructor: Rastalsky,Hartmut Maria; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Other: Lang Req

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 230.

This fourth-term course provides a creative and entertaining approach to the field of Film Studies in German. Students will read articles on film criticism (English and German) as well as view and discuss German film classics of various periods and genres. In the hands-on part of the course students will shoot a short movie (10-15 min) based on a self-produced script. Workshops in shooting and editing video will be provided. Grades will be based on participation, homework, quizzes, presentations, essays, and the script/video-project.

Advisory Prerequisite: GERMAN 221 or 231 and assignment by placement test

GERMAN 232 — Second-Year Course
Section 006, REC
Introduction to German Film

Instructor: Rastalsky,Hartmut Maria; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Other: Lang Req

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 230.

This fourth-term course provides a creative and entertaining approach to the field of Film Studies in German. Students will read articles on film criticism (English and German) as well as view and discuss German film classics of various periods and genres. In the hands-on part of the course students will shoot a short movie (10-15 min) based on a self-produced script. Workshops in shooting and editing video will be provided. Grades will be based on participation, homework, quizzes, presentations, essays, and the script/video-project.

Advisory Prerequisite: GERMAN 221 or 231 and assignment by placement test

GERMAN 300 — German Grammar and Composition
Section 001, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course seeks to increase the accuracy of students' grammar and vocabulary through conversation, writing, and reading. The content of the course is focused on everyday life, cultural trends, and current events in Germany. Texts to be read include journalistic prose, material from the Internet, movies, and popular music. The course will also provide a systematic review of German grammar. The course is intended for students still wishing or needing a systematic review of German grammar and practice in composition after having satisfied the language requirement.

Textbook:
Martin Durrell. Hammer's German Grammar and Usage. Lincolnwood: NTC, 1997.

Advisory Prerequisite: GERMAN 230 or 232

GERMAN 300 — German Grammar and Composition
Section 002, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course seeks to increase the accuracy of students' grammar and vocabulary through conversation, writing, and reading. The content of the course is focused on everyday life, cultural trends, and current events in Germany. Texts to be read include journalistic prose, material from the Internet, movies, and popular music. The course will also provide a systematic review of German grammar. The course is intended for students still wishing or needing a systematic review of German grammar and practice in composition after having satisfied the language requirement.

Textbook:
Martin Durrell. Hammer's German Grammar and Usage. Lincolnwood: NTC, 1997.

Advisory Prerequisite: GERMAN 230 or 232

GERMAN 302 — German, Politics, History, and Society
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Rensmann,Lars

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR, SS

This course will look at the problems and politics of contemporary Germany through the prism of history. By analyzing previous political regimes which governed Germany just in the 20th century — absolute monarchy, unstable liberal democracy, totalitarian fascism, stable liberal democracy, bureaucratic communism — the course will shed light on the vicissitudes of the "German Question" and its importance for European politics as a whole. The course is taught in English.

Intended audience:Open to undergraduates interested in German Studies, Political Sciences, and European Area Studies.

Course Requirements:Students will be required to give a brief oral presentation on a topic from the syllabus; write short analyses of selected, representative works; and prepare a final essay on a topic to be arranged with the instructor. One exam on basic concepts covered in the course.

Class Format:Seminar , meets three hours per week

GERMAN 305 — Conversation Practice
Section 001, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 1

Credit Exclusions: Students who have previously participated in a 400-level GERMAN conversation course may not register for GERMAN 305 or 306.

The goal of this course is to increase students' confidence in speaking on any topic and, therefore, the course will focus on a variety of topics ranging from practical language situations to current cultural events to areas of students' academic interests. Students will work on expanding vocabulary, finding synonyms, and understanding/using varying spoken styles, which are necessary to appreciate life in German-speaking communities. The materials for the course will come from German websites as well as various materials from the instructor. Course requirements are: energetic class participation, thorough preparation, e-mail in German with the instructor and fellow students, and oral presentations.

Advisory Prerequisite: GERMAN 230, 231, or 232; concurrent enrollment in a 300-level course is encouraged but not necessary.

GERMAN 305 — Conversation Practice
Section 002, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 1

Credit Exclusions: Students who have previously participated in a 400-level GERMAN conversation course may not register for GERMAN 305 or 306.

The goal of this course is to increase students' confidence in speaking on any topic and, therefore, the course will focus on a variety of topics ranging from practical language situations to current cultural events to areas of students' academic interests. Students will work on expanding vocabulary, finding synonyms, and understanding/using varying spoken styles, which are necessary to appreciate life in German-speaking communities. The materials for the course will come from German websites as well as various materials from the instructor. Course requirements are: energetic class participation, thorough preparation, e-mail in German with the instructor and fellow students, and oral presentations.

Advisory Prerequisite: GERMAN 230, 231, or 232; concurrent enrollment in a 300-level course is encouraged but not necessary.

GERMAN 305 — Conversation Practice
Section 003, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 1

Credit Exclusions: Students who have previously participated in a 400-level GERMAN conversation course may not register for GERMAN 305 or 306.

The goal of this course is to increase students' confidence in speaking on any topic and, therefore, the course will focus on a variety of topics ranging from practical language situations to current cultural events to areas of students' academic interests. Students will work on expanding vocabulary, finding synonyms, and understanding/using varying spoken styles, which are necessary to appreciate life in German-speaking communities. The materials for the course will come from German websites as well as various materials from the instructor. Course requirements are: energetic class participation, thorough preparation, e-mail in German with the instructor and fellow students, and oral presentations.

Advisory Prerequisite: GERMAN 230, 231, or 232; concurrent enrollment in a 300-level course is encouraged but not necessary.

GERMAN 305 — Conversation Practice
Section 004, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 1

Credit Exclusions: Students who have previously participated in a 400-level GERMAN conversation course may not register for GERMAN 305 or 306.

The goal of this course is to increase students' confidence in speaking on any topic and, therefore, the course will focus on a variety of topics ranging from practical language situations to current cultural events to areas of students' academic interests. Students will work on expanding vocabulary, finding synonyms, and understanding/using varying spoken styles, which are necessary to appreciate life in German-speaking communities. The materials for the course will come from German websites as well as various materials from the instructor. Course requirements are: energetic class participation, thorough preparation, e-mail in German with the instructor and fellow students, and oral presentations.

Advisory Prerequisite: GERMAN 230, 231, or 232; concurrent enrollment in a 300-level course is encouraged but not necessary.

GERMAN 305 — Conversation Practice
Section 005, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 1

Credit Exclusions: Students who have previously participated in a 400-level GERMAN conversation course may not register for GERMAN 305 or 306.

The goal of this course is to increase students' confidence in speaking on any topic and, therefore, the course will focus on a variety of topics ranging from practical language situations to current cultural events to areas of students' academic interests. Students will work on expanding vocabulary, finding synonyms, and understanding/using varying spoken styles, which are necessary to appreciate life in German-speaking communities. The materials for the course will come from German websites as well as various materials from the instructor. Course requirements are: energetic class participation, thorough preparation, e-mail in German with the instructor and fellow students, and oral presentations.

Advisory Prerequisite: GERMAN 230, 231, or 232; concurrent enrollment in a 300-level course is encouraged but not necessary.

GERMAN 310 — Studies in German Culture
Section 001, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 1
Other: WorldLit

Advisory Prerequisite: Residence in Max Kade German House; others by permission of instructor.

GERMAN 325 — Intermediate German
Section 001, REC
German Civilization and Culture for Business

Instructor: VanValkenburg,Janet K

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course will explore various aspects of "being" German, and how these contribute to the ways in which Germans are "German" and how they interact with other peoples all over the globe. Some of the aspects which will be dealt with are geography, history, politics, language, psychology, culture, and everyday living. There will be readings and several movies or videos. The language of instruction is German.

Advisory Prerequisite: GERMAN 230 or 232, or the equivalent (placement test) or permission of instructor.

GERMAN 325 — Intermediate German
Section 002, REC
Goethe's Lyrics

Instructor: Amrine,Frederick R

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Goethe's lyrics are, by turns, charming, anguished, philosophical, intimate, Baroque, Classical, Romantic, 'primitive,' and avant-garde. Goethe imitated and mastered Italian, Greek, Roman, and even Medieval Persian forms. This course, in which we will read closely a representative sample of Goethe's most important lyrics, should also provide an excellent introduction to Goethe, the German lyric, and many lyric genres more generally. Students will be asked to write short interpretations and lead discussions by turn. The texts will be read entirely in the original; discussion will be conducted in both German and English

Advisory Prerequisite: GERMAN 230 or 232, or the equivalent (placement test) or permission of instructor.

GERMAN 325 — Intermediate German
Section 003, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Designed to improve proficiency in written and spoken German by way of introductions to various topics in German studies.

Advisory Prerequisite: GERMAN 230 or 232, or the equivalent (placement test) or permission of instructor.

GERMAN 325 — Intermediate German
Section 004, REC
German for Engineering I

Instructor: Rastalsky,Hartmut Maria; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course will introduce students to German engineering discourse. It is the first course in a two-course sequence designed to prepare students for internships and jobs requiring some knowledge of technical German, and for study abroad in a technical field in a German-speaking country. Readings will be taken primarily from Wie funktioniert das? Technik heute (5th ed.). This book provides a wide range of technical information in a standardized format consisting of one page of text with a facing page of illustrations for each topic. We will watch a number of videos related to the course material, and will make some use of the internet. The course will also include one or two field trips and/or guest lectures by faculty from technical fields. In addition, we will spend one day taking some things apart and putting them back together again. Vocabulary building will be emphasized strongly; grammar will be reviewed as needed. There will be a lot of partner and small group work during class time, in order to maximize students' opportunities to practice speaking and to help each other master the material.

Student tasks and the instructor's expectations will be based on the assumption that the majority of students will previously have had (no more than!) the equivalent of four semesters of college German. It is strongly recommended, but not required, that students have some background in Engineering. Students enrolling in the course without such a background should be open to and interested in the study of scientific and technical concepts.

Advisory Prerequisite: GERMAN 230 or 232, or the equivalent (placement test) or permission of instructor.

GERMAN 325 — Intermediate German
Section 005, REC

Instructor: Weineck,Silke-Maria

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Designed to improve proficiency in written and spoken German by way of introductions to various topics in German studies.

Advisory Prerequisite: GERMAN 230 or 232, or the equivalent (placement test) or permission of instructor.

GERMAN 325 — Intermediate German
Section 006, REC
Soccer

Instructor: Federhofer,Karl-Georg

FA 2007
Credits: 3

In this course, students are invited to dive into the fascination ‘Fußball'. Introduction to the rules, soccer-jargon, teams, and players will be part of the class time, as well as historical and cultural aspects of soccer in the German-speaking countries. The material for discussions and student presentations is based on literary texts, Internet resources, videos and a movie. The course will be conducted in German; weekly readings and motivated participation are required. Matters of German grammar, which may occur while improving the speaking, reading and writing skills, will be reviewed as needed.

Advisory Prerequisite: GERMAN 230 or 232, or the equivalent (placement test) or permission of instructor.

GERMAN 325 — Intermediate German
Section 007, REC

Instructor: Kyes,Robert L

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Designed to improve proficiency in written and spoken German by way of introductions to various topics in German studies.

Advisory Prerequisite: GERMAN 230 or 232, or the equivalent (placement test) or permission of instructor.

GERMAN 325 — Intermediate German
Section 008, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Designed to improve proficiency in written and spoken German by way of introductions to various topics in German studies.

Advisory Prerequisite: GERMAN 230 or 232, or the equivalent (placement test) or permission of instructor.

GERMAN 329 — Independent Study
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: INDEPENDENT

Independent study for students who need work in a certain area to complete their degrees and are unable to acquire it from a regularly scheduled course.

Advisory Prerequisite: PER. CHRM.

GERMAN 330 — German Cinema
Section 001, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: WorldLit

An introduction to German cinema and its cultural background from the beginnings to the present, with emphasis on the classical period (ca. 1918-1933) and the modern (post-1965) resurgence.

GERMAN 350 — Business German
Section 001, REC

Instructor: VanValkenburg,Janet K

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course introduces students to the language of business German and gives them insight into Germany's place in the global economy. The course is organized around major business and economic topics, such as:

  • the geography of business in German;
  • the European Union and Germany's roll therein;
  • trade;
  • traffic and transportation;
  • marketing;
  • industry;
  • money and banking; and
  • ecology.

In addition to the basic text, students will read actual business, merchandising, and advertising material; newspapers and magazines. There will also be short videos on business and related topics. There will be three major exams; a number of short reports, papers, and projects; and a final exam. The language of instruction is German.

Advisory Prerequisite: GERMAN 230 or 232, or the equivalent (placement test) or permission of instructor.

GERMAN 351 — Practice in Business German
Section 001, REC

Instructor: VanValkenburg,Janet K

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Expr

This course will give credit to a student for the completion of an internship in a German-speaking country.

Requirements for receiving credit are as follows:

  1. The student will complete an eight-week (minimum) internship in a German-speaking country before registering for these three credits.
  2. The student will then complete a report/paper of at least 20 typed pages in German on this experience.
    1. Part 1 of the paper will describe the location of the internship. It will include information on the geography, history, population, major industries, social structure, politics, and culture of the area.
    2. Part 2 of the paper will be a 2 –3 page description of the company or organization where the internship was completed. This part will include the elements of a "company presentation": location, history, major changes and developments, industrial branch, products, present legal form, number of employees, yearly turn-over, recent developments.
    3. Part 3 of the paper will be the student's personal account of the internship experience. This part should start with a description of a typical day for the intern: work hours, the facilities, the department, typical duties and activities, superiors, support staff, and co-workers, technologies, special events. If applicable, the student will compare and contrast the working situation and work-relationships in the United States and the location of the internship, noting similarities and differences between the two. The student may also include a description of the housing, as well as pictures and descriptions of travels or other non-work related activities and other mementos of the internship.
    4. Finally, the student will include a copy of any written summary or recommendation provided by the company upon the completion of the internship, as well as copies of thank-you letters written by the student to the company/department and to the landlord.
  3. During the registered term, the student will also make a ten-minute presentation in German about the internship experience to Business German students and potential interns.

No regular class meetings are scheduled.

Advisory Prerequisite: Internship in a German-speaking country.

GERMAN 375 — Celtic and Nordic Mythology
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: WorldLit

A study of the Celtic and Nordic cycles of myths and sagas, including the Nibelungenlied, Tristan and Isolde cycles, the Irish Tain, the Welsh Mabinogi, the Scandinavian Edda and some of the literature based on these cycles.

GERMAN 384 — Short Fiction: Romanticism to Realism
Section 001, REC
The Poetics of Fear

Instructor: Guillemin,Anna Claire

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

In this course we will examine short prose from Romanticism to Realism with a special emphasis on the genre of the horror story: grizzly fairy tales, the Romantic "artificial fairy tale," ghost stories, and the fantastic. Writing of this period is rife with spirits, witches, Doppelgangers, and inanimate objects come to life. We will ask how fright, during this period, was defined as an aesthetic term. How was fear mediated? Wherein lay a terrified readership's pleasure in it? In what ways did the transition from Romanticism to Realism "contain" the world of terror or of the fantastic? Readings will include works from the Brothers Grimms, Tieck, Kleist, Eichendorff, E.T.A. Hoffmann, Heine and others. Discussion will be held in German and students will be asked to write two short assignments, a final paper, as well as a midterm and final exam.

Advisory Prerequisite: GERMAN 230, 232, or the equivalent (placement test) or permission of instructor

GERMAN 401 — Nineteenth-Century German and European Intellectual History
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Weineck,Silke-Maria

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: WorldLit

Between the upheavals of the French Revolution and the First World War, the European nations witnessed an utter transformation of their world. The relations of the person to the nation, to the state, to history, and to the physical world were rethought from top to bottom. Our exploration of modern ideas take us from rationalism to racism, and from utopian ideologies to the birth of psychoanalysis.

Advisory Prerequisite: German students must have concurrent registration in German 403. See Course Guide.

GERMAN 405 — Conversation Practice
Section 002, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 1

No Katzenjammer! The final etappe in the tour de conversation will equally stress the practical and informative needs of students who may work, study, or simply live (factually or imaginatively) abroad. You will learn how to compose a résumé and how to address specific professional or academic situations. The latter fields will provide much fodder for our conversations which will also include a wide array of cultural topics in German-speaking communities.

The course aims to provide an ample range of stylistic registers and make you feel comfortable in using them. This course is restricted to students who have already completed a 300-level German conversation course and who have also reached the GERMAN 325-level course plateau. Various presentations and vigorous discussions will establish the formal requirements of this course.

Advisory Prerequisite: GERMAN 305 or 306.

GERMAN 425 — Advanced German
Section 001, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Translation and free composition and practical study of the syntax of German as written and spoken.

Advisory Prerequisite: GERMAN 325, 326 or permission of instructor

GERMAN 425 — Advanced German
Section 002, REC

Instructor: Federhofer,Karl-Georg

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

Students will be exposed to a variety of styles of written and spoken German in order to improve their reading and listening abilities. Students' abilities to present an argument in writing persuasively and engagingly in German will be substantially improved. To this end, students will be required to do extensive writing, rewriting, and peer editing. One oral presentation is required of each student. German is used exclusively in this course. The final grade is based on the compositions as well as participation in the discussions. GERMAN 426 may be taken independently of GERMAN 425.

Advisory Prerequisite: GERMAN 325, 326 or permission of instructor

GERMAN 431 — Business German: Management and Marketing
Section 001, REC

Instructor: VanValkenburg,Janet K

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course offers authentic information and terminology as they apply to professional practices in the fields of company structure, management, and marketing in the German-speaking world. Using authentic situations and materials, the students become acquainted with the forms, roles, and related organizations of German companies. This is then expanded with management and manager skills, marketing and advertising in German companies. The course includes the essential cross-cultural aspects of doing business in/with Germany. When possible, guest speakers will be brought in to elaborate on topics being covered. The course will be interactive, and the language of instruction is German. The intended audience is the large (and growing) number of concentrators and minors seeking courses in Business German, as well as non-concentrators who undertake summer internships in German-speaking countries. The course will meet three hours per week in a discussion format.

The course will have two major exams and a final exam, vocabulary quizzes, three required written reports of approximately five typed pages with brief oral presentations of findings, and one longer term report of at least 15 pages.

Advisory Prerequisite: GERMAN 350 or 430.

GERMAN 449 — Special Topics in English Translation
Section 001, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: WorldLit

Various themes, e.g., Nietzsche and Modern Literature or Rilke translations, etc., are taught by various members of the staff according to student interest and faculty availability.

GERMAN 449 — Special Topics in English Translation
Section 002, REC

Instructor: Markovits,Andrei S; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: WorldLit

Various themes, e.g., Nietzsche and Modern Literature or Rilke translations, etc., are taught by various members of the staff according to student interest and faculty availability.

GERMAN 455 — Nineteenth-Century German Fiction
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Amrine,Frederick R

FA 2007
Credits: 2 — 3

We will read a number of seminal pieces of short prose from the long 19th century (~1780-1910), including selections from Goethe, Kleist, Eichendorff, Droste-Huelshoff, Storm, Kafka, and Thomas Mann. Of special interest will be the development of the novella, a short genre said to be organized around an unerhoerte Begebenheit a rare event of intense symbolic or historical significance. This will allow us to trace changing conceptions of history, transitions, and crises. Readings in German, discussion in German and English. Grades will be based on attendance and participation, written homework assignments, and four short papers.

Advisory Prerequisite: One year beyond GERMAN 232.

GERMAN 491 — German Honors Proseminar
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Barndt,Kerstin

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Honors

Completion of the sequence of GERMAN 491 and 492 is required for an Honors concentration in German Studies. Interested students are encouraged to contact the Honors Concentration Advisor for admission into the program (minimum 3.4 GPA with at least 3.7 in German) for Fall Term of their senior year, preferably — but not necessarily — as early as Winter Term of their sophomore year. GERMAN 491 is regarded as a preparatory term in anticipation of GERMAN 492 (Winter), in which each student writes an Honors thesis. The kinds of work to be read will be determined in part by the perceived needs of the students, geared possibly toward already-identified thesis topics and/or toward intensified focus on reading literary texts, acquiring and honing interdisciplinary research skills, and developing a persuasive and sustained argument. Every effort will be made to accommodate students with a broad range of interests from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds.

Regardless of ultimate subject matter, the intent of the seminar will be to increase students' critical reading abilities in their chosen field of interest and their familiarity with secondary literature, source material, and contemporary scholarship. Requirements for the course include at least one oral presentation (depending on the number of participants) and two papers (to total about 25 pages, in German or English). Students are urged to contact the Honors Concentration Advisor in advance of the Fall Term to arrange an interview in which particular individual needs and interests will be discussed, so that the course may be tailored to fit each group.

Advisory Prerequisite: Senior Honors standing.

GERMAN 499 — Seminar in German Studies
Section 001, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 3

A seminar for graduate students and advanced undergraduates which focuses on a special topic each time the course is offered. Topics vary from term to term.

Advisory Prerequisite: One year beyond GERMAN 232.

GERMAN 499 — Seminar in German Studies
Section 002, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 3

A seminar for graduate students and advanced undergraduates which focuses on a special topic each time the course is offered. Topics vary from term to term.

Advisory Prerequisite: One year beyond GERMAN 232.

GERMAN 501 — Old English
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Toon,Thomas E

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course is an introduction to the earliest texts written in English over a thousand years ago. We will begin with Old English, the language spoken by our forebears until the unpleasantness at Hastings — the Norman Conquest. Since Old English is so different from Modern English as to seem like another language, the first objective of this course will be to master the rudiments of the structure and vocabulary of the earliest attested form of English. The reward is being able to read an excitingly different corpus of prose and poetry. We will conclude with the study of the later texts which continue the Anglo-Saxon alliterative tradition. My chief aim is to help you develop a new appreciation of where our language, culture, and intellectual traditions come from.

GERMAN 517 — Principles and Methods of Historical Linguistics
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Thomason,Sarah G

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course is an introduction to the theories and methods that enable linguists to describe and explain processes of linguistic change and historical relationships among languages. The major topics to be covered are the emergence of language families and means of establishing family relationships; sound change; grammatical change, especially analogy; language change caused by culture contacts; the Comparative Method, through which prehistoric language states can be reconstructed with an impressive degree of accuracy; internal reconstruction, a less powerful but still important method for gaining information about linguistic prehistory; and ways in which the study of current dialect variation offers insights into processes of change.

Course requirements: regular homework assignments (45%), final exam (45%), class participation (10%).

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing, or permission of instructor.

GERMAN 531 — Teaching Methods
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Rastalsky,Hartmut Maria; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

GERMAN 531 is open to graduate students and advanced undergraduates. Readings will be primarily in English; class discussion will be in German and English.

This course is intended to provide the theoretical and practical foundations for the teaching of German as a foreign language in schools and colleges. The course will combine regular reading assignments with frequent class observations and the preparation of sample lessons in order to generate a fruitful interplay between theory and practice. There will also be a strong emphasis on introducing students to relevant instructional technology. Course requirements include regular reading assignments, regular class observations, several short presentations, quizzes, and a final project.

Advisory Prerequisite: Senior standing; and candidate for a teaching certificate.

GERMAN 540 — Introduction to German Studies
Section 001, SEM

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course is an intensive introduction to research methods, bibliography, and basic principles of literary analysis as they pertain to the study of the Germanic languages and their literatures. It surveys the various subfields of German literary studies, as well as Germanic philosophy and linguistics.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

GERMAN 821 — Seminar in German Studies
Section 001, SEM
Citizenship in Modern Germany

Instructor: Canning,Kathleen M

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course is aimed at graduate students who are specializing in modern German or European history, German or European literature or cultural studies. Its chronological time frame encompasses the period from the mid-nineteenth to the mid-twentieth century (from Kaiserreich through the Nazi period. Course readings will include studies widely recognized as "classics," as well as more recent studies that are informing present-day discussions in the field. In this class we will work conceptually as well as historiographically. This means that we will read some theoretical texts, including theory from the time period we are studying, for the purpose of defining the conceptual parameters of state, social, citizenship and body, and the violence inflicted in the name of each (or upon each). Because this course considers histories of practices as well as languages, institutions as well as ideologies, our readings will include texts in social, cultural and intellectual history. We will also pay attention to the shifts in historical methodologies, from political and social history of the 1970s and 1980s, to more recent studies in cultural and intellectual history, gender and cultural studies.

Among the thematics that I would like to explore in this course are: notions of time (continuities and ruptures) and their place in German history; the traditions of the German state as a disciplinary complex and its relationship to the sphere of the "social;" the place of gender, religion, ethnicity and nationalism in the expansion of the public sphere during the 1890s; recent scholarship on German colonialism and its impact on notions of citizenship and national belonging; the particularities of German militarism in WW1 and its legacies of violence for the aftermath of war; the reinvention of state and social body during the Weimar Republic; participatory citizenship from Weimar into the Nazi period; Germany's particular twentieth-century "modernity" and its affiliation with crisis; the social body in the Nazi racial state.

Course Requirements: One short mid-term essay, weekly or bi-weekly short bibliographies, and one longer paper at the end of the term. Each student will introduce the readings two or three times during the semester, depending on the size of the class. Readings will generally be in English with occasional recommended alternative readings for students who read German.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

GERMAN 901 — Directed Reading in German Literature and Linguistics
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 8

For degree candidates who have completed course requirements and who need supplementary work. Under supervision of graduate committee.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permission of instructor.

GERMAN 990 — Dissertation/Precandidate
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 8

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Advisory Prerequisite: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing.

GERMAN 993 — Graduate Student Instructor Training Program
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Rastalsky,Hartmut Maria; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 1

A seminar for all beginning graduate student instructors, consisting of a one week orientation before the term starts and periodic workshops/meetings during the Fall Term. Beginning graduate student instructors are required to register for this course.

Advisory Prerequisite: Must have Teaching Assistant award. Graduate standing.

GERMAN 995 — Dissertation/Candidate
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 8

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Enforced Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate

 
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