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LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Fall 2007, Dept = HISTART
 
Page 1 of 1, Results 1 — 38 of 38
Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
HISTART 101 — Visual Wonders from the Stone Age to the Middle Ages
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Root,Margaret C

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

HA101 introduces students to the disciplinary practices and goals of art history via encounters with selected great monuments of visual culture ranging from magic-charged cave art of prehistory to compelling Christian, Jewish, and Islamic monuments of medieval life, piety, and power down through the Crusades. We place each monument in dialogue with a cluster of thematically associated creations that enrich our understanding of how art expresses ideas and exerts meaning in its era of original production. We also consider how to "read" a famous monument across time — as its fame may have the power to produce new meanings in new historical contexts. Discussion sections encourage active use of campus museum collections via specially designed online engagements.

Course materials:
Textbook (Shaman Drum);
Coursepack (Accu Copy);
Online Aids.

Grading basis: Three Unit Tests (1 hour each), Two Essays (2-3 pages each), Class Attendance/Section Participation.

I. IV. 1, 2

HISTART 108 — Introduction to African Art
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Doris,David T; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

Through the study of a selected group of African and African Diaspora cultures, we will investigate several pivotal issues and narratives that lie behind the surfaces of some extraordinary objects and practices. African people have their own stories to tell about these things, of course: stories of mythic power expressed as living form, stories of historical contact with other cultures, stories of struggle and redemption, stories of ordinary, everyday life. And over the past several centuries, we in the "West" also have had a decisive, often disturbing hand in the framing of African peoples, objects and stories. The coupled histories of colonialism and the slave trade, along with our inevitably distorted views and representations of what African people are and what they do, have affected Africa and its peoples to the core. When we look at and think critically about "African Art," then, we necessarily must look at and think critically about ourselves. Ultimately, the goal is to understand aspects of African cultures in the terms by which Africans understand them — to know African ideals and realities as they are shaped in word, sound, matter and movement. In this course we'll be taking a few steps towards that goal. In lectures and weekly discussion sections, in films, recorded sound, and perhaps even in live performance, we will examine objects and the many stories that surround them. Looking and listening closely, we will learn to see and to understand a wide range of African visual practices including architecture, textiles, body adornment, painting, graphic communication systems, photography, dance, ritual performance and, of course, sculpture — not only as these practices continue to unfold on the African continent, but also as they are transformed, and as they endure, in the African Diaspora.

II. V. 4

HISTART 112 — History of Photography
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Biro,Matthew Nicholas; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

This course surveys the history of photography from the invention of the medium in 1839 to its most recent developments. It is designed to introduce students to skills of analyzing and interpreting photographs as well as to present the history of photography as both an art form and as a social phenomenon. Since the meaning of a photograph changes depending on the methodology used to interpret it, this course will also introduce students to a number of different methods of visual analysis, including formal analysis, semiotics, psychoanalysis, and Marxism (as well as other forms of contextual analysis). In addition, the development of photographic theory will also be briefly examined. IV> 4

HISTART 194 — First Year Seminar
Section 001, SEM
Global Encounters: Asia and the World

Instructor: Sloan,Anna J

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem

The final years of the fifteenth century heralded a new era in the relationship between Asia and distant parts of the globe. The arrival of Vasco da Gama on the west coast of India in 1498 established direct contact between Europe and maritime Asia. It also initiated centuries of commercial, cultural, artistic and technological exchange. This course explores facets of that exchange, pursuing case studies in India, Southeast Asia, China and Japan. Readings, lectures, and student projects will address the varied nature of Asia's encounters with the Portuguese, Dutch, and British, and more recently with global modernity and post-modernity. Topics include cartography, exotica, gift exchange, diplomacy and protocol, trade, missionary activity, colonization, Orientalism, and the post-colonial condition. I.III.IV. 3,4

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

HISTART 211 — Gender and Popular Culture
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Simons,Patricia; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

"Popular culture" is a complex social system and this course concentrates on its visual manifestations in various media. We focus on women as signs or emblems, as producers, and as consumers, of "popular culture", but attention is also given to the representation of masculinity and of race/ethnicity. Mainstream and marginal, appropriated and subverting, reflective and formative, "popular culture" is both a multivalent signifying system and a powerful industry. After a brief thematic introduction to gender, and to analysis, we focus on contemporary American culture, examining such examples as advertising and consumption; Barbie dolls; parental roles in film and advertising; romance in fiction and films like the classics, Pretty Woman and Titanic; and the male "buddy" system in action movies alongside the female friend in other films. IV. 4

HISTART 221 — Introduction to Greek Archaeology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Herbert,Sharon C

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

The Ancient Greeks are always with us, in high places and low, from the halls of our democratic institutions to the pages of the Sports Illustrated swimsuit edition. How can we explain their ubiquitous presence in our lives? Why won't they go away? This course explores the art and archaeology of ancient Greece, beginning in the Bronze Age (the famous Minoan and Mycenaean civilizations) through to Hellenistic times (the age of Alexander the Great). We will explore all aspects of Greek life as reflected in the materials they left behind, objects that range from mighty marble temples such as the Parthenon, to discarded drinking vessels from their parties, from cities to theaters, from houses to palaces. Such artistic and archaeological evidence allows us to consider how Greek society worked, and how they understood the relations of humans and gods, men and women, Greeks and barbarians. Having taken this course, you will understand far better just why they Greeks are so hard to forget.

HISTART 244 — Art of the American Century (1893-1968)
Section 001, LEC
The "American Century" (1839-1970)

Instructor: Zurier,Rebecca; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

This lecture/discussion class surveys art and the visual and material environment from the emergence of the United States as a world power in the 1890s to the questioning of the "American Way of Life" during the era of the Civil Rights movement and the Vietnam War. In lectures, discussion, and original hands-on-research, we will examine the work of such celebrated figures as Frank Lloyd Wright, Jacob Lawrence, Georgia O'Keeffe, Isamu Noguchi, Edward Hopper, Walker Evans, and Diego Rivera, but also the culture of consumerism and emergent racial and ethnic identities in which they worked.

IV. 4

HISTART 251 — Italian Renaissance Art, II
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Holmes,Megan L

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

In this course we will study Italian art from circa 1480 to 1570. This period is traditionally known as the ‘High Renaissance,' and usually begins with the maturity of Leonardo da Vinci and ends with the death of Michelangelo. We will follow the careers of major masters like Botticelli, Leonardo, Raphael, Titian and Michelangelo. We will also explore the urban centers — Venice, Florence, Rome — where these masters, and many others not as well known, produced their works in response to the demands of patrons and institutions. We will study key works of art, sites of production, techniques, patrons, practitioners, and publics. Transformations in artistic practices and representational forms will be related to specific social, political, economic, and cultural conditions. We will also consider primary sources, and pay close attention to how art historians selectively regard the fragmentary material and textual remains from the period and incorporate them into a ‘story of art'.

IV. 3

HISTART 254 — Introduction to Gender and the Arts
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: André,Naomi A
Instructor: Siegfried,Susan L

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

This course is an introduction to gender issues in a wide range of art forms with special emphasis in the visual arts, music and literature. We will meet as a seminar once a week for a combination of lecture and discussion. Classes will be supplemented with required attendance at performances and museums in the Ann Arbor and Detroit area.

Our goal throughout the term is to develop a critical appreciation of the arts and skills in writing about the arts. We will think about how performances of femininity, masculinity, and sexuality intersect with race, class and ethnicity and consider how these issues are produced and received by artists and audiences in the past and present. Writing assignments will include reports on performance and arts events as well as critical analyses. For those who are interested, there will be some opportunities for creative projects.

This course has a Lab Fee of $100.00.

HISTART 271 — Origins of Modernism: Art and Culture in Nineteenth Century France
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

This course examines a series of remarkable episodes in modern French painting, from the establishment of an official, State-sponsored form of Classicism to the succession of movements — Romanticism, Realism, Impressionism, and Neo-Impressionism — that emerged in opposition to official art. The Nineteenth Century is the period during which modern art developed its characteristic strategies and behavioral patterns: an insistence on innovation, originality, and individuality; a contentious involvement with tradition; a critical relationship with both institutional and commercial culture; and a somewhat strained allegiance with radical politics and alternative subcultures. It is also the period that witnessed a thorough-going reassessment of visual representation, and a parallel concern with the possibilities and limitations of the medium of painting. The course is designed to encourage close readings of images (by David, Gericault, Manet, Degas, Seurat, Cézanne, et al.) within the parameters of their historical contexts and of recent critical debate. IV. 4

HISTART 299 — Experiential Study
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 3
Other: Expr

Intended for students to wish to receive credit for an internship or other experiential work under the direction of a member of the faculty.

Advisory Prerequisite: One course in History of Art

HISTART 340 — Archaeology of Ancient Housing
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Nevett,Lisa C

FA 2007
Credits: 3

All of us have a home, whether it consists of a whole house or a single room, and most of us have strong views about how our home should be furnished and decorated. We all know that entering into someone else's house can reveal much about his or her character. In the same way, studying the physical remains of domestic buildings — including their decoration and furnishings — reveals much about the behaviour and character of the ancient Greeks and Romans.

The course will tackle a series of topics, starting with the emergence of private housing in the Greek Dark Ages (tenth and ninth centuries B.C.) and moving forward in time through the Classical and Hellenistic periods, looking at housing from sites such as Athens, Olynthos and Vergina. Questions raised will include how and why the organisation and decoration of houses changed so dramatically over a relatively short time, and what the remains of houses tell us about broader issues such as the character of the Greek economy and the nature of social relationships. We will then move on to compare the Greek ‘core' with the ‘diaspora' areas, using the evidence from sites such as Himera in Sicily and Euesperides (Benghazi) in Libya. The second half of the course will cover households in various areas of the Roman world, starting in Italy itself with Rome, Pompeii, Herculaneum, and Ostia, and moving outwards to look at contrasting groups of evidence from some of the provinces, including North African settlements (such as Dougga, Bulla Regia, Volubilis, Timgad and especially, the Michigan excavations at Karanis in Egypt) and the Greek East (Ephesos, Doura Europos, Antioch). Questions raised will include the extent to which it is possible to talk about a standardised ‘Roman house' and the degree to which housing in different areas provides evidence for the continuity of indigenous cultural traditions.

HISTART 382 — Introduction to Egyptian Archaeology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Richards,Janet E; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

This course focuses on the material culture and disposition of archaeological sites in ancient Egypt and Nubia from c. 3200 bce-285 ac. The logic and nature of both sacred and secular landscapes are explored, and specific sites, some well known (such as the extensive temple precinct at Karnak and the Meroitic pyramids).

HISTART 386 — Painting and Poetry in China
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Powers,Martin J

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: Theme

Many Chinese paintings can be "read" as visual poetry. Every image resonates with centuries of poetic writing, where each poem addresses human issues of interest to most of us even today: poverty, childhood, the loss of loved ones, individual against the establishment, family fights, unrequited love, injustice......Each of these topics was addressed in both the painting and the poetry of China. Helping students to appreciate the human drama underlying such paintings and poems is one goal of this course. As a pedagogical aid, we will read a fair amount of modern American poetry, especially by authors who refer to or admire the Chinese tradition, including Wendell Berry, Hayden Carruth and Gary Snyder. At another level, the relationship of pictures to texts is a more general art historical problem that has occupied some of the finest minds in both Europe and China. The problem continues to generate new and insightful writings by contemporary students of these cultural traditions, and so we will sample some Chinese critical literature on painting and poetry as well more contemporary approaches to word/image issues. By the end of the course students should have a store of analytical methods for relating pictures and texts generally, but will also understand a good deal about how to read a Chinese painting. There will be a midterm, a final, and a short paper (roughly 7 pages). There is no prerequisite. No cost for materials. III. 3

Advisory Prerequisite: Upperclass standing and a course in archaeology.

HISTART 388 — Norm and Storm: Rebellion in Art
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Babaie,Sussan; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

This course coincides with and utilizes the exhibition "Persian Visions: Contemporary Photography from Iran," which takes place between October 2007 and January 2008 at the UMMA's off-site gallery. We take modern and contemporary visual culture of Iran and its diasporas as a point of departure to examine the meaning of rebellion in and through art. This course seeks to explore the ways in which the makers and consumers of art have questioned, contested, subverted and negotiated visual and cultural "norms." What are those norms and how are they defined, naturalized, enforced? What artistic strategies are deployed to decentralize dominant paradigms, be they the force of tradition or of the ‘foreign' (farangi)? What are the mechanisms for the visual production of a rebellious relationship with the established norms of sexuality, gender, race, or religious and political ideologies? We also investigate these contested arenas of visuality in relation to the emergence of modernisms outside Europe and the U.S. Comparative studies of the visual enterprise of modernity in places such as Iraq, Egypt and Pakistan will help us navigate the cultural tensions and artistic negotiations between tradition and invention, between rebellion and conformity, between the institutional and the individual. Although the medium of photography will take center stage, we will examine a wide range of genres of visual representation — painting and sculpture, public monuments and architecture, film and video, and such small media as posters, stamps and banknotes. There are no prerequisites for this course. I. 4

HISTART 393 — Junior Proseminar
Section 001, SEM
Researching Visual Culture

Instructor: Holmes,Megan L

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This pro-seminar is designed for history of art majors intending to write senior theses and for advanced humanities students interested in conducting original research using visual images. Early sessions will focus on critical issues in the study of Late Medieval and Early Modern European visual culture (c.1300-1650) (my area of expertise). We will investigate strategies for utilizing works of art and material culture as primary sources in historical research, working with historical artifacts in local collections when possible. Archival and printed textual sources will also be examined, with instruction on how to access important resources through the internet. We will consider some of the different ways in which scholars contextualize works of art: artistic biography, patronage, representational objectives, artistic movements, the politics of display, reception, social history, religious ritual, gift-giving, the market, etc. Significant historiographic developments and approaches to visual analysis will be explored. Each student will be asked to define a research project that involves a small corpus of objects and primary textual sources from any historical period (some of which should be available for first-hand study in local museum and library collections), and a bibliography of the relevant secondary literature. Alternatively, students may chose a potential research or senior thesis topic and work with the related visual images and documentation. Students will present their preliminary investigations into the materiality, category/genre, and historical contexts of their visual and textual source materials; the historical and interpretive problems raised by these sources; and their own working hypotheses. There will be a final paper (10-15 pp) on the research project.

IV. 2, 3

Advisory Prerequisite: Concentration in History of Art and upperclass standing.

HISTART 394 — Special Topics
Section 001, LEC
The Art and Life of Roman Villas

Instructor: Gazda,Elaine K

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course will examine the architecture and art (primarily wall paintings, sculptures, and mosaics) of Roman villas in the context of social, intellectual, economic, religious and political life. It will focus on luxuriously appointed villas in the region of the Bay of Naples that were destroyed in the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in AD 79, including, among others, the Villa of the Papyri in Herculaneum, the Villa of the Mysteries in Pompeii, the Villa of Oplontis at Torre Annunziata, and several recently excavated villas at Stabiae. In such villas wealthy Romans lived a life of leisure alongside one that required careful management and productive use of the surrounding land and nearby sea. In our study of artworks and architecture, we will consider the ways in which visual imagery and the built environment responded to and negotiated between these two seemingly divergent modes of life. Social practices (e.g., banqueting, bathing, and the pursuit of intellectual and cultic interests) will be studied against the backdrop of the villa as a farm and the social prestige that the owners garnered from owning and cultivating land while cultivating social and political relationships. The course will breifly compare Roman villa life to that of Renaissance Italy. Students will have an opportunity to do research on objects in the Kelsey Museum that are being considered for display in the museum's new Upjohn wing. Requirements: class attendance and participation, one or two class presentations, two short papers, midterm and final examinations. Graduate students enrolled in HistArt 613 must write a substantial research paper. I. 1

Advisory Prerequisite: Upperclass standing.

HISTART 397 — Honors Colloquium
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Lay,Howard G
Instructor: Powers,Martin J

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Honors

Directed research and writing in preparation for Honors thesis. The course involves weekly meetings of each senior thesis writer, their faculty advisors, and the Director of Undergraduate Studies who oversees the seminar. Class time is divided between group meetings of all parties and individual tutorials between students and their advisors.

Advisory Prerequisite: HISTART 393.

HISTART 399 — Independent Study
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 3
Other: INDEPENDENT

Undergraduate students may work independently with a faculty member from the department of the History of Art.

Advisory Prerequisite: PER. INSTR.

HISTART 406 — Looking at African Things
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Doris,David T; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

In southeastern Nigeria, an Igbo proverb tells us, "You can't view a performance standing in one place." In the West, however, our understanding of African visual culture has long been centered on the practice of exhibiting African objects out of their vital contexts — rendering them motionless, making them available to our consuming vision, mapping out onto them our own systems of value. Such a practice has unfolded especially in museums dedicated to the exhibition of objects categorized as "African Art." But it is not these objects alone that are made to represent "Africa" so problematically; in world's fairs, theme parks and other cultural expositions, living Africans too are transformed into things, into images of themselves. In this course, we will examine the history of how African objects have become "African Art": What are the terms by which African people describe the visual objects they create and use? What are the "exotic" terms that allow us to consider those objects within the canons of Art History? What is excluded from those canons, and why? And how are such strange and even violent transformations a metaphor for how African people have been transformed into objects?

II. V. 4.

Advisory Prerequisite: HISTART 108/CAAS 108

HISTART 415 — Studies in Gender and the Arts
Section 001, SEM
Imagining Female -Female Eroticism in Early Modern Europe

Instructor: Simons,Patricia; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

We examine the varieties of representations of women who desired other women in Western Europe from the 15th-17th centuries. Focusing on England and Italy, with forays into France, Germany, Spain and Holland, we will read early modern texts (poems, drama, opera, mythology, paintings, domestic artifacts, pornography, and medical writing), as well as contemporary theorizing about lesbianism. Charting continuities and discontinuities between early modern conceptions and contemporary ones, we investigate the extent to which a coherent history of lesbianism exists. IV. 3.

Advisory Prerequisite: Upperclass standing, and one course in Women's Studies or History of Art.

HISTART 436 — Hellenistic and Roman Architecture
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Ratte,Christopher John

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course surveys the art and archaeology of Greece and the Greek-speaking world in the Roman period. From the time of Alexander the Great in the 4th century B.C.E. to the Arab conquests of the 7th century C.E., the dominant civic culture of the entire eastern Mediterranean region extending from Greece proper through Asia Minor, Syria, the Lebanon, Palestine, and Egypt as far as Libya was Greek. The complex relations between the indigenous cultures of these regions and their Greek and Roman conquerors will form the major subject of the course; it will focus on the evidence of architecture and architectural decoration, and on the evolution of urban form. Special topics of investigation will include: the Romanization of Greek civic architecture in early imperial Asia Minor; material evidence for the history of Judaism in the Roman empire, and for the spread of Christianity; the various and changing meanings of Greek mythological images in media ranging from floor mosaics to funerary sculpture; the archaeological excavations sponsored by the University of Michigan at Karanis in Egypt and the evidence they recovered for daily life in the Roman period; the complex relationship between Roman imperial portraiture and local self-representation; and the foundation and urban development of Constantinople.

Advisory Prerequisite: Upperclass standing, and HISTART 101 or CLARCH 221/HISTART 221 or CLARCH 222/HISTART 222.

HISTART 440 — Cities and Sanctuaries of Classical Greece
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Nevett,Lisa C

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: WorldLit

In the ancient Greek world cities and religious sanctuaries formed two complementary and interdependent types of built environment, each with its own characteristic function, architecture and layout.

  • But how did these distinctive architectural complexes arise, and how did they change through time and space?
  • What were their characteristic roles?
  • How can we detect those roles in the buildings and layouts of individual sites?
  • And to what extent did major political and cultural changes, such as the introduction of democracy, shape the various structures and the sites on which they stood?

In this course we address these questions and evaluate some of the answers (both ancient and modern) which have previously been offered, by looking in detail at the evidence from a variety of sites, including sanctuaries such as Delphi, Olympia and Samos, and cities such as Athens, Megara Hyblaia and Priene. We cover a wide geographical area, stretching from the Greek communities of southern Italy in the west, through Greece itself, to the eastern Greek settlements on the west coast of modern Turkey. We also span a long period of time, from the ninth and eighth centuries BCE, down to the third century BCE. The aim of the course is to enable students with some prior experience of Greek art and archaeology (for example through CLARCH/HISTART 221 and/or CLARCH/HISTART 384) to explore in more depth some of the cultural, social and political factors influencing the architectural form and spatial organisation of sites and structures in the Greek world during this period.

Advisory Prerequisite: Upperclass standing, and a course in archaeology.

HISTART 474 — Topics in Modern and Contemporary Architecture
Section 001, SEM
Trajectories of British Modernism

Instructor: Zimmerman,Claire A

FA 2007
Credits: 3

The seminar considers a series of shifting contexts for British architecture together with increasingly fluid transmissions between British architects, Continental modernists, and a shrinking colonial empire. From an early embrace of modern building during the Industrial Revolution (culminating in the Crystal Palace), Britain then shrank from a blatantly technological modernity until the conclusion of World War II, when a doctrinaire, economically constrained version of European functionalism swept the British scene as a result of postwar building needs and ideological affinities. The particular efforts of the prewar MARS group of Morton Shand (aided by the arrival of Walter Gropius, Erich Mendelsohn, Arthur Korn, Laszlo Moholy-Nagy, Berthold Lubetkin and others in the 1930s) were dramatically eclipsed after the war by the London County Council and other local building authorities that produced a reduced and bureaucratized (and often poorly constructed) modernism against which architects of the late 1950s reacted with militant iconoclasm. Returning to the sources from which British architects learned of Continental modernism (Le Corbusier's Oeuvre Complète (1935-) and Alberto Sartoris's Gli elementi dell'architettura funzionale (1935) among others), young architects trained in the immediate aftermath of the war resumed the incomplete project of modernism with pioneering ambition. Organized by a variety of institutions — the ICA, CIAM's Team X, Gordon Cullen's townscape movement, the Architectural Association, and Reyner Banham, to name a few — a new architecture emerged from the work of the Smithsons, Archigram, Cedric Price, Stirling + Gowan, Fry and Drew, and others. Skirmishes with Italy's ‘neo-Liberty' (neo-Realist) architects in the late 50s and 60s left Britain victoriously leading a neo avant-garde that avoided the pitfalls of American corporate modernism without relinquishing the project of an integrated, progressive, multi-disciplinary modern culture in which architects, artists, urban planners, and social scientists worked side by side. Banham's ‘Second Machine Age' helped create the emergent group of techno-architects who went on to mastermind the most recent wave of British cultural imperialism: Stirling, Richard Rogers, Norman Foster, Ove Arup, and Nicholas Grimshaw. The course will conclude with the contemporary British scene as represented by David Chipperfield, David Adjaye, and young collectives like FAT (Fashion Architecture Technology). Open to advanced undergraduates and graduate students.

IV.4

Advisory Prerequisite: Any 100- or 200-level course in art history or architecture

HISTART 555 — Renaissance Architecture in Italy
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Soo,Lydia M; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course examines the architecture of the Renaissance; the buildings and cities of the 15th and 16th centuries in Italy, France and England. They will be discussed in relationship to contemporary theoretical writings, addressing issues of function, structure and beauty, as well as in relationship to the cultural context of the Renaissance, including philosophical, religious, political, economic and environmental factors. This course is comprised of lectures and discussions. Students are required to take written exams, to write a term paper, and to participate in discussions based on required readings.

IV. 3

Advisory Prerequisite: Upperclass standing, and HISTART 101 or 102.

HISTART 584 — Painting in Islamic Countries
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Babaie,Sussan; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This seminar explores the theory and practice of the extraordinary mode of painting associated with the Iranian world. With its scrupulous attention to detail, its exuberance of color and surface patterning, and its deliberate disregard for the "rules" of naturalism and scientific perspective, Persian painting developed an entirely new and distinctive pictorial regime between the 14th and 17th centuries. Seventeenth-century European travelers and missionaries viewed it as "childlike" and "primitive" while 19th-century Parisians admired and collected Persian illustrated manuscripts for the sheer beauty of their jewel-like surface quality. Students in this seminar will explore this Orientalist perspective in the context of the astonishing visualities of Persian painting. We will closely analyze manuscript paintings along with critical readings of such primary documents of "art historical" nature as biographies of artists, poetic and ekphrastic considerations of the art of painting, artists' prefaces to albums of paintings and calligraphic samples, epigraphic and signatory marks of the artists, and their contemporary chronicles. Specialist knowledge of Persian language and culture is not a prerequisite.

I. 2, 3

Advisory Prerequisite: Upperclass standing, and HISTART 285.

HISTART 600 — Independent Study
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 3

Directed readings or research in consultation with a member of the department faculty.

Advisory Prerequisite: PER.G.ADV.

HISTART 613 — Museum Research
Section 001, LEC
The Art and Life of Roman Villas

Instructor: Gazda,Elaine K

FA 2007
Credits: 2 — 3

This course will examine the architecture and art (primarily wall paintings, sculptures, and mosaics) of Roman villas in the context of social, intellectual, economic, religious and political life. It will focus on luxuriously appointed villas in the region of the Bay of Naples that were destroyed in the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in AD 79, including, among others, the Villa of the Papyri in Herculaneum, the Villa of the Mysteries in Pompeii, the Villa of Oplontis at Torre Annunziata, and several recently excavated villas at Stabiae. In such villas wealthy Romans lived a life of leisure alongside one that required careful management and productive use of the surrounding land and nearby sea. In our study of artworks and architecture, we will consider the ways in which visual imagery and the built environment responded to and negotiated between these two seemingly divergent modes of life. Social practices (e.g., banqueting, bathing, and the pursuit of intellectual and cultic interests) will be studied against the backdrop of the villa as a farm and the social prestige that the owners garnered from owning and cultivating land while cultivating social and political relationships. The course will breifly compare Roman villa life to that of Renaissance Italy. Students will have an opportunity to do research on objects in the Kelsey Museum that are being considered for display in the museum's new Upjohn wing. Requirements: class attendance and participation, one or two class presentations, two short papers, midterm and final examinations. Graduate students enrolled in HistArt 613 must write a substantial research paper. I. 1

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

HISTART 615 — First Year Graduate Seminar
Section 001, SEM
Art History in the Making

Instructor: Brusati,Celeste A; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

The discipline of art history, like the histories it generates and the subjects it studies, is a work in progress. This course looks at the some of the central concerns and challenges that are shaping the practice of art history today, particularly in light of the expanding parameters of the field. It will consider such questions as the relationship of visual culture studies to the historical study of art, and how the incorporation of diverse artistic traditions and cultural perspectives might change the ways we do art history. The seminar will look at these and other issues from two related perspectives. First it will explore several influential approaches to the critical and interpretative study of images and objects. Secondly it will take up problems of historical, cultural, and cross-cultural analysis that have come to the fore in recent years. Particular attention will be given to studies that model dynamic ways of understanding images and objects within the material practices and social processes of making, viewing, and exchange of which they are part. Topics to be discussed include: art and visuality, concepts and uses of style, ritual uses and social functions of art, iconoclasms across cultures, theories of perception and representation, uses of tradition, economies of artistic exchange, art and cultural identity. A key goal of the course is to provide a fuller intellectual and practical basis for addressing two complementary challenges facing art historians today: first, the task of locating particular objects and practices in their historically and culturally specific circumstances, and secondly, the identification of methods and categories of analysis useful for comparative and cross-cultural study.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

HISTART 677 — Studies in American Art
Section 001, SEM
The Ashcan School: Visual Culture and Representation in the Early Twentieth Century

Instructor: Zurier,Rebecca; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 2 — 3

This fall, two major exhibitions of art of the New York painters known as the Ashcan School (1895-1917) offer the opportunity for a wide-ranging investigation of realism, representation, and visuality in American culture of their period. We will consider the artistic, literary, and intellectual origins of the artists' concepts of "real art" and "real life" and study their art's relationship to representations of urban life in turn-of-the-century journalism, literature, film, social sciences and popular entertainment. But we will also ask how their work participated in larger cultural debates that led observers at the time to proclaim, "the eye of the senses is regnant." A heightened awareness of visual practice characterized advertising, fashion, and entertainment as well as journalism, literature, and the social sciences. It informed the way people understood class difference, immigration and ethnic diversity, gender definitions, changing patterns of work and leisure; spectacle, display and public life; consumerism, and the nature of community and communication in urban society. At the same time, artists of the Stieglitz circle explored means to escape material representation through the development of abstract forms. Our concentrated focus on a limited time period will in the end allow us to examine how vision itself has a history. Our seminar will read period writings on art and various manifestations of visual culture, as well as recent critical analyses of realism and representation, visuality and spectacle. We will look at some of the varied efforts to create a suitable modern art at the time, but also look into such diverse forms of cultural production as cinema, realist fiction, and popular magazines. A trip to see the Ashcan School exhibitions at the New-York Historical Society and Delaware Art Museum will cap the course. Requirements: informed participation in class discussion; two brief group assignments; a research paper, and a short preliminary paper on a topic that relates to the research project. Students from art history, American culture, visual arts, history, English, architecture, and communications are encouraged to participate.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

HISTART 694 — Special Studies in the Art of China
Section 001, SEM
Imitation, Reference, and Citation in Chinese Painting

Instructor: Powers,Martin J

FA 2007
Credits: 2 — 3
Other: Theme

The subject of this course is the impact of historical consciousness on the production and interpretation of painting. The class is not principally about the imitation of exemplary styles (as in Classicism), although we will devote some time to that. The thrust of our reading will deal with the self-conscious use of art historical citation, especially in matters of style. Those of us involved in the seminar will share a common project with two goals: (1) to distinguish and identify fundamentally different kinds of art historical citation; (2) to develop a non-parochial vocabulary for discussing art historical citation across different historiographical traditions. Your papers will serve as case studies examining specific kinds of citation, while we will work in class to find a vocabulary adequate to the task. Your paper may employ materials from China, Japan, or early modern and modern Europe, but your final paper will need to incorporate comparative material from the Chinese tradition, seeing as most of our reading will deal with that tradition. By the end of the course we should have a working "taxonomy" of rhetorically distinct uses of citation in art. We should also be able to detach historical issues concerning citation from the particular cultural substrates in which they may appear. Each student will be responsible for a brief presentation (comments) on one of the assigned readings, but each student will read all the readings for the week. Apart from participation in class, students will deliver a brief research report in the fifth week, followed by a more formal presentation in the 12th or 13th week. That paper will be discussed in class, and after revision will constitute the final paper. No cost for materials.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

HISTART 700 — Independent Research
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 3

Intended for individualized student non-thesis research under the supervision of History of Art faculty. Must be arranged with the faculty member and approved by the program.

Advisory Prerequisite: Approval of Graduate advisor. Graduate standing.

HISTART 771 — Problems in Art of the Nineteenth Century
Section 001, SEM
Materialism and the 19th Century Visual Imaginary

Instructor: Siegfried,Susan L

FA 2007
Credits: 2 — 3

A key characteristic of art and visual culture in the nineteenth century is the focus on documents, facts, and the material properties of things — a kind of visual positivism, as it were. This combined with a new cult of the imagination, and in the work of some artists and writers painstaking descriptions of objects oscillated with the symbolic and narrative associations they called up. Fantasies about history and the classical world mingled with an attention to the urban environment and the proliferating commodities of the industrial revolution. We shall explore these preoccupations as they played out in the various tendencies associated with the pictorial imagination of the nineteenth century — classicism, romanticism, and realism — putting particular emphasis on the situation in France. We shall be exploring the interplay between the factual and the imaginary, and between description and narration, as manifested in the fine arts as well as in popular illustration, fashion, and photography. We shall consider the combination of novelty and repetition that characterized artistic processes during the period in relation to modes of manufacture and marketing. The gendering of material objects and media in the nineteenth century is another theme we shall consider. Among the artists we will be studying are Boilly, Ingres, Géricault, Delacroix, Daguerre, Daumier, Gavarni, Delaroche, Courbet, Degas, and Atget. Theoretical texts include Michel Foucault, The Order of Things; Karl Marx, Capital; and Naomi Schor, Reading in Detail, as well as some more recent interventions in the field.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

HISTART 841 — Topography of Rome
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Terrenato,Nicola

FA 2007
Credits: 3

The course deals with the development of settlement in Rome from its origins to the 5th century AD, within the context of contemporary urban developments in Italy. The students are exposed to the basic methodologies that allow the combination of textual and visual sources with the archaeological evidence. A series of case-studies, from the archaic Sacra Via to the Temple of Divus Augustus will provide opportunities to discuss controversial problems and different approaches to their solution. Reading knowledge of Italian is necessary.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

HISTART 855 — Problems in Roman Archaeology
Section 001, SEM
Cities of Asia Minor in Late Antiquity

Instructor: Ratte,Christopher John

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Greek speaking Asia Minor was one of the most prosperous and extensively urbanized regions of the Roman empire.? This seminar examines the archaeological evidence for the civic culture of this region from the 3rd through the 7th centuries A.D.? This period is bracketed by invasions by Gothic raiders in the mid-3rd century A.D., and by the near-total abandonment of urban settlements in rural areas in the early 7th century A.D.? Its central event is the foundation of Constantinople in A.D. 324, and the subsequent growth of Constantine?s city as the new center of the Roman world.

Special topics of investigation will include: imperial patronage of urban building projects, especially fortifications; the early development of eastern church architecture, culminating in the Haghia Sophia; late Roman civic and imperial portrait sculpture; domestic architecture and interior decoration, and the changing role of private space in public life; relations between town and countryside; and the reasons for the collapse of urban life outside Constantinople in the early 7th century A.D.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

HISTART 990 — Dissertation/Precandidate
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 8

The Preliminary Examination, normally taken in April of the third year, forms a bridge between coursework and dissertation research. It is based upon the student's initial formulation of a dissertation topic. By the close of the second year, students are required to give the DGS a tentative list of three members of the Preliminary Examination Committee. The precise areas of questioning and the bibliography begin to be developed by the student in consultation with members of the Committee at a meeting convened well in advance of the examination, but no later than the beginning of the term prior to the term in which the student intends to take the Preliminary Examination.

The Preliminary Examination is designed to consolidate and test students' command over the art and scholarship of their major field of study: students must demonstrate up-to-date knowledge of principal artists, genres and monuments, and familiarity with scholarly literature and art historical problems. The examination is set by the student's primary advisor (normally the eventual chair of his/her Dissertation Committee) and at least one other faculty member from the History of Art. It is read by the student's Preliminary Examination Committee, which consists of the two faculty members who set the examination, and a third reader who also takes part in the oral follow-up exam. In fields where only one faculty member may be able to set the exam, it is still read by the two additional faculty on the committee.

The written Examination, taken on two consecutive days, consists of four areas of questioning: the general field (historically and geographically defined) from which the dissertation is drawn [Part I] and three more focused areas broadly relevant to the proposed dissertation topic [Part II]. Depending on the character of the dissertation and the needs of the student, the areas of questioning in Part II may focus on a particular medium or genre, a critical category or concept, a body of comparative material, or a related minor field. One area of questioning may be devoted to theoretical or methodological issues pertinent to the dissertation or to a topic in a cognate discipline of special importance to the student's dissertation research. In preparing for Part I of the Exam, a student discusses the general field with his/her primary advisor, who is responsible for seeing that the student covers an appropriate range of material. Examples of general fields include "Islamic Art and Architecture Between the Seventh and the Thirteenth Centuries," "Islamic and Christian Worlds in the Mediterranean Basin, Tenth to Thirteenth Centuries," "Modern European Painting and Sculpture, 1848-1945," "Seventeenth-Century Netherlandish Art," and "Arts of China in the Song Period, 960-1279." As a general rule of thumb, a student should expect that studying for the general field portion of the preliminary exam will prepare him/her to teach undergraduate survey courses in that area. After discussing the general field with the primary advisor, the student then submits to the Preliminary Examination Committee a paragraph defining and delimiting the general field, prepares a bibliography of key texts, and identifies a corpus of works of art for which s/he will be responsible. In preparing for Part II of the Examination, a student composes a bibliography and proposes three questions for each of the three focus areas; these questions serve as the basis for the exam in each of the three focus areas.

Timing of the Preliminary Exam

In order to remain in good standing in the program, the student must pass the Preliminary Examination by the end of the winter term of his/her third year. Students who enter the program with a prior M.A. must pass the Preliminary Examination before the end of the winter term of their second year. The Preliminary Examination is taken during the last week of classes. The oral defense takes place by the end of the following week.

Examination Format

The Preliminary Examination consists of three parts. The written portion is taken on two successive days.

Part I: This section consists of written responses to questions posed in relation to slides, photographs or objects drawn from the general field of the student's specialization. Students are given two hours to write the answers, either longhand or on a portable computer. Upon completion of the test, the student immediately submits the essays or disk to the Graduate Program Coordinator for distribution to the Committee.

Part II: The second part consists of three long essays on issues raised by the material in the designated areas. Typically these questions, developed from questions proposed by the student, are thematically oriented and directed toward matters of theory, criticism and interpretation, historiography and bibliography. Students are given two hours to write each of the three essays (selecting one questions from a choice of two in each case), either longhand or on a portable computer. Immediately upon completion of each test, the student submits the essay or disk to the Graduate Program Coordinator for distribution to the Committee.

Part III: The final component is an oral examination of one and one half hours taken within one week of the written portions of the Examination. The oral is administered by the entire committee of three examiners and serves as an opportunity to discuss issues not addressed, or insufficiently treated in the written Exam. This is also an occasion for beginning to discuss the student's preparation of the dissertation prospectus.

A student must pass all parts of the preliminary examination. S/he will be asked to retake unsatisfactory portions of the Examination. Barring exceptional circumstances, students will not be allowed to resit the Exam more than once.

Advisory Prerequisite: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing.

HISTART 993 — Graduate Student Instructor Training Program
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Huerta,Monica I

FA 2007
Credits: 1

A seminar for all beginning graduate student instructors, consisting of a two day orientation before the term starts and periodic workshops/meetings during the Fall Term. Beginning graduate student instructors are required to register for this class.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

HISTART 995 — Dissertation/Candidate
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 8

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Enforced Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate

 
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