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LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Fall 2007, Dept = HISTORY
 
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Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
HISTORY 110 — Medieval, Renaissance, and Reformation Europe
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Hughes,Diane Owen

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS

This is a course about Europe and its neighbors between the end of antiquity and the beginning of modern times. We learn about this past directly, by viewing the changing environment, art, and artifacts left to us, and by the classroom conversations about what the men and women of that era wrote for each other. Among the themes we will discuss are the rise of monotheistic religions, the growth of modern practices of government, alternatives in social organization, the practice of emotion, and the uneasy triumvirate of science, the state, and religion.

The sole requirement for this course is intellectual curiosity. Work in class will consist of lectures, discussions, and conversations about visual and textual artifacts. Each class session will include illustrative materials and discussion. Your grade will depend upon performance on exams and your willingness to join our discussion; a book report can provide extra credit.

The course readings will come from sources written during the era we cover plus modern scholarship.

HISTORY 132 — Peoples of the Middle East
Section 001, LEC
Issues in Race & Ethnicity

Instructor: Babayan,Kathryn; homepage
Instructor: Brisch,Nicole M

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

This course will survey Middle Eastern political, social, and cultural history from Sumer (3000 BC) to Khomeini's Iran (1979-89). The lectures, the readings, the visuals (web, movies, slides) are all geared towards providing the student with a sense of the nature of authority, political and cultural styles, the fabric of society, attitudes and behaviors, heroes and villains, that are and were part of the heritage of those peoples who lived in the lands between the Nile and Oxus rivers, generally referred to as the Middle East. Throughout the academic term you will have four quizzes, a midterm, and an accumulative final exam. A one-page synopsis of your readings will be due weekly for your discussion section.

HISTORY 160 — United States to 1865
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Vinovskis,Maris A

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS

This lecture/discussion course will examine central issues and events in the history of the territories that became the United States, and the peoples who lived there, from the late 16th to the middle of the 19th centuries. Among the topics that will be considered are the territorial expansions of Europeans into the Americas; the creation of Anglo-American colonies; the social, political, and cultural orders of British North America; the creation of an independent American republic in the Revolution; and the destruction of that first republic in the War Between the States. The required readings will include both primary and secondary sources, and will be examined in weekly discussion sections. There will be both a midterm and a final examination, and active class participation will be expected in the sections.

Required readings may be purchased at Shaman Drum and are on reserve at the UGLi.

HISTORY 195 — The Writing of History
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Kerenji,Emil

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

Each section of this course studies a different era and topic in the past. Students read the work of modern historians, documents, and other source materials from the past. The goal is to learn how to construct effective arguments, and how to write college-level papers.

HISTORY 195 — The Writing of History
Section 002, REC

Instructor: Soppelsa,Peter Shannon

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

Each section of this course studies a different era and topic in the past. Students read the work of modern historians, documents, and other source materials from the past. The goal is to learn how to construct effective arguments, and how to write college-level papers.

HISTORY 195 — The Writing of History
Section 003, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

Each section of this course studies a different era and topic in the past. Students read the work of modern historians, documents, and other source materials from the past. The goal is to learn how to construct effective arguments, and how to write college-level papers.

HISTORY 195 — The Writing of History
Section 004, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

Each section of this course studies a different era and topic in the past. Students read the work of modern historians, documents, and other source materials from the past. The goal is to learn how to construct effective arguments, and how to write college-level papers.

HISTORY 196 — First-Year Seminar
Section 001, SEM
Venezuela and the US in Historical Perspective

Instructor: Skurski,Julie A

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS
Other: FYSem

This course examines key moments in Venezuelan history from Simón Bolívar, independence hero, to Hugo Chávez, the current president and critic of the U.S. It examines how interactions with the U.S. have shaped Venezuelan nationalism and images of national culture. In particular, it focuses on issues of race, gender, political violence, the petroleum state, and religiosity, with an emphasis on the contemporary period. We will use film, novels, and the press, and students will present brief research projects.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

HISTORY 197 — First-Year Seminar
Section 001, SEM
Witchcraft in Russia

Instructor: Kivelson,Valerie Ann

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem

Many of the assumptions that we make about witches and witchcraft do not hold true in the Russian case. Unlike the western European cases, where witches were overwhelming imagined as female, in Russia, the vast majority of the accused were male. In the west, Satan and a satanic pact defined the essential nature of witchcraft, but in Russia the devil made little appearance in witchcraft cases. How can we explain these differences? What do the differences and similarities tell us about Russia and about witchcraft? We will analyze fairy tales, folk practices, miracle tales, contemporary descriptions and trials, and we will read several recent studies that offer thought-provoking analytical frameworks.

A new component of the course will be a unit on the understandings, justifications, and results of judicial torture in witch trials in Russia and the west, a subject with startling relevance in the world of today.

The course is conceived as a collective effort to puzzle out some of the fundamental problems and methods of comparative history. Students will have a chance to do original research and analysis.

The course requires no background in Russian history and is open to all interested first-year students.

Course Requirements:
The course will be a small discussion class, meeting twice a week. Requirements will include very short weekly response papers (2 pages), plus a longer (10 page) source-based paper due at the end of the semester. Students will be required to submit their longer papers in draft form and then to rewrite them incorporating editorial suggestions. Students will be expected to attend every class, to participate regularly, and to present results of their individual research to the class.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

HISTORY 197 — First-Year Seminar
Section 002, SEM
Writing Violence

Instructor: Mir,Farina

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: Honors, FYSem

In a world in which violence seems endemic — from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan (2003- and 2001-, respectively), "militia" violence in the Darfur region of Somalia (2003-), pogroms in Gujarat, India (2002), ethnic cleansing in Kosovo (1999), to genocide in Rwanda (1994) … — this course examines the ability of history, as a discipline, to represent violence. This course is concerned, in particular, with the limits of the existing historiography of violence, and gauges whether other disciplines or genres (specifically anthropology, literature, and film) have been more successful in capturing the multifaceted — and often elusive — causes of violence, and its impact on society.

While this course addresses a broad theme, it will focus, principally, on a single historical event: the partition of India in 1947. Due to this historical event, which accompanied India's independence from British colonial rule, some 12 million people migrated, 1 million people were killed, and perhaps as many as 75,000 women were victims of sexual violence. The study of the partition has produced a rich and diverse body of scholarship that helps address the broader theoretical questions about violence and history that this course engages.

This course has no prerequisites.

Evaluation in this course will be based on participation, two 3-4 page essays, and a final exam.

Required texts:
Gyanendra Pandey, Remembering Partition (Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 2002)

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

HISTORY 197 — First-Year Seminar
Section 004, SEM
Civil Rights and Black Power Era

Instructor: Gaines,Kevin K; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem

This course will investigate the gender contestation that lay just beneath the emphasis on Black unity and antiracist struggle in the movement activism and cultural production of the 1950s and 1960s. It is common knowledge that the fault lines of gender and sexuality were far more pronounced and prominent in Black public culture during the post-civil rights era than during the high tide of the Black freedom movement. In historicizing gender as a crucial aspect of discourses of Black identity and authenticity in the art, literature and politics of the Black freedom movement, we will re-examine that assumption. Our readings will help provide a contextualization and analysis of the uses of gender and sexuality in contemporary constructions of African American religion, popular culture and politics. Drawing on a range of printed sources and works of cultural production, including government documents, legal discourses, fiction, drama, periodicals, popular music, visual art, and dance, I hope to explore the centrality of gender and sexuality as a marker for racial authenticity, and as a predictable site for common sense "diagnoses" of antiBlack oppression and prescriptions for Black liberation.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

HISTORY 200 — Greece to 201 B.C.
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

Presents a survey of the history of ancient Greece and of contacts between Greece and other ancient societies, especially those of Egypt, Mesopotamia, and Persia, from the Bronze Age to 201 B.C. No special background is required. Emphasis is on the critical use of sources (read in translation) to argue about broad historical questions.

HISTORY 204 — East Asia: Early Transformations
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: de Pee,Christian

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: Theme, WorldLit

Survey of the history of China, Korea, and Japan, from mythical times to 1600. The course emphasizes the historical interactions and transformations that have made East Asia a coherent cultural region: exchanges of objects and ideas, technology and writing, monks and merchants, artists and scholars.

HISTORY 206 — Indian Civilization
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Trautmann,Thomas R

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

This course is an introduction to one of the world's great civilizations, that of India, from its beginnings in the third millennium BC to the present day. The first half will deal with classical Indian civilization, its origins, its social structure, religions, arts and sciences. The second half will examine India's encounters with the civilizations of Islam and Europe. We will also study the modern nations— India, Pakistan, Nepal, Bhutan, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka — which have emerged in the twentieth century, and their problems and accomplishments.


HISTORY 207 — Southeast Asian Civilization
Section 001, LEC
Issues in Race & Ethnicity

Instructor: Lieberman,Victor B

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: RE, SS
Other: WorldLit

Southeast Asia is one of the world's most culturally diverse regions, home to Buddhist, Moslem, Confucian, and Christian civilizations. It boasts ancient monuments of surpassing grandeur and symbolic complexity. It was the scene of the bloodiest conflict since World War II, the so-called Second Indo-China War (c.1960-1975). Until very recently it boasted the world's fastest growing regional economy.

HISTORY 207 offers an introduction to Southeast Asian history — the earliest civilizations, through the colonial conquest, the struggle for independence, and the development of an interdependent region.

The following paperback books can be purchased at Shaman Drum, 313 South State:

  • David Steinberg et al., In Search of Southeast Asia
  • Milton Osborne, Southeast Asia: an Introductory History
  • George Orwell, Burmese Days
  • Clark Neher and Ross Marlay, Democracy and Development in Southeast Asia
  • Thierry Zephyr, Khmer: The Lost Empire of Cambodia

In addition, you will need a course pack which is also available at Shaman Drum Bookstore.

HISTORY 208 — Topics in History
Section 001, LEC
The Philippines: Culture and History

Instructor: de la Cruz,Deirdre Leong

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course surveys major themes in history of the Philippines, paying particular attention to their cultural dimensions. Starting with its inception as a colony of Spain, through the American colonial period, to the post-colonial present, we will draw from Philippine historiography, ethnography, literary works and popular culture to examine the cultural effects of processes such as: religious conversion and colonial encounter; revolution and nationalism; hybridity and language; regional, class, and identity formation; modernity, globalization, and migration.

The course will be conducted as a seminar. Students will be graded on their active participation in discussion, response papers, and final research project.

HISTORY 210 — Early Middle Ages, 300-1100
Section 001, LEC
Issues in Race & Ethnicity

Instructor: Squatriti,Paolo

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: RE, SS

The course covers the period when the first true 'Europe' was born. It covers the disintegration of the Roman Empire in the western Mediterranean, and the development of successor states in northwestern Europe, like the 'barbarian' monarchies, and the multiethnic empires of Charlemagne and the Ottonians up to 1000. Main themes are the development of new kinds of community among European people (Christian monasticism, feudalism, ethnic solidarity), new economic systems, and relations with the earliest Islamic states and with the Byzantine empire.

HISTORY 220 — Survey of British History to 1688
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: MacDonald,Michael P

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS

This class is an introductory survey of the history of England from ancient times to the Glorious Revolution of 1688. Introductory but not simplified: it assumes no prior knowledge of the subject but strives to engage the complexities and challenges of studying a nation and period with a famously excellent and contentious tradition of historical writing.

It focuses on the major events in English history in the Middle Ages and era of the Tudor and Stuart monarchs. The emphasis will necessarily be on political and religious developments, but aspects of social and economic history will also be covered. At the end of the term students should have a good grasp on the trajectory of English history as the nation formed and evolved into a medieval and then an early modern polity and society.

There will be a mid-term and a final. In addition, there will also be two short papers on assigned topics.

Required readings are available for purchase at Shaman Drum Bookshop.

HISTORY 226 — The Latin Tinge: Latin Music in Social Context in Latin America and the U.S.
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Hoffnung-Garskof,Jesse E

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

This is a pilot course that experiments with multimedia lectures and podcasting as ways to introduce the social history of key Latin musical styles. Students download listening and video-viewing assignments to their computers or MP3 players, and write about both these assignments as well as their assigned readings. Listening and viewing is paired with analysis of the social contexts and social meanings of musical production and consumption. Students consider how "Latin" musics emerged from persecuted Afro-diasporic musical styles into (often shallow) celebrations of mixed national identity. They will see how music is entangled in the international interplay between colonizing audiences and exotic racial others, but is often also a basis for interchange in a Black Atlantic and oppositional social identity among Latino migrants in the United States. In short, viewing Latin music in social context means thinking about music as a complicated site for the working out of colonialism, international cultural markets, race, and ethnicity.

HISTORY 230 — Humanities Topics in History
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Bacon,John U

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

This course is meant to examine an aspect or select topic in history not covered under a specific country or time period. It will be taught from a Humanities perspective.

Intended audience: First-year students and sophomores.

Course Requirements: Specific requirements would vary by instructor.

Class Format: 3 hours of lecture/discussion each week.

HISTORY 240 — The World Since 1492
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Northrop,Douglas Taylor; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS, RE

Interested in knowing how the current world system emerged? Want to know more about other possibilities that existed in the past — and that may appear in the future? How about understanding the roots of fundamental human identities, political systems, and economic patterns? Unlike most history courses, which focus narrowly on a particular period and area, this class offers students a rare chance to think big — to seek broad patterns and connections that extend across space and through time. We will explore the last 500 years of world history, highlighting major trends and transnational developments. "The World Since 1492" stresses wider patterns characterizing human societies in different parts of the world and considers encounters and exchanges within, between, and among different societies and cultures around the globe.

There are no prerequisites, intended for all undergraduates.

HISTORY 241 — America and Middle Eastern Wars
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Cole,Juan R; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS

This course examines the U.S. military and diplomatic involvement in the modern Middle East, beginning with the impact of President Wilson's 14 Points in the aftermath of WW I and proceeding to the U.S. invasion of North Africa in WW II and involvement in Iran and Egypt early in the Cold War. Much of the class focuses on U.S. interventions in Lebanon, Afghanistan and Iraq. Attention is paid to U.S. motives and goals and to the ways in which Middle Eastern actors deployed conventional and unconventional forces against U.S. forces.

HISTORY 246 — Africa to 1850
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Poteet,Ellen Spence

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS

This course will explore African pre-colonial history, from prehistory to 1850. The focus will be on the history of Ancient Egypt and the ancient kingdoms of the Nile and their relations with Black Africa; West Africa as a region; The rise of African kingdoms; African slavery and Saharan and Atlantic slave trade; the consequences of the Trans-Saharan trade relations in West Africa; the Atlantic Slave Trade, its organization, features and different impact on local African societies; The consequences of the growing relationship between Africa, Europe and the Americas on the continent societies and Oral traditions as documents for history writing and production.

HISTORY 252 — Introduction to Chinese Civilization
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Brown,Miranda D

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: Theme

This course is intended to introduce students to major issues in pre-modern Chinese history. The course covers the political, cultural, social, and intellectual history from the Neolithic to the Mongol conquest (in the 13th century). Some of the major questions we will treat include: Is "China" the oldest continuous civilization? Was it culturally and ethnically homogeneous? Was Chinese traditional culture and society "patriarchal"? To what extent was the state successful in penetrating into the daily lives of individuals? Course assignments will include not only reading primary and secondary literature (entirely in English); but they will also require students to analyze visual sources (to a lesser degree). No assumed knowledge of Chinese history, culture, or language required.

HISTORY 257 — Law in the Pre-Modern World
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Neis,Rachel

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

This introduction to the study of law will expose the student to a variety of ancient and medieval legal cultures across the globe (from Egypt to Israel, from Islamic to Hindu, from Iceland to China). While asking the basic question, "what is law," we will investigate how law was justified and understood by its practitioners (philosophy, narrative, history, myth, religion) and how laws were used to govern, regulate and create human social relations and transactions (agreements, disputes, crime, punishment, courts, judgment, justice, who made laws, who obeyed laws, who enforced laws).

We will look at a variety of sources such as legal codes, narratives, documents, trial records, cases, accounts of rituals, performances and ceremonies, as well as literature drawn from history, anthropology, and political theory. Specific legal topics to be covered will be: personal status, property, the regulation of intimacy, criminal law, varieties of violence (sanctioned, prohibited, actionable), legal institutions and procedure.

This lecture course will have a midterm, a final exam, and several short response papers and quizzes.

HISTORY 263 — Discovering America: Atlantic History I, 1492-1607
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Hancock,David J

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS

This course is an introduction to the formation of the early Atlantic world from the voyages of Christopher Columbus to the expeditions of Walter Raleigh. This course compares English French, Spanish, Portuguese and native American experiences. Special attention is given to the letters and diaries of Columbus, Cortes, Cartier, Gilbert, Raleigh, and Champlain, as well as a selection of Indian texts. The course highlights integrative themes common to European, African and Indian encounters with and in the Americas, encounters that knit together a larger, newer community: the exploring mixing and settling of peoples and races; the emergence of viable trans-Atlantic commercial systems; a groping towards a balance of power among European states; and the exchange and advancement of knowledge. There are no pre-requisites.

HISTORY 266 — Twentieth-Century American Wars as Social and Personal Experience
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Marwil,Jonathan L

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

This course will examine the American experience of war in this century. Lectures, readings, films, and discussions will focus not only on the military experience itself, but on how America's wars — real and imagined — have shaped the country's economy, politics, and culture. The course will also examine the processes of transmission and memory: how Americans who did not fight learned about those who did, and what all Americans have remembered or have been taught to remember about the wars of this century. Finally, we will consider how the nation's wartime conduct, at home and on the battlefield, has fit into long-standing social patterns and behavior such as our alleged propensity for violence. In brief, we will be looking at the American experience of war as inclusively as a term will allow.

HISTORY 284 — Sickness and Health in Society: 1492 to the Present
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Pernick,Martin S

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS

From devastating infectious epidemics to the quiet suffering of malnutrition, health problems have both affected and reflected the evolution of modern society. The course will study four different historical periods, exploring such issues as:

  • the effects of individual habits, environmental conditions, and medical innovation on public health;
  • the role of ethics, economics, and politics in medical decision making;
  • the changing health problems of the disadvantaged, including Native Americans, women, Blacks, immigrants, and workers;
  • the changing meaning of concepts like "health," "disease," "cause," and "cure";
  • the dissemination and impact of medical discoveries; and
  • the changing organization and power of the healing professions.

We will focus on American history, although comparisons will be drawn to other societies. The course is a basic introduction, however, first-year students must obtain permission of the professor to enroll. Classes are taught in lecture format with discussion sections, and will include a variety of audio-visual sources. There will be two essay-style examinations, and frequent short quizzes. This is a challenging and demanding course. Those who miss the first meeting without advance permission will be dropped from the course.

Reading assignments will range from modern histories to poetry and old medical journals. Required Readings:

  • Leavitt and Numbers, Sickness and Health in America
  • Rosenberg, Cholera Years
  • Crosby, Columbian Exchange
  • DeKruif, Microbe Hunters
  • Pernick, The Black Stork
  • Morantz-Sanchez, Sympathy and Science
  • Course pack from Dollar Bill
  • Warner and Tighe, Major Problems in History of American Medicine

Advisory Prerequisite: First-year students must obtain permission of the instructor.

HISTORY 287 — Armenian History from Prehistoric Times to the Present
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Libaridian,Gerard J

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: WorldLit

This course explores the role of dynastic families and the nobility as well as intellectual élites and the Church in the rise and fall of different forms of Armenian statehood, from ancient and medieval kingdoms to the republics in the twentieth century. The course will cover successive political and economic systems throughout Armenian history as well as recent debates on domestic and foreign policy choices and their relationship to political parties and the Armenian Diaspora.

HISTORY 289 — From Genghis Khan to the Taliban: Modern Central Asia
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Northrop,Douglas Taylor; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS, RE

More than 500 years ago, the Silk Road famously connected traders from all over the world, linking the major cities of China and Southeast Asia with those of Europe and Africa. Vast wealth traveled this route, wending across the mountains and steppes of Central Asia, creating rich and sophisticated towns along the way. Bukhara and Samarkand became two of the world's greatest cities, enviable centers of learning and culture. How did Central Asia go from being the most cosmopolitan place on earth to an area now seen as one of the most isolated, remote places in the world? How did a region where a dizzying array of cultures had long intermingled and coexisted peacefully become a place associated (at least in Western eyes) with intolerance and terrorism? This course tries to answer such questions by providing an overview of modern Central Asian history. Using both lecture and discussion, it focuses on the colonial and post-colonial periods of the last 300 years: especially in Russian and Soviet Central Asia, but also the neighboring areas dominated by Britain and China (Afghanistan, Pakistan, Xinjiang). It offers a strong emphasis on the links and connections across these political borders, which were at first largely artificial and porous but which became crucially important and shaped local communities in deeply divergent ways. It also emphasizes social and cultural history, as a complement and counterweight to the usual political frameworks and classic grand narratives of khans, revolutions, and wars. Three themes structure the course: the fragmented, changing character of regional identities; the complexities of popular attitudes towards, and relations with, various forms of state power; and the differences between — and the complicated economic, environmental, political, artistic, and cultural legacies of — the major imperial systems (Russian, British, Chinese). Students will be evaluated on their class contributions as well as written work (short essays and class exercises) and two exams.

HISTORY 302 — Topics in History
Section 001, LEC
September 11

Instructor: Marwil,Jonathan L

FA 2007
Credits: 3

There is no way to measure the impact of the September 11, 2001 attacks, and certainly no way to predict how those attacks — and the responses to them — will be viewed in twenty-five years from now. But September 11 was unquestionably a unique day in the nation's history, and uniquely unsettling in its effect. Such extraordinary events have always inspired contemporaries to inquire into their causes, their consequences, and their meanings. September 11 offers an unusual opportunity for doing so given that it occurred in a time (and in places) with so many means for knowing and recording it. Never before has a whole nation witnessed such an event while it was happening.

This course will examine September 11 from many vantage points, beginning with why it happened — a subject yet to get serious public airing — and then moving on to how the nation responded to the immediate shock of the day. We will then look at the ways the nation and its leaders chose to interpret the attacks, respond to them, and subsequently respond to its victims, the living as well as the dead. We will also examine how and why the nation's politicians and political values have been affected as they have, and how its writers and artists have chosen to deal with it. Finally, we will deal with the battles over how to memorialize September, and what those battles tell us about who we are as a people.

A syllabus has yet to be worked out for the course. Choosing the materials now and working out a schedule of classes a year ahead makes no sense for a "living" event. Still, there are some texts that are almost certain to be included.

The 9/11 Commission Report
Thomas Keane and Lee Hamilton, Without Precedent
Rowan Williams, Writing in the Dust
William Langewiesche, American Ground
Don DeLillo, In the Ruins of the Future
Tom Junod, The Falling Man
Various websites containing photographs of the attacks will be used, as well as the film "United 93."

HISTORY 302 — Topics in History
Section 002, LEC
US Interventions in Latin America and the World

Instructor: Turits,Richard L

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Honors

The 20th century was a turbulent period of U.S. military and covert operations in Latin America and other parts of the world. These interventions ranged from occupation and "nation building" experiments in the early part of the century to covert CIA operations to topple socialist and social democratic politics during the Cold War to an invasion to re — establish democracy in the 1990s. This seminar will explore the history of these interventions in comparative perspective. We will assess the stated and unstated goals of interventions, various perceptions and illusions within the U.S. about events leading up to them, and their short and long term impact. We will thus also explore the aftermath of intervention, including the many dictatorships that followed in their wake. The course will focus on Latin America and Caribbean, but will also discuss the Philippines, Iran, Bosnia, and Iraq.

We will use film literature, and personal testimony in addition to more conventional historical sources. Grades are based on seminar participation and weekly two to three page papers on the assigned texts.

This course will be conducted in seminar format for LSA HONORS students only.

HISTORY 305 — Histories of the Modern Caribbean
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Turits,Richard L

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Situated at the crossroads of African, European, Latin American, and United States history, the Caribbean has played a pivotal role in global transformations since 1492. The region's past illuminates many of the central contradictions of modernity: slavery and freedom, colonialism and independence, racial hierarchy and political equality, despotism and revolution, nationalism and transnationalism, and migration and creolization. This class will treat these themes that cut across the empires, nations, and cultures that have shaped the region. The course is not designed to provide a complete survey of the dozens of nations composing the Caribbean. Rather, focusing on the Greater Antilles — on Puerto Rico, Dominican Republic, Jamaica, and especially Haiti and Cuba — we will explore world historical themes in this region from the Haitian Revolution to the present. The class is structured around readings of history, fiction and film, active class discussion, and weekly papers on the assigned texts.

HISTORY 313 — The Revolutionary Century: France, 1789-1900
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Cole,Joshua H

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS

The revolution of 1789 in France announced the beginning of a new age, in which established social and political traditions were to be swept away before the bracing winds of cultural novelty and political experimentation. Armed with a powerful new model of citizenship and national identity, France's revolutionaries sought to export their allegedly universal model of modern civilization to the rest of the world, beginning somewhat fitfully in the first half of the nineteenth century with Napoleon's invasion of Egypt and the conquest of Algeria in 1830, and then much more rapidly with French expansion in to west Africa and Indochina in the second half of the nineteenth century. The results were not always what the French expected, and in the late nineteenth century this vision of a "civilizing mission" was used to justify a predatory colonial policy that was to have painful consequences in the 20th century. Using a variety of sources — biography, historical documents, novels, and recent studies — this class will explore the social and political history of France's revolutionary century, paying special attention to its resonance beyond France's European borders.

Intended audience:Undergraduates, especially history concentrators Class Format: 3 hours per week to consist of lectures and some discussion.

Course Requirements:Attendance, participation in discussions, mid-term exam, final exam and 10 page paper on related topic.

HISTORY 318 — Europe in the Era of Total War, 1870-1945
Section 001, LEC
Europe in the Age of War

Instructor: Gaggio,Dario

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS

In 1945 the most destructive period in European history ended. This course explores the era of the world wars, with special emphasis on industrialization, imperialism, and political ideology. We also see how everyday life was transformed as people came to perceive class and gender in new ways.

HISTORY 320 — Britain, 1901-1939: Culture and Politics
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Israel,Kali A K

FA 2007
Credits: 4

Examines British culture and politics from the death of Queen Victoria up to World War II, with particular attention to the nature and structure of politics and the state, the first world war and the processes through which the war experience of mass participation and trauma were understood; cultural and political debates in the interwar years; the growth of mass media; gender; the empire and colonial subject; the Great Depression; British politics during the rise of Nazi and fascist movements in Europe.

HISTORY 325 — The History of Islam in South Asia
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Mir,Farina

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

This is an introductory level course on the history of Muslim communities and institutions in South Asia. Its aim is to introduce students to the broad historical currents of the expansion of Islam in the Indian subcontinent, the nature of Muslim political authority, the interaction between religious communities, Islamic aesthetics and contributions to material culture, the varied engagements and reactions of Muslims to colonial rule, the partition of British India and the creation of Pakistan, and the contemporary concerns of South Asia's Muslims. The course will begin with an introduction to the Islamic religious tradition. The main emphasis of the course will be on the social, political, and cultural history of Islam in South Asia. This course does not assume any prior knowledge of South Asian or Islamic history.

This course has no prerequisites

Evaluation in this course will be based on participation, a midterm exam, a 4-5 page essay, and a final exam.

Required texts:

  • Sugata Bose and Ayesha Jalal, Modern South Asia (Routledge, 2004).
  • Jamal Elias, Death Before Dying (University of California Press, 1998).
  • Jamal Elias, Islam (Prentice Hall, 1999).
  • Barbara Metcalf, trans., Perfecting Women: Maulana Ashraf Ali Thanawi's Behishti Zewar (University of California Press, 1992).

HISTORY 332 — Survey of Russia: The Russian Empire, the Soviet Union, and the Successor States
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Rosenberg,William G

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS

This course is an introduction to the geographic area that comprised the Russian Empire, later the Soviet Union, and now the former Soviet Union. This region is often referred to in a shorthand way as "Russia," although geographic designations other than Russia are included and at all periods of history, many people other than ethnic Russians have populated the area.

To understand issues and perspectives on the region a large amount of information from different disciplines and perspectives is introduced. Students differ in their backgrounds and initial interests. The professor, graduate student instructors, and guest lecturers will seek to make the information understandable regardless of the background of an individual student.

At the conclusion of the course, each student should have a wide range of knowledge about the Russian Empire, the Soviet Union, and Successor States. The student should be able to analyze and compare major trends in academic thought about the region and to be able to present his or her own views about these issues. The experiences in this course will hopefully motivate students to take additional courses about the region and in a variety of disciplines. The knowledge gained in the course should help each student decide whether to choose a minor, a major, or a career in Russian and East European Studies.

HISTORY 339 — Science in Premodern China
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Brown,Miranda D

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: Theme

This course is intended as an introduction to the basic problems and issues in Chinese medicine, astronomy, chemistry, and mathematics before the 14th century. In addition to examining the content of what many scholars construe as Chinese science and natural philosophy, this course will examine two themes at length. The first is how one should define science. Is science, as older scholars assumed, a timeless, cross-cultural phenomenon that emerged exclusively in 17th and 18th-century Europe? Or is science socially and culturally contingent? Is there, in other words, more than one effective way to represent and predict natural phenomenon? The second theme involves the "Needham thesis," which argues that China, despite early advances in natural philosophy and proto-science, failed to develop "modern science" because of the adoption of Confucianism as state orthodoxy in the early 14th century. In addition to reading the monumental works of Joseph Needham (1900-1995) and others, students will be asked to evaluate the Needham thesis by examining the primary sources Needham et al. drew upon to make their arguments. Readings will focus equally on primary and secondary sources in English. In addition to weekly "response" paragraphs, students will give oral presentations and write two 6 to 8-page papers critically treating the secondary literature by examining the primary sources from which scholars have drawn conclusions about some aspect of Chinese science and natural philosophy. No knowledge of Chinese language or China is required, and the course is open to all.

HISTORY 341 — Nations and Nationalism
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Suny,Ronald G

FA 2007
Credits: 4

This course explores the history, politics, and recent literature on the formation of nations and the development of nationalism. Theories of the nation have moved from ideas of their essential, primordial quality through a moment of social construction featuring the processes of modernization to a more cultural, discursive approach emphasizing the role of imagination and invention. These theoretical advances have been developed primarily by historians and literary analysts, but in recent years social science thinking on nationalism has borrowed freely, often critically, from the emerging literature. We will both develop a narrative of the emergence of nations and explore some of the ways in which social science has employed and developed the body of theory on nationalism, looking at paradigms taken from international relations, identity theory, anthropology, and various psychological theories.

Requirements:
1. Undergraduate students are required to attend all the lectures and discussions, complete the assigned reading, and participate in discussions.
2. A mid — term take home examination (6-8 pages, typed, double-spaced).
3. A final take home examination or paper, a short synthetic research paper or "think-piece" (8-10 pages, typed, double-spaced), that uses the readings, lectures, and discussions, as well as any outside reading the student might wish to include. The paper should demonstrate that you have read, understood, and can critically employ the material in the course.
4. Graduate students will write a slightly longer paper (15-20 pages) and will use additional readings.

The course meets for two lectures and one discussion group per week.

Required Readings:
Benedict Anderson, Imagined Communities: Reflections on the Origins and Spread of Nationalism (London-New York: Verso, 1991).
Rogers Brubaker, Reframing Nationalism: Nationhood and the National Question in the New Europe (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1996).
Geoff Eley and Ronald Grigor Suny, Becoming National: A Reader (New York: Oxford University Press, 1996).
Ernest Gellner, Nations and Nationalism (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1983).
Michael Hechter, Containing Nationalism (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2000).

HISTORY 347 — Latin America: The Colonial Period
Section 001, LEC
Issues in Race & Ethnicity

Instructor: Mumford,Jeremy Ravi

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: RE, SS

This course examines Latin America from the initial encounters between Europeans and Native Americans to the early nineteenth-century wars of independence. It focuses on interactions among Native Americans, Africans, and Europeans, and on the emergence of a durable colonial system. We will use primary sources such as the transcripts of court cases as well as secondary works, and look at culture as well as the dynamics of social change. There will be a midterm exam, a final exam, and several reaction papers. There are two lectures per week and a discussion section. Students who wish to complete an extra hour's credit may opt for a somewhat longer discussion section held in Spanish.

HISTORY 354 — Rebellion and Revolution in China Through Two Centuries
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Cassel,Par Kristoffer

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme

This course will explore rebellions and revolutions in China, from the White Lotus rebellion in the late 18th century through social protests during the last decades of the 20th century. Although the subject matter will be arranged chronologically, different time periods will be used to highlight different themese in the Chinese "revolutionary tradition." The course will draw on selected readings from secondary sources, as well as fiction and translated primary sources. The course should enable students to identify and explain the significance and relevance of major figures, terms, events and institutions in Chinese political and social history from 1790 to 2000 by using supporting evidence from course readings. Students will acquire a nuanced and critical understanding of how the transformation in China in the 19th and 20th centuries has been characterized by both continuity and rupture.

Intended audience: Sophomore and upperclass students with little or no prior knowledge of China.

Course Requirements: No prior knowledge of China or Chinese is required. Grades based on class participation (10%), one short paper (30%), one midterm exam (20%), and one final exam (40%). Paper topics should be chosen in consultation with the instructor.

Class Format: 3 hours each week in lecture format.

Advisory Prerequisite: At least one course in HISTORY or Asian Studies

HISTORY 356 — World War Two in the Pacific
Section 001, LEC
World War Two in the Pacific: Hist, Cult, Memory

Instructor: Salesa,Damon I
Instructor: Pincus,Leslie B

FA 2007
Credits: 4

The Pacific theater of World War Two was a complicated war, one that has many histories. This course studies the origins and course of the war from a historical perspective, but includes more obscure but equally vital social and cultural aspects. Other topics include: the effects of the war on local communities, the development of cultures of war, the ethics and morality of killing, the war as a meeting of empires, the arrival of the atomic age, and the trials of war criminals. It will culminate with the way that the war has been recorded in history, from the Enola Gay exhibit at the Smithsonian to Hollywood films to the History Channel.

Intended audience: Those interested in military history and the social history of war; relevant regions such as Hawaii, Japan, East Asia, SE Asia, the Pacific Islands, and Australasia; cultural history; imperial and colonial history; public history and historiography; international relations and diplomatic history.

Course Requirements: Discussion/Participation (10%); Reading Assignments (10%); Reading responses (20%); Internet Assignment 1000-1200 words (15%); Audio-visual Assignment 10001200 words (15%); Encounter Assignment 800-1000 words (10%); Final Project 2500-3000 words (20%).

Class Format: Three lecture hours per week with discussion sections led by a GSI.

HISTORY 358 — Topics in Latin American History
Section 001, LEC
Cuba: Race & Nation

Instructor: Skurski,Julie A

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Cuba has long occupied a vital place in the Caribbean and continues to be the object of metropolitan competition and imaginings. This seminar introduces students to the history and culture of Cuba since its wars of independence in the late 19th century. It focuses on the development of Cuban nationalism with relation to concepts of race, paying particular attention to music and religious practice as arenas in which issues of historical memory, forms of identity and political organization have been contested. It traces intersections between Cuba and other countries, both in the movement of people across borders and relations with major powers. A wide variety of materials will be used, including primary documents, film, and audio. Students will write two papers and make a presentation.

HISTORY 361 — U.S. Intellectual History, 1750-1940
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Carson,John S; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

America, one historian has remarked, is a nation of words. In this lecture course we will examine some of the words and concepts that have been central within American culture from the Enlightenment to World War II and how they have been articulated, debated, instantiated, and deployed at a variety of times and by a variety of people. Our approach, derived from the cultural history of ideas, will examine not just the world of thinking, but how those thoughts get translated into doing and making, and in the process are themselves transformed. Our reading will include such major figures as Thomas Jefferson, Harriet Beecher Stowe, W.E.B. DuBois, William James, and Langston Hughes, as well as a host of less well known writers, scientists, political thinkers, popular commentators, and the like. We will focus throughout, however, as much on how the words are used — in producing arguments, laws, social movements, consumer goods, and machines — and on the technologies that make them available, as on the language itself.

The goals of this course are to develop your ability to engage with historical materials critically and to gain some appreciation for the issues that have been central to the development of American intellectual culture. We will not attempt to generate an over-arching narrative explaining America from the founders to the Cold War. Rather, we will interrogate various moments in the American past in order to enrich our understanding of the varieties of voices that have contributed, and continue to contribute, to the development of American culture and to uncover the dynamics of the process determining which voices get heard and in what ways.

HISTORY 364 — History of American Suburbia
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Lassiter,Matthew D

FA 2007
Credits: 4

In post — 1945 U.S. history, the suburbs have emerged as the dominant method of social organization, the primary focus of land — use planning, and the center of political power. Critics have blamed suburbia for everything from the abandonment of the cities to the alienation of youth to the environmental devastation of sprawl. Defenders have praised the suburbs for the safety of their neighborhoods, the quality of their schools, and the broad expansion of the middle-class "American Dream" of a detached, single — family home. This course will grapple with the dominant themes and legacies of suburbanization in modern America through a focus on popular culture; social and political history; race, class, gender, and generational analysis; urban planning policies and environmental consequences.

  • Did the same forces that produced the sprawling suburbs also create the urban crisis?
  • How does a metropolitan approach to modern American history recast discussions about the rise and fall of the New Deal Order, the power shift from Rustbelt to Sunbelt, the changing ideologies of class and race, the politics of family and community, and the relationship between local and national policies?
  • How can the increasing diversity and dynamism of the suburbs be reconciled with the pervasive stereotypes of architectural blandness and cultural conformity?
  • What does it mean to say that the United States has become a "Suburban Nation"?

Lecture themes and discussion topics range from Levittown to Columbine, from the "Feminine Mystique" to the black middle class, from the "Silent Majority" to the anti — sprawl movement. We will begin by confronting the dominant discourses of suburbia in American politics and pop culture, and the course will focus extensively on films, novels, and other mass media sources as key shapers of suburban identity. We will pay close attention to the periodic battles over inclusion and exclusion in suburban communities, including political conflicts over school desegregation and housing integration. Throughout the semester, we will examine the changing meaning of the "suburban" label, as middle-class bedroom communities have evolved into autonomous horizontal cities no longer dependent on the urban core.

No prerequisites are necessary to enroll in this course. HISTORY 364 is divided into a lecture/discussion format that will include weekly reading assignments, six films to be viewed outside of regular class hours, a midterm essay, a research paper, and a final exam.

** HISTORY 364 will not be offered again until Fall 2009.

The list below includes the books likely to be assigned but is subject to change.

  • Kenneth Jackson, Crabgrass Frontier: The Suburbanization of America
  • Dean Bakopoulos, Please Don't Come Back from the Moon
  • Richard Yates, Revolutionary Road
  • Kirse Granat May, Golden State, Golden Youth: The California Image in Popular Culture
  • Bret Easton Ellis, Less Than Zero
  • David L. Kirp, John Dwyer, and Larry Rosenthal, Our Town: Race, Housing, and the Soul of Suburbia
  • Mike Davis, City of Quartz: Excavating the Future in Los Angeles
  • Elinor Burkett, Another Planet: A Year in the Life of a Suburban High School
  • Sheryll Cashin, The Failures of Integration: How Race and Class are Undermining the American Dream
  • Elizabeth Plater-Zyberk, Andres Duany, and
  • Jeff Speck, Suburban Nation: The Rise of Sprawl and the Decline of the American Dream

HISTORY 368 — History of the Family in the U.S.
Section 001, LEC
Issues in Race & Ethnicity

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: RE, SS

"Parents first embody love and power, and each of their actions conveys to the child, quite independently of their overt intentions, the injunctions and constraints by means of which society attempts to organize experience. If reproducing culture were simply a matter of formal instruction and discipline, it could be left to the schools. But it also requires that culture be embedded in personality. Socialization makes the individual want to do what he has to do; and the family is the agency to which society entrusts this complex and delicate task."

— Christopher Lasch, Haven in a Heartless World

The world we live in — its divisions and conflicts, its widening gap between rich and poor, its seemingly inexplicable outbursts of violence — is shaped far less by what we celebrate and mythologize than by the painful events we try to forget."

— Adam Hochschild, King Leopold's Ghost

This course aims to give a perspective on the contemporary American family by studying the development of this important institution in the past. Particular emphasis will be placed on changing attitudes and experiences of sex roles, sexuality, childrearing, economic strategies, work patterns and relationships between men, women, and children. We will explore race, ethnicity and class as well as shifting conceptions of the role of the state and how these factors have affected family life in America. We will want to ask ourselves how much the family has changed over time and try to project, on the basis of historical evidence, whither the family is going.

Course work will consist of readings, lectures and discussion, and the viewing of 4 movies as appointed times outside of class. There will be a 10 page historical paper required of each student on some aspect of the history of your own family by using the historical perspective gained in this course to evaluate and analyze historical changes in your own family over time. An alternative topic is provided by the instructor if this subject proves impossible to do. Two essay exams will be given, a take-home midterm and take-home final. Students are invited to visit the instructor as well as the GSIs during office hours to discuss reading, class lectures, or other topics of interest.

HISTORY 374 — The Politics and Culture of the "Sixties"
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Countryman,Matthew J; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS

Freedom Rides, Classic Rock, Motown, Vietnam, The Draft, Woodstock, Hippies, and The Great Society. The "Sixties" have a mythic quality in our political and cultural life. Debates over the 1960's and the history of that decade mirror the very essence of American culture. This is the decade of peace, optimism, cultural turbulence, despair, war, and frustration. It was a time when basic assumptions and institutions were challenged.

This course will explore the nature of American society through a look at the social and cultural movements of the 1960's. Specific attention will be paid to changes in race relations and racial structures in the nation. Specifically, we will examine the relationship between political and cultural change during that decade.

  • How did movements for political and social change affect the nation's political upheavals?
  • What was the relationship between the decade's demographic and cultural changes and the political upheavals of the time?
  • What role did resistance to political and cultural change during the 1960's play in the development of the conservative political and cultural movements that have been so influential in the decades since?

HISTORY 386 — The Holocaust
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: RE

This course examines the destruction of European Jewry (1933-1945), its causes and effects. Major themes include the resurgence of political and racial anti-Semitism in the nineteenth century, European Jewry in the period before World War II, the rise of the Nazis to power and the response of European society and European Jewry, the "final solution," and the literature of the Holocaust.

HISTORY 391 — Topics in European History
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Rensmann,Lars

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

This course is meant to examine an aspect, to be designated in the section title, of Topics in European History on an experimental, one-time basis.

HISTORY 392 — Topics in Asian History
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Lee,James

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme

This course is meant to examine an aspect, to be designated in the section title, of Topics in Asian and African History on an experimental, one-time basis.

HISTORY 393 — Topics in U.S. History
Section 001, LEC
Detroit Politics and Community Organization

Instructor: Kurashige,Scott T; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

  • "How did Detroit get this way?"
  • "Why are the city and suburbs so divided?"
  • "What does it mean to revitalize Detroit?"
  • "Are sports stadiums and events the key to economic development?"
  • "Is gentrification a good or bad thing?"
  • These are some common questions that are frequently heard in relation to Detroit. Digging below the surface of popular discourse and disagreement, this course seeks to get at the roots of urban social, political and economic issues. It offers students an opportunity to gain an in-depth perspective on racism, poverty, political activism, and community organizing among diverse groups. First, we will study what historian Thomas Sugrue has called the "origins of the urban crisis." We will examine the effects of deindustrialization and racism in the post-World War II era alongside the emergence of protest movements which sought to promote social justice. Second, we will study the divergent ways that city and suburban politicians and residents interpret the "urban crisis," and we will critically analyze their response Third, we will probe the history of radicalism in Detroit and investigate the grassroots solutions to the "crisis" being enacted by community organizations.

    Designed to link the study of Detroit's past, present, and future, this interdisciplinary course should appeal to students in a variety of fields, including history, ethnic studies, urban studies, education, law, business, environmental justice and fine arts. There are no prerequisites or prequalifications. You may have lived in the city your entire life, or you might only know the Fox Theater, the Tigers and Xochimilco. Highly-motivated students may be offered opportunities to fulfill course requirements through community service-learning activities.

    HISTORY 395 — Reading Course
    Section 001, IND

    FA 2007
    Credits: 1 — 4
    Other: INDEPENDENT

    Credit Exclusions: A maximum of eight credits can be elected through HISTORY 394 and 395.

    This is an independent 1-4 credit course open only to history concentrators by written permission of the instructor.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Open only to History concentrators with permission of instructor.

    HISTORY 396 — History Colloquium
    Section 001, SEM

    Instructor: Masuzawa,Tomoko

    FA 2007
    Credits: 4
    Reqs: ULWR

    Intensive examination of historical problems of limited scope either as delimited historical events (e.g., the French Revolution) as single analytical themes developed over time (e.g., urbanization in America), or as problems in the philosophy of history (e.g., objectivity, determinism). Classes of twenty students or less are designed to exploit an educational setting unlike that of the large lecture course. Major stress on critical reading and class discussion.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Junior and Senior HISTORY concentrators by permission only. HISTORY concentrators are required to elect HISTORY 396 or 397

    HISTORY 396 — History Colloquium
    Section 002, SEM
    Health and Medicine in US Culture Since 1875

    Instructor: Pernick,Martin S

    FA 2007
    Credits: 4
    Reqs: ULWR

    Unprecedented technical advances and dramatic cultural changes transformed the health of Americans and the healing professions since 1875. This course examines how gender, race, ethnicity, economics, politics, and changing cultural meanings of disease and science combined with scientific innovations to alter medicine, health, and society.

    Class is discussion format, with occasional short lectures. Students are expected to read and discuss thoughtfully about 150 pages per week, drawn from often divergent sources. A 15-page paper based on original historical research, a weekly journal, and two 5-page book review papers are required.

    Required purchases cost about $35 but additional required reading available on reserve may be purchased for about $175. Overrides for non-history concentrators will be allocated the first day. Anyone absent from the first class without advance permission may not take the course.

    Required Readings:
    Starr, Social Transformations of American Medicine
    DeKriuf, Microbe Hunters
    Tomes, Gospel of Germs
    Brandt, No Magic Bullet
    Pernick, The Black Stork
    Course pack from Dollar Bill

    Advisory Prerequisite: Junior and Senior HISTORY concentrators by permission only. HISTORY concentrators are required to elect HISTORY 396 or 397

    HISTORY 396 — History Colloquium
    Section 003, SEM
    Global Nuclear Proliferation

    Instructor: Hecht,Gabrielle

    FA 2007
    Credits: 4
    Reqs: ULWR

    This course presents global perspectives on the history of nuclear weapons, focusing on the political, cultural, environmental, health, and technological factors involved in their development and spread since the end of World War II. We consider the aftermath of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombings, the unfolding of the Cold War, and the multiple reasons states pursue nuclear weapons development. We also explore uranium production and atomic testing, the emergence of international treaties and organization, and the question of whether nuclear weapons can be "uninvented." We conclude with a brief consideration of other forms of radioactive weaponry, including depleted uranium munitions and "dirty bombs." Every week students are expected to read 150-200 pages, write a 2-page response, and be well prepared for extensive class discussion. There are also two term papers, at least one of which involves two drafts. No final exam. Expected cost for course materials: $150.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Junior and Senior HISTORY concentrators by permission only. HISTORY concentrators are required to elect HISTORY 396 or 397

    HISTORY 396 — History Colloquium
    Section 004, SEM
    Dreams and Visions in the History of Medieval and Early Modern Europe and America

    Instructor: MacDonald,Michael P

    FA 2007
    Credits: 4
    Reqs: ULWR

    This colloquium will explore the history of dreams and visions in Western Europe and America from ancient times to about 1900, when Freud published his famous Interpretation of Dreams. It will concentrate on the medieval and early modern periods, with looks backwards and forwards, for these were the eras when visionary experiences were most greatly valued and ultimately devalued.

    Ancient religions and philosophy posited three causes for dreams and visions: they might be sent by supernatural beings; they might originate in the mind of the dreamer or visionary himself or herself; or they might be caused by natural but hidden forces described by Neoplatonist philosophers. Throughout late antiquity and the Middle Ages theologians and philosophers devised typologies of dreams and their significance. Both learned scholars and lay people believed that some dreams had prophetic or predictive significance. Ways to identify "true" and "false" dreams and visions were also invented, as were means to tell whether dreams were supernatural or natural or if supernatural from God or from the Devil. For centuries, debate raged over the causes and frequency of divine dreams and visions, but until the 1700s the possibility of genuinely prophetic dreams and visions was widely acknowledged. And sometimes dreams and visions had a powerful influence on individuals, religious sects and even nations. In the eighteenth century, however, psychological explanations for visions and dreams came to prevail, largely because of the religious and political conflicts of the seventeenth century and the reaction to them. Visions and especially dreams were devalued and assumed the place that they have in our modern culture, as symptoms of mental illness or psychological phenomena significant only for the individual. (A viewpoint rejected, incidentally, by many cultures throughout the world today.)

    In this class we shall discuss this history, reading historical works on ancient, medieval and early modern visions and dreams. We shall examine some original sources from the eras we study, such as Marcrobius' Commentary on the Dream of Scipio and — at the other end of the temporal span Freud's book and the work of his more recent critics. Students will be asked to prepare rather intensive reading assigments and they must participate actively in class discussions. In addition each class member will write a term paper discussing either a particular aspect of the history of the interpretation of visions and dreams or the records of a visionary or dream experience that was influential or is notably revealing.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Junior and Senior HISTORY concentrators by permission only. HISTORY concentrators are required to elect HISTORY 396 or 397

    HISTORY 396 — History Colloquium
    Section 005, SEM
    Remembering War: War&Genocide in Germany's 20th C

    Instructor: Canning,Kathleen M

    FA 2007
    Credits: 4
    Reqs: ULWR

    This course explores the transformation of the two world wars and the Holocaust from historical event / lived experience into historical memory and memorial. For much of the twentieth century, Germany was either waging war or contending with the catastrophic aftermath of war. The course begins with the end of the First World War, probing how memory of the First World War became a dividing line through the political culture of the Weimar Republic during the 1920s, as debates raged over the reasons for the German defeat, the punitive costs of the peace treaty, and the care of war veterans, widows and orphans. Indeed, the politics and culture of the Weimar Republic were shaped by disputes over the memory of the First World War. Some would argue that the Nazi rise to power is unthinkable without these contests over the war, defeat and the "dictated peace" imposed upon Germany. This course will also explore the different ways in which the Nazi dictatorship, its war of annihilation, and the Holocaust were first repressed during the 1950s and then gradually became sites of contested memory from the late 1960s on. From the "inability to mourn" in West Germany of the 1950s to the first coming to terms with the Holocaust in the 1970s, we will trace the widening scope of historical memory and memorialization in West Germany and undertake a comparative exploration of the place of the Third Reich, the Holocaust, and the Second World War in the national identities and political cultures of the two Germanies from 1948 through German reunification in 1990.

    Prerequisites: HISTORY 111, 318, 319, 322 or 386 or a deeper familiarity with the historical events of these periods. History majors who still need to fulfill the upper-division writing requirement shall have priority in enrollment. Three-hour weekly class time includes two hours of group instruction and discussion (seminar), followed by a writing workshop.

    Course requirements: This course is writing-intensive: it includes a series of short papers and one longer paper at the end of the academic term. Students will also be asked to introduce readings or make a brief presentation at least once per term. Attendance and participation are central to this seminar course and thus count for one-third of the grade.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Junior and Senior HISTORY concentrators by permission only. HISTORY concentrators are required to elect HISTORY 396 or 397

    HISTORY 397 — History Colloquium
    Section 001, SEM
    Religion and the Italian Renaissance

    Instructor: Siegmund,Stefanie B

    FA 2007
    Credits: 4

    Intensive examination of historical problems of limited scope either as delimited historical events (e.g., the French Revolution) as single analytical themes developed over time (e.g., urbanization in America), or as problems in the philosophy of history (e.g., objectivity, determinism). Classes of twenty students or less are designed to exploit an educational setting unlike that of the large lecture course. Major stress on critical reading and class discussion.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Enrollment limited to junior and senior History concentrators by permission only. History concentrators are required to elect HISTORY 396 or 397.

    HISTORY 397 — History Colloquium
    Section 002, SEM
    Indians and Empires

    Instructor: Witgen,Michael

    FA 2007
    Credits: 4

    In this course you will be asked to re-think American history. That is, we will approach the history of America as a continental history. This will require that we think of North America as a New World space, a place that was inhabited and occupied by indigenous peoples, and then remade by the arrival and settlement of Europeans. You will be asked to imagine a North America that was indigenous and adaptive, as well as colonial and Euro-American. This approach to the study of North American history is designed to challenge the epistemology and literature of Borderlands and frontier historiography, which displaces Native peoples from the central narrative of American history by placing them at the physical margins of colonial and national development. Instead we will explore the intersection and integration of indigenous and Euro-American national identity and national space in North America and trace their co-evolution from first contact through the early nineteenth century.

    Readings will include primary source documents including missionary records, captivity narratives, indigenous oral history, and colonial records, as well as historical studies that focus on inter-cultural contact, trade, diplomacy and warfare in the colonial and early national period. Students will be expected to write several short response papers based on these readings and a longer term paper based on original research.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Enrollment limited to junior and senior History concentrators by permission only. History concentrators are required to elect HISTORY 396 or 397.

    HISTORY 397 — History Colloquium
    Section 003, SEM
    Penal Colonies and Camp Cultures in the Twentieth-Century Asia and Europe

    Instructor: Mrázek,Rudolf

    FA 2007
    Credits: 4

    Twentieth-century history of death and survival places — internment, labor and concentration camps — will be studied. Diaries of inmates, scholarly treatments, fiction and poetry will be read, films, photographs, plans, maps and works of art surveyed, on the colonial camps of French-Indochina and the Netherlands-East Indies, as well as the labor, internment and concentration camps in Europe of the same time. Culture, language, and architecture of the camps will be respectfully considered and mourned (which is: an effort will be made to understand them) as consequences and also undercurrents of modern Western civilization.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Enrollment limited to junior and senior History concentrators by permission only. History concentrators are required to elect HISTORY 396 or 397.

    HISTORY 399 — Honors Colloquium, Senior
    Section 001, SEM

    FA 2007
    Credits: 1 — 6
    Other: Honors

    Senior honors seminar for thesis writers.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Honors students, HISTORY 398, senior standing, and permission of instructor.

    HISTORY 406 — The Church and the Jews
    Section 001, SEM

    Instructor: Siegmund,Stefanie B

    FA 2007
    Credits: 3

    Examines the complex relationship between the western Church and the Jews, from the time of the Church Fathers to the Reformation. It analyzes doctrines and policies regarding the Jews as expressed in different realms. Major topics include: consequences of the entrenchment of the Church in Europe; the Crusades; the 13th century papacy and the Jews; the preaching of the mendicant friars; money-lending and the Church; popular libels; Reformation and Counter-Reformation; Vatican II.

    HISTORY 408 — Byzantine Empire, 284-867
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Fine Jr,John V

    FA 2007
    Credits: 3

    This course covers the history of the Byzantine Empire from Constantine the Great to the end of the Amorian Dynasty (284-867). Political, cultural, and religious relations with the civilizations of Rome, the medieval West, the Slavs, and the Near East are stressed.

    There will be a 10-15 page written paper, a mid-term and final for undergraduates;for graduate students an optional midterm, a 25-30 page written paper and a final exam are required.

    Required readings are on reserved at the Undergraduate Library.
    Required readings are also available at Shaman Drum Bookshop.
    A Course pack will also be available.

    HISTORY 416 — Nineteenth-Century German and European Intellectual History
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Weineck,Silke-Maria

    FA 2007
    Credits: 3
    Other: WorldLit

    Between the upheavals of the French Revolution and the First World War, the European nations witnessed an utter transformation of their world. The relations of the person to the nation, to the state, to history, and to the physical world were rethought from top to bottom. Our exploration of modern ideas take us from rationalism to racism, and from utopian ideologies to the birth of psychoanalysis.

    Advisory Prerequisite: German students must have concurrent registration in German 403. See Course Guide.

    HISTORY 421 — Religions of the African Diaspora
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Johnson,Paul Christopher

    FA 2007
    Credits: 3

    This survey course offers an overview of the religions of the African Diaspora. Beginning with a theorization and genealogy of the concept of diaspora itself, the course provides introductions (both in historical context and contemporary manifestations) to the following: Brazilian Candomblé and Umbanda; Cuban Santería and Palo Monte; Haitian Vodou; Jamaican and globalized Rastafarianism; the ancestor religion of the Garifuna of Honduras, Guatemala and Belize; Obeah/ orisha practices of Trinidad; and the Afro-Baptist tradition and Pentecostal roots of the Black Church in the U.S. Key issues will include the way "Africa" is recreated in ritual practice, the experience of exile and transculturation, and common ritual tropes such as spirit possession, altars devoted to material exchange and sacrifice, performative codes of clothing and music, and many others.

    Intended audience: Upper-level undergrads and grad students

    Class Format: 3 hours/week in lecture format

    Course Requirements:Attendance; participation; short in-class presentations; critical reading reviews; midterm exam; final exam. Undergraduates will do weekly critical reading response/reflection papers of about 3 pages each, making a sum of around 40 pages during the term. They also write essays on midterm and final exams, in addition to doing an oral presentation. Grads will be required to do a research paper.

    HISTORY 422 — Indian Religions and Western Thought
    Section 001, SEM

    Instructor: Mandair,Arvind-Pal Singh

    FA 2007
    Credits: 3

    This course examines the intellectual encounter between India and the West from the 1770's to the present day, a period that coincides with the entry of India into the historical experience of colonialism and modernity. It looks at how the discovery of knowledge about India affected debates in modern European philosophy and conversely examines the reception of European ideas in modern Indian thought. Students will be encouraged to compare some central philosophical ideas from Indian devotional traditions with the ideas of Western philosophers in order to examine the possibility of a convergence between these seemingly different traditions of thought.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Junior and above.

    HISTORY 433 — Russia Under the Tsars: From Peter the Great to the Revolutions of 1917
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Kivelson,Valerie Ann

    FA 2007
    Credits: 3

    Beginning with the reign of Peter the Great (1682-1725), the Russian Empire embarked on a long and difficult process of economic, social, and cultural development within the framework of tsarist autocracy. A multinational empire dominated by the Russian landed gentry, who lived off the labor of the peasantry, Russia in the 18th and 19th centuries lagged behind the more rapidly evolving Western European states. The autocracy itself tried to bridge the growing gap between Russia and the West through reforms, even as its own creature, the bureaucracy, isolated the ruling elite from much of Russian society. A reformist and later revolutionary opposition to the monarchy and its social order worked relentlessly to bring down the Romanov state. In a development with powerful resonances for today, a fiercely committed group of idealists wreaked havoc on the society throughout the 19th century by waging a concerted campaign of terrorism and assassination. By the early 20th century tsarism proved to be unable to resist any longer the social forces it had done so much to create.

    In an effort to understand the Imperial era in its own terms as well as in the light of the Revolution that would bring it to a cataclysmic end, we will study the swirling currents of Russian and Western thought that clashed and combined to form a uniquely Russian cultural mix in the centuries between 1700 and 1917. We will examine economic development, imperial expansion, religious and secular culture, successive wars, political reforms, and the hardening of the institution of serfdom which characterized the historical experience of the overwhelming majority of Russia's population until formal emancipation in 1861.

    There are no pre-requisites

    COURSE REQUIREMENTS:

    • Attendance at all lectures required, and participation is strongly encouraged.
    • Midterm exam
    • Two short (2 pp.) response papers during the term, 1 before the midterm and 1 after, at your convenience
    • Research Paper based on a primary source (7-10 pp.)
    • Take-home final

    HISTORY 440 — Ancient Mesopotamia: History and Culture
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Yoffee,Norman; homepage

    FA 2007
    Credits: 4
    Other: WorldLit

    (Graduate students: Please note description for the graduate section of this course ACABS 513 below.)

    Sumerian, Babylonian, and Assyrian civilization from the first cuneiform documents (ca. 3100 BC) to the fall of the Neo-Babylonian empire (539 BC); special attention to

    1. the rise and nature of early Mesopotamian city-states;
    2. Mesopotamian economics;
    3. Mesopotamian law;
    4. ethnic relations in Mesopotamia;
    5. Mesopotamia and its neighbors — Egypt, Iran, Israel;
    6. the collapse of Mesopotamian civilization.
    Original documents are examined to show methods of interpreting the history and culture of Ancient Mesopotamia.

    ACABS 513 meets with ACABS 413 but is intended for graduate students. It will survey Sumerian, Babylonian, and Assyrian civilization from the first written documents (ca. 3100 BC) to the fall of the Neo-Babylonian empire (539 BC). Students will meet with the instructor bi-weekly to discuss readings and topics.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Junior standing.

    HISTORY 451 — Japan Since 1700
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Pincus,Leslie B

    FA 2007
    Credits: 3

    In this course we will explore the history of Japan from the dissolution of a semi-feudal system in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries to Japan's rise as a world economic power in the latter half of the twentieth century. We will address both the major historical thems during these two centuries of radical transformation and the issues at stake in historical interpretation.

    There will be short, ungraded writing assignments, a midterm, and 3 required papers.

    There will be a course pack. Required readings are available for purchase at Shaman Drum Bookshop. Readings are also on reserve at the Undergraduate Library.

    HISTORY 452 — History of Late-Colonial Southeast Asia, 1780-1942
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Mrázek,Rudolf

    FA 2007
    Credits: 3

    This course focuses on late-colonialism up to 1942 in Southeast Asia, including Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, the Philippines, Siam/Thailand, Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos and Burma. One of the primary themes is the historical conflict between the societies of the region and the global community of "developed" nations. After looking at a sensitive and well-informed variety of historical sources, we also explore the area's political, social, and intellecutal history. We also address students' interests in particular regions.

    HISTORY 457 — History of India, 1750-1900
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Metcalf,Barbara Daly

    FA 2007
    Credits: 3

    This course covers the decline of Mughal power, the warfare and negotiations that produced diverse and vibrant regional states, and ultimately the establishment of the world's longest and deepest example of modern European colonialism, the British Indian Empire. Topics include the cultural transformations of the 18th century, the structure and ideology of British rule, transformations in Indian society and culture through the high colonial period, and the emergence of a new public life, including movements for social and religious reform, as well as the beginnings of the nationalist movement. One central theme of the course will be to show that the commonsense notions of continuity, fostered both by colonialism and nationalism, must be replaced with understanding the newness of modern identities and the new meanings infused into old terms (caste, language, Hindu or Muslim, even India itself). To understand how our cultures are constructed is to give us a critical distance on what otherwise seems part of nature.

    Students are expected to complete the readings before the class for which they are assigned, reflecting on the italicized questions below. They should also attend lectures, participate in discussions, take the mid-term and final examinations, and submit two one-age assignments and two papers (6-8 pages, double-spaced), one on Dean Mahomet's memoirs/life and one on the novel Kim. Graduate students taking the course for credit will also be expected to complete a longer paper (18-20 pp) on a subject of their choice.

    Required reading, available for purchase:

    • A Concise History of Modern India, Second Edition (2006) by Barbara D. Metcalf and Thomas R. Metcalf, ISBN 0-521-68225-8

    • Sources of Indian Tradition, Volume II ed. Ainslee Embree and Stephen Hay, ISBN 231064152

    • The Travels of Dean Mahomet, ed. Michael H. Fisher 0520207173

    • The Home and the World,by Rabindranath Tagore. Penguin Classics, ISBN, 9780140449860

    HISTORY 461 — The American Revolution
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Scott III,Julius S

    FA 2007
    Credits: 4

    Through lectures, readings, and discussion, this course examines the origins, character, and legacies of the American Revolution. It covers roughly the period from the end of the Seven Years' War in 1763 until the Louisiana Purchase in 1803. During the semester, we will (re)visit many of the familiar themes of this crucial period in American history — the rise of opposition to Britain, the nature of the military conflict that ensued, and the "republican" experiment that followed the Treaty of Peace in 1783. Much of our inquiry, however, will focus on other crucial issues, examining the Revolution, to quote an early historian, "as a social movement." To what extent did the Revolution act as a force for change within America itself? How did the "middling and lower sorts" (as well as colonial elites) respond to and shape the changes around them? Throughout the semester, one of the central challenges will be to keep the diversity of America's eighteenth-century social structure in view, since women, Native Americans, and African Americans all profoundly affected — and were affected by — the American Revolution and its aftermath. This four-credit-hour class meets twice a week for lecture and once in discussion sections. Written requirements include two essays and midterm and final examinations.

    HISTORY 464 — Race, Culture, and Politics in the Era of Civil War and Reconstruction
    Section 001, REC

    Instructor: Rosen,Hannah

    FA 2007
    Credits: 3
    Reqs: RE

    In the mid-19th century, contests over slavery, race, freedom, and equality divided the United States in a bloody Civil War and shaped one of the most revolutionary eras in U.S. history, Reconstruction. The Civil War and its outcome — slave emancipation, the dismantling of social hierarchies, and the loss of political power among traditional elites — created new political possibilities and challenged previous notions of who was an "American" and a "citizen," who had the right to vote, and what it meant to be "Black" or "white" and an "honorable" man or woman.

    This course focuses on cultural and political change from 1830 to 1896, tracing the contests leading to the Civil War and the transformations ushered in by emancipation and resulting, ultimately, in legal racial segregation. It analyzes the interaction of race, gender, class, and citizenship in contests over slavery, voting rights, labor, family, and sexuality. It also considers the role that memories of the Civil War play in politics and culture in the U.S. today. We will explore these questions through both lecture and discussion, through readings in secondary and primary sources, and through films and student presentations.

    HISTORY 468 — Topics in U.S. History
    Section 001, LEC
    The Asian American Movement

    Instructor: Kurashige,Scott T; homepage

    FA 2007
    Credits: 3

    In this course, we will analyze the history and legacy of Asian American activism during the Asian American Movement era of the 1960s and 1970s. We will explore these issues:

    • The radical political origins of "Asian American" identity among young Japanese, Chinese, Filipino, and Korean Americans
    • How Asian Americans responded to the movement against the Vietnam War
    • Why Asian American and ethnic studies stressed the importance of college students becoming involved in community activism
    • Coalition building and interracial solidarity between Asian Americans and African Americans, Latinos, and Native Americans
    • Women's activism and the relationship between race, class, and gender

    We will also examine the following issues that demonstrate how Asian American activism has become more diverse during the past twenty years:

    • New currents of activism within South Asian and Southeast Asian communities
    • Resistance of Asian immigrant workers to sweatshop labor conditions
    • Asian American queer and LGBT activism
    • Community organizing in Detroit

    This is an advanced seminar and not an introductory class. Coursework will stress critical reading, qualitative discussion, and analytical writing. It is recommended that you meet one of the following criteria before enrolling (regardless of whether you enroll through AC or History):

    1. You have taken AMCULT314/HISTORY 378 ("History of Asian Americans")
    2. You are an Asian/Pacific Islander American Studies minor
    3. You are an American Culture concentrator
      OR
    4. You have knowledge of ethnic studies and Asian American history consistent with one of the three criteria listed above.

    Graduate students from all disciplines are welcome to enroll and will be expected to satisfy requirements consistent with a 600-level readings course.

    HISTORY 469 — Precolonial Southeast Asia
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Lieberman,Victor B

    FA 2007
    Credits: 3

    This course examines select problems in the history of both mainland and island Southeast Asia from the start of the first millenium C.E. to the early 19th century, on the eve of colonial rule. Its focus is simultaneously political, cultural, and economic. It seeks to explain why, particularly on the mainland, localized political and economic systems coalesced with increasing speed and success, chiefly from the 15th century, and why similar integrative trends in the island world were less sustained. But at the same time it seeks to explore in open-ended fashion the relation between international and domestic economic stimuli, cultural importation and cultural creativity, institutional demands and patrimonial norms. Principal thematic topics include: Indianization, the rise of the classical states and their chief features, the collapse of the classical states, reintegration on the mainland, the age of commerce thesis, comparisons between Theravada, Neo-Confucian, the Muslim Southeast Asia, the early role of Europeans, the 18th century crises, Southeast Asia on the eve of colonial intervention.

    Requirements: Meets weekly, two to three research papers using secondary sources, no final exam, all graduate and advanced undergraduates welcome.

    HISTORY 472 — Topics in Asian History
    Section 001, LEC
    Treaty Ports and Semi-Colonialism in East Asia

    Instructor: Cassel,Par Kristoffer

    FA 2007
    Credits: 3
    Other: Theme

    Following China's defeat in the Opium war 1939-42, the Sino-British treaty of Nanjing opened five coastal cities for foreign trade and foreign residents. These "treaty ports," as they were called at the time, grew dramatically in number and a number of treaty ports were also opened in Japan and Korea. While the treaty ports were only a relatively brief episode in Japanese and Korean history, the Chinese treaty ports would remain China's primary contact zone with the West for a century.

    The treaty ports have left a complex and contentious legacy in China. On one hand, the treaty ports in many ways defined the urban experience and most of the ports developed into islands of prosperity which stood in sharp contrast to China's vast hinterland. On the other hand, the treaty ports were bastions of foreign privilege and influence and many of the open ports gave birth to China's first nationalist movements.

    This course will explore the treaty ports by reading both "classical" and more recent scholarship as well as selected primary sources in English. While the primary focus will be on China, Japanese and Korean treaty ports will also be discussed where applicable. The course will be both thematically and chronologically organized, and it will cover the years 1790-1950.

    Grades will be based on participation, on short paper, a midterm and a final exam.

    HISTORY 476 — American Business History
    Section 001, REC

    FA 2007
    Credits: 3

    This course familiarizes students with the broad sweep of American business history, and touches on global business history as well. Much course content is personalized, that is, focuses on people, rather than institutions or events.

    Course pack. No text.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Junior, senior, or graduate standing

    HISTORY 477 — Law, History, and the Dynamics of Social Change
    Section 001, SEM
    Boundries of Citizenship for Dred Scott-Plessy vs Ferguson

    Instructor: Scott,Rebecca J

    FA 2007
    Credits: 3

    This course explores the changing boundaries and content of state and national citizenship in the United States, from the period of slavery to the beginning of the twentieth century. The core question is: how was membership in the social and political community defined? What meanings did legal freedom and formal citizenship have for former slaves? What rights could be claimed by immigrants, and by residents of territories acquired or conquered by the United States?

    Readings for the course include state and federal Supreme Court cases — including the attorneys' briefs and testimony from the trial court records — as well as interpretive works of history and law, Congressional testimony, and 19th century newspaper reports. Students will be grouped into five work teams, and each team will take responsibility for studying and presenting a key legal case in context.

    There will be a midterm exam, and the reading load is heavy. The course will also include law students, and will meet twice a week for an hour and twenty minutes. Enrollment is open to seniors in LSA and to graduate students.

    HISTORY 478 — Topics in Latin American History
    Section 002, LEC

    Instructor: Coronil,Fernando

    FA 2007
    Credits: 3

    A historical exploration of the shift to the "left" in Latin America.

    HISTORY 480 — Conflict and Diplomacy in the Caucasus
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Libaridian,Gerard J

    FA 2007
    Credits: 3

    This course will examine militarized conflicts (Nagorno Karabagh, South Ossetia and Abkhazia) and latent ones (such as Ajara and Javakheti) in the South Caucasus as well as diplomatic efforts at conflict resolution in the last decade. The rise of conflicts and nationalism will be studied in view of factors such as ethnicity, religion, class, historical processes, and of state-building in independent Armenia, Azerbaijan and Georgia in the context of post-Soviet international relations.

    Intended audience: Upper-level undergraduates and graduate students

    Course Requirements: Attendance, participation in discussions, 12-15 page paper, mid-term and final examination

    Class Format: lecture/discussion 3 hours per week

    HISTORY 489 — The History of the Roman Catholic Church, 1775-2005
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Porter-Szucs,Brian A

    FA 2007
    Credits: 4

    There are over one billion Roman Catholics in the world today, making this the world's largest religious organization. For all its apparent success, however, the Catholic Church has faced monumental challenges over the past few centuries, and observers have frequently predicted its imminent demise. The ongoing tension between faith and modernity has become one of the central concerns of our time, but the Roman Catholic Church has been grappling with this issue for at least two centuries. In confronting the challenges of the modern era, Catholics have adapted and changed even as they struggled to uphold what they considered to be immutable values and eternal truths. In HISTORY 489 we will study the basic teachings of Catholicism and how these have been transformed in response to the new lifestyles, family structures, social institutions, and sexual norms of an increasingly urbanized, industrialized world. We will learn how Catholics have responded to the turmoil of war and revolution, and how the Church has dealt with political and intellectual challenges from liberalism, communism, fascism, and other modern ideologies. The class will cover the history of Catholicism from the late 18th century to the present day, from the maneuverings within the corridors of the Vatican to the day-to-day devotional practices of ordinary believers.

    HISTORY 498 — Topics in History
    Section 001, LEC
    Literature and Sprit: Law, Interpretation and Identity in Early Juda-Christanity

    Instructor: Neis,Rachel

    FA 2007
    Credits: 3

    In this course we will study attitudes towards law in early Judaism and Christianity. Was law a marker of Jewish /Christian difference, with Jews adhering to it and Christians rejecting it? When studied closely the sources reveal a more complex variety of ways in which Jews and Christians over the first centuries of the Common Era grappled with the demands, relevance and interpretation of Biblical law in light of their contemporary lives and shifting identities.

    Through primary sources of first-century Judaism, the early Jesus movement, the Church Fathers and the Rabbis (including Philo, Josephus, the New Testament, the Mishnah and Talmuds) and through secondary scholarship on these sources as well as on law (religious and otherwise) in the late ancient world, we will consider questions such as:

    • Was there an approximately uniform notion of what "law" was among the variety of late antique Jews and Christians?
    • How did it relate to laws found in the Bible?
    • To what extent can anti-law language be read as Christian anti-Jewish polemic, as intra-Jewish debates about legal interpretation or even as Christian halakha?
    • Can we find Jewish reflections on "law" as such?
    • How was the concept, role and content of law appropriated, negated and deployed in ways to shore up religious, communal and social identities among late antique Jews and Christians?

    HISTORY 549 — Social Scientific Studies of Historical and Contemporary China
    Section 001, SEM

    Instructor: Lee,James
    Instructor: Tardif,Twila Z

    FA 2007
    Credits: 3
    Other: Theme

    CCS 501 is part of a two-semester Interdisciplinary Seminar in Chinese Studies intended for M.A. and Ph.D. students from all disciplines. Disciplinary departments create barriers between shared problems, methods, and sources. ISCS is designed to recover and highlight the connecting links of Chinese Studies: the multidimensional study of China encompassing all social groups and the entire range of human experience, from literature and the visual arts to politics and economics. There are no formal prerequisites, except permission of the instructors.

    CCS 501 will introduce graduate students to current issues in social scientific studies of China, emphasizing different methodological approaches drawn from multiple disciplines. The course will address four common themes — family and social organization, poverty, social stratification and social mobility, and political economy — that intersect the multiple social science disciplines. Each class will discuss one or more disciplinary approaches to a common subject through class discussion of exemplary studies of China. We will discuss the existing state of the field on each subject and emphasize the different research design and data available for such studies.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

    HISTORY 578 — Ethnicity and Culture in Latin America
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Alberto,Paulina Laura

    FA 2007
    Credits: 3

    This course will explore texts that have helped to construct racial identities in Brazil from the late 19th century to the present. It will trace the ways that changing ideas of race — particularly regarding Brazilians of African descent — have shaped the terms of Brazilian national identity and citizenship. We will focus primarily on texts produced by Brazilians of African descent themselves — specifically, on the so-called "black press," newspapers written by and for African-descended Brazilians across Brazil in the 20th century. Students will work closely with articles from the black press (which will be available in digital form online), learning to place them in dialogue with a wider, more mainstream literature on race and national identity produced in the same period (broadly defined to include novels, short stories, essays, historiography, and song lyrics.) The course will be conducted in Portuguese, with readings in Portuguese and English; shorter writing assignments will be primarily in Portuguese, but students will have the option of completing the final paper in English. Prerequisites: students should be proficient in Portuguese (they should have completed, or placed out of, the Portuguese sequence through PORTUG 232), with particular emphasis on reading and speaking skills; completion of PORTUG 270 is suggested but not required.

    Advisory Prerequisite: CAAS 202

    HISTORY 590 — History Topics Mini-course
    Section 001, LEC

    FA 2007
    Credits: 1
    Other: Minicourse

    This course is meant to examine a topic, designated by the section title, offered as a mini-course.

    HISTORY 592 — Topics in Asian History
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Lee,James

    FA 2007
    Credits: 3
    Other: Theme

    This course is meant to examine an aspect, to be designated in the section title, of Topics in Asian History.

    HISTORY 600 — Introduction to Archival Administration
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Wallace,David A; homepage

    FA 2007
    Credits: 3

    Provides an understanding of why societies, cultures, organizations, and individuals create and keep records. Presents cornerstone terminology, concepts, and practices used in records management and archival administration. Examines the evolution of methods and technologies used to create, store, organize, and preserve records and the ways in which organizations and individuals use archives and records for ongoing operations, accountability, research, litigation, and organizational memory. Participants become familiar with the legal, policy, and ethical issues surrounding records and archives administration and become conversant with the structure, organization, and literatures of the archival and records management professions.     

    Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

    HISTORY 615 — Introduction to the Comparative Study of History
    Section 001, REC

    Instructor: Israel,Kali A K
    Instructor: Salesa,Damon I

    FA 2007
    Credits: 3

    The designated studies course covers a broader scope than other studies courses. It is designed to offer first-year graduate students an introduction to historical literature to encourage the development of critical skills. HISTORY 615 is co-taught by two history professors with different areas of expertise. It is not intended to prepare students for a particular regional or chronological specialization, but to provide a forum for collective examinations of methods, topics, and questions of historical writing and research. Both sections of this course are designed to potentially meet the same goals but require different readings.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

    HISTORY 615 — Introduction to the Comparative Study of History
    Section 002, REC

    Instructor: Cole,Joshua H
    Instructor: Cole,Juan R; homepage

    FA 2007
    Credits: 3

    The designated studies course covers a broader scope than other studies courses. It is designed to offer first-year graduate students an introduction to historical literature to encourage the development of critical skills. HISTORY 615 is co-taught by two history professors with different areas of expertise. It is not intended to prepare students for a particular regional or chronological specialization, but to provide a forum for collective examinations of methods, topics, and questions of historical writing and research. Both sections of this course are designed to potentially meet the same goals but require different readings.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

    HISTORY 623 — Topics in World Economic History, II
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Whatley,Warren C; homepage

    FA 2007
    Credits: 3

    This class introduces students to a variety of topics in the economic history of the world. The class is a combination of lectures and discussions leading to a research paper. Topics are added each year and students are encouraged to introduce new topics from around the world. Topics covered in the recent past include: conceptual issues concerning path dependence, institutions, anthropometrics, transactions cost and markets in economic history; the importance of fundamentals (endowments, geography, disease and climate) in the broad sweep of world history; the Paleolithic revolution and world economic inequality before 1500 A.D.; the economics of early long-distance trade; increasing world inequalities after 1500; the economics of constitutions; economic history of the Pre-Columbian Americas; Colonialism; the rise of an Atlantic economy; the industrial revolution in comparative perspective; the sources of U. S. economic growth; gender and racial inequality across industrialized countries; the history of technology; the history of slavery and freedom in the West; and the Great World Depression of the 1930s.

    Advisory Prerequisite: ECON,Intermediate economic theory/statistics

    HISTORY 626 — Studies in Byzantine History
    Section 001, REC

    Instructor: Fine Jr,John V

    FA 2007
    Credits: 3

    This course focuses on major historical issues and scholarly debates in the field. Usually we spend a week on each controversy. If students have special interests, the course attempts to fit them into some of its sessions. The course requires a paper to be presented orally late in the academic term and subsequently submitted in written form. The paper is normally focused on a specific controversy. This course hopes not only to stimulate critical thinking but also to contribute to preparation for prelims.

    HISTORY 629 — Studies in African History
    Section 001, REC
    Technology and Nature in Africa

    Instructor: Hecht,Gabrielle

    FA 2007
    Credits: 3

    Over the last two centuries, the African continent has been explicitly portrayed as a continent without technology. These portrayals reflect not only politics and cultures of colonial domination, but also politics and cultures of technology. In challenging assertions about the absence of "technology" in "Africa," this course explores ways in which African histories have been shaped by and through technological activities and conceptions of nature. We will pay special attention to technopolitical geographies, sometimes focusing on tightly circumscribed geographical regions, and other times situating localities in larger regional, national, continental, or global networks. We will explore the nature and meaning of technological knowledge, particularly as that knowledge involves the manipulation of nature (e.g., through agriculture, land management, transportation, mining, etc.). We will discuss the ways in which technologies mediate, represent, or perform power (for example, by focusing on the instruments of mobility, manipulations of human bodies, the deployment of expertise, and of course violence). We shall examine the role of technological infrastructures and technical experts in creating and sustaining networks, and also discuss what happened when those networks — or the technologies they involved, or the natural orders they organized — broke down.

    The course focuses mainly on the colonial and postcolonial periods, but includes some precolonial material. It proceeds thematically rather than chronologically. Readings are drawn primarily from the disciplines of history, anthropology, and geography. A typical week will require 250-350 pages of reading and a 2-3 page response paper. Twice per semester, students will do additional reading in order to present a literature review relevant to the theme under discussion; this will be accompanied by a formal book review. Students will also write a final paper (which will consist of a bilbiographic essay, a fellowship proposal, or a dissertation prospectus).

    HISTORY 630 — Introduction to Greek and Roman Studies
    Section 001, REC

    Instructor: Frier,Bruce W

    FA 2007
    Credits: 3

    This course is an introductory survey to historical interpretations, methodology, and comparative studies, and their relevance to Greek and Roman history. In addition to reading assigned texts and participating in discussion, students are expected to make presentations and write short reviews and a substantial paper on their own projects.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

    HISTORY 637 — Research Seminar on Archives and Institutions of Social Memory
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Hedstrom,Margaret L; homepage

    FA 2007
    Credits: 3

    Thematic focus of this research seminar is collective memory and the role of archives as "memory institutions." Students examine the role of archives and archivists in shaping memory through appraisal and selection, creation and collection of oral history, and interpretation and display of documentary evidence. Most of the readings place archives in the context of a broader literature on memory and interpretation of the past, including comparisons between archives and other memory institutions, such as museums.

    Advisory Prerequisite: HISTORY 600; Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

    HISTORY 641 — Studies in 20th Century European History
    Section 001, REC
    Sites of Citizenship, States of Violence, European History in Comparison

    Instructor: Canning,Kathleen M

    FA 2007
    Credits: 3

    This course is aimed at graduate students who are specializing in modern German or European history, German or European literature or cultural studies. Its chronological time frame encompasses the period from the mid-nineteenth to the mid-twentieth century (from Kaiserreich through the Nazi period. Course readings will include studies widely recognized as "classics," as well as more recent studies that are informing present-day discussions in the field. In this class we will work conceptually as well as historiographically. This means that we will read some theoretical texts, including theory from the time period we are studying, for the purpose of defining the conceptual parameters of state, social, citizenship and body, and the violence inflicted in the name of each (or upon each). Because this course considers histories of practices as well as languages, institutions as well as ideologies, our readings will include texts in social, cultural and intellectual history. We will also pay attention to the shifts in historical methodologies, from political and social history of the 1970s and 1980s, to more recent studies in cultural and intellectual history, gender and cultural studies.

    Among the thematics that I would like to explore in this course are: notions of time (continuities and ruptures) and their place in German history; the traditions of the German state as a disciplinary complex and its relationship to the sphere of the "social;" the place of gender, religion, ethnicity and nationalism in the expansion of the public sphere during the 1890s; recent scholarship on German colonialism and its impact on notions of citizenship and national belonging; the particularities of German militarism in WW1 and its legacies of violence for the aftermath of war; the reinvention of state and social body during the Weimar Republic; participatory citizenship from Weimar into the Nazi period; Germany's particular twentieth-century "modernity" and its affiliation with crisis; the social body in the Nazi racial state.

    Course Requirements: One short mid-term essay, weekly or bi-weekly short bibliographies, and one longer paper at the end of the term. Each student will introduce the readings two or three times during the semester, depending on the size of the class. Readings will generally be in English with occasional recommended alternative readings for students who read German.

    HISTORY 652 — Studies in East European History
    Section 001, REC

    Instructor: Porter-Szucs,Brian A

    FA 2007
    Credits: 3

    The basic goal of this class is to familiarize you with the English-language scholarship on modern East-Central Europe, defined (very approximately) as the territory encompassed today by Poland, the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Hungary, and Romania. We will read a wide variety of texts, sampling a range of methodological approaches, topics, and even academic disciplines. The main emphasis will be placed on more recent works that reflect the state of the field at this moment, but we will also include some classic works of scholarship that raise questions still discussed by historians today. There are three basic requirements for this course: read the assigned material (about one book per week), participate actively in our discussions, and submit two 10-15 page review essays.

    HISTORY 672 — Life, World, and Story
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Hancock,David J

    FA 2007
    Credits: 3

    This course introduces and familiarizes graduate students with different ways of writing lives and contextualizing them in societies and worlds narrative. It focuses on the writing of biography as both a historical and a literary form. It examines the lives of people in countries and empires facing the Atlantic Ocean in the period 1600-2000, and explores various techniques historians and authors have used to transform the diverse and often contradictory sources into a coherent, explanatory whole.

    HISTORY 675 — Theorizing Religion
    Section 001, SEM

    Instructor: Johnson,Paul Christopher

    FA 2007
    Credits: 3

    This class has four objectives:

    1. to acquire a modest control of key classical theoretical texts on religion which have provided, and continue to provide, much of the working vocabulary used in interpretations and analyses of religion;
    2. to see religion as a key term that contains within it a genealogy of Western reflection and self-construction in relation to putative others;
    3. to interrogate these classic texts and their contemporary heirs and evaluate their relative utility for interpreting religion in students' own project; and
    4. to transform inherited theories of religion, often implicit or embedded, into conscious and deliberate choices that inform our work.

    The temporary trajectory covered will be from the mid-18th century (Hume) to the 1960s polarization between structuralism (Lévi-Strauss) and critical theories like the Frankfort School (Adorno) along with selected departures to engage current critical responses to these "big" theories of religions.

    HISTORY 687 — Studies in Black History
    Section 001, REC

    Instructor: Scott III,Julius S

    FA 2007
    Credits: 2 — 3

    The life of Blacks in America and their impact upon American society from colonial time to the present. Focus is on such topics as the origins of slavery in America, the effects of slavery on Black personality and culture, Black nationalism, and the current movement for civil rights. Students will have the option of taking this course either as a studies course or as a seminar. Students in the studies course will also spend time identifying and analyzing a variety of key primary sources from a specific period (topics vary be term) of African American history. Students electing the seminar option will spend the academic term preparing original research papers related in some way to African history.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing; seniors with permission of instructor.

    HISTORY 688 — Studies in Twentieth-Century American History
    Section 001, REC
    Urban Crisis / Suburban Nation

    Instructor: Lassiter,Matthew D

    FA 2007
    Credits: 3

    Graduate seminar in twentieth-century U.S. history, emphasizing a metropolitan approach to and a spatial analysis of the post-1940 period. The course begins with the three great migrations of mid-century America: Black southerners to the North and West, white families to the suburbs, and political power and economic resources to the Sunbelt. We will then investigate processes of political transformation and economic restructuring, civil rights battles over school and housing integration, and policy debates over the inner-city "underclass," urban redevelopment, "theme-parking" cities, and suburban sprawl. From a variety of methodological and theoretical approaches, the readings probe the intersection of race, class, neighborhood, consumer culture, grassroots movements, public policies, and the "creative destruction" of capitalism in modern America. The title of the course is not intended to imply fixed categories in a metropolitan dichotomy, but instead the intertwined discourses of "urban crisis" and "suburban nation" that we will approach skeptically and investigate thoroughly.

    • Did the same policies that built the sprawling suburbs also produce the urban crisis?
    • How does a metropolitan approach to postwar America recast historiographical debates about racial identity and class consciousness, public policy and political realignment, the rise and fall of the New Deal Order?

    Case studies of key cities and regions are interspersed with synthetic works and policy analyses that address topics such as the forging of urban and suburban political cultures; the postwar reconstruction of the "American Dream"; the power shift from Rust Belt to Sunbelt; the intersection of market forces, state policy, and grassroots movements in metropolitan space; and the emerging interdisciplinary "postsuburban" synthesis.

    HISTORY 688 also operates in alliance with the Metropolitan History Workshop. Several authors from the syllabus will come to campus in the fall for workshops with members of the seminar.

    Writing requirements include short weekly responses on CTools and a final paper assessing an issue of historiography or public policy. Interested graduate students are invited to contact the instructor for additional information about the course, and the final list of books to be assigned will be ready by July. HISTORY 688 is open to doctoral students in all fields; master's degree candidates should consult the instructor before enrollment.

    The list below includes books likely to be assigned but is subject to change.

    • Kenneth Jackson, Crabgrass Frontier: The Suburbanization of America
    • Bruce Schulman, From Cotton Belt to Sunbelt: Federal Policy, Economic Development, and the Transformation of the South
    • Jefferson Cowie, Capital Moves: RCA's Seventy-Year Quest for Cheap Labor
    • Thomas Sugrue, The Origins of the Urban Crisis: Race and Inequality in Postwar Detroit
    • Robert Self, American Babylon: Race and the Struggle for Postwar Oakland
    • Lizabeth Cohen, A Consumer's Republic: The Politics of Mass Consumption in Postwar America
    • Bryant Simon, Boardwalk of Dreams: Atlantic City and the Fate of Urban America
    • Alison Isenberg, Downtown: A History of the Place and the People Who Made It
    • Lisa McGirr, Suburban Warriors: The Origins of the New American Right
    • Andrew Wiese, Places of Their Own: African American Suburbanization in the Twentieth Century
    • Komozi Woodard and Jeanne Theoharis, Freedom North: Black Freedom Struggles outside the South, 1940-1980
    • J. Anthony Lukas, Common Ground: A Turbulent Decade in the Life of Three American Families
    • Mike Davis, City of Quartz: Excavating the Future in Los Angeles
    • Howard Gillette, Jr., Camden after the Fall: Decline and Renewal in a Post-Industrial City
    • Rhonda Williams, The Politics of Public Housing: Black Women's Struggles against Urban Inequality
    • Edward W. Soja, Postmetropolis: Critical Studies of Cities and Regions

    Advisory Prerequisite: Junior or senior or permission of instructor

    HISTORY 691 — Studies in Latin American and Caribbean History
    Section 001, REC
    Atlantic Perspectives

    Instructor: Scott,Rebecca J

    FA 2007
    Credits: 3

    This graduate readings course is an overview of historical writing on Latin America and the Caribbean, with a particular focus on what is often termed the ‘Atlantic World,' and an emphasis on exchange and interaction. Designed to assist history doctoral students who are preparing for general examinations in the Latin American field, the course will be tailored to the interests of the participating students, who will take responsibility for adding to the reading list and for introducing one week's readings to the class. We will begin by examining the late colonial period, including the Haitian revolution and its relationship to events in Cuba and on the Spainish mainland. We will look at writings on race, ethnicity, and nationality in nineteenth century Latin America, ans well as works that take other approaches to the formative period of the independent nations of the region, as well as to those areas that remained under colonial rule into the twentieth century.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Reading knowledge of Spanish or Portuguese highly desirable.

    HISTORY 698 — Topics in History
    Section 002, REC
    Processing the Past: Archives and Institutions on Social Memory

    Instructor: Rosenberg,William G

    FA 2007
    Credits: 3

    This course is intended to review major writings on issues related to Islam in the Indian sub-continent in such areas as statecraft, social organization, legal and ethical thought, scholarship, the institutions and practices of "Sufism," as well as schools of thought and movements of reform and revival. Class meetings will consist of discussion of shared readings and participant presentations on specific topics of interest to them. Two papers of 12-15 pages each will be required.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

    HISTORY 698 — Topics in History
    Section 003, REC
    Politics, Language, Religion and Race, from Sanskrit Philology to the Neo-Nazis

    Instructor: Rubin,Gayle S
    Instructor: Trautmann,Thomas R

    FA 2007
    Credits: 3

    The concept of the "Aryan" has been highly mobile; it is connected both with linguistic discoveries of enduring scientific value and various forms of racial politics. This seminar explores the extraordinary career of the Aryan idea from its modern inception in Sanskrit scholarship in British India in the late eighteenth century to some of today's controversial cultural and political manifestations. With the discovery of the structural affinity of languages knows as Indo-European (or Aryan), the modern history of the Aryan idea begins as a node in a tree of languages and nations inherited from the Bible. In the nineteenth century it is involved in the classifications of religions and races. What had in ancient times been a term used by Indo-Persians to refer to themselves became in the West the idea of an ancestral unity between Europeans on the one hand and the ancient rulers of India and Persia on the other, a unity that came to exclude the Semites and other Orientals. In the seminar we will explore how linguistic, racial and religious taxonomies were transmuted into popular discourse and political programs, most disastrously in the National Socialist state, and how the Aryan concept came to be identified with racial "whiteness" as a central symbol around which contemporary neo-Nazi and white supremacist groups still mobilize.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

    HISTORY 698 — Topics in History
    Section 004, REC
    The Greek East under Roman Rule

    Instructor: Van Dam,Raymond H

    FA 2007
    Credits: 3

    This course will introduce graduate students to the rapidly growing field of world/global history — a field that operates on a larger scale than most, and in which scholars make arguments and connections that stretch far across space and / or time. We will read some of the most interesting and important new work being done in this area, along with classic studies that defined the approach and continue to exert a strong influence. Taken as a whole, the colloquium will sketch the major approaches that world historians have taken, identifying the methods and theories they have employed, and suggest some of the main disputes that have arisen. It is meant to give students familiarity with world history as both a research and a teaching filed, and we will conclude by considering how best to present these approaches in the classroom.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

    HISTORY 698 — Topics in History
    Section 005, REC
    Pre-Modern China

    Instructor: de Pee,Christian

    FA 2007
    Credits: 3
    Other: Theme

    Survey of current scholarship on Middle-Period China (eighth through fourteenth centuries), with prominent articles and monographs on topics such as economy, politics, local elites, gender and the family, religion, philosophy, and art.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

    HISTORY 698 — Topics in History
    Section 006, REC
    Comparative History of North American Borderlands

    Instructor: Witgen,Michael

    FA 2007
    Credits: 3

    This course is designed to challenge Borderlands epistemology and literature in order to more fully explore the development of national identities and national space in North America. Borderlands historiography evokes the American southwest. This scholarship has traditionally traced Native-European encounters and interactions from the era of first contact through the early national periods of U.S. and Mexican history. Recently, however, historians have adapted the idea of the borderlands to explore the history of settler colonialism in North America more broadly. This course is designed to engage Borderlands literature and epistemology as a means of rethinking the colonial and post colonial past in North America. We will challenge the geographic limitation of the Borderlands as a regional category of analysis, and as a reification of the frontier concept. We will also explore the emergence of intersecting indigenous and European national identities tied to the social construction of space and race.

    In this course I will ask you to re-think American history by situating North America as a Native space, a place that was occupied and controlled by indigenous peoples. You will be asked to imagine a North America that was indigenous and adaptive, and not necessarily destined to be absorbed by European settler colonies. Accordingly, this course we will explore the intersections of European colonial settlement and Euro-American national expansion, along side of the emergence of indigenous social formations that dominated the western interior until the middle of the 19th century. This course is intended to be a readings seminar, but close attention will be given to use and analysis of primary source evidence. Similarly, we will explore the necessity of using multiple genres of textual evidence — archival documents, oral history, material artifacts, etc., — when studying indigenous history.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

    HISTORY 698 — Topics in History
    Section 007, REC
    Hist of American Urban Education

    Instructor: Mirel,Jeffrey E; homepage

    FA 2007
    Credits: 3

    A History reading seminar. Topics vary.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

    HISTORY 698 — Topics in History
    Section 008, REC

    Instructor: Lieberman,Victor B

    FA 2007
    Credits: 3

    A History reading seminar. Topics vary.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

    HISTORY 700 — Independent Research Seminar
    Section 001, IND

    FA 2007
    Credits: 1 — 3

    This course allows faculty to offer required seminar work to graduate students on an individual basis during terms when their regular seminars are not scheduled to be offered.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

    HISTORY 737 — Special Problems in Archives Administration
    Section 001, LEC

    FA 2007
    Credits: 3

    Thematic focus of this research seminar is collective memory and the role of archives as "memory institutions." In the seminar, students examine the role of archives and archivists in shaping memory through appraisal and selection, creation and collection of oral history, and interpretation and display of documentary evidence. Most of the readings place archives in the context of a broader literature on memory and interpretation of the past, including comparisons between archives and other memory institutions, such as museums.

    Advisory Prerequisite: DOCT.STD.

    HISTORY 796 — Topics in History
    Section 001, SEM
    The Greek East under Roman Rule

    Instructor: Van Dam,Raymond H

    FA 2007
    Credits: 3

    This course will introduce graduate students to the rapidly growing field of world/global history — a field that operates on a larger scale than most, and in which scholars make arguments and connections that stretch far across space and / or time. We will read some of the most interesting and important new work being done in this area, along with classic studies that defined the approach and continue to exert a strong influence. Taken as a whole, the colloquium will sketch the major approaches that world historians have taken, identifying the methods and theories they have employed, and suggest some of the main disputes that have arisen. It is meant to give students familiarity with world history as both a research and a teaching filed, and we will conclude by considering how best to present these approaches in the classroom.

    HISTORY 796 — Topics in History
    Section 002, SEM
    Life, World, Story

    Instructor: Hancock,David J

    FA 2007
    Credits: 3

    This course introduces and familiarizes graduate students with different ways of writing lives and contextualizing them in societies and worlds narrative. It focuses on the writing of biography as both a historical and a literary form. It examines the lives of people in countries and empires facing the Atlantic Ocean in the period 1600-2000, and explores various techniques historians and authors have used to transform the diverse and often contradictory sources into a coherent, explanatory whole.

    HISTORY 796 — Topics in History
    Section 003, SEM

    Instructor: Mirel,Jeffrey E; homepage

    FA 2007
    Credits: 3

    A research seminar on a topic chosen by the instructor.

    HISTORY 801 — Reading Course
    Section 001, IND

    FA 2007
    Credits: 1 — 3

    This course is designed for preparation of a special topic or area no adequately covered by regular courses. A faculty member willing to offer this course for an individual graduate student set formal requirements and evaluates performance just as in a regular class. This course is graded.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

    HISTORY 803 — Reading for the General Examination
    Section 001, IND

    FA 2007
    Credits: 1 — 3

    This course is designed for preparation of a special topic or area no adequately covered by regular courses. A faculty member willing to offer this course for an individual graduate student set formal requirements and evaluates performance just as in a regular class. This course has a grading basis of 'Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory'

    Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

    HISTORY 812 — Seminar on History Pedagogy
    Section 001, SEM

    FA 2007
    Credits: 3

    This course is open to graduate students with at least two terms of teaching experience. It is aimed primarily at Ph.D. candidates who are preparing to enter the job market and would like to assemble a teaching portfolio. The approach of this course is that teaching is deserving of serious intellectual reflection and debate. This time the emphasis of the course will be less generic and will emphasize visualizing history in the classroom. This means more than the usages of media technologies like Power Point, but aims for a more serious consideration of the differences and dissonances in the relationship between and among visual, textual, and narrative/oral materials in the classroom. We thus hope to benefit from and contribute to the activities of the Institute for Historical Studies, which will sponsor a full program of colloquia and speakers during the coming year on the theme of "History and the Visual." For further information, please contact kcanning@umich.edu.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Second-year Graduate standing or higher.

    HISTORY 830 — Anthropology and History Workshop/Reading Group
    Section 001, SEM

    FA 2007
    Credits: 1

    This one-credit course is to support a workshop/reading group of students in the Anthro/History program. It will be a seminar in format with the purpose of discussing works-in-progress and especially significant pieces of scholarship in the field. Presentations will be circulated and read in advance. The two hour session is dedicated fully to discussion of the work among all those present.

    HISTORY 898 — Dissertation Colloquium Candidacy
    Section 001, SEM
    Job Skills Colloquium

    Instructor: Metcalf,Barbara Daly

    FA 2007
    Credits: 1

    Participation in the Dissertation Colloquium for doctoral students nearing the job market stage is required, although official enrollment for one credit is optional.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Ph.D. candidacy status. Graduate standing.

    HISTORY 900 — Preparation for Preliminary Examinations
    Section 001, IND

    FA 2007
    Credits: 1 — 6

    This is an ungraded course of one to six credits which students nearing their preliminary examination elect. It may be taken in the term before or during which the student plans to take the examination.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Normally to be taken only in the term in which a student plans to take his general preliminary examinations. Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

    HISTORY 990 — Dissertation/Precandidate
    Section 001, IND

    FA 2007
    Credits: 1 — 8

    Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing.

    HISTORY 993 — Graduate Student Instructor Training Program
    Section 001, SEM

    FA 2007
    Credits: 1

    A seminar for all beginning graduate student instructors, consisting of a two day orientation before the term starts and periodic workshops/meetings during the Fall Term. Beginning graduate student instructors are required to register for this class.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Must have Teaching Assistant award. Graduate standing.

    HISTORY 995 — Dissertation/Candidate
    Section 001, IND

    FA 2007
    Credits: 8

    Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

    Enforced Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate

     
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