< back Send To Printer  
LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Fall 2007, Dept = HJCS
 
Page 1 of 1, Results 1 — 22 of 22
Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
HJCS 100 — Peoples of the Middle East
Section 001, LEC
Issues in Race & Ethnicity

Instructor: Babayan,Kathryn; homepage
Instructor: Brisch,Nicole M

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

This course will survey Middle Eastern political, social, and cultural history from Sumer (3000 BC) to Khomeini's Iran (1979-89). The lectures, the readings, the visuals (web, movies, slides) are all geared towards providing the student with a sense of the nature of authority, political and cultural styles, the fabric of society, attitudes and behaviors, heroes and villains, that are and were part of the heritage of those peoples who lived in the lands between the Nile and Oxus rivers, generally referred to as the Middle East. Throughout the academic term you will have four quizzes, a midterm, and an accumulative final exam. A one-page synopsis of your readings will be due weekly for your discussion section.

HJCS 101 — Elementary Modern Hebrew, I
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Weizman,Paula; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 5

Sections 001 and 002 of Modern Elementary Hebrew I are for students with no background and experience in Hebrew. (Students with previous knowledge of Hebrew SHOULD REGISTER for Sections 003 and 004.) This course will offer instruction on all four language skills, starting with reading and writing the alphabet.


HJCS 101 — Elementary Modern Hebrew, I
Section 002, REC

Instructor: Weizman,Paula; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 5

Sections 001 and 002 of Modern Elementary Hebrew I are for students with no background and experience in Hebrew. (Students with previous knowledge of Hebrew SHOULD REGISTER for Sections 003 and 004.) This course will offer instruction on all four language skills, starting with reading and writing the alphabet.


HJCS 101 — Elementary Modern Hebrew, I
Section 003, REC

Instructor: Eliav,Milka

FA 2007
Credits: 5

Students will develop basic communication skills in Hebrew. There are class discussions and readings in Hebrew as well as class and language laboratory drills.

HJCS 101 — Elementary Modern Hebrew, I
Section 004, REC

Instructor: Eliav,Milka

FA 2007
Credits: 5

Students will develop basic communication skills in Hebrew. There are class discussions and readings in Hebrew as well as class and language laboratory drills.

HJCS 200 — Introduction to World Religions: Near Eastern
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Williams,Ralph G; homepage
Instructor: Knysh,Alexander D

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

This course serves two main functions: the first of these is to provide an introductory sense of what is involved in the academic study of religion; the second, which will occupy almost the whole term, is to introduce the major religious traditions of the Near East, with emphasis on the development and major structures of Israelite Religion, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. The course will keep two foci in view: one will have to do with the historical development of these religious traditions, their sacred texts and major personalities; the second will involve a comparative view of these traditions by analyzing their sense of the sacred in space, time, and text, their views on holy people. This is an introductory course: it is not necessary for students to have any previous experience in the study of religion. The course consists of three weekly lectures and a discussion group. Writing for the course typically involves an essay, a midterm, and a final exam.

HJCS 201 — Intermediate Modern Hebrew, I
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Lamm,Doron; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 5

The focus of instruction is on the development of advanced language skills with an emphasis on oral and written communication and in standard modern Hebrew. In addition to reading texts, relevant cultural materials are provided through the use of video and technology based materials. This course is taught in small sections and class discussion. The final grade is based on class activities, students presentations, written assignments, and unit tests: midterm and final. Class discussions and activities are exclusively in Hebrew.

Advisory Prerequisite: HJCS 102.

HJCS 201 — Intermediate Modern Hebrew, I
Section 002, REC

Instructor: Lamm,Doron; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 5

The focus of instruction is on the development of advanced language skills with an emphasis on oral and written communication and in standard modern Hebrew. In addition to reading texts, relevant cultural materials are provided through the use of video and technology based materials. This course is taught in small sections and class discussion. The final grade is based on class activities, students presentations, written assignments, and unit tests: midterm and final. Class discussions and activities are exclusively in Hebrew.

Advisory Prerequisite: HJCS 102.

HJCS 201 — Intermediate Modern Hebrew, I
Section 003, REC

Instructor: Rosenberg,Ilan

FA 2007
Credits: 5

The focus of instruction is on the development of advanced language skills with an emphasis on oral and written communication and in standard modern Hebrew. In addition to reading texts, relevant cultural materials are provided through the use of video and technology based materials. This course is taught in small sections and class discussion. The final grade is based on class activities, students presentations, written assignments, and unit tests: midterm and final. Class discussions and activities are exclusively in Hebrew.

Advisory Prerequisite: HJCS 102.

HJCS 201 — Intermediate Modern Hebrew, I
Section 004, REC

Instructor: Rosenberg,Ilan

FA 2007
Credits: 5

The focus of instruction is on the development of advanced language skills with an emphasis on oral and written communication and in standard modern Hebrew. In addition to reading texts, relevant cultural materials are provided through the use of video and technology based materials. This course is taught in small sections and class discussion. The final grade is based on class activities, students presentations, written assignments, and unit tests: midterm and final. Class discussions and activities are exclusively in Hebrew.

Advisory Prerequisite: HJCS 102.

HJCS 301 — Advanced Hebrew, I
Section 001, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This is the third-year course within the Hebrew language sequence at the University of Michigan. The course aims to acquaint students with a variety of Hebrew texts and use them as a basis for conversation, discussion and writing in Hebrew. In this course the students will develop a sophisticated vocabulary for understanding central contemporary cultural issues. It is a content-based course, which focuses on Israeli and Jewish culture. There will be emphasis on reading comprehension and conversation, as well as reviews of grammar and syntactical structures that are commonly found in reading. Students will learn to identify different registers of Hebrew (literary, media, slant, etc.), as well as different periods of the language. In this course students will read articles, poems and short stories, listen to the radio, watch video clips and films, write short essays and discuss their individual projects in class. The language of instruction and discussion is Hebrew.

Advisory Prerequisite: HJCS 202.

HJCS 301 — Advanced Hebrew, I
Section 002, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 3

The course materials consist of texts from Modern Hebrew prose: fiction and non-fiction. Writing and speaking skills are enhanced through a series of related assignments. Review of basic language structures and enrichment of vocabulary are among the objectives of this course.

Advisory Prerequisite: HJCS 202.

HJCS 381 — Introduction to Israeli Literature and Culture
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

Since 1948, Israeli literature has dealt with issues confronting a new nation-state created with a utopian vision, but also burdened with a legacy of war and rapid social change. This course explores the main writers and trends of Israeli literature and culture from the War Generation of the late 40's to the new postmodern voices of the 21st century, analyzing how they respond both to the dreams and the reality of modern Israel. A wide variety of novels, poetry and short stories from the best and most important Israeli writers are presented. Additionally, students view and discuss films and adaptations of literary works. All the texts are in English translation.

HJCS 395 — Directed Undergraduate Readings
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 3
Other: INDEPENDENT

Designed for individual students who have an interest in a specific topic (usually that has stemmed from a previous course). An individual instructor must agree to direct such a reading, and the requirements are specified when approval is granted.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

HJCS 425 — Near Eastern Studies Capstone Seminar
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Babayan,Kathryn; homepage
Instructor: Ginsburg,Elliot K; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

The proposed capstone seminar will be thematically driven, focusing each year on a theme and topical clusters, organized around key issues in the Middle East, such as rituals, problems in Middle Eastern history and literature, gender issues, wars and violence, etc. The pilot seminar will focus on "rituals" and combine study of the methodological approaches to the study of ritual — drawn from anthropology, sociology, psychology, history of religions, etc. — with application of case studies drawn from our representative fields. Specifically, the rituals seminar aims to:

  • afford exposure to representative cultures in discrete sites and settings, i.e., to provide micro- studies of specific traditions and cultural moments;
  • provide a framework for fruitful juxtaposition or comparison of these cultures;
  • afford students greater methodological sophistication by focusing on ritual as a critical category for interpreting and theorizing about culture and cultures; and
  • develop students' critical writing skills.

Throughout the seminar, we will see the ways in which ritual serves as a launching pad to discuss core issues of identity/belonging, the boundaries of community and nation, issues of authority, sacred and profane, stasis and crisis, orality and literacy, memory and forgetting, the encounter with the other (imagined or real, human or divine), as well as key issues of gender, embodiment, and textuality. In short, we will use ritual to explore fundamental dimensions (and specific cultural inflections) of being human.

Intended audience: Senior concentrators in Near Eastern Studies

Course Requirements: Regular attendance and participation; three short essays (4-5 pages each); one final research paper (12-15 pages); one oral presentation.

Class Format: Three hours per week seminar format

Enforced Prerequisites: Senior standing

Advisory Prerequisite: JR P.I.

HJCS 478 — Jewish Mysticism
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Ginsburg,Elliot K; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: WorldLit

A critical study of the historical development of Jewish mysticism, its symbolic universe and its social ramifications. The focus is on the variegated medieval stream known as Kabbalah. The issues explored are: the nature of mystical experience; images of God and the Person; symbols of the male and female; the problems of evil; mysticism and language; kabbalistic myth and ritual innovation; and kabbalistic interpretations of history.

HJCS 498 — Senior Honors Thesis
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 6
Other: Honors, Indpnt Study

The Senior Honors thesis is for students who have been approved by the Near Eastern Studies concentration advisor, Honors advisor, and the LS&A Honors Council. The length of the thesis may vary, but 50-60 pages is common. Two advisors should be chosen. The principal advisor is a member of the faculty in whose field of expertise the thesis topic lies, and he or she oversees the student's research and the direction taken by the thesis.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

HJCS 577 — Seminar: Topics in the Study of Judaism
Section 001, SEM
Hasidic Texts (Cycle of the Year)

Instructor: Ginsburg,Elliot K; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Hasidism, that popular revival movement that rocked East European Jewry in the 18th and 19th centuries, has been called "Mysticism become ethos", i.e., mysticism turned into a way of life. One of the hallmarks of this movement is its celebration and rich symbolic rereading of sacred time. In this course we will learn to read (decode, historically contextualize, and interpret) key Hasidic texts in the Hebrew original. Our focus will be on the cycle of the year, and on the mystical interpretation of the Sabbath. Among the key texts to be explored are:

  • teachings associated with the Baal Shem Tov, the charismatic figure around which Hasidism coalesced;
  • the contemplative master, Dov Baer of Mezritch;
  • the storyteller-and radical mythopoet, Nahman of Bratslav;
  • and such creative figures as the Gerer and Slonimer masters.

Primary texts will be supplemented with secondary literature(in English) drawn from history and religious studies. We will also explore cultural details such as performed music (niggun) and storytelling.

Pre-requisites: intermediate or advanced Hebrew. Background in either Religious Studies, Literary Studies, or Jewish mysticism is helpful.

Written work includes 2-3 short essays and a translation project.

HJCS 798 — Directed Graduate Readings
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 3

Designed for individual students who have an interest in a specific topic (usually that has stemmed from a previous course). An individual instructor must agree to direct such a reading, and the requirements are specified when approval is granted.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

HJCS 990 — Dissertation Research Precandidate
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 8

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Advisory Prerequisite: Election for dissertation work by doctoral candidate not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing.

HJCS 993 — Graduate Student Instructor Training Program
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Rammuny,Raji M

FA 2007
Credits: 1

A seminar for all beginning Graduate Student Instructors (GSIs), consisting of a one-day orientation before the term starts and seven consecutive two-hour workshops/meetings discussion during the Fall Term. Topics include classroom management, strategies for effective classroom discussion, rules for group discussion, grading of students' written work, handling controversial issues, teaching encounters, etc. Evaluation is based on students' attendance, participation and weekly presentations of brief reports. Beginning GSIs are required to register for this course.

Advisory Prerequisite: Must have a Teaching Assistantship. Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

HJCS 995 — Dissertation Research
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 8

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Enforced Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate

 
Page 1 of 1, Results 1 — 22 of 22