< back Send To Printer  
LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Fall 2007, Dept = JUDAIC
 
Page 1 of 1, Results 1 — 20 of 20
Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
JUDAIC 101 — Elementary Yiddish I
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Szabo, Vera ; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Welcome to Beginning Yiddish!

This course offers you the opportunity to learn the basics of Yiddish grammar and to acquire basic reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. You will learn to talk about yourself and your interests, surroundings, friends, and family. You will also learn about the history, sociology and culture of Yiddish and how Jewish life of the past centuries is reflected in the language. You will become acquainted with simple Yiddish texts from various times and places — a poem from a Yiddish children's textbook published in New York in the 1930s, Yiddish folksongs that have been sung in Eastern Europe for many, many years, stories from a school book used in our days in some haredi schools in Israel, and more. Games and audio-visual materials will enhance the learning process!

Grading: Classroom Work: 30%, Quizzes & Homework: 30%, and Exams: 40% As you can see from the grading system, active classroom participation is very important, as are daily homework assignments — always due on the next class. I am always happy to meet with you to discuss any questions or concerns you may have about the class, or to give you additional help that you might need with the Yiddish alphabet, reading skills or anything else you feel you would benefit from.

JUDAIC 101 — Elementary Yiddish I
Section 002, REC

Instructor: Szabo, Vera ; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This section of Judaic 101 (Elementary Yiddish) will be a videoconferencing class connecting with other universities.

JUDAIC 201 — Intermediate Yiddish I
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Szabo, Vera ; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Welcome to your third semester of Yiddish!

If you are taking this course you have completed JUDAIC 102 or have taken two semester of Yiddish elsewhere.

This year we will continue the course of study we began last year. Emphasis will shift slightly towards reading and speaking. We will read and discuss more complicated texts, continue class correspondence and you will immerse yourself in another project.

Grading: Classroom Work: 30%, Quizzes & Homework: 30%, Exams: 30%, and Project: 10%. As you can see from the grading system, active classroom participation is very important, as are daily homework assignments — always due on the next class. I am always happy to meet with you to discuss any questions or concerns you may have about the class, or to give you additional help that you might need.

Advisory Prerequisite: JUDAIC/YIDDISH 102.

JUDAIC 301 — Advanced Yiddish I
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Szabo, Vera ; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This is the third year of the language sequence, focusing on reading and speaking Yiddish. Literary, historical and other texts will be considered, along with film, folklore, and music. Students will also learn how to approach handwritten documents.

Advisory Prerequisite: JUDAIC/YIDDISH 202.

JUDAIC 317 — Topics in Judaic Studies
Section 001, REC
Passing: Race, Religion and Getting By

Instructor: Moore,Macdonald S

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Passing is the pretense of being a different sort of person for advantage or protection. Passing reeks of inauthenticity; it arouses pity, amusement, and loathing. But authenticity, notes Henry Louis Gates, Jr., is "among the founding lies of the modern age." As a violation of American racial codes, passing is seen as a color problem to be policed through constant surveillance. The contours of gender, sexuality, class, and ethnicity (including "The Jewish Problem" of assimilation) are also scrutinized. Not that passing is new. Moses passed. Many Jews caught up in the Spanish Inquisition acted Christian in public. Both terrors of the Shoah and opportunities of life in America have been associated with Jewish passing, not always by Jews.

The course approaches these issues through historical and theoretical studies, memoirs, short stories, plays and films.

JUDAIC 317 — Topics in Judaic Studies
Section 002, LEC

Instructor: Neis,Rachel

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course is a historical and comparative introduction to the study of law, thus exposing students to a variety of ancient and medieval legal cultures across the globe. Besides grappling with the basic question of what law actually is, we investigate how law was made and justified, how laws were involved in governing and regulating human relations and transactions, and shifting notions of justice. We examine a range of famous and lesser-known legal sources and materials (codes, narratives, documents, trial records, cases, rituals, performances and ceremonies) as well as literature drawn from history, anthropology, and political theory.

JUDAIC 317 — Topics in Judaic Studies
Section 003, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 4

Course in interdisciplinary field for undergraduate students, to be designated by the section title and taught by a member of the Judaic Studies regular or visiting faculty. May include fields such as philosophy, film and video, literature, history, political science, etc., as they pertain to Judaic Studies.

JUDAIC 381 — Introduction to Israeli Literature and Culture
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

Since 1948, Israeli literature has dealt with issues confronting a new nation-state created with a utopian vision, but also burdened with a legacy of war and rapid social change. This course explores the main writers and trends of Israeli literature and culture from the War Generation of the late 40's to the new postmodern voices of the 21st century, analyzing how they respond both to the dreams and the reality of modern Israel. A wide variety of novels, poetry and short stories from the best and most important Israeli writers are presented. Additionally, students view and discuss films and adaptations of literary works. All the texts are in English translation.

JUDAIC 386 — The Holocaust
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: RE

This course examines the destruction of European Jewry (1933-1945), its causes and effects. Major themes include the resurgence of political and racial anti-Semitism in the nineteenth century, European Jewry in the period before World War II, the rise of the Nazis to power and the response of European society and European Jewry, the "final solution," and the literature of the Holocaust.

JUDAIC 406 — The Church and the Jews
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Siegmund,Stefanie B

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Examines the complex relationship between the western Church and the Jews, from the time of the Church Fathers to the Reformation. It analyzes doctrines and policies regarding the Jews as expressed in different realms. Major topics include: consequences of the entrenchment of the Church in Europe; the Crusades; the 13th century papacy and the Jews; the preaching of the mendicant friars; money-lending and the Church; popular libels; Reformation and Counter-Reformation; Vatican II.

JUDAIC 417 — Topics in Judaic Studies
Section 001, SEM
Radical Jewish Secularism: Messiahs and Utopia

Instructor: Moore,Macdonald S

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Jewish engagements with modernity are notable for responses at once critical and utopian. The roots of this disputatious tradition extend back through the Enlightenment and the Emancipation of Jews, back apparently into the debris of failed Messianic movements. We focus first on German-speaking Jewish intellectuals, religious and secular, who were active in the first half of the 20th century: Freud, Kafka, Scholem, Benjamin, Arendt, Adorno, and Marcuse. Our concluding unit examines writings by a broad spectrum of secular American Jews, several of whom constituted a community of scholars at Brandeis University in the 1960s. Herbert Marcuse, Lewis Coser, Rose Coser, Abraham Maslow, Frank Manuel, Paul Goodman, Peter Drucker, and Richard Sennett debated the cultivation of constructive disorder in art, in boardroom and classroom, at home, and on the street.

JUDAIC 417 — Topics in Judaic Studies
Section 002, SEM

Instructor: Neis,Rachel

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course is designed for advanced undergraduates in the interdisciplinary field of Judaic Studies and taught by a member of Judaic Studies regular or visiting faculty. It will be an in-depth examination of selected topics in areas such as literature, history, philosophy, film, political science and law as they relate to Judaic Studies. Using primary source materials, the course will develop critical tools of comparative analysis, situating Judaic Studies methodologies in dialogue with diverse disciplines. As such, it will be multidisciplinary in structure. Although taught in English, it will require students to interpret various texts and to situate them in relation to historical traditional contexts.

Intended audience: Advanced Undergraduates Class Format: 3 hours per week seminar format

Course Requirements: Students will be required to write interpretive exercises (500-1000 words in length), as well as a longer term paper (4,000-5,000 words in length) appropriate to the topic under study. In addition, students will be expected to prepare class material for oral presentations. A take-home midterm is an optional requirement depending on the instructor in any given term.

JUDAIC 467 — Seminar: Topics in the Study of Judaism
Section 001, SEM
Hasidic Texts (Cycle of the Year)

Instructor: Ginsburg,Elliot K; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Hasidism, that popular revival movement that rocked East European Jewry in the 18th and 19th centuries, has been called "Mysticism become ethos", i.e., mysticism turned into a way of life. One of the hallmarks of this movement is its celebration and rich symbolic rereading of sacred time. In this course we will learn to read (decode, historically contextualize, and interpret) key Hasidic texts in the Hebrew original. Our focus will be on the cycle of the year, and on the mystical interpretation of the Sabbath. Among the key texts to be explored are:

  • teachings associated with the Baal Shem Tov, the charismatic figure around which Hasidism coalesced;
  • the contemplative master, Dov Baer of Mezritch;
  • the storyteller-and radical mythopoet, Nahman of Bratslav;
  • and such creative figures as the Gerer and Slonimer masters.

Primary texts will be supplemented with secondary literature(in English) drawn from history and religious studies. We will also explore cultural details such as performed music (niggun) and storytelling.

Pre-requisites: intermediate or advanced Hebrew. Background in either Religious Studies, Literary Studies, or Jewish mysticism is helpful.

Written work includes 2-3 short essays and a translation project.

JUDAIC 468 — Jewish Mysticism
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Ginsburg,Elliot K; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: WorldLit

A critical study of the historical development of Jewish mysticism, its symbolic universe and its social ramifications. The focus is on the variegated medieval stream known as Kabbalah. The issues explored are: the nature of mystical experience; images of God and the Person; symbols of the male and female; the problems of evil; mysticism and language; kabbalistic myth and ritual innovation; and kabbalistic interpretations of history.

JUDAIC 480 — Jewish Identity, Politics and Culture in the Age of Secularism
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Gitelman,Zvi Y; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Illuminates issues of ethnicity and religion by exploring the ways in which Jews have defined themselves, and consequently, their relations to other groups. We see how Jews have combined flexible self-definitions with the maintenance of characteristics that came to be regarded as defining.

Advisory Prerequisite: JUDAIC 205, POLSCI 350, or any course in modern Jewish history.

JUDAIC 495 — Independent Studies
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 3
Other: INDEPENDENT

An independent studies course under the supervision of one of the Judaic Studies faculty members.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

JUDAIC 497 — Senior Thesis
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: INDEPENDENT

Senior thesis research, under the supervision of one of the Judaic Studies faculty members.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

JUDAIC 500 — Independent Study in Judaic Studies
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 3
Other: INDEPENDENT

An independent studies course under the supervision of one of the Judaic Studies faculty members.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor/department.

JUDAIC 517 — Topics in Judaic Studies
Section 002, REC
The Yiddish Writings of Sholem Aleichem

FA 2007
Credits: 3

What's in a pen name? This course will focus on the history of pen names in modern Jewish writing. More specifically, we will discuss the emergence of the appellation "Sholem Aleichem": the wild satirist of "Letter Stolen from the Post Office" (1884) and "Office Affairs" (1885) vis a vis the ideologue of the gentrification of Yiddish literature. You will see him not just as an author but as a literary critic, an editor and a sentimental novelist. In-depth discussions will also include the artistic and cultural significance of "Menakhem Mendl" and "Teyve the Dairyman"; the strangest and most radical of his creations, "Motl the Cantor's Son"; late developments in his art of the monologue, "Railway Stories"; and the advantages and limitations of self-interpretation in his unfinished autobiographical novel "Back from the Fair".

JUDAIC 601 — Introduction to Methods and Topics in Judaic Studies
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Norich,Anita

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course introduces students to the various questions, texts, methodologies, and perspectives that constitute the broad field of Jewish studies. We will range from antiquity to the modern period, reading Biblical and rabbinic texts, as well as histories, memoirs, folklore, novels, and poems. Our primary — but not exclusive — focus will be on the interactions between Jews and others: on the ways in which Jews have understood themselves in relation to the societies in which they lived, the peoples with whom they interacted, the languages they acquired, etc.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

 
Page 1 of 1, Results 1 — 20 of 20