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LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Fall 2007, Dept = LHSP
 
Page 1 of 1, Results 1 — 12 of 12
Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
LHSP 125 — College Writing
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Metsker,Jennifer A

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

Credit Exclusions: A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Every day we encounter a whirlwind of advertisements, products, media, and fads based on ideals presumed readymade for the populace, ideals that are often supported by assumptions about what you, the consumer, need or desire. By combining a close examination of popular culture with the challenging task of creating successful college essays, this class sets out to achieve two goals at once. In addition to offering you the tools to write well in a variety of academic contexts, this class will encourage you to form a healthy habit of questioning your relationship with popular culture. And as good writing often begins with a good question, this attitude of inquiry will be the basis of our approach to writing. While we form inquiries about such topics as television addiction, rap music, and comic books, we will also critically examine our writing habits and our ideas of how to create viable theses and effective arguments.

Over the course of the term, you will write four main essays, all of which will be workshopped and revised before being turned in for a final grade. We will discuss grammar as a set of standards that reflect a static image of a living language, and you will work in groups to create your own grammar lessons.

To help with your engagement with discussions and skills acquisition, you will keep a writing journal, which will contain reading questions, free-writes, vocabulary notes, and in-class exercises. We will also analyze visual media, including photography, advertisements, television, and film, and you will be assigned an art project that will help you explore argumentation in a creative medium.

LHSP 125 — College Writing
Section 002, REC

Instructor: Cicciarelli,Louis A

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

Credit Exclusions: A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

This section of LHSP 125 will pivot on two main, simultaneous concerns: the development of your writing voice and the essential practice of revision. While our texts will explore the sometimes dark, sometimes destructive, and always mysterious pull of family, this course is ultimately designed to guide your development as critical readers, thinkers, and writers able to communicate in an academic community. We will use a workshop format to discuss our work-in-progress, with both peer critiques and full class workshops. Workshops will help us develop the critical skills necessary to read, discuss and analyze a piece of writing, and to learn how to apply these critical skills to our own work, especially in the process of revision. This class will stress drafting and revision as a necessary component of the writing process. Active class participation will also be a vital component of our class; discussions will develop critical processes that I believe help us clarify our thoughts and write good essays. In the end this course will improve upon your own writing processes and working methods as strategies you can return to as you continue to develop your writing.
Students will be expected to complete four revised essays, two short essays and two longer papers, and several one-page response papers. Our readings will include several essays that discuss notions of family in history and within the United States, as well as several short stories, a play, two novels, and two films steeped in family secrets, lore, struggle, dysfunction, and joy.

Texts may include Goodbye, Columbus, Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf, Affliction, Into the Great Wide Open, Housekeeping, The Virgin Suicides, Magnolia, The Squid and the Whale, and East is East.

LHSP 125 — College Writing
Section 003, REC

Instructor: Anderson,Marjorie Caldwell

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

Credit Exclusions: A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

What happens when questions of why and how intersect with the question where? This class will explore location and dislocation, home and travel, in text and experience. We'll read fiction writers who focus their attention on places like the plains of north Mexico and Ann Arbor, Michigan; we'll read nonfiction writers who explain their ways of understanding place and suggest new meanings for it; and we'll examine the actual places around us as a way of practicing creating arguments out of what we notice.

Good writing is based on careful observation and fresh insight, and the places around us provide one of our best resources for looking carefully and generating ideas about what we see.
Come with an enthusiasm for discussion and for writing as a process. Come prepared to work hard. Perhaps most of all, come with an interest in investigating where you are and where you come from.

LHSP 125 — College Writing
Section 004, REC

Instructor: McDaniel,Raymond Clark

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

Credit Exclusions: A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Every section of LHSP 125 addresses questions of narrative, argument and analysis. This section is no different in terms of WHAT you will learn, but it differs a bit in terms of HOW. We'll focus on writing about art, but not just "High Art" — we'll pay equal attention to high, middle and low, and determine whether those distinctions make any sense. So you'll be reading academic theory as well as the Television Without Pity website, savoring classics of horror literature as well as cheap B-movies. We'll consider epics and comic books, opera and bubblegum pop. Along the way, you'll learn how to recognize and manipulate the standards of college-level writing and thought, both in terms of flexible and professional prose and sophisticated argument.

LHSP 125 — College Writing
Section 005, REC

Instructor: Chamberlin,Jeremiah Michael

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

Credit Exclusions: A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

I have named this class "The Individual Voice in Community and Culture" because writing is not only a process of learning and expression, but also an important way to develop a conscious voice as an individual. We are each members — citizens, if you will — of diverse and myriad communities. Be it our regional or national background, educational or economic circumstances, ethnic or racial history, sexual or political preference, or religious or family upbringing, we understand the world and define ourselves in relation to the institutions and groups to which we belong (whether by choice or not). Yet ultimately, and perhaps most importantly, we are our own persons. Over the course of this semester we will explore the ways in which individuals — including ourselves — negotiate the different and sometimes difficult responsibilities of culture. By seeking to understand what "belonging" means, we will not only learn to see the world in a more complex way, but also begin the life-long process of developing our own voices as artists, writers, thinkers, and citizens.

LHSP 130 — Writing and the Arts I
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Ralph,Alexander Luria

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: CE

In "Prize Stock," Nobel Laureate Kenzaburō Ōe adapts the story of Huck Finn to a remote Japanese island, recasting Jim as a downed U.S. airman. "It seems unlikely," writes John Nathan, Ōe's translator, "that a Japanese schoolboy [Ōe] knowing only the tiny, manageable wilderness of the Japanese countryside could be much moved by Huckleberry's pilgrimage down the vast Mississippi: Ōe was ardently moved. It was Huck's moral courage, literally Hell-bent, that ignited his imagination."

What Ōe experienced by reading Mark Twain was an example of what Herman Melville, another of the authors we'll read, has referred to as the "shock of recognition": "For genius, all over the world, stands hand in hand, and one shock of recognition runs the whole circle round." This idea of an authorial genius, however, is a relatively recent concept in the history of art, and, in this course devoted to imitation and adaptation, we will examine our notions of originality and inspiration. We shall do this both by rigorous study of literature, but also within our own literary efforts and experimentations.

Students will write four essays as well as smaller responses.

Additionally, as a class, we will organize a LHSP-wide public reading showcasing our work for the term. Our wide-ranging readings will include samplings from the Bible, pop lyrics, Renaissance essayists, fairy tales, a Chilean novelist, and a unit devoted to the American short story.

LHSP 130 — Writing and the Arts I
Section 002, REC

Instructor: Barron,Paul Douglas

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: CE

We often value artists and writers because their visions are personal — they show us new worlds, or at least the same old world through new lenses. But it doesn't always work so smoothly. Think of art that's so off beat — the vision of which is so individual — that very few people get it. And can't some writing be personal to the point of self-indulgence? When writers or artists do get us to see, or make us feel or identify, how have they bridged that gap? And how much of the work can the audience be expected to do?

These are the sorts of questions you'll be encouraged to mine in this course, in essays about art and writing, but also as artists yourselves, as writers of creative nonfiction. Making your ideas and experience relevant to a wide audience goes to the heart of good writing, but it's not always easy. We'll emphasize pre-writing, drafting, research, and discovery. Among other activities, after some research, you'll introduce to your classmates the work of a little known artist, writer, or filmmaker you think deserves our attention.

LHSP 140 — Arts and Humanities
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Tucker,Mark E

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: CE

Credit Exclusions: A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Close your eyes and imagine that you were born completely without sight. Now imagine that your sight was miraculously restored. What would you "see"? Look at your hand and wiggle your fingers. Is this what you expected your hand to look like? Would you be able to comprehend the world around you or would everything be such a confusing mass of shapes, lines, colors, textures, spaces, shadows and light that you would feel overwhelmed by the complexity of it all?

In this course we will demystify the art of seeing. Learning to draw and paint requires you to look at the world more closely and to record what you see more accurately. Learning to see, not what you "think" you see, but what you actually see, is the key that can unlock the door to your inner vision. Once you can access visual phenomenon through drawing and painting you will find out how much there is to see and how beautiful things really are.

One half of the course will be in black and white, drawing the human body; something simultaneously intimate and yet completely foreign. The second half of the course will concentrate on seeing the world in color through painting.

Note: This course will require the purchase of art materials related to drawing and painting. A specific list of materials will be available on the first day of class. There is also a lab fee of $75, which will cover the hiring of the model(s). Mandatory attendance and active class participation required. Expect extensive outside work on homework assignments. Museum trips required.

LHSP 140 — Arts and Humanities
Section 002, REC

Instructor: Abrams,Terry Steven

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: CE

Credit Exclusions: A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

The technology of photography has been changing rapidly during the past 5 years with the proliferation of high quality digital cameras, comprehensive software and highly-capable printers.. These changes have affected not only the way that photographers work, but also the types of images they create. Not only can digital photographs be more immediate and controlled than those created in the darkroom, but we also have more control over the emotional impact of color and luminosity than ever before.
In this course, you will learn to create photographs with a digital camera, download and edit them in software and output them as prints and electronic images. We will explore the fundamental controls of photography, such as focus and motion, in addition to learning about light and color phenomena and the extent to which they can be used to enhance your images. You will produce a portfolio of photographs that demonstrate your ability to express visual ideas and control the medium, and you will gain a deeper understanding of your environment through visual exploration.
For this class you will need access to a 4 megapixel (or higher) digital camera. RAW files capability is preferred, as is override of automatic exposure.

LHSP 151 — Focused Studies
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Potter,David S

FA 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Minicourse

Credit Exclusions: A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Julius Caesar in fact and fiction from antiquity to Shakespeare

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

LHSP 200 — Advanced Leadership and Service Learning
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Whitney,Charlotte E

FA 2007
Credits: 1

Credit Exclusions: A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

All Second-Year students must enroll in LHSP 200.

There is much misunderstanding regarding leadership and the talents necessary for cultivating leadership qualities in individuals. This course focuses on understanding leadership theory and developing leadership skills using a combination of readings, tests, interactive exercises, discussions and guest speakers. We will look at the potential that each one of you brings to the course and how you can cultivate and develop your own style of leadership.

Advisory Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and participation in Lloyd Hall Scholars Program.

LHSP 299 — Independent Study
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: INDEPENDENT

Credit Exclusions: A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Lloyd Hall Scholars Independent study.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

 
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