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LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Fall 2007, Dept = LING
 
Page 1 of 1, Results 1 — 42 of 42
Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
LING 102 — First Year Seminar (Humanities)
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Baxter, William H

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem

Much of our current knowledge of early civilizations is due to the deciphering of ancient scripts and languages, which requires an understanding of how scripts and languages work as well as a bit of luck. This course examines successful decipherments of the past (e.g., of Egyptian and of languages written in cuneiform scripts), recent breakthroughs (e.g., in deciphering Mesoamerican languages), and cases that remain unsolved. Hands-on exercises are based on real examples.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

LING 102 — First Year Seminar (Humanities)
Section 002, SEM

Instructor: Lawler,John M; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem

Designed to introduce entering students to the intellectual life of the university in a small course taught by an experienced member of the faculty. Topics vary according to the interests of the instructors. Whatever their subject matter, first-year seminars emphasize critical thinking through class discussion and regular practice in writing. Linguistics 102-104 differ only in their area distribution designation.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

LING 111 — Introduction to Language
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Coetzee,Andries W

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS

Human beings have always been curious about the uniquely human possession, human language — about its structure, its diversity, its use, and its effects on others. This course explores the human capacity for language. We begin with the discussion of the uniqueness of human language and then review major properties of language structure including sound systems, word and sentence structure, meaning and their use. We explore how these properties relate to language acquisition, processing/computation, and writing. The course also considers the rich variation of language in terms of language change, dialects, sign language and language deficits.

LING 140 — Introduction to Deaf Culture
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Berwanger,Paula D

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course introduces students to Deaf culture within the United States, and focuses on the link between culture and language (in this case, American Sign Language). An analysis of medical and cultural models of perceiving deafness is investigated to familiarize students with the range of perceptions held by members of the cultural majority and the effect it has on the Deaf community. The influencing factors of educational systems on deaf children are reviewed to understand the link between language systems used in the classroom and the development of a Deaf identity. The historical roots of American Sign Language and the value of language preservation provide for additional overview of attitudes in American society. Social adaptations to deafness and individual factors of communicative and linguistic development are analyzed for understanding the implications of family and social systems on deaf children and adults.

Instructor will use a course pack. There will be weekly written assignments (1-2 paragraph reaction statements to readings from the course pack) or weekly quizzes. There will be a written midterm and final.

LING 150 — Elementary American Sign Language
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Berwanger,Paula D

FA 2007
Credits: 4

LING 150 is a beginning course in American Sign Language (ASL) that introduces students to basic grammatical structures and sign vocabulary through intensive classroom conversational interactions. Emphasis is on practical communicative functions as students learn how to communicate in a visual-gestural channel. Classroom work is supplemented by video-taped workbook exercises to facilitate development of receptive language skills. LING 140 (Introduction to Deaf Culture) is a pre- or co-requisite for this course. Class will meet two days, two hours per day. There will be 1-2 hours of weekly lab work to be completed at the Language Resource Center.

This course will be conducted exclusively in American Sign Language. Required course materials include a workbook and videotape. Handouts will also be provided. An optional Dictionary of ASL is suggested. Students will complete weekly assignments from the workbook. There will be both a midterm and final consisting of both written exams and videotaped Sign Language interactions. A 3-5 page term paper is also required (a report on a Deaf social event, on an interaction with Deaf persons, or on an approved article or subject).

Advisory Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in or completion of LING 140.

LING 210 — Introduction to Linguistic Analysis
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Heath,Jeffrey G

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS

An intensive general introduction to Linguistics with data from a range of languages. Can be taken as a stand-alone course, but is also designed as preparation for all upper-division courses in Linguistics, and for language-related courses in other departments. Covers sound systems (phonetics and phonology, including spectrography), word-structure (morphology), syntax (the structure of phrases and sentences), prosody (tones, intonation), and meaning (semantics and pragmatics). Brief coverage of historical linguistics, sociolinguistics, first-language acquisition, and computational linguistics. One general theme is this: given that sentences express complex concepts whose structure is hierarchical (like a mobile hanging from the ceiling, with many branches), how are these concepts expressed in a flat, linear sequence of consonants and vowels?

Students do weekly homeworks, based on data sets from various languages. Friday sections are limited to 20 students to encourage discussion. Midterm and final exams. Sorry, no videos of monkeys trying to speak English.

LING 212 — Introduction to the Symbolic Analysis of Language
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Abney,Steven P; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA

This course is an introduction to some basic mathematical concepts and techniques used in the study of language. What is language? What characterizes a scientific account of language? We will introduce a number of mathematical tools, including finite-state and context-free grammars, logic, and probability, and look at how these mathematical tools are used to construct and evaluate models of language. Overarching themes are the nature of abstraction and explanation, and quantitative reasoning.

The focus will be on syntax (how sentences are put together) and semantics (what they mean). The treatment will be introductory, giving a broad overview and a framework for further study. There are no prerequisites.

LING 250 — Intermediate American Sign Language
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Berwanger,Paula D

FA 2007
Credits: 4

Students in this intermediate course in American Sign Language (ASL) will learn more advanced communicative forms including understanding the essential role of facial communication (non-manual behaviors) in forming expressions. Additional vocabulary including idiomatic expressions will be introduced to expand students' abilities to understand and converse appropriately in various settings. Through a conversational approach, students will continue to study selected literature, history, culture, and outlooks of Deaf people in order to develop an understanding of appropriate standards of communicating in ASL. Students completing LING 250 will have acquired a basic understanding of how to communicate in a visual-gestural channel in order to receive and express ASL sentences in everyday conversational interactions. Regular attendance is essential. Participation in class includes short presentations and situational role playing. There will be 1-2 hours of weekly lab work to be completed at the Language Resource Center.

This course will be conducted exclusively in American Sign Language. Required course materials include a workbook and videotape. Handouts will also be provided. An optional Dictionary of ASL is suggested. Students will complete weekly assignments from the workbook. There will be both a midterm and final consisting of both written exams and videotaped Sign Language interactions. A 3-5 page term paper is also required (a report on a Deaf social event, on an interaction with Deaf persons, or on an approved article or subject).

Advisory Prerequisite: LING 151.

LING 305 — Advertising Rhetoric
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Heath,Jeffrey G

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Considers how verbal and visual advertising messages are interpreted by consumers within a cultural context. The rhetorical analysis emphasizes the inherent contradictions in most advertising messages; for example, consumers want cars that are a) roomy, safe, and comfortable, but also b) compact, sporty, and exciting. The components of print ads (photography, dimensionality, layout, copy, typography) are broken down and analysed in this context. In addition to exams and individual papers, there are creative projects involving radio and print (magazine) formats, using Audacity and Photoshop. Designed for students with no art background; not open to students from the School of Art and Design. At least junior standing required.

Advisory Prerequisite: Junior standing.

LING 313 — Sound Patterns
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Duanmu,San

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS

This course explores two fundamental aspects of the sounds of human languages: speech sounds as physical entities (phonetics) and speech sounds as linguistic units (phonology). In viewing sounds as physical elements, the focus is articulatory descriptions: How are speech sounds made? What types of articulatory movements and configurations are used to differentiate sounds in the world's languages? In this part of the course, the goal is to learn to produce, transcribe, and describe in articulatory and acoustic terms many of the sounds known to occur in human languages. In the second part of the course, the focus is on sounds as members of a particular linguistic system. Phonological data from a wide range of languages are analyzed that is, regularities or patterns in sound distribution are extracted from the data set and then stated within a formal phonological framework. We will also construct arguments to support the proposed analyses, and will find that phonetic factors play a crucial role in validating phonological analyses. Throughout the course, a major emphasis is that speech sounds are simultaneously physical and linguistic elements, and that these two aspects of sound structure are interdependent. Class sessions will consist of lectures, phonetic practice, and discussion of phonological data sets. Each student will also write a research paper on the phonetics and phonology of a language. Course grades will be based on weekly assignments, midterm, and the research paper. LING 210, 211, 411 or permission of instructor is required to take the course.

Advisory Prerequisite: LING 210 or 211.

LING 315 — Introduction to Syntax
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Epstein,Samuel D

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course investigates the syntax (sentence structure properties) of human language. It addresses the need for a scientific model to explain human knowledge of language that also makes predictions about its representation in the mind. The focus here is on human language as a specific cognitive capacity restricted to humans, rather than on the individual languages (e.g., English, Arabic, Hindi) that are made possible by the existence of this capacity. For this reason, the course explores in detail many structural properties that are common across different languages, even those that clearly do not share a common recent past. A simple example: all languages have specific strategies to ask questions that make them different from affirmative sentences (e.g., English uses special question words — 'who', 'what' and so on — as most languages do). In order to explain this and many other common properties of human language, a scientific hypothesis that has been explored in depth is that a large part of human knowledge of language is biologically determined, and maybe innate. This is further supported by the fact that normal children effortlessly learn their native language at an amazing speed, despite the complexity of the task at hand (compare trying to learn for example Korean or Turkish as an adult, with years of language classes), and despite variation and deficiencies of the language input they are exposed to.

it is also clear, however, that there is a huge diversity among human languages, which can be illustrated only in an unfair way in this short description (e.g., only some languages change the sentence structure in a regular question: you say 'Who do you like?' in English, instead of 'You like who?', a possible word order similar to the one would find for instance in Chinese). Given this kind of diversity, which will be made clear, children need to be exposed to some minimum input of a particular language in order to be able to acquire it proficiently. Therefore, a major question that arises in modern linguistic inquiry and that will be object of this course is how the hypothesis of a biological basis for human language — which provides an explanation for the common aspects among all human languages and for the striking success of the acquisition task — can be reconciled with the obvious diversity of the human language experience. Course requirements include (bi-)weekly assignments, a midterm and a final exam.

Prerequisites: Although there are no official prerequisites, students usually take one introductory course in linguistics (LING 210, 211 or 212) before taking this course.

Advisory Prerequisite: LING 210 or 211.

LING 316 — Aspects of Meaning
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Pires,Acrisio M

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

Many of the sentences and other linguistic forms that we utter and perceive are novel (we have never encountered them before) and complex. Yet we usually able to compute the meanings of these novel and complex linguistic forms. Semantic theory is a theory of how we compute the meanings of complex linguistic forms based on the meanings of the atomic components. As we will see, there are a number of challenging problems in constructing a semantic theory, beginning with simple questions of how predication works, extending to how pronouns and quantifiers (like 'every') work and on to complex constructions involving tense, aspect, and modals in the diverse languages of the world. Can a unified semantic theory be found for all these phenomena? I dunno — I'm asking!

Advisory Prerequisite: LING 210 or 211.

LING 340 — Introduction to Sociolinguistics
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course examines the varied relationships between language use and society along with the major methods and theories that have been devised to explore those relationships. Topics covered include the language contact and change, linguistic diversity and intercultural communication, and the relationship of identity to language use.

Advisory Prerequisite: LING 210 or 211.

LING 350 — Perspectives on Second Language Learning and Second Language Instruction
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Dyer,Judy A

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in LING 450.

This introductory class aims at providing students with a mix of theory and practice in the teaching of languages. Students will be introduced both to the various language teaching methodologies, and to the theories behind these methods, with an overview of the theories of second language acquisition research, (particularly those pertaining to instructed second language learning) offering an empirical base. In addition to this historical and research background to language teaching, students will also learn the foundations of how to teach the various skill areas such as writing, reading, pronunciation, speaking and listening at various levels and to differing populations of learners. Practice teaching opportunities in class will provide opportunities for students in pairs and groups to try out what they are learning. Students will be required to complete a portfolio containing their own lesson plans, reflections on their practice teaching and reflections on observed language classes.

Advisory Prerequisite: LING 210 or 211.

LING 362 — Talking and Telling
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Keller-Cohen,Deborah

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

This course introduces students to systematic thinking about the structure and function of conversation and narrative from the perspective of anthropology, sociology and linguistics. We will think about such topics as what makes something a conversation, how conversations are organized, what role speaker characteristics play in talk (e.g., gender, age, ethnicity, social rank, culture), the family as an interactional unit, talk in institutions, types of talk (e.g., gossip, interviews), the differences between conversation and narrative, and the role of narratives in ritual, identity construction, and public life. Methodologically the course is aimed at developing students into careful observers who study face to face interactions and narrative. To this end students are taught how to gather oral language data, transcribe it, formulate research questions, and conduct analyses. After an initial independent project, students will work in teams with their collective data to explore other questions collaboratively.

Advisory Prerequisite: One course in linguistics, anthropology, or a related field.

LING 370 — Language and Discrimination: Language as Social Statement
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS, RE

In this course we examine the interplay between language and ideological processes, particularly as they function below the level of conscious awareness. We are concerned with the suppression of linguistic variation; that is, with the development of a standard language ideology, which is understood to be a bias toward an abstracted idealized, (but ultimately unattainable) homogenous spoken language, modeled on variants favored by the white, middle American mainstream. This ideology is one of many social practices on which people depend without close analysis of underlying assumptions. In this class, we will look into those assumptions linguistic and social and about the arguments used to uphold them. We will examine the way in which these behaviors are institutionalized by the media, the entertainment industry, school systems, business community, and the judicial system, all of which promote standard language ideology and underwrite assimilatory and often discriminatory practices, the goal of which is to suppress perfectly functional language variation intimately linked to homeland, race, ethnicity, ability (e.g., as it relates to the use of signed rather than spoken languages), or gender. We will look at issues of language choice and accent as legal issues in the courts, including battles about hate speech. This course should be of interest to those concerned with non-mainstream language varieties as a cultural resource and asset, historical heritage, and potential complication in supre-cultural communication. An introductory linguistics course would be helpful but is not essential.

Advisory Prerequisite: LING 210

LING 374 — Language and Culture
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Lemon,Alaina M; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

This course is concerned with the relations among language, thought, and culture. The first half of the course centers on how language as a system of signs makes culture possible. It looks at some basic questions about the nature of human language and its implications for how people make sense of the world. We ask such things as these: What do we share with other animal systems of communication and what is peculiar about human language? How does language shape the way we perceive and think about the things around us — and how does the world shape language? How does language let people mean things? The second half of the course focuses on language in action and interaction. We explore the dynamics of everyday conversations, the artful uses of language in performance, and aspects of power such as the politics of gender, national identity, and social status. Although most of the readings are drawn from anthropology, we will also venture into closely related areas in linguistics, sociology, and psychology. This course does not assume any background in linguistics and has no prerequisites.

There are four written exercises: two short (2-4 page) take-home essays and two in-class exams. The essays may involve some observations of your own surroundings but otherwise make use only of readings on the syllabus. Attendance in both lectures and discussion sections is mandatory and will be reflected in the final grade. Active participation in discussion sections is expected.

Advisory Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

LING 385 — Experiential Practice
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: McNulty,Elaine M

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 6
Other: Expr

In this course students, participate in a service project or projects that draw on their knowledge of linguistics. In addition, we will meet as a seminar that complements the placement. Some weeks the seminar will meet as a whole group to discuss readings relevant to your projects or to discuss general issues that arise in the course of your work.

In the past project sites have included:

  • The Family Literacy Institute,
  • the University Center for the Development of Language and Literacy (formerly the UM's Communicative Disorders Clinic),
  • assistance with an ESL course at the UM English Language Institute and
  • UM Family Housing ESL Program.

Some of these are daytime opportunities and some are after school and evening.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

LING 386 — Community Service and Language, Education, and Culture
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Axelson,Elizabeth Ruth; homepage
Instructor: Madden,Carolyn

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Expr

In this course, students teach or assist in a local ESL classroom or tutoring program for at least four hours per week or 48 hours during the semester. The course will employ an academic service learning framework in preparing for and reflecting on this experiential practice. Students will receive training and supervision in teaching English as a Second Language and discuss issues as they emerge from the practica and readings. Likely themes include lesson planning, task design, individual learner differences, and socio-cultural factors in teaching ESL. In addition, students will meet with the instructor in small groups based on site placement at least once per month. Students who have experience working with English language learners and a background in applied linguistics or second language education are preferred.

Students assist in a local ESL classroom or tutoring program for at least four hours per week or 48 hours during the semester. Potential site placements include:

  • UM Family Housing English as a Second Language program
  • Family Learning Institute
  • English Language Institute
  • Latino academic tutoring organizations
  • Ann Arbor Public School ESL classrooms
  • Migrant Farmcamps outside of Ann Arbor (car required)

LING 395 — Individual Research
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: INDEPENDENT

Adequately prepared students can pursue individual research with a member of the faculty.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

LING 420 — Word and Metaphor
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Lawler,John M; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

A course in lexical semantics, cognitive word grammar, and metaphor. Topics include basic epistemology, semantic fields and ontologies, frames and cognition, the embodied mind, and the nature and analysis of metaphor.

Advisory Prerequisite: LING 315, 316, or equivalent

LING 440 — Language Learnability
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: McNulty,Elaine M

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course examines various theory-related questions, goals, and assumptions within the scope of language acquisition. The course objectives are two-fold: (1) to develop familiarity with prominent aspects of language learnability; and (2) to promote discussions and perspectives that stimulate further investigation and insight into language learning theories.

Advisory Prerequisite: LING 316 and 315 or permission of instructor.

LING 441 — Mathematics and Computation of Human Language
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Abney,Steven P; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS

Human language has a rich mathematical structure, which is interesting in its own right, as well as for the computational methods and technologies that depend on it. This course describes the mathematics of language and provides an introduction to computational linguistics. Topics covered include formal language theory, semantics and logic, probabilistic models, information theory, and learning theory. The course involves no programming and has no specific prerequisites, but good mathematical aptitude and some background in linguistics are strongly recommended.

Advisory Prerequisite: Linguistics concentrators should take LING 315 and 316 first.

LING 447 — Psychology of Language
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Boland,Julie E

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS

The sentence "She saw her duck" has several different interpretations. What factors determine which meaning of "duck" we think of? How does this influence the structure of the sentence? Do people ever produce ambiguous sentences like this? This course is designed to familiarize students with experimental research on the cognitive processes that underlie language comprehension and production in normal adults. The focus of the course is on word recognition, syntactic and semantic analysis, and discourse-level processing; language acquisition and speech perception will not be covered. Topics will include lexical and structural ambiguity resolution, models of parsing and sentence understanding, the role of discourse-level information, the planning and production of sentences, and the role of prosody/intonation. This course will be taught at a level appropriate for advanced undergraduate and graduate students studying linguistics, psychology or cognitive science.

Enforced Prerequisites: PSYCH 240.

LING 492 — Topics in Linguistics
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Duanmu,San

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course looks at natural language processing (NLP) systems; the aim is to provide students with an overview of how NLP systems are put together. There will be an emphasis on natural language understanding (NLU), as opposed to generation or machine translation, and we will focus particularly on parsing, which forms the heart of any (reasonably sophisticated) NLU system. The course assumes basic programming abilities, but there are no formal prerequisites.

LING 493 — Undergraduate Reading
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 3
Other: INDEPENDENT

An independent study course for undergraduates.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of the concentration advisor.

LING 495 — Senior Honors Reading Course
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 3
Other: Honors, Indpnt Study

An independent senior Honors reading course for undergraduates.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of concentration advisor.

LING 496 — Senior Honors Reading Course
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 3
Other: Honors, Indpnt Study

An independent senior Honors reading course for undergraduates.

Advisory Prerequisite: LING 495

LING 512 — Phonetics
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4

This course introduces students to the nature of human speech and speech sounds. The course goals are: (1) To understand the speech process, which involves transmission of an acoustic signal from a speaker to a listener, and to arrive at a representation of speech sounds in terms of their articulatory (speaker-based), acoustic, and perceptual (listener-based) characteristics. Towards this goal, students are introduced to fundamental principles of phonetic theory through readings and lectures. (2) To introduce students to phonetic experimentation and modeling. Small-scale experiments provide training in acoustic analysis and perceptual testing, and reinforce theoretical principles by serving as empirical tests of selected claims. (3) To consider the relation between human articulatory and perceptual capacities and patterns in linguistic sound systems (i.e., phonology). Our exploration of issues related to this third goal is necessarily preliminary, serving as a bridge between phonetics and future coursework that many students will take in phonology. (4) To provide practical experience in producing and transcribing sounds of the world's languages.

Advisory Prerequisite: LING. 313 or Permission of Instructor.

LING 515 — Generative Syntax
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Epstein,Samuel D

FA 2007
Credits: 3

In Generative Linguistics, syntactic structure is generated by a formal rule system and by applying constraints to its output. Some of these rules and constraints have been hypothesized to be innate, or "unlearned" (most likely a species specific system). That is supported by how human language acquisition (or grammar growth) takes place, in a fast and successful way across the species, and by the observation of striking structural similarities across different human languages. Other aspects of our linguistic knowledge appear "learned", i.e. determined by an interaction between human biology and the particular linguistic experience individuals are exposed to, motivating different but constrained aspects of variation among human languages. This class explores this so-called "Principles and Parameters" approach to the analysis of human syntactic knowledge, focusing on the investigation of how various postulated ("simple") rules and constraints can interact to generate ("complex") structures, characteristic of the potentially infinite number of human language sentences one can produce (such as the one you are now reading, and understanding).

Prerequisites: For undergraduates, LING 315 and permission of the instructor. No prerequisites for linguistics graduate students. Graduate students from other departments may be allowed to enroll with permission of the instructor.

Advisory Prerequisite: LING 315 or Permission of Instructor.

LING 517 — Principles and Methods of Historical Linguistics
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Thomason,Sarah G

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course is an introduction to the theories and methods that enable linguists to describe and explain processes of linguistic change and historical relationships among languages. The major topics to be covered are the emergence of language families and means of establishing family relationships; sound change; grammatical change, especially analogy; language change caused by culture contacts; the Comparative Method, through which prehistoric language states can be reconstructed with an impressive degree of accuracy; internal reconstruction, a less powerful but still important method for gaining information about linguistic prehistory; and ways in which the study of current dialect variation offers insights into processes of change.

Course requirements: regular homework assignments (45%), final exam (45%), class participation (10%).

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing, or permission of instructor.

LING 541 — Natural Language Processing
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This introduction to computational linguistics stresses the processing of written language with supplementary discussion of topics related to spoken language. The course is based on the textbook, Speech and Natural Language Processing (Daniel Jurafsky and James H. Martin, Prentice Hall, 1999). Course covers finite state automata and finite state techniques for processing words, language models, tagging corpora for part-of-speech, context -free grammars, parsing techniques, unification grammars and unification-based parsing, probabilistic parsing, semantics, discourse modeling, word sense disambiguation and information retrieval, natural language generation, and machine translation.

Additional requirements for doctoral students include:

  • Read six research papers from a list provided by the instructor
  • Write a one-page reaction to each paper
  • Submit a research project at the end of the semester which will be developed under the instructor's direct guidance. What distinguishes a research project from a regular project is that the former addresses an open research problem to which no optimal solution is currently known. The final report on that project will be in the form of a conference paper and will have to be of such a quality to be submitted to a first-tier conference or workshop in NLP or IR. The final project will be evaluated using a realistic benchmark.

Advisory Prerequisite: Senior standing.

LING 542 — Introduction to Sociolinguistics
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Queen,Robin M

FA 2007
Credits: 2 — 3

This seminar presents a graduate-level introduction to sociolinguistics. Sociolinguists are researchers generally interested in trying to understand and systematically investigate language as it is related to social life. Sociolinguists do not have a common research paradigm, theory, epistemology or set of research questions; however, they do share the conviction that understanding language involves understanding both the extralinguistic and the linguistic contexts in which language is produced, intended, and interpreted. We will consider many of the topics and methods on which people who call themselves sociolinguists have focused, including language change, language contact, linguistic diversity, bi- and multilingualism, the relationships between social identity and language use, intercultural communication, and the connections of these issues to ideologies about language. Throughout the course, we will be interested in several issues concerning the research and the researchers we are studying, such as:

  • What assumptions does this researcher make about language and about the nature of society and culture?
  • How does this work give us insight into the nature and structure of language?
  • How might this work fit into a general theory of language?
  • How does this work relate to the work of other researchers interested in similar questions?
  • What are the aims and methods used for focusing on this topic?
  • How can this research be applied to other disciplines such as education, rhetoric, sociology, psychology, communications, or anthropology or to other professionals (e.g., teachers, doctors, lawyers, therapists, etc.)?

Advisory Prerequisite: LING,Graduate standing

LING 545 — Cognitive Anthropological Linguistics
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Heath,Jeffrey G

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Three parts: 1) cross-linguistics study of culturally significant lexical domains; 2) Cognitive Linguistics (e.g. Langacker, Talmy) as an alternative model of language; 3) semantically-focused analysis of speech registers (e.g. honorific, insulting).

Advisory Prerequisite: Undergraduates require instructor's permission

LING 756 — The Development of Language and Communication Skills
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Shatz,Marilyn J

FA 2007
Credits: 3

One of the most remarkable feats of childhood is the child's ability to learn a first language. This course will examine how children accomplish this task. We will focus on a wide range of empirical studies and theoretical analyses examining typical and atypical language development, with special focus on word meanings and syntax. Other topics include infant speech perception, pragmatics, language disorders, and language and thought. The format is a mixture of lecture and discussion. Students will be expected to contribute to class discussion, write a term paper, and make a presentation.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Psychology and permission of instructor.

LING 792 — Topics in Linguistics
Section 001, SEM
Adv. Issues in SLA

Instructor: Duanmu,San

FA 2007
Credits: 3

A course on topics in linguistics. Content varies by term and instructor.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

LING 801 — Seminar on Graduate Study
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Queen,Robin M

FA 2007
Credits: 1

This seminar has three goals. The first is to introduce students to the history of the modern field of linguistics. In the Fall Term we will focus on readings and discussions that will take us from 19th-century linguistics through the Chomskyan revolution of the 1960s. In the Winter Term we will concentrate on the past 40 years of (mostly American) linguistics. The second goal is to begin to develop an understanding of the diverse approaches to the study of linguistics and an appreciation for the relations among these different approaches. Thus the course also serves as a forum where students can discuss how the various aspects of their coursework fit together. These two goals converge in helping us to build an integrated view of the discipline. The third goal is specific to the first-year students in the Department of Linguistics: the seminar will provide an orientation to graduate study in linguistics in the Department and at the university, and will consider first-year students' long-term goals relative to the course of study they are embarking on. Throughout the year, many of our discussions will be led by linguistics faculty with expertise in specific topics to be covered.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

LING 815 — Seminar: Syntax
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Pires,Acrisio M

FA 2007
Credits: 2 — 3

A seminar on topics in syntax. Content varies by term and instructor.

Advisory Prerequisite: Previous course in syntax. Graduate standing.

LING 990 — Dissertation/Precandidate
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 8

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Advisory Prerequisite: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing.

LING 993 — Graduate Student Instructor Training Program
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Queen,Robin M

FA 2007
Credits: 1

This seminar consists of three or four long class sessions during the Fall Term, together with individual visits to several introductory Linguistics classes. The seminar is required for all graduate students in Linguistics who will, or might, teach linguistics as Graduate Student Instructors during their period of study in the Department, and it must be taken before the students begin teaching.

Advisory Prerequisite: Must have GSI award. Graduate standing.

LING 995 — Dissertation/Candidate
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 8

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Enforced Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate

LING 997 — Special Research
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 6

This is a graduate-level independent research course.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

 
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