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LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Fall 2007, Dept = MEMS
 
Page 1 of 1, Results 1 — 14 of 14
Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
MEMS 110 — Medieval, Renaissance, and Reformation Europe
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Hughes,Diane Owen

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS

This is a course about Europe and its neighbors between the end of antiquity and the beginning of modern times. We learn about this past directly, by viewing the changing environment, art, and artifacts left to us, and by the classroom conversations about what the men and women of that era wrote for each other. Among the themes we will discuss are the rise of monotheistic religions, the growth of modern practices of government, alternatives in social organization, the practice of emotion, and the uneasy triumvirate of science, the state, and religion.

The sole requirement for this course is intellectual curiosity. Work in class will consist of lectures, discussions, and conversations about visual and textual artifacts. Each class session will include illustrative materials and discussion. Your grade will depend upon performance on exams and your willingness to join our discussion; a book report can provide extra credit.

The course readings will come from sources written during the era we cover plus modern scholarship.

MEMS 210 — Early Middle Ages, 300-1100
Section 001, LEC
Issues in Race & Ethnicity

Instructor: Squatriti,Paolo

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: RE, SS

The course covers the period when the first true 'Europe' was born. It covers the disintegration of the Roman Empire in the western Mediterranean, and the development of successor states in northwestern Europe, like the 'barbarian' monarchies, and the multiethnic empires of Charlemagne and the Ottonians up to 1000. Main themes are the development of new kinds of community among European people (Christian monasticism, feudalism, ethnic solidarity), new economic systems, and relations with the earliest Islamic states and with the Byzantine empire.

MEMS 251 — Italian Renaissance Art, II
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Holmes,Megan L

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

In this course we will study Italian art from circa 1480 to 1570. This period is traditionally known as the ‘High Renaissance,' and usually begins with the maturity of Leonardo da Vinci and ends with the death of Michelangelo. We will follow the careers of major masters like Botticelli, Leonardo, Raphael, Titian and Michelangelo. We will also explore the urban centers — Venice, Florence, Rome — where these masters, and many others not as well known, produced their works in response to the demands of patrons and institutions. We will study key works of art, sites of production, techniques, patrons, practitioners, and publics. Transformations in artistic practices and representational forms will be related to specific social, political, economic, and cultural conditions. We will also consider primary sources, and pay close attention to how art historians selectively regard the fragmentary material and textual remains from the period and incorporate them into a ‘story of art'.

IV. 3

MEMS 310 — Medieval Sources of Modern Culture
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Sowers,Cynthia A

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

"The Dark Ages" conjures up lurid images of barbarians wearing horned helmets roaming a cultural landscape of generalized savagery and superstition. This course will attempt to discover a more complex, less stereotyped perspective on a fascinating period of Western European history. We will begin with the encounter between pagans and Christians in the field not only of religious belief, but also of philosophy and the arts. We will ask questions about the status of the body and its representations, about the role of intellectual life in the midst of political intrigue, and most importantly about the way in which a new history of origins and endings was framed by means of new narratives of purpose, pattern, choice, and engagement. How did Christians use paganism as a grounding and source for a new philosophy? How did barbarians use Christianity in order to represent and perhaps even to invent their own history? The course is interdisciplinary in nature, and will include a study of selected examples of the visual arts to enrich and deepen our understanding of the period.

Works studied will include: Plato, Phaedo; The Sayings of the Desert Fathers; The Life of Mary the Egyptian; St. Augustine, Confessions; Gregory of Tours, History of the Franks; Beowulf.

Advisory Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

MEMS 350 — Literature in English to 1660
Section 001, LEC
Questioning Heroic, Singing Romance

Instructor: Williams,Ralph G; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4

The course will focus on the reading and enjoyment of the dazzling variety of texts which made of the English tradition one of the major cultural streams in the West. At the same time we will explore the implications of these texts in and for political, social, and cultural history more generally. We will give special attention in 2007 to the ongoing rewriting of the heroic, with its shifting models of male and female excellence and to Romance with its artful fables of desire. Readings will range widely from Beowulf to Paradise Lost. Major time will be devoted to Chaucer, Marlowe, Spenser, Shakespeare, Donne, and Milton. The course features lecture three hours a week; discussion groups will meet a fourth hour to discuss the material further and to work out writing assignments for the course. There will be two essays of approximately six pages each, a midterm and a final examination.

MEMS 367 — Shakespeare's Principal Plays
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Worthen,William B

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

This course will consider Shakespeare's plays from a range of perspectives: in the context of early modern literary and cultural history; as documents in the history of ideology, notably the ideologies of identity; and as designs animating dramatic performance in the early-modern theater, in subsequent theaters, and (glancingly) in a range of media today. We will develop a series of key terms for the analysis of drama, and consider how the plays conceive Shakespeare's theater as a site of theoretical inquiry. The course will be paced at roughly one play per week, in addition to a substantial critical/theoretical reading that will mark the point of departure for our discussion of the play. Plays to be chosen from the range of Shakespeare's career, and will include early and late comedies, a history cycle, several major tragedies and romances. Two papers, midterm, final examination. I will order the Norton Complete Works, but any recent edition of Shakespeare's plays will be fine.

Plays to be covered chosen from this list: Midsummer Night's Dream, Romeo and Juliet, Richard II, 1 Henry IV, 2 Henry IV, Henry V, Twelfth Night, As You Like It, Hamlet, Macbeth, Othello, King Lear, Troilus and Cressida, Coriolanus, Antony and Cleopatra, The Tempest


This course fulfills the Pre-1600 requirement for English concentrators.

MEMS 368 — Shakespeare and his Contemporaries
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Mullaney,Steven G

FA 2007
Credits: 4

A study of major dramatic works from the revenge tradition that flourished on the Elizabethan and Jacobean stage and included many of the most popular plays of the period. We will read plays by a number of Shakespeare's contemporaries and a select few Shakespearean plays which will highlight the energetic dialogue between playwrights and acting companies of the period. Designed along the lines of English 367, this course can be taken either as a sequel or as an alternative to 367. Plays will be read intensively as theatrical and literary works, and also will be considered in relation to complex social and political issues of the period. Among the plays likely to be studied: The Spanish Tragedy, The Jew of Malta, Titus Andronicus, Hamlet, The Revenger's Tragedy, The Changeling, The Duchess of Malfi. Approximate book cost: $100 (available at Shaman Drum Bookshop). There will be a midterm and a final exam, as well as two relatively short essays.

MEMS 375 — Celtic and Nordic Mythology
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: WorldLit

A study of the Celtic and Nordic cycles of myths and sagas, including the Nibelungenlied, Tristan and Isolde cycles, the Irish Tain, the Welsh Mabinogi, the Scandinavian Edda and some of the literature based on these cycles.

MEMS 377 — Literature, History, and Culture of Early Modern France
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Hoffmann,George P; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

Class conducted primarily in French. Suspicious lovers imagine scenarios, scrutinize character, and "create" scenes. Reading the literature of jealousy encourage examining motives and second-guessing intent in a way that parallels the suspicions that a jealous lover feels endlessly compelled to entertain. This painful yet profoundly imaginative experience has acted as a topic, motive, and, ultimately, form for fiction from the earliest romances to France's first "psychological" novels.

Readings from:
  • Béroul's Tristan et Iseult
  • Lemaire de Belges's Épître de l'amant verd
  • Rabelais's Tiers livre
  • Navarre's Heptaméron
  • Rosset's Histoires tragiques
  • Shakespeare's Othello
  • Lafayette's Princesse de Montpensier
  • Molière's École des femmes
    C Racine's Andromaque

Films:

  • Draughtsman's Contract (1982)
  • High Fidelity (2000)
  • Blood Simple (1984)
  • Shakespeare in Love (1999)
  • Contempt (1963)

Expectations:

  • 4 papers
  • 2 revisions
  • discussion
  • 2 quizzes
  • 2 exams

Special:
Class visit to see rare original editionsin Special Collections, Harlan Hatcher Graduate Library

Enforced Prerequisites: Two of the following: FRENCH 235, FRENCH 250-299, or RCLANG 320; or study abroad equivalent.

MEMS 386 — Medieval Literature, History, and Culture
Section 001, REC
France and the Crusades

Instructor: McCracken,Peggy S

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

In this course we will study the various crusading movements of the twelfth and thirteenth centuries from the perspectives of French, Muslim, and Jewish historians; through literary texts written in France; and through modern histories of the crusades. We'll also look at a couple of recent films and other kinds of representations of the crusades to try to understand how, particularly in the wake of September 11, medieval crusades have come to stand as a modern emblem of Christian-Muslim conflict. Class discussion and readings mostly in French; some reading assignments in English. Course requirements include consistent class participation, a series of short reaction papers, and a research project to be carried out over the course of the semester and whose final form (paper? film? performance? website?) will be defined by the student.

Enforced Prerequisites: Two courses in FRENCH numbered 250 and above

MEMS 411 — Special Topics
Section 001, REC
Imagining Female — Female Eroticism in Early Modern Europe

Instructor: Simons,Patricia; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

We examine the varieties of representations of women who desired other women in Western Europe from the 15th-17th centuries. Focusing on England and Italy, with forays into France, Germany, Spain and Holland, we will read early modern texts (poems, drama, opera, mythology, paintings, domestic artifacts, pornography, and medical writing), as well as contemporary theorizing about lesbianism. Charting continuities and discontinuities between early modern conceptions and contemporary ones, we investigate the extent to which a coherent history of lesbianism exists. IV. 3.

MEMS 411 — Special Topics
Section 002, REC

Instructor: Holmes,Megan L

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 3

Designed to accommodate courses taught only once by various faculty members on a variety of subjects. The topic are specified each term and may fall into any of the basic areas of concentration.

MEMS 490 — Directed Reading
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: INDEPENDENT

Independent reading and/or research under the supervision of a faculty member. Intended for students with projects not subsumed under regular MEMS offerings.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

MEMS 491 — Honors Senior Colloquium
Section 001, SEM

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 6
Reqs: ULWR
Other: Honors

The centerpiece of the MEMS concentration is the senior Honors thesis, which is meant to be the single most meaningful piece of work you will do as an undergraduate at Michigan. This course is designed to guide you in this difficult and rewarding process, from first glimmerings, to conceiving the project, doing the research, and writing your honors thesis. We will spend some time each week working together on learning techniques and methods generally applicable to academic research in the humanities. We will also discuss what makes an honors thesis different from a long end-of-term paper. The honors thesis is a major essay, composed over the course of at least two semesters. The thesis should not be merely an extended survey of the relevant critical or scholarly literature; nor should it be a record of your private musings on a given topic. The thesis should display extended evidence of the author's searching, creative, well-articulated thoughts about his/her subject. It should also be built on a substantial amount of original research, and display a strong conceptual grasp of the issues it raises.

This course is a workshop for thesis writers. It concentrates on practical and theoretical problems of research and writing with special reference to methodological questions. The course will meet in a seminar format for 3 hours per week. Students will elect a total of 6 hours for the course but may divide this into two terms. Students will write a 60-100 page Honors thesis.

Advisory Prerequisite: Honors student and senior standing.

 
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