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LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Fall 2007, Dept = MENAS
 
Page 1 of 1, Results 1 — 8 of 8
Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
MENAS 289 — From Genghis Khan to the Taliban: Modern Central Asia
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Northrop,Douglas Taylor; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS, RE

More than 500 years ago, the Silk Road famously connected traders from all over the world, linking the major cities of China and Southeast Asia with those of Europe and Africa. Vast wealth traveled this route, wending across the mountains and steppes of Central Asia, creating rich and sophisticated towns along the way. Bukhara and Samarkand became two of the world's greatest cities, enviable centers of learning and culture. How did Central Asia go from being the most cosmopolitan place on earth to an area now seen as one of the most isolated, remote places in the world? How did a region where a dizzying array of cultures had long intermingled and coexisted peacefully become a place associated (at least in Western eyes) with intolerance and terrorism? This course tries to answer such questions by providing an overview of modern Central Asian history. Using both lecture and discussion, it focuses on the colonial and post-colonial periods of the last 300 years: especially in Russian and Soviet Central Asia, but also the neighboring areas dominated by Britain and China (Afghanistan, Pakistan, Xinjiang). It offers a strong emphasis on the links and connections across these political borders, which were at first largely artificial and porous but which became crucially important and shaped local communities in deeply divergent ways. It also emphasizes social and cultural history, as a complement and counterweight to the usual political frameworks and classic grand narratives of khans, revolutions, and wars. Three themes structure the course: the fragmented, changing character of regional identities; the complexities of popular attitudes towards, and relations with, various forms of state power; and the differences between — and the complicated economic, environmental, political, artistic, and cultural legacies of — the major imperial systems (Russian, British, Chinese). Students will be evaluated on their class contributions as well as written work (short essays and class exercises) and two exams.

MENAS 493 — Comparative Perspectives of the Middle East and North Africa
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Hagen,Gottfried J

FA 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Minicourse

The aim of this course is to expose students to various UM faculty and outside experts on a particular theme. It is taught from a comparative perspective to introduce students to a range of historical periods, geographical areas, and methods for future study and research.

MENAS 495 — Senior Honors Thesis
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 3 — 4
Other: Honors, Indpnt Study

To be taken in the senior year by students in the area concentration program on Near Eastern and North African Studies who have been admitted to the Honors Program. Two to three advisors should be chosen; the principal advisor must be a member of the faculty in whose field of expertise the thesis topic lies. The proposal for the thesis should be submitted by the end of the junior year.

Advisory Prerequisite: Open only to Honors concentrators with senior standing. permission of instructor.

MENAS 520 — Bibliographical Resources in Middle Eastern Studies
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Rodgers,Jonathan H

FA 2007
Credits: 1

This seminar course introduces significant bibliographical resources in print and electronic format for the study of the Middle East. The course covers the bibliographical organization of the disciplines of history, language and literature, politics, economics, and sociology, religion and philosophy, and art and archaeology within the context of Middle Eastern area studies. The students discuss, evaluate, and use the bibliographical tools introduced in the course. Many students lack knowledge of the bibliographical resources in the disciplines and are inadequately prepared in the use of them. An introduction to these resources, accompanied by assigned work in the use of the material helps students overcome the difficulties in locating and organizing research materials.

MENAS 591 — Interdisciplinary Middle East Topics Seminar
Section 001, SEM
Arab-Israel Conflict

Instructor: Stanzler,Jeffrey Adam

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This class is based on a computer-mediated simulation that engages middle school and high school students in exploring the Arab-Israeli Conflict through participating in it themselves. Students in high schools in Michigan, elsewhere in the US, and even outside the U.S. could be interacting with one another, and with you, over the course of the term. University student "mentors" (that's you) facilitate this diplomatic simulation (in which we create a scenario that becomes the "reality" of our world) and serve as gatekeepers, pushing the students to act in ways that are in keeping with the beliefs/constraints that the person they are portraying would hold and operate under. There is a complex structure in place for them to communicate with others, to issue press releases and otherwise express their interests and trade influence, and finally to introduce possible new actions into the simulated world. All of this is done with the support and with the assistance of the mentors.

Fundamentally, the exercise is an attempt to give students a tangible window into the diplomatic process, with it's slow, thorny inner-workings. This course, and the Arab-Israeli Conflict (AIC) simulation itself, are based on the idea that the most meaningful learning often happens when one is actively engaged in a purposeful activity. By participating in AIC as a mentor, we hope that you will get a chance to think deeply about (among other things) how people learn to take diverse perspectives, what it takes to foster thoughtful discourse, and the nature of diplomacy itself.

AIC is also a project in the School of Education, and part of its purpose is to develop new ways that technology can support meaningful learning experiences with high school students. Within the context of the seminar, then, we start with a basic grounding in the history of the conflict, and then move on to figuring out how to let that grounding inform your ongoing efforts to both support and challenge the student participants.

Advisory Prerequisite: Upperclass standing; concentration in MENAS, NES or other fields with main interest in Middle Eastern Studies.

MENAS 591 — Interdisciplinary Middle East Topics Seminar
Section 002, SEM
Place Out of Time

Instructor: Stanzler,Jeffrey Adam
Instructor: Fahy,Michael A

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This class is based on a computer-mediated simulation that engages middle school and high school students in exploring the Arab-Israeli Conflict through participating in it themselves. Students in high schools in Michigan, elsewhere in the US, and even outside the U.S. could be interacting with one another, and with you, over the course of the term. University student "mentors" (that's you) facilitate this diplomatic simulation (in which we create a scenario that becomes the "reality" of our world) and serve as gatekeepers, pushing the students to act in ways that are in keeping with the beliefs/constraints that the person they are portraying would hold and operate under. There is a complex structure in place for them to communicate with others, to issue press releases and otherwise express their interests and trade influence, and finally to introduce possible new actions into the simulated world. All of this is done with the support and with the assistance of the mentors.

Fundamentally, the exercise is an attempt to give students a tangible window into the diplomatic process, with it's slow, thorny inner-workings. This course, and the Arab-Israeli Conflict (AIC) simulation itself, are based on the idea that the most meaningful learning often happens when one is actively engaged in a purposeful activity. By participating in AIC as a mentor, we hope that you will get a chance to think deeply about (among other things) how people learn to take diverse perspectives, what it takes to foster thoughtful discourse, and the nature of diplomacy itself.

AIC is also a project in the School of Education, and part of its purpose is to develop new ways that technology can support meaningful learning experiences with high school students. Within the context of the seminar, then, we start with a basic grounding in the history of the conflict, and then move on to figuring out how to let that grounding inform your ongoing efforts to both support and challenge the student participants.

Advisory Prerequisite: Upperclass standing; concentration in MENAS, NES or other fields with main interest in Middle Eastern Studies.

MENAS 591 — Interdisciplinary Middle East Topics Seminar
Section 003, SEM
Earth Odysseys

Instructor: Stanzler,Jeffrey Adam

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This class is based on a computer-mediated simulation that engages middle school and high school students in exploring the Arab-Israeli Conflict through participating in it themselves. Students in high schools in Michigan, elsewhere in the US, and even outside the U.S. could be interacting with one another, and with you, over the course of the term. University student "mentors" (that's you) facilitate this diplomatic simulation (in which we create a scenario that becomes the "reality" of our world) and serve as gatekeepers, pushing the students to act in ways that are in keeping with the beliefs/constraints that the person they are portraying would hold and operate under. There is a complex structure in place for them to communicate with others, to issue press releases and otherwise express their interests and trade influence, and finally to introduce possible new actions into the simulated world. All of this is done with the support and with the assistance of the mentors.

Fundamentally, the exercise is an attempt to give students a tangible window into the diplomatic process, with it's slow, thorny inner-workings. This course, and the Arab-Israeli Conflict (AIC) simulation itself, are based on the idea that the most meaningful learning often happens when one is actively engaged in a purposeful activity. By participating in AIC as a mentor, we hope that you will get a chance to think deeply about (among other things) how people learn to take diverse perspectives, what it takes to foster thoughtful discourse, and the nature of diplomacy itself.

AIC is also a project in the School of Education, and part of its purpose is to develop new ways that technology can support meaningful learning experiences with high school students. Within the context of the seminar, then, we start with a basic grounding in the history of the conflict, and then move on to figuring out how to let that grounding inform your ongoing efforts to both support and challenge the student participants.

Advisory Prerequisite: Upperclass standing; concentration in MENAS, NES or other fields with main interest in Middle Eastern Studies.

MENAS 595 — Directed Reading in Near Eastern and North African Studies
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 3

Designed for individual students who have an interest in a specific topic (usually that has stemmed from a previous course). An individual instructor must agree to direct such a reading, and the requirements are specified when approval is granted.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

 
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