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LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Fall 2007, Dept = MUSICOL
 
Page 1 of 1, Results 1 — 37 of 37
Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
MUSICOL 121 — Introduction to the Art of Music
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Garrett,Charles Hiroshi; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

MUSICOL 121 offers a broad overview of the history of Western music from the Baroque era to the present. The syllabus spans a vast range of material, touching on music by celebrated classical composers (Bach, Mozart, Haydn, Beethoven, Brahms, Verdi, Stravinsky, and more) as well as by significant jazz artists (Louis Armstrong, Ella Fitzgerald, Miles Davis). Primarily designed to develop listening skills, the course aims to help students to better appreciate, interpret, describe, and write about music. Its chronological survey traces major shifts in musical aesthetics, form, function, and style, placing these shifts in cultural, historical, and social context. The course features three lectures per week as well as one weekly small-group discussion section. Assignments involve reading, listening, three brief concert reports, and four exams. No prior musical experience is required.

Advisory Prerequisite: NON-MUS ONLY

MUSICOL 139 — Intro to Mus
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Castro,Christi-Anne; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 2
Reqs: HU

A survey of musical concepts and repertories of the Western and non-Western world.

Advisory Prerequisite: S M STU ONLY

MUSICOL 239 — History of Music
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Borders,James M; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 2
Reqs: HU

This core music literature class introduces lower division undergraduates in the School of Music to the music of the Middle Ages, Renaissance, and Baroque periods, roughly nine centuries of Western European music.

Advisory Prerequisite: S M STU ONLY

MUSICOL 345 — History of Music
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Mengozzi,Stefano; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

History of European music from the Middle Ages through the Baroque.

Advisory Prerequisite: NON-MUS ONLY

MUSICOL 405 — Special Course
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Clague,Mark Allan; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Undergraduate Seminar. With the rise of nationalism in the nineteenth century, individuals increasingly defined themselves by membership in a more or less ethnically and culturally homogenous nation-state. Musicians and other artists naturally were influenced by this development, creating works that aimed to reflect a distinctively national character and that, in turn, often helped to shape the collective consciousness of the nation. This course explores the role of music in the creation of such a national identity, placing an emphasis on the art-music tradition of Europe and the United States in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Grappling with fundamental questions surrounding such concepts as nationhood and nation-building, the course will highlight the degree to which musical works often assumed a nationalist guise beyond the apparent intentions of the composer. Among the many case studies will be considerations of post-World War I America, Nazi Germany, and Stalinist Russia, along with discussions of the music by several major composers of the time period from Beethoven to Tan Dun.

Advisory Prerequisite: UG.ONLY

MUSICOL 406 — Special Course
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Whiting,Steven Moore; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Who gave the first public piano recital and to whom? When did orchestras begin using stand-alone conductors? How did nineteenth-century audiences in New York react to Dvorak's New World Symphony; did they really listen to Wagner at the beach? Who founded the Boston Symphony and why? How did the invention of radio affect classical music? Who were Louis-Moreau Gottschalk, Theodore Thomas, Willlem Mengelberg, Georges Cziffra, Jascha Heifetz, Paul Robeson, and Maria Callas, and what did they contribute to musical tradition? Questions such as these will be addressed by a new course, History of Performance: Case Studies in Classical Music, a research-intensive class that forges connections between history and performance.

Participating students will develop a series of independent projects related to their own performance specialties, including a comparative performance edition of historical sound recordings, an interview with a currently active performer, and opportunities to recreate historical performances live. Each participant will write a substantial and original term paper on a topic of his or her choice.

MUSICOL 406 — Special Course
Section 002, LEC

Instructor: Clague,Mark Allan; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Selected topics in Music. Specific focus is determined by instructor and indicated in the current Schedule of Classes.

MUSICOL 408 — Special Course
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Wierzbicki,James E; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 2 — 3

"Film Music" is an introductory survey of the history and aesthetics of film music as exemplified in Hollywood and European productions from the late 1890s to the present day.

Topics for discussion will include — but will not be limited to — the dramatic function of music as an element of cinematic diegesis and as non-diegetic underscore, the codification of musical iconography in the standard cinematic genres, the symbolic use of pre-existing music in film scores, and the evolving musical styles of Hollywood composers. Special attention will be focused on the music of such composers as Max Steiner, Franz Waxman, Bernard Herrmann, David Raksin, Dmitri Tiomkin, and John Williams, and on the use of music in the films of such directors as Alfred Hitchcock, Stanley Kubrick, and Terrence Malick.

In addition to lecture material, class sessions will involve the viewing and discussion of numerous film clips. Assignments will include readings, brief reports on the music in specified films viewed outside of class, and a final paper (2,000 words minimum) on the role of music in an instructor-approved film of the student's choice.

Advisory Prerequisite: UG.ONLY

MUSICOL 411 — Hist of Symphony
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Geary,Jason Duane; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course traces the history of the symphony from its origins in the first half of the eighteenth century up to the present. Highlighting significant developments in the genre over time, we will consider works by, among others, Sammartini, Beethoven, Berlioz, Mahler, and several twentieth-century composers. We will also explore the many social and cultural forces that helped to shape this most familiar of orchestral forms. Topics to be addressed include the changing nature of the listening audience, influential conductors and ensembles, the formation of a canon in Western music, and shifting aesthetic values during the time period in question. Assignments will involve listening and score analysis, supplemented by readings on reserve or in a course packet. Grading will be based upon class participation, one or more papers to be completed in consultation with the instructor, and both a midterm and final exam. Undergraduates who enroll in this course should have completed the core musicology and theory sequences.

Advisory Prerequisite: UG.ONLY

MUSICOL 413 — History of Opera
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Stein,Louise K; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course is devoted to the study of opera in the first two centuries of its existence, from its beginnings just before 1600 to nearly the end of the 18th century. Opera is to be studied critically as music, as theater, as spectacle, as performance medium, and as cultural expression. Special aspects of this course include lectures on operatic eroticism, singers of baroque opera, opera's arrival in the Americas, and the financing and staging of early opera. While some of the lectures and listening assignments will be organized around excerpts, others will be designed to focus on whole operas, their musical dramaturgy, historical significance, economics, modes of production, and reception in performance. Composers to be studied include Peri, Caccini, Da Gagliano, Monteverdi, Cavalli, Lully, Purcell, Hidalgo, A. Scarlatti, Handel, Vivaldi, Hasse, Rameau, Gluck, Salieri, Sarti, Piccinni, Mozart, and Haydn. The assignments in this course will be primarily listening assignments, supplemented by score study, readings from the coursepack or materials on reserve, and some in-class performances. Grades will be based on written work (three short papers) and class participation.

Advisory Prerequisite: UG.ONLY

MUSICOL 417 — History of Jazz
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Garrett,Charles Hiroshi; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

MUSICOL 417-517 surveys the historical growth and development of the various kinds of music that have been called "jazz" in the United States. Structured as a chronological overview, the course places the musical conventions, significant performers, and key aesthetic shifts of jazz in cultural, technological, and social context. Students will learn not only to identify the differences between a wide range of jazz styles but also to analyze and interpret the meanings of these differences. In the process, the course aims to help students build skills for listening to, describing, analyzing and writing about jazz. Assignments involve reading, listening, brief written assignments, two papers, and two exams.

MUSICOL 422 — 19th C Music
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Wiley,Roland J; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 2 — 3

Prerequisite: undergraduate surveys of music history and music theory, or lacking these, permission of the instructor.

This lecture course will survey the most important developments in western art music from about 1800 to about 1850 through the study of selected works. Beethoven will be presented as the initiator of the romantic period for his innovations in formal pattern, Schubert for his development of a romantic vocabulary in music. Instrumental music by Schumann, Chopin, Mendelssohn, Liszt, and Fanny Hensel will be discussed for their contributions to musical genre and romantic thought. In opera, Donizetti, Meyerbeer, Wagner, and (time permitting) Glinka, will be studied to show the growing concern among composers for distinctive national styles as midcentury is approached.

There is no required textbook, but optional readings on reserve. Grading factors are two hour examinations and a final. Students electing MUSICOL 522 will be expected to write an analytical paper of 10-15 pages placing a work of their choice in the period 1800-1850 as regards style and genre.

Advisory Prerequisite: UG.ONLY

MUSICOL 478 — Renaissance Music
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Mengozzi,Stefano; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

The course focuses on European music of the 15th and 16th centuries. Its goal is to lead students to develop some familiarity not only with the vast repertory of this period (genres, styles, forms, composers, etc.), but also with the political and social institutions that contributed to creating such a flourishing musical culture. We will spend a good deal of time learning the repertory through listening and score analysis.

Advisory Prerequisite: UG ONLY

MUSICOL 481 — Special Projects
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 4

Independent study.

Advisory Prerequisite: UG W P.I.

MUSICOL 501 — Intro Grad Study
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Borders,James M; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course acquaints musicology graduate students with a range of research methods and critical perspectives. Its goal is to develop an awareness of musicological argumentation, critical thinking, and presentation; and to enhance bibliographic and other research skills. Over the term, among other issues, we will survey developments in the fields of historical musicology and ethnomusicology, drawing from a range of scholarship in English and other languages. Students will be assigned weekly readings, library and web-based research, and regular written work. (Note: The approach, materials, and topics covered of this course, which is intended for graduate students in musicology, differ from those of Musicology 503 Bibliography.)

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

MUSICOL 503 — Mus Bibliogr
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Reynolds,Charles A

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Emphasis will be upon learning to locate and evaluate various tools of music research. The course also includes the study of editing music to scholarly standards and recent developments in on-line searching for music materials. Some assignments will permit students to focus on their own specialties

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

MUSICOL 505 — Special Course
Section 001, LEC
Music & Language

Instructor: Clague,Mark Allan; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course examines relationships between music and language through repertories of East Asian folk and popular songs. In addition to reading theories of musical and linguistic structures, students in the course will learn to critically analyze a number of representative East Asian songs in their stylistic, historical, cultural, and social contexts. For their term projects, students are encouraged to do comparative studies, contrasting East Asian samples with those from four corners of the world, past and present.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

MUSICOL 506 — Special Course
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Whiting,Steven Moore; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Who gave the first public piano recital and to whom? When did orchestras begin using stand-alone conductors? How did nineteenth-century audiences in New York react to Dvorak's New World Symphony; did they really listen to Wagner at the beach? Who founded the Boston Symphony and why? How did the invention of radio affect classical music? Who were Louis-Moreau Gottschalk, Theodore Thomas, Willlem Mengelberg, Georges Cziffra, Jascha Heifetz, Paul Robeson, and Maria Callas, and what did they contribute to musical tradition? Questions such as these will be addressed by a new course, History of Performance: Case Studies in Classical Music, a research-intensive class that forges connections between history and performance.

Participating students will develop a series of independent projects related to their own performance specialties, including a comparative performance edition of historical sound recordings, an interview with a currently active performer, and opportunities to recreate historical performances live. Each participant will write a substantial and original term paper on a topic of his or her choice.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

MUSICOL 508 — Special Course
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Wierzbicki,James E; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 3

"Film Music" is an introductory survey of the history and aesthetics of film music as exemplified in Hollywood and European productions from the late 1890s to the present day.

Topics for discussion will include — but will not be limited to — the dramatic function of music as an element of cinematic diegesis and as non-diegetic underscore, the codification of musical iconography in the standard cinematic genres, the symbolic use of pre-existing music in film scores, and the evolving musical styles of Hollywood composers. Special attention will be focused on the music of such composers as Max Steiner, Franz Waxman, Bernard Herrmann, David Raksin, Dmitri Tiomkin, and John Williams, and on the use of music in the films of such directors as Alfred Hitchcock, Stanley Kubrick, and Terrence Malick.

In addition to lecture material, class sessions will involve the viewing and discussion of numerous film clips. Assignments will include readings, brief reports on the music in specified films viewed outside of class, and a final paper (2,000 words minimum) on the role of music in an instructor-approved film of the student's choice.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

MUSICOL 509 — Teach Intro Music
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Stein,Louise K; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 2

Open to all graduate students in music. This is a pedagogy course, and doctoral students can elect it to satisfy their pedagogy requirement. The goal of the course is to help students develop good classroom teaching skills and strategies for introductory courses in music. Students will be asked to engage with music verbally, give class presentations on a weekly basis, etc.

MUSICOL 511 — Hist of Symphony
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Geary,Jason Duane; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course traces the history of the symphony from its origins in the first half of the eighteenth century up to the present. Highlighting significant developments in the genre over time, we will consider works by, among others, Sammartini, Beethoven, Berlioz, Mahler, and several twentieth-century composers. We will also explore the many social and cultural forces that helped to shape this most familiar of orchestral forms. Topics to be addressed include the changing nature of the listening audience, influential conductors and ensembles, the formation of a canon in Western music, and shifting aesthetic values during the time period in question. Assignments will involve listening and score analysis, supplemented by readings on reserve or in a course packet. Grading will be based upon class participation, one or more papers to be completed in consultation with the instructor, and both a midterm and final exam. Undergraduates who enroll in this course should have completed the core musicology and theory sequences.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

MUSICOL 513 — History of Opera
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Stein,Louise K; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course is devoted to the study of opera in the first two centuries of its existence, from its beginnings just before 1600 to nearly the end of the 18th century. Opera is to be studied critically as music, as theater, as spectacle, as performance medium, and as cultural expression. Special aspects of this course include lectures on operatic eroticism, singers of baroque opera, opera's arrival in the Americas, and the financing and staging of early opera. While some of the lectures and listening assignments will be organized around excerpts, others will be designed to focus on whole operas, their musical dramaturgy, historical significance, economics, modes of production, and reception in performance. Composers to be studied include Peri, Caccini, Da Gagliano, Monteverdi, Cavalli, Lully, Purcell, Hidalgo, A. Scarlatti, Handel, Vivaldi, Hasse, Rameau, Gluck, Salieri, Sarti, Piccinni, Mozart, and Haydn. The assignments in this course will be primarily listening assignments, supplemented by score study, readings from the coursepack or materials on reserve, and some in-class performances. Grades will be based on written work (three short papers) and class participation.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

MUSICOL 517 — History of Jazz
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Garrett,Charles Hiroshi; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

MUSICOL 417-517 surveys the historical growth and development of the various kinds of music that have been called "jazz" in the United States. Structured as a chronological overview, the course places the musical conventions, significant performers, and key aesthetic shifts of jazz in cultural, technological, and social context. Students will learn not only to identify the differences between a wide range of jazz styles but also to analyze and interpret the meanings of these differences. In the process, the course aims to help students build skills for listening to, describing, analyzing and writing about jazz. Assignments involve reading, listening, brief written assignments, two papers, and two exams.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

MUSICOL 522 — 19th C Music
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Wiley,Roland J; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 2 — 3

Prerequisite: undergraduate surveys of music history and music theory, or lacking these, permission of the instructor.

This lecture course will survey the most important developments in western art music from about 1800 to about 1850 through the study of selected works. Beethoven will be presented as the initiator of the romantic period for his innovations in formal pattern, Schubert for his development of a romantic vocabulary in music. Instrumental music by Schumann, Chopin, Mendelssohn, Liszt, and Fanny Hensel will be discussed for their contributions to musical genre and romantic thought. In opera, Donizetti, Meyerbeer, Wagner, and (time permitting) Glinka, will be studied to show the growing concern among composers for distinctive national styles as midcentury is approached.

There is no required textbook, but optional readings on reserve. Grading factors are two hour examinations and a final. Students electing MUSICOL 522 will be expected to write an analytical paper of 10-15 pages placing a work of their choice in the period 1800-1850 as regards style and genre.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

MUSICOL 542 — World Music Repertoires
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Becker,Judith O; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Organized especially for the specialist in Ethnomusicology program, this course is designed to develop teaching skills in world music courses.

MUSICOL 578 — Renaissance Music
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Mengozzi,Stefano; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 2 — 3

The course focuses on European music of the 15th and 16th centuries. Its goal is to lead students to develop some familiarity not only with the vast repertory of this period (genres, styles, forms, composers, etc.), but also with the political and social institutions that contributed to creating such a flourishing musical culture. We will spend a good deal of time learning the repertory through listening and score analysis.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

MUSICOL 581 — Special Projects
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 4

Independent study.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

MUSICOL 591 — Musicol Thesis
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 2 — 6

THIRD-TERM REVIEW: RESEARCH PAPER. Beginning in the second term and extending into the third term, a student will develop the topic for his or her third-term paper. In consultation with members of the faculty, the student will chose a research topic that will be original in material or in approach, and will demonstrate the student's ability to pursue a rigorous program of research and writing reflecting contemporary scholarly paradigms. The recommended length for this paper is 35-40 pages of prose, in addition to the bibliography, with appendices, musical examples or transcriptions as needed. Three copies of the paper are to be submitted to the departmental Director of Graduate Studies by September 15 (or the first business day thereafter) of the second year of study. After faculty critique, a revised version will be submitted six weeks thereafter.

Advisory Prerequisite: Master's students only.

MUSICOL 647 — 20th C Music
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Wiley,Roland J; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

On the basis of score-libretto study and selected readings, selected 20th -century operas from 1945 and beyond will be discussed as to issues emergent in their drama and music. At the beginning of the term, one or two important predecessors will be discussed briefly to set the discussion, but the focus in general is on libretto analysis to determine dramatic shape and focal points, and how the music reinforces them. The repertoire will include: Britten, Peter Grimes; Floyd, Susannah; Stravinsky, The Rake's Progress; Adams, Nixon in China; Glass, Akhnaten; Shnitke, Zhizn's idiotom; and Heggie, Dean Man Walking. The seminar will proceed through this list, with additions, as time permits. Seminar members will be expected to make a verbal report and a written analysis of an opera since 1945.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

MUSICOL 705 — Special Course
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Agnew,Vanessa Helen

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Germany is often thought of as a musical nation. German and Austrian composers dominate the classical music tradition, and music theorists and philosophers the intellectual one. By reading a range of sources spanning the late eighteenth to the early twentieth centuries — music travelogues and criticism, and philosophical, historiographical, and ethnomusicological texts — the course explores the ways in which such a nexus may have come about. In reconstructing the discourse on national identity, music and musical thought, we will interrogate ‘German music' as an ambiguous, oppositional category: it was defined at different historical points as, for example, not Italian, French, Semitic, or German colonial. We will find that claims about national specificity and universal intelligibility hinged on an engagement with musical difference that often served non-musical ends.

The graduate seminar thus deals with the controversies over formalism and idealism, high versus low culture, the question of meaning and music's capacity to signify, exoticism, the idea of a colonial discourse of music, and music and race. Authors to be covered include Burney, Reichardt, Forkel, Herder, E.T.A. Hoffmann, Hanslick, Wagner, Hegel, Nietzsche, Schopenhauer, Adorno, Krämer, Hornbostel, Weber, Eichenauer, and Blume. In addition to listening to a number of guest speakers, we will attend a series of concerts that complement the readings covered in class. Readings will be in German and in translation.

Advisory Prerequisite: See Time Schedule for title in any particular term.

MUSICOL 705 — Special Course
Section 002, SEM

Instructor: Borders,James M; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 2 — 3

This seminar will explore the ritual use and putative meaning of liturgical plainchant through detailed investigation of essential documents (in modern edition). The main sources for the seminar will be the Ordines Romani, the Pontificale Romano-Germanique, and the three medieval recensions of the Pontificale Romanum (that is, through the late thirteenth-century Guillaume Durandus pontifical). Additional primary sources will be assigned. Since none of these documents is fully available in English translation, reading competence in Latin (medieval liturgical or Classical) is a prerequisite for enrollment, as is graduate-level coursework in Gregorian Chant, which should have included a survey of the basic forms of Christian worship. In addition to these materials, readings in modern ritual studies will be assigned. Grading will be based on regularly assigned seminar reports and a substantial term paper, due during the University's examination period.

Advisory Prerequisite: See Time Schedule for title in any particular term.

MUSICOL 730 — Ethnomus Field Meth
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Castro,Christi-Anne; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course is concerned with ethnomusicological method, investigating approaches to conceptualizing, formulating, doing, documenting, analyzing and reporting field research in ethnomusicology. It engages the full spectrum of analytical approaches to the study of music as a cultural phenomenon that exists in the discipline of ethnomusicology. Topics: types of ethnomusicological studies; basic problems of fieldwork; research methods, including collection methods — structured and unstructured approaches, sampling, participant observation, description/documentation practices, interviewing methods (formal & informal), performance practice in the field, and more; sound and visual recording techniques and technologies; ethics in fieldwork; analysis and synthesis of collectanea; the ethnomusicological monograph. Critical examination of the analytical methods employed in ethnomusicology occupies a substantial part of the course.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

MUSICOL 760 — Colloq in Ethnomus
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Becker,Judith O; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 1

The field of ethnomusicology is currently involved in many of the same issues that are redefining anthropology, history, and cultural studies, such as the use of multiple theories of interpretation and discourse, issues of writerly authority, positioning of the scholar in reference to her work, feminism, post-colonialism, and all the other "post...isms" of the turn of this century. This colloquium will provide a forum for the discussion of some of these contemporary issues. Short readings will be assigned each week. The colloquium is required for all incoming graduate students in ethnomusicology. All graduate students in ethno­musicology are strongly urged to enroll; the course is repeatable for credit. Other graduate students may enroll with permission of instructor.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

MUSICOL 881 — Special Readings
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 2 — 6

Individual work and reading for graduate students.

Advisory Prerequisite: For Ph.D. students only.

MUSICOL 900 — Preliminary Exam
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1

This examination normally includes a listening exam and two essays, the general sense and limits of which have been discussed in advance with the prospective dissertation advisor. One essay will cover the entire period of research. The second will be more closely focused on the proposed dissertation topic.

MUSICOL 990 — Diss-Precand
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 8

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. The dissertation proposal will consist of a carefully researched and written description of the proposed topic (approximately 20-25 pages) that will argue for its relevance, feasibility, and originality as a scholarly contribution to the field of musicology. The proposal should also describe the plan of research and indicate as precisely as possible the objectives of the project, the sources to be consulted, the current state of research, and the cultural, musical, methodological, historical, aesthetic, anthropological, critical, analytical and social issues relevant to the topic. If the project involves fieldwork, the proposal should indicate how it will be carried out and what criteria will be applied in the evaluation of data.

Advisory Prerequisite: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

MUSICOL 995 — Diss-Cand
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 8

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period. While researching and writing the dissertation, each Ph.D. candidate will present a lecture in a public forum before an audience of students and departmental faculty. This dissertation oral presentation will describe the topic, methodology, and results of his or her dissertation research to date. This lecture will customarily be presented at a point when the candidate can benefit most from the exchange: after enough research has taken place to define the chief issues of the topic but before a large portion has been written. The dissertation in historical musicology must make a significant and original contribution to the field, and otherwise conform to the standards of the Horace H. Rackham School of Graduate Studies.

Enforced Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate

 
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