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LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Fall 2007, Dept = NEUROSCI
 
Page 1 of 1, Results 1 — 6 of 6
Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
NEUROSCI 520 — Sleep: Neurobiology, Medicine, and Society
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Lydic,Ralph; homepage
Instructor: Baghdoyan,Helen A

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS

The objective of this course is to give students the most up-to-date information on the biological, personal, and societal relevance of sleep. Personal relevance is emphasized by the fact that the single best predictor of daytime performance is the quality of the previous night's sleep. The brain actively generates sleep, and the first third of the course will overview the neurobiological basis of sleep cycle control. Sleep will be used as a vehicle for teaching basic neuroanatomical and neuropharmacological principles. This information will provide a cellular-level understanding of how sleep deprivation, jet lag, and substances such as alcohol, caffeine, and nicotine alter sleep and wakefulness. It is now clear that sleep significantly alters physiology. The second third of the class will cover sleep-dependent changes in physiology and sleep disorders medicine. Particular emphasis will be place on disorders of excessive sleepiness, insomnia, and sleep-dependent changes in autonomic control. Chronic sleep deprivation impairs immune function and promotes obesity. Deaths due to all causes are most frequent between 4 and 6 a.m., and the second portion of the class will highlight the relevance of sleep for preventive medicine. The societal relevance of the sleep will be considered in the final portion of the class. In an increasingly complex and technologically oriented society, operator-error by one individual can have a disastrous negative impact on the public health and safety. Fatigue-related performance errors contributed to the Three Mile Island and Chernobyl nuclear power plant failures and to the Exxon Valdez Alaskan oil spill. The personal relevance of fatigue-related performance errors will be considered by reviewing the recent data showing that in the U.S. more people die from medical mistakes each year than from highway accidents, breast cancer, or AIDS. Fulfillment of course objectives will be quantified by pre- versus post-class informational self-evaluation. In-class arousal levels will be facilitated by seminar participation.

Advisory Prerequisite: BIOLOGY 222, MCDB 422, or PSYCH 230; and permission of instructor.

NEUROSCI 601 — Principles Neuroscience I
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Maren,Stephen A; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4

NEUROSCI 601 represents the first half of a year long, graduate-level survey of neuroscience. The goals for NEUROSCI 601 and 602 are: 1) To provide our students with a sense of the state of current knowledge in molecular, cellular, developmental, integrative and cognitive neuroscience. Considerable emphasis is put on pulling together information obtained from different types of investigations (anatomical, physiological, behavioral, biochemical, genetic) to gain a balanced view of neuroscience. 2) To provide our students with a sense of how knowledge was obtained, by reading and discussing "classic papers." 3) To provide our students with a sense of where the current frontier is, by reading and discussing very recent papers. Each week this class meets for 3-5 hours, with a mix of lectures and discussion. The major topics treated in NEUROSCI 601 and 602 are: I) Excitable Membranes, II) Molecular Neuropharmacology, and III) Developmental Neurobiology.

Students who wish to study only a single area of neuroscience may register for single modules of the course (Module 1, Excitable membranes = NEUROSCI 611; Module 2, Molecular Neuropharmacology = NEUROSCI 612 or Pharmcology 615; Module 3, Development of the Nervous System= NEUROSCI 613) for one credit each. Students who complete NEUROSCI 601 will receive 4 credits.

Advisory Prerequisite: Enrollment in a Ph.D. program. Graduate students in Master's degree programs may register only with the permission of the instructor.

NEUROSCI 611 — Excitable Membranes
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Maren,Stephen A; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 1

Represents the first half OF a year-long, graduate-LEVEL survey OF NEURO. The goals FOR NEUROSCI 601 AND 602 are : 1) TO provide our students WITH a sense OF the state OF CURRENT knowledge IN molecular, cellular, developmental, integrative AND cognitive Neuroscience. Considerable emphasis IS put ON pulling together information obtained FROM different types OF investigations(anatomical, physiological, behavioral, biochemical, genetic) TO gain a balanced VIEW OF Neuroscience. 2) TO provide our students WITH a sense OF how knowledge was obtained, BY reading AND discussing "classic papers." 3) TO provide our students WITH a sense OF WHERE the CURRENT frontier IS, BY reading AND discussing very recent papers. Each week this class meets FOR 3 — 5 hours, WITH a mix OF lectures AND discussion. The major topics treated IN NEUROSCI 601 AND 602 are : I) Excitable Membranes, II) Molecular Neuropharmacology, AND III) Developmental Neurobiology. Students who wish TO study ONLY a single area OF Neuroscience may register FOR single modules OF the course(Module 1, Excitable membranes = NEUROSCI 611; Module 2, Molecular Neuropharmacology = NEUROSCI 612 OR Pharmcology 615; Module 3, Development OF the Nervous System = NEUROSCI 613) FOR one credit each. Students who complete NEUROSCI 601 will receive 4 credits.

Advisory Prerequisite: Enrollment in a Ph.D. program. Graduate students in Master's degree programs may register only with the permission of the instructor.

NEUROSCI 613 — Central Nervous System Physiology and Development
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Maren,Stephen A; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 1

Represents the first half of a year long, graduate-level survey of neuroscience. The goals for NEUROSCI 601 and 602 are: 1) To provide our students with a sense of the state of current knowledge in molecular, cellular, developmental, integrative and cognitive neuroscience. Considerable emphasis is put on pulling together information obtained from different types of investigations (anatomical, physiological, behavioral, biochemical, genetic) to gain a balanced view of neuroscience. 2) To provide our students with a sense of how knowledge was obtained, by reading and discussing "classic papers." 3) To provide our students with a sense of where the current frontier is, by reading and discussing very recent papers. Each week this class meets for 3-5 hours, with a mix of lectures and discussion. The major topics treated in NEUROSCI 601 and 602 are: I) Excitable Membranes, II) Molecular Neuropharmacology, and III) Developmental Neurobiology. Students who wish to study only a single area of neuroscience may register for single modules of the course (Module 1, Excitable membranes = NEUROSCI 611; Module 2, Molecular Neuropharmacology = NEUROSCI 612 or Pharmcology 615; Module 3, Development of the Nervous System= NEUROSCI 613) for one credit each. Students who complete NEUROSCI 601 will receive 4 credits.

Advisory Prerequisite: Enrollment in a Ph.D. program. Graduate students in Master's degree programs may register only with the permission of the instructor.

NEUROSCI 682 — Organogenesis of a Complex Tissue
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Gumucio,Deborah L; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 2

Two course modules are offered, one covering an aspect of stem cell biology (embryonic or adult stem cells) and the other focused on a specific organ system (development, maintenance, organ disease, artificial organs). Course content is different each year. Current module topics are listed at: http://www.med.umich.edu/cdb.

Advisory Prerequisite: BIOLOGY,Graduate Cell biology recommended, but not required. Graduate standing.

NEUROSCI 683 — Organogenesis of Complex Tissues
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: O'Shea,Kathy Sue; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 2

Two course modules are offered, one covering an aspect of stem cell biology (embryonic or adult stem cells) and the other focused on a specific organ system (development, maintenance, organ disease, artificial organs). Course content is different each year. Current module topics are listed at: http://www.med.umich.edu/cdb.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate Cell biology recommended, but not required. Graduate standing.

 
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