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LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Fall 2007, Dept = ORGSTUDY
 
Page 1 of 1, Results 1 — 10 of 10
Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
ORGSTUDY 310 — Formal Organizations and Environments
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Owen-Smith,Jason D; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

Complex organizations are enduring formal structures that direct human attention, shape decision-making, channel wealth, and concentrate power while standardizing the procedures that govern action in all spheres of society. Such organizations are ubiquitous parts of contemporary life in economics and business, politics, the law, science, education, entertainment, arts, and leisure. People live most of their lives in complex organizations, and society can be understood in terms of these formal structures and the relationships among them. But what are complex organizations? Where do they come from? How do they work? Why are they so important in contemporary life?

This class is organized around the central themes in sociological and economic research on organizations to provide an analytic framework that will help us grapple with these questions. We begin by examining the sources, arrangements, and functions of complex organizations. Next, we focus on their internal dynamics with an eye toward understanding the relationships between these structures and the people that inhabit them. Finally, we step back to consider the organizations themselves, addressing the ways they grow and change and their interactions with their environments, each other, and the larger institutions of society.

At each stage, the class draws on a mixture of classic and contemporary articles, and empirical case studies. The readings will introduce students to the theories that have shaped research on organizations, while the cases provide empirical context for understanding and discussing those concepts.

Advisory Prerequisite: Introductory Psychology (PSYCH 111, 112, 114, or 115), introductory sociology (SOC 100, 101, 102, or 195), and ECON 101.

ORGSTUDY 395 — Current Issues in Organizational Studies
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Hoag,Amy K

FA 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Minicourse

Minicourse provides the opportunity for upper-level course offerings on special topics by Organizational Studies and affiliated faculty in a minicourse format. While topics vary, seminars are thematic in nature and involve more intensive interaction between faculty and students.

Advisory Prerequisite: Introductory psychology and sociology, and ECON 101

ORGSTUDY 410 — Advanced Research Methods in Organizational Studies
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Wierba,Elizabeth E

FA 2007
Credits: 4

This course is devoted to the use of social science research methods to study organizations, emphasizing interviewing, organizational network analysis, and organizational survey methods. Our team-based approach combines lecture, applications, and field research methods. Course topics include organizations and social capital, team and organizational design, the use of organizational network analysis, and the use of interviewing and surveys in organizations.

This course emphasizes learning by doing. You and your team will design and carry out a field project in a client organization. This project is an opportunity to experience the study of an organizational unit from start to finish, including designing and administering the survey instrument, planning and conducting the data analysis, interpreting and communicating the results in both written and oral formats, and providing feedback to the client organization.

Advisory Prerequisite: Restricted to Organizational Studies concentrators who have completed the core course requirements. One of the following: STATS 210, 350, 400, or ECON 404 (may be elected concurrently).

ORGSTUDY 490 — Advanced Research Team
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 3 — 4

Entrepreneurship, understood as the effort to found a new venture, is the driving force of change in both the for-profit and nonprofit sectors. Nevertheless, scholars and practitioners alike disagree on the sources of entrepreneurialism and the causes of failure and success. Does entrepreneurship arise from individual inclinations and talents or from socially-structured opportunities? What obstacles do entrepreneurs typically face, and what kinds of resources can they mobilize to overcome them? Together, we will develop answers to these central questions about entrepreneurship while learning about the concrete steps needed to launch new ventures, both for-profit and nonprofit.

We will begin the course by examining and comparing psychological and sociological theories of entrepreneurship and studying the actions and profiles of a number of successful entrepreneurs, both historical and contemporary. Next, we will develop our skills in several research methods, including historical, survey, and interview-based research. Students will then draw on these skills to conduct and write up research on past and present entrepreneurs in either the for-profit or the nonprofit sector using one or more of these methods, depending on their interests. Students will be evaluated on participation, several short memos, a research paper, and a short in-class presentation. The course will be limited to eight Organizational Studies students. To apply, please send your resume and unofficial transcript and a 1-page cover letter describing your interest in the course and your future career interests to Victoria Johnson at vjohnsn@umich.edu. (Please take care to copy the email address exactly as it appears here.)

Advisory Prerequisite: Enrollment in either ORGSTUDY 305 or 310 & STATS course

ORGSTUDY 495 — Special Topics in Organizational Studies
Section 001, SEM
Non-Profit Organizations: Theory and Practice

Instructor: Johnson,Victoria

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Millions of Americans give their time and money every year to nonprofit organizations. Nonprofits have played a key role in American society since the Colonial era, providing a wide range of services and goods that include — but are by no means limited to — medical care, education, the arts, and religion. In this course, students will gain a thorough understanding of the nonprofit sector as well as practical knowledge required to work successfully in a nonprofit organization.

In the first half of the course, we will pose and answer questions about the nonprofit sector's emergence in the United States; its changing relations with government and with the for-profit sector; the current state of the nonprofit sector; and its likely future. Attention to the nature of civil society abroad will shed light on the unique role of nonprofits in the U.S., while comparative analyses of different domains of U.S. nonprofit activity (the arts, education, etc.) will provide an in-depth understanding of the processes and issues that divide and structure the nonprofit sector internally. This part of the course is organized into the following modules:

Module A: Key Historical Moments in the Development of the U.S. Nonprofit Sector
Module B: Nonprofit Sectors in the United States Today
Module C: International Aid and Global Civil Society

In the second half of the course, drawing on readings in law, public policy, and business, we will develop practical knowledge of the special challenges that come with managing and working for a nonprofit organization. Among the topics we will take up in this half of the class are the formulation of nonprofit mission and strategy; the management of relations with boards, committees, volunteers, and employees; and marketing and fundraising for nonprofits.

Students will develop their knowledge of the nonprofit sector through case-based analysis, a research paper on a nonprofit of their choosing, and a mock grant proposal written on behalf of their chosen organization.

Required texts:

  • Robert D. Herman and Associates, The Jossey-Bass Handbook of Nonprofit Management and Leadership (2004) and
  • Lester M. Salamon, ed., The State of Nonprofit America (2002).

Additional readings are contained in a coursepack.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor; Restricted to Organizational Studies concentrators who have completed the core course requirements.

ORGSTUDY 495 — Special Topics in Organizational Studies
Section 002, SEM
Leading in a Global Organizational World

Instructor: Price,Richard H

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Leaders in business, nongovernmental organizations and in social and political movements face new challenges and opportunities in a rapidly globalizing world. Leading successfully across differences in culture, language, political and economic systems means creating and leading organizations with new and different strengths.

  • What are the challenges and opportunities leaders find when they reach across cultural and national borders and boundaries?
  • How do these new organizational leaders respond to these challenges and opportunities?

Seminar members will explore these questions through readings, interviews with leaders, and formulate their own answers in class discussions and exploratory essays.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor; Restricted to Organizational Studies concentrators who have completed the core course requirements.

ORGSTUDY 495 — Special Topics in Organizational Studies
Section 003, SEM
Non-Profit Organizations: Theory and Practice

Instructor: Johnson,Victoria

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Millions of Americans give their time and money every year to nonprofit organizations. Nonprofits have played a key role in American society since the Colonial era, providing a wide range of services and goods that include — but are by no means limited to — medical care, education, the arts, and religion. In this course, students will gain a thorough understanding of the nonprofit sector as well as practical knowledge required to work successfully in a nonprofit organization.

In the first half of the course, we will pose and answer questions about the nonprofit sector's emergence in the United States; its changing relations with government and with the for-profit sector; the current state of the nonprofit sector; and its likely future. Attention to the nature of civil society abroad will shed light on the unique role of nonprofits in the U.S., while comparative analyses of different domains of U.S. nonprofit activity (the arts, education, etc.) will provide an in-depth understanding of the processes and issues that divide and structure the nonprofit sector internally. This part of the course is organized into the following modules:

Module A: Key Historical Moments in the Development of the U.S. Nonprofit Sector
Module B: Nonprofit Sectors in the United States Today
Module C: International Aid and Global Civil Society

In the second half of the course, drawing on readings in law, public policy, and business, we will develop practical knowledge of the special challenges that come with managing and working for a nonprofit organization. Among the topics we will take up in this half of the class are the formulation of nonprofit mission and strategy; the management of relations with boards, committees, volunteers, and employees; and marketing and fundraising for nonprofits.

Students will develop their knowledge of the nonprofit sector through case-based analysis, a research paper on a nonprofit of their choosing, and a mock grant proposal written on behalf of their chosen organization.

Required texts:

  • Robert D. Herman and Associates, The Jossey-Bass Handbook of Nonprofit Management and Leadership (2004) and
  • Lester M. Salamon, ed., The State of Nonprofit America (2002).

Additional readings are contained in a coursepack.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor; Restricted to Organizational Studies concentrators who have completed the core course requirements.

ORGSTUDY 495 — Special Topics in Organizational Studies
Section 004, SEM
Leading in a Global Organizational World

Instructor: Price,Richard H

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Leaders in business, nongovernmental organizations and in social and political movements face new challenges and opportunities in a rapidly globalizing world. Leading successfully across differences in culture, language, political and economic systems means creating and leading organizations with new and different strengths.

  • What are the challenges and opportunities leaders find when they reach across cultural and national borders and boundaries?
  • How do these new organizational leaders respond to these challenges and opportunities?

Seminar members will explore these questions through readings, interviews with leaders, and formulate their own answers in class discussions and exploratory essays.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor; Restricted to Organizational Studies concentrators who have completed the core course requirements.

ORGSTUDY 497 — Senior Honors Research I
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 3 — 4
Other: Honors, Indpnt Study

Honors level independent research in the field of Organizational Studies with a designated faculty member. Taken during the fall term of the senior year, the student conducts the research for the Honors thesis.

Advisory Prerequisite: Must be accepted into the OS Honors program by review of proposal.

ORGSTUDY 499 — Independent Study
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: INDEPENDENT

Through an Independent Study project, Organizational Studies students work one-on-one with faculty supervisors to carry out academic and field-based research and engage in guided reflection about their organizational experiences.

Advisory Prerequisite: Restricted to Organizational Studies concentrators who have completed the core course requirements.

 
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